Issue: 20120701

Sunday, July 1, 2012
JULY 2012
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281
Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0001.xml
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Advertisements
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RadioShack
ARDUINO UNO REV 3
RadioShack
RGB LED
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0002.xml
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Canon
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Canon
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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contents
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A WORD FROM THE EDITOR
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One for the Colonel
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MARK JANNOT
A few of the covers we’ve published during my tenure here have given me particular satisfaction. One cherished cover-whosesuccess-confounded-the-circulation-experts was our August 2005 image of solar-radiation-screening satellites circling the globe behind the headline “Saving a Scorched Earth: 6 Spectacular Technologies to Halt Global Warming.”
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0005.xml
masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0006.xml
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ALLSTATE
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ALLSTATE
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0007.xml
article
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PEER REVIEW
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Flight Training
Cracking the POPSCI Code
TOWING OFF
MAN VS. DRONE
LOSS OF APPETITE
BAD KARMA
POPULAR SCIENCE
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The paper-airplane competition in your May issue [“Paper Lions”] was a great idea. Projects like these encourage learning about physics and aerodynamics, especially for the younger set. Dedicating a few pages per issue to items that intrigue younger readers is a service to future science, because your young readers of today will be the inventors, engineers and scientists (and airline pilots) that will shepherd our world when we've grown old.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0008.xml
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The Chemical Company: acResin
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The Chemical Company
acResin
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0009.xml
article
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MEGAPIXELS
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D-Day
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Joanna Foster
The 1,585-foot Fort Steuben Bridge spanned the Ohio River, linking Ohio to West Virginia for 84 years, but it took just seconds for it to drop in a controlled demolition in February. The Ohio Department of Transportation closed the aging concrete-and-steel suspension bridge in 2009 and finally hired general contractors Joseph B. Fay Company to take the bridge down.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0010.xml
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Energizer: AA Ultimate Lithium batteries
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Energizer
AA Ultimate Lithium batteries
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0011.xml
review
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What's new
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World's Fastest Bike
Engineers master bicycle aerodynamics
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Cervélo P5
$6,500
Mark Anders
At the Olympic level, where cyclists are in roughly the same physical condition, the difference between victory and defeat often boils down to a bike's aerodynamics. The more smoothly air flows over a frame and rider, the less wind resistance he will feel and the faster he'll go.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0012.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
the goods
A dozen great ideas in gear
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The SuctionSeal vacuum works as well on hardwood and tile floors as it does on carpet. A polycarbonate plate on the front of the upright creates a sealed chamber between the vacuum head and the floor, which makes for more-focused suction. Eureka SuctionSeal The new CordCruncher headphones prevent knots.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0013.xml
review
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14
WHAT'S NEW
HOW IT WORKS
Fire Power
A wood-burning camp stove that doubles as a gadget charger
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BioLite CampStove
$129
Michael Myser
To get a hot meal on the trail, campers must either lug a propane stove and fuel canister or try their luck on the uneven heat of a campfire. Designers at BioLite in Brooklyn have created a new solution. Their lightweight wood-fired CampStove not only burns as hot as a propane one but also converts waste heat into electricity to charge any USB-powered gadget.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0014.xml
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FORD: F-150
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FORD
F-150
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0015.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
TESTED
Changing Focus
Can an all-electric version of Detroit'S too-selling compact car get traction?
THE TEST
THE RESULTS
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Ford Focus Electric
$39,200
John Voelcker
Later this year, Ford will roll out the Focus Electric, Detroit's first direct competitor to the Nissan Leaf. Like the Leaf, the Focus Electric is an all-electric five-door hatchback with a 600-plus-pound lithium-ion batterg, a driving range of close to 100 miles on a charge, and a price tag north of $35,000.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0016.xml
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SAMSUNG: HT-E6730W
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SAMSUNG
HT-E6730W
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0017.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
LONG AWAITED
A Cold One
Finally, the first ever self-chilling can
THREE MORE WAYS TO BEAT THE HEAT
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West Coast Chill
$4
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IDEA International Mini-Elefan
$75
The AALni-Elefan is the only fan with a pulse mode that mimics a natural breeze. It blows at Low speed for 10 seconds, high for five seconds, and then repeats the cycle.
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Igloo Yukon Cold Locker
$570
This 150-quart cooler keeps ice solid in 90° weather for 10 days, three days Longer than a conventional one. Its two-inch-thick insulation and gaskets seal out heat.
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Tempronics Temperfect Office Chair
$1,100
The Tempronics Office Chair is the first chair that can cool its user. Just beneath the fabric, semiconductor chips conduct heat away from the body when powered.
Patrick Di Justo
Twenty years ago, Mitchell Joseph set out to solve one of the great challenges of the modern age: how to make a can of beer that could cool itself. He designed a can that used and released the coolant HFC-134a. His prototype worked—it cooled liquid dramatically in a matter of minutes—but there was a hitch.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0018.xml
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Advertisement: PERT
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PERT
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0019.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
TECH TREND
Rocket Books
Intel's new processor powers a range of ultra-slim laptops
THE TREND
THE BENEFIT
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Toshiba Satellite U845
$749
Although its one-inch frame is thicker than those of most ultrabooks, the 14inch Satellite U845 has more ports than its competitors, including full-size HDMI and Ethernet plugs.
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Acer Aspire S5
$1,000
At 0.59 of an inch thick, the Aspire S5 is the thinnest ultrabook available. To save space in the chassis, Acer designers fused the 13.3-inch laptop's boot drive directly onto the motherboard.
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Fujitsu Lifebook U772
$1,200
The U772 is the first ultra book to dock with an entire full-size office setupmonitor, kegboard, mouse-using a single plug. Fujitsu engineers placed a 1.2-inch docking connector on the bottom of the 14-inch laptop.
Troy Dreier
Last October, Acer and Asus debuted the first ultrabooks, a class of laptops characterized by their sub-inch-thick chassis. The trim designs, however, Left engineers little room to include graphics cards or large, fast processors. The new third-generation Intel Core chips, code-named Ivy Bridge, on the other hand, are both compact and powerful—and will run 110 ultrabooks by year's end.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0020.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
OUTLOOK
Cutting the Cords
How wireless charging will keep tons of toxic waste out of landfills
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Brian Clark Howard
RECHARGEABLE batteries were supposed to keep trash out of landfills. Instead they replaced old garbage with new. Consumers throw away billions of battery chargers every year; cellphone chargers alone account for almost 100,000 tons of trash annually.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0021.xml
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American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
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American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0022.xml
article
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HEADLINES
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Rise of the Machines
At last, a plan for airships that might finally take off
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Josh Bearman
Some kids wanted to be firefighters,” Igor Pasternak says. “I always thought about blimps.” Pasternak grew up in Lviv, Ukraine, near a weather station. When he was six, he convinced the Soviet meteorologists there to let him launch one of their balloons.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0023.xml
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Advertisements
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FUJIFILM North America Corporation
X10
FUJIFILM North America Corporation
X100
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0024.xml
article
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HEADLINES
THE ANNOTATED MACHINE
Instant Eye
Giving sight to the blind, with laser power
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Arnie Cooper
A new bionic eye implant could allow blind people to recognize faces, watch TV and even read. Nano Retina's Bio-Retina is one of two recent attempts to help patients with age-related macular degeneration, which affects 1.5 million people in the U.S. Although a similar implant, Second Sight's Argus II, has been on the market in Europe since last year, it reguires a four-hour operation under full anesthesia because it includes an antenna to receive power and images from an external apparatus.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0025.xml
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GEICO
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GEICO
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article
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HEADLINES
WORK SPACE
Deep Space
How astronauts train at the bottom of the sea
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Katharine Gammon
Since 2001, planners at NASA's Extreme Environment Mission Operations (NEEMO) program have been sending people to live in Aguarius, an underwater laboratory three and a half miles south of Key Largo, Florida. Last month, during NEEMO's 16th mission, three astronauts lived there for 12 days, testing strategies for future asteroid expeditions, evaluating the best spacewalking technigues, and planning how to sample rocks and soil.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0027.xml
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Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Co.: Natural American Spirit
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Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Co.
Natural American Spirit
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0028.xml
article
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HEADLINES
BY THE NUMBERS
Four Futures
How the choices we make today will change the world
Possible Scenarios
Population (in billions)
282 billion
Land Use
Purchasing Power (per capita)
Income Disparity
Water Shortage
Hunger Incidence
Environmental Impact
Year When Natural Resources Will Run Out
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Mara Grunbaum
How many people could live on Earth? Many scientists have tried to calculate that number, with widely divergent results. Seventeenth-century biologist Antonie van Leeuwenhoek put the upper limit at 13.4 billion; in 1967, biochemist C.T. De Wit said one trillion.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0029.xml
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Purolator Filters NA LLC: Purolator SYNTHETIC
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Purolator Filters NA LLC
Purolator SYNTHETIC
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0030.xml
article
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HEADLINES
ROUGH SKETCH
Blood Cell
"A snail could be used as a battery to power small sensors"
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Evgeny Katz
Our biofuel cell generates power from glucose sugar in a snail's body. We drill holes through the shell and implant enzyme-coated electrodes in the hemolymph, or snail blood, that naturally collects between the snail's body and shell. Like any battery, ours is based on chemical reactions that create a flow of electrons.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0031.xml
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HEADLINES
FUTURE PROOF
Over Seen
Our Web videos reveal more than we realize, and perhaps more than we want
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Jacoh Ward
AS WE UPLOAD more and more videos to the Internetone hour of new video every second to YouTube alone—experts are finding new ways to mine them. A team led by Igor Curcio of Nokia’s Research Center, for example, has developed an algorithm that stitches concertgoers’ cellphone footage into a single, synchronized multi-angle film.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0033.xml
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1&1
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1&1
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36,37,38,39,40,41,42,43,80
The Future of the ENVIRONMENT
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The Battle
Climate scientists routinely face death threats, hate mail, nuisance lawsuits and political attacks. How much worse can it get?
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Tom Clynes
There's no police tape across Michael Mann's office doorway this morning. "Always a good start," he says, juggling a cup of coffee as he slides his key into the lock. Mann directs Penn State University’s Earth System Science Center. Several months ago, he arrived at his office with an armload of mail.
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The Future of the ENVIRONMENT
PART 1
Climate Change Is Already Happening
Now it's time to get ready
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David Roberts
THERE IS NO LONGER any question of preventing climate change. Some 98 percent of working climate scientists agree that the atmosphere is already warming in response to human greenhouse-gas emissions, and the most recent research suggests that we are on a path toward what were once considered “worst case” scenarios.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0036.xml
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The Future of the ENVIRONMENT
PART 2
Build Smarter Cities
Climate change will drive people to urban areas. How will urban planners accommodate them all?
Community-Shared Electric Cars
Neighborhood Nukes
Hyperefficient Housing
Really Local Eats
All-in-One Recycling
Multifunctional Buildings
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Kalee Thompson
The world's population will top nine billion by 2060. Because of climate-change-induced environmental degradation, scientists project that tens of millions of people will move into today's small and medium-size cities. To prepare for the influx, says Dennis Frenchman, an architect and professor of urban planning at MIT, city designers must make decisions today to mitigate the migration of tomorrow.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0037.xml
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PROGRESSIVE
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PROGRESSIVE
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0038.xml
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The Future of the ENVIRONMENT
PART 3
Fix the Food Equation...
Feeding a warming world won't be easy, but it can be done
1. ADD SEEDS
2. DIVIDE THE LAND
3. MULTIPLY WATER
4. SUBTRACT MEAT AND BIOFUEL
5. BALANCE THE BOOKS
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Frederick Kaufman
The calculus of human sustenance is simple: to feed the planet's seven billion people, farmers must generate at Least 12 trillion calories' worth of food every day. And even as the world's growing population demands ever more of those calories, climate change is making them harder to produce.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0039.xml
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The Future of the ENVIRONMENT
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...By Making Better Seeds
How to adapt the three crops that provide 60 percent of the world's calories
Help Wheat Evolve
Breed Rice with Weeds
Replace Corn
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Maggie Koerth-Baker
The biggest challenge in preparing crops for climate change is knowing what to prepare them for. Even within agricultural regions, the effects of global warming will vary. Consider Kansas, the source of a fifth of America's wheat. Parts of eastern Kansas are now 20 percent wetter than they were in 1900.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0040.xml
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The Future of the ENVIRONMENT
PART 4
See the System Whole
The amount of water on Earth is fixed, but everything else is changing fast
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Elizabeth Royte
IF YOU COMBINED all of the water in the planet’s ice caps, glaciers, rivers, lakes, aquifers and oceans, it would fill a sphere 860 miles in diameter. That volume, some 366 million trillion gallons, hasn’t changed in millennia, nor will it change in the foreseeable future.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0041.xml
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The Future of the ENVIRONMENT
PATR 5
And If All Else Fails
It's 115 degrees. In March. Now what?
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Damon Tabor
IT’S IMPOSSIBLE to predict the exact speed and severity with which climate change will unfold, but one thing is clear: if we take no preventive action, eventually we’ll be tempted to take desperate action. And over the decades, as the effects of climate change grow increasingly severe, the amount of risk humankind is willing to bear will increase.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0042.xml
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Volkswagen of America, Inc.
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Volkswagen of America, Inc.
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0043.xml
article
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The Future of the ENVIRONMENT
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CHERNOBYL NOW
Are nuclear disasters the new normal?
1. "WHAT DOES THAT TELL YOU ABOUT SAFETY?"
2. "A HOUSE OF CARDS"
3. "THE BOGEYMAN IN EVERY EQUATION"
4. "IT'S MUCH MORE COMPLICATED THAN THAT"
5. "YOU WOULD EXPOSE NUMEROUS PEOPLE"
6. "THEY'RE GOOD AT MAKING RULES"
7. "WE'LL DIE OF SOMETHING ELSE"
8. "FUKUSHIMA SAY IT AGAIN"
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Steve Featherstone
On April 26, 1986, two powerful explosions tore through Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, flipping the reactor’s giant 2,000-ton concrete lid into the air like a coin. White-hot chunks of the nuclear core rained down on adjacent buildings, setting fires and peppering the ground outside.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0044.xml
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Advertisement: VersoShock
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VersoShock
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0045.xml
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MacNeil IP LLC: FloorLiner
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WeatherTech
FloorLiner
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0046.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
YOU BUILT WHAT?!
Extra Large, to Go
A 14-ton pizzeria on wheels
Building a Mobile Pizzeria
HOW IT WORKS
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Peter Andrey Smith
Jon Darsky spent years in San Francisco restaurants baking Neapolitan-style pizzas— thin crusts topped with fresh salted tomatoes and milky fior di latte mozzarella—in oldschool specialty wood-fired ovens. In 2010 he began looking around for a place of his own but couldn't find the right piece of real estate.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0047.xml
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popsci: STANLEY
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popsci
STANLEY
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0048.xml
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THE IRON SHOP
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THE IRON SHOP
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0049.xml
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Valentine Research, Inc.
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Valentine Research, Inc.
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0050.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
BUILD IT
Float On
A remote-control spy blimp
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Yvon Masyn
I'm a materials-science engineer at an agency that allocates funding to research projects. It's theoretical work, so in my spare time I like to do practical, hands-on things. I've been building R/C models for 33 years and have always preferred uncommon vehicles—amphibious cars, submarines, hovercrafts—so indoor R/C airships are a good fit for me.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0051.xml
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Advertisement: AcuVision
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AcuVision
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0052.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
THEME BUILDING
Chord Progression
A stringless guitar simulator that anyone can play
Two More Projects That Rock
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Andrew Rosenblum
Miroslaw Sowa, an electronics hobbyist in Montreal who grew up playing the accordion, liked the guitar but found fingering chords on the fret board too difficult. So he teamed up with Toronto software developer Vsevolod Zagainov to develop the Tabstrummer, an electronic instrument that allows the user to play different guitar chords simply by pressing one of up to 12 preset memory buttons.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0053.xml
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Advertisements
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MI Integrated Media, LLC
Passport 9500ix
MI Integrated Media, LLC
Breo iPalm520
[no value]
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0054.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
PROJECT OF THE MONTH
The Autonomous Lawn Mower
A tinkerer works hard on a machine that helps him be lazy
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Ian Chant
It took Hubert Pissavin two weeks in his garage to build a machine that would do his least favorite chore for him: mowing the lawn. The retired electrical engineer started with a simple, boxy chassis made of wood. With four motorized wheels and a spinning blade, the battery-powered device moves in a straight line until it bumps into an obstacle, which activates a relay switch that backs the mower up about three feet.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0055.xml
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ROCKAUTO, LLC
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ROCKAUTO, LLC
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0056.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
TECH SUPPORT
FROM THE POPSCI DIY ARCHIVES March 1960
WEB APP OF THE MONTH Trap!t
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"Damien Fournier, a Canadian inventor, designed aluminum water shoes that he can strap to his feet or lock together for use as a boat. They are held rigid by a special seat and are buoyant enough to support an outboard." Users normally get all the articles in an RSS feed, whether they want them or not.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0057.xml
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plasmacam
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plasmacam
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0058.xml
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FYI
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What's the hottest the Earth has ever gotten?
Q Will climate change make it too hot again?
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Susannah F. Locke
Hot enough to boil oceans and vaporize rock. The highest terrestrial temperatures occurred more than four billion years ago, when a Mars-size proto-planet smashed into the Earth. (The debris from this collision formed our moon.) Within a millennium, the surface air temperature had dropped from a high of about 3,700°F down to 3,000°.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0060.xml
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K&N Engineering, Inc.
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K&N Engineering, Inc.
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0061.xml
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Advertisements
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HarborFreight
36 LED SOLAR SECURITY LIGHT
HarborFreight
29 PIECE TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED DRILL BIT SET
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0062.xml
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LIBIDO-MAX
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LIBIDO-MAX
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MDHearingAidPRO
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MDHearingAidPRO
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0064.xml
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82
82,83,84,85,86
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psshowcase
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0065.xml
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86
86,87
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[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE DIRECT
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0066.xml
article
88
88
FROM THE POPULAR SCIENCE ARCHIVES
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Fabric Design
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Naomi Major
In the 1970s, so many Muslim people were traveling to Mecca each year that Saudi Arabian authorities decided to build a new terminal at the King Abdulaziz International Airport just to accommodate them. They hired American architectural firm Skidmore Owings and Merrill, which, along with German-born engineer Horst Berger, designed the Hajj Terminal, an open-air building covered by a 105-acre tension structure—a tent; actually, 210 tents joined together into two halves.
PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0067.xml
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89
89
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0068.xml
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90
90
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Apple Inc.: iPhone 4[S]
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Apple Inc.
iPhone 4[S]
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PopularScience_20120701_0281_001_0069.xml