Issue: 20120601

Friday, June 1, 2012
JUNE 2012
6
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280
Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0001.xml
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RadioShack
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RadioShack
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0002.xml
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Allstate Insurance Company
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Allstate Insurance Company
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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contents
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A WORD FROM THE EDITOR
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Abundantly Inventive
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MARK JANNOT
For regular readers of POPULAR SCIENCE, the name Peter Diamandis should be a familiar one. It has shown up in at least a dozen issues over the past decade or so, tied to his stewardship of optimistic enterprises including the citizen-spaceflight-catalyzing Ansari X Prize (and its various prize-driven crowdsourced-innovation spinoffs), his Nascar-with-wings Rocket Racing League venture, and Singularity University, an institution that teaches ambitious forward-thinkers how to harness the power of exponential growth curves to transform the world.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0005.xml
masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0006.xml
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Samsung Electronics America
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Samsung Electronics America
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0007.xml
article
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PEER REVIEW
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A Dirty Job
PRINTED MATTERS
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I was delighted to see David Goodwillie’s article on nuclear divers [“Swimming on the Hot Side,” April], but one sentence made my heart plummet: “There hasn’t been a diving accident at Cook since she”— that’s me—“became supervisor.” Our safety record at D.C. Cook is due to the efforts of many people.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0008.xml
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ford: TAURUS
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ford
TAURUS
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0009.xml
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MEGAPIXELS
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Down the Hatch
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Emily Elert
Last August, while diving to conduct a fish census on Australia's Great Barrier Reef, marine ecologist Daniela Ceccarelli spotted the ghostly white skin of a brown-banded bamboo shark. When she swam in for a closer look, she saw that the fish's head had disappeared—into the mouth of another shark.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0010.xml
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Advertisement: HYDRO
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HYDRO
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0011.xml
review
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what's new
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The Future-Proof Television
A modular chipset saves smart TVs from an early grave
Samsung
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Samsung
LED ES8000
$3,000
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Consumers are faced with a dilemma when buying an Internet-connected television: Most LCD and plasma screens last for at least seven years before their pixels begin to dim, but most PC hardware, which is necessary to run apps such as Hulu and Netflix, becomes obsolete within three.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0012.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
the goods
A Dozen Great Ideas in Gear
Shooting Stars
Spread the Light
Pocket Scan
Make or Break
Air Strike
Righty Tighty, Lefty Tighty
Trick Shot
SMART BOARD
Auto Fill
Easy Rider
Power Washer
Compact Cutter
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The Canon 60Da DSLR is specially designed to take photos of stars. Compared with other DSLRs, the camera's infrared filter permits three times the red hydrogen-alpha wavelengths emitted by celestial bodies to reach the image sensor. Canon EOS 60Da $1,500 The Tulip lantern is the only camping lamp to automatically adjust its focus.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0013.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
DREAM MACHINE
The 200mph Muscle Car
Ford builds the fastest Mustang yet
650-Horsepower Engine
Drag-Racing Assist
High-Speed Stabilizers
Adjustable Steering and Suspension
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2013 Ford Mustang Shelby GT 500
$54,200
Lawrence Ulrich
Detroit automakers have recently been locked in a competition straight out of the 1960s: a race to create the fastest and most powerful muscle car. This summer, Ford takes the lead with the 650-horsepower Mustang Shelby GT 500. To break the 200mph mark, engineers departed from the muscle-car tradition of throwing a truck engine under the hood and calling it a day.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0014.xml
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DOW
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DOW
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0015.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
LONG AWAITED
Water Locked
How invisible nano-coatings can make any phone waterproof
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Stewart Wolpin
More cellphones meet their demise from exposure to moisture than from any other cause. In the past, a user who wanted to protect his phone had to buy a watertight case, and thus double the size of the device. Last year, the company P2i introduced a less clunky approach: coating devices in invisible, water-repelling nano-polymers.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0016.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
TESTED
LIQUIPEL WATERPROOFING
THE TEST
THE RESULTS
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For $59, Liquipel will retro-waterproof any of a dozen cellphone models, including iPhones and Samsung Galaxy handsets. Because the nanoparticies are so small, they can penetrate seams to reach and coat the internai parts of an already-assembled device.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0017.xml
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FORD: The Ford F-150
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FORD
The Ford F-150
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0018.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
THE SETUP
The Reengineered Barbecue
Designers upgrade the cookout's most fundamental tools
GRILL
SPATULA
SKEWERS
MEAT THERMOMETER
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Cata Marketing Cook-Air Grill
$200
Portable grills tend to reach only 500°F, but the designers of the Cook-Air added a ventilation system to get theirs twice as hot. An electric fan acts as a bellows, blowing a continuous stream of fresh air onto the grill's wood-fueled fire.
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Grill Daddy Heat Shield Spatula
$25
Hot splatters are one of grilling's great hazards, so Grill Daddy Introduced a line of utensils with heat shields. On Its spatula and other tools, a stainless-steel panel rotates freely around the handle so that it always hangs between the cook's hand and the grill. Grill Daddy Heat Shield Spatula $25
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3D Grill Magic Skewers
$57
The engineers at 30 Grill made their new stainless-steel skewers in a three-pointed shape, as opposed to circular, so food won't spin or slip when grillers rotate kebabs. 3D Grill Magic Skewers $57 for 8
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iDevices iGrill
$80
The iGrlll is the first Bluetooth-enabled meat thermometer. Users program in meat type and doneness and pair the device with an iPhone. When the meat's internal temperature is right, the app issues an alert. Just don't stray more than 200 feet, or dinner could overcook. iDevices iGrill $80
Sarah Fecht
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0019.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0020.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
HOW IT WORKS
Circuit Training
The first exercise tracker that doubles as a real-time coach
Sneaker
Pressure sensors
Sports Sensor
Nike+ app
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Nike Lunar TR1+
$235
Tim Newcomb
Personal fitness monitors are great at collecting data but fail at providing useful interpretations. Users often have no way to translate speed, distance and calories into metrics that can help guide them to improve over time. The Nike+ Training system is the only monitor that records data, processes it, and delivers real-time coaching.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0021.xml
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Transitions Optical, Inc.: Transitions ADAPTIVE LENSES
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Transitions ADAPTIVE LENSES
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0022.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
OUTLOOK
The Bigger Picture
How 4K resolution will bring movie-theater quality into the living room
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Al Griffin
Since the first high-definition televisions came out in 1998, consumers have heard the same tired sales pitch: “It’s like having a movie theater in your living room!” Actually, no. An HD image does have nearly the same resolution as one projected in a theater.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0023.xml
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BASF
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BASF
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0024.xml
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Energizer
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Energizer
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0025.xml
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HEADLINES
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Standard Operating Procedure
Scientists outsmart the immune system to better match people with parts
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Spencer Woodman
ONE OF THE MOST vexing problems that confronted surgeons after they completed the first successful human organ transplant, in 1954, was: Where would they get more organs? Medical researchers have since figured out how to transplant hearts, eyes and even entire faces.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0026.xml
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Advertisements
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FUJIFILM North America Corporation
X10
FUJIFILM North America Corporation
X100
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0027.xml
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iRobot
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iRobot
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0028.xml
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HEADLINES
ROUGH SKETCH
Straight Shooter
"Our .50-caliber bullet can guide itself to a hit half a mile away"
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FOR YEARS, people have tried to come up with ways to steer bullets, and everyone has consistently said you can’t do it. And you couldn’t—if the bullet was spinning. A spinning bullet is too stable; you can’t apply enough force to turn it off its axis of revolution.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0029.xml
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iRobot Corporation
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iRobot Corporation
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0030.xml
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0031.xml
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THE LIST
Human Subjects
Ralph Steinman
Barry Marshall
John Stapp
Jesse William Lazear
Daniel Alcides Carrion
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ROSE PASTORE
Last October, the Nobel Committee announced that it would award him a prize in medicine, unaware that he had died three days earlier. The Canadian biologist had been experimenting with triggering the immune system's dendritic cells to treat cancer when, in 2007, he was diagnosed with pancreatic adenocarcinoma and given less than a year to live.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0032.xml
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Advertisement: Mothers California Gold Water Spot Remover
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Mothers California Gold Water Spot Remover
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0033.xml
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HEADLINES
BY THE NUMBERS
Space Race
Why does everyone suddenly want to go to astronaut school?
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Adam Hadhazy
When NASA announced last year that it would be accepting candidates for its two-year astronaut training program, it received more than 6,300 applications—the most since 1978, when word of the agency's newly launched shuttle program drew a still-record 8,000 applications.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0034.xml
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Advertisement: Enbrel
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Enbrel
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0035.xml
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HEADLINES
THE BIG FIX
Under Pressure
A new way to keep deep-sea creatures alive at the surface
THE PROBLEM
THE SOLUTION
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Stephanie Warren
Although scientists have been studying deep-sea animals since the 1860s, they still don't know much about them. That's in Large part because the fish, octopuses and other creatures that thrive at the bottom of the ocean die quickly at the surface.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0036.xml
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SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA
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SIGMA CORPORATION OF AMERICA
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0037.xml
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HEADLINES
FUTURE PROOF
Communicable Science
New research could identify nature's most dangerous viruses. But only if it's public
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Jacoh Ward
LAST YEAR, Nature and Science prepared to publish research describing how to mutate H5N1, a deadly bird flu, into more-contagious forms. The papers could help scientists create a treatment should a similar mutation occur in nature. But according to the U.S. government, the papers could also help terrorists create a weapon.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0038.xml
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progressive
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progressive
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THE NEW AGE of INVENTION
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INNOVATION GOES VIRAL
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Peter Diamandis
Steven Kotler
The barriers to individual invention are falling away. Amateur scientists and inventors now have access to tools exponentially more powerful and affordable than those of a generation ago. They can transform ideas into physical products in a matter of days.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0040.xml
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FEATURES
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INVENT YOUR OWN ANYTHING
Think Big
Team Up
A WORD ON THE FEDS
Gear Up
A WORD ON DANGER
Get the Right Stuff
Build a Supply Chain
Get It Funded
A WORD ON VENTURE CAPITAL
Get It Out There
A WORD ON THE LAW
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Katherine Bagley
The most original projects combine two or more disciplines. Look to mash them up Shared workspaces let you learn new skills and wield expensive tools. These are some of the largest and most active Each of TechShop's five 15,000-square-foot locations contains more than $1 million in prototyping equipment and software.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0041.xml
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Bose Corporation: QuietComfort 15
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Bose Corporation
QuietComfort 15
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0042.xml
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2012 6TH ANNUAL INVENTION AWARDS
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Counter Intuition
A SAFE, SIMPLE ENGINE POWER SYSTEM FOR SMALL HELICOPTERS
WANT MORE?
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CLAY DILLOW
When James O'Neill, a retired marketing executive, first learned how helicopter powertrains worked a decade ago, he immediately started redesigning them. Most helicopters have a huge transmission that reduces the engine's high speed to a level more fit for the main propeller and turns the tail rotor to keep the aircraft from corkscrewing out of control.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0043.xml
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INVENTION AWARDS
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Don't Watch Your Step
AN ASSISTED-WALKING DEVICE FOR PATIENTS WITH INJURED NERVES
HOW IT WORKS
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BECKY FERREIRA
Long before he became an inventor,Jon Christiansen was a sea captain. In 1985 he was hired to sail a replica of the Godspeed, the ship that Landed at Jamestown, Virginia, in 1607, in a reenactment of the original voyage. One day while he was cleaning the ship's hull, someone spun the wheel, trapping Christiansen's Leg between the rudder and a support post.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0044.xml
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Invention Awards
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Cleaner Wash
A SYSTEM THAT HEATS AND RECIRCULATES WATER DURING A SHOWER
HOW IT WORKS
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RENA MARIE PACELLA
Taking a shower draws more water and more energy than any other daily household activity. Low-flow showerheads save only a little of both, typically at the expense of comfort. That's because they let the hot water—and all the heat energy it contains—go down the drain.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0045.xml
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INVENTION AWARDS
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Running Hot
A HIGHER-EFFICIENCY, LOWER-EMISSION ENGINE SYSTEM
HOW IT WORKS
Inauspicious Patents
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COREY BINNS
For the better part of Frank Will's life, he has been consumed with improving engine performance. He started racing motorcycles as a teenager in Germany In the 1970s, winning a world championship race in 1991, and later became an automotive engineer at Ford In Australia.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0046.xml
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INVENTION AWARDS
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Soldier Saver
AN INFLATABLE TOURNIQUET THAT STOPS ABDOMINAL BLEEDING IN SECONDS
HOW IT WORKS
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ROSE PASTORE
While serving as an army medic during Operation Desert Storm, Richard Schwartz became all too familiar with gunshot wounds, particularly shots to the pelvis and upper legs. Enemies would target that region because body armor doesn't always cover it.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0047.xml
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Invention Awards
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A Better Lobster Trap
A DELAYED-RELEASE BAIT DISPENSER THAT SAVES FISHERMEN TIME AND MONEY
HOW IT WORKS
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BROOKE BOREL
During a regular fishing season, most lobstermen can afford to check and rebait their traps only every three or four days. Each run to the traps can cost as much as $600 for fuel and take 18 hours of work. But three or four days can be more than enough time for lobsters to eat the chunks of herring or mackerel that serve as bait.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0048.xml
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INVENTION AWARDS
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All-Seeing Eyes
A CONTACT LENS THAT HELPS PRODUCE AUGMENTED-REALITY VISION
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JOSEPH A. BERNSTEIN
After two decades as an electrical engineer, Randy Sprague quit his job in 2008 to start a solar power company. He had been planning the venture for years, saving up, getting his wife's blessing. But then one morning while taking a shower, he had a brainstorm for an entirely different idea: contact lenses that could act as part of a wearable display.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0049.xml
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INVENTION AWARDS
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Quick Blades
A SPRING-LOADED SKATE BOOSTS HOCKEY PLAYERS' SPEED
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BJORN CAREY
David Blois manages condominium properties near Toronto, but at any given time he's usually also working on several inventions—a solar-powered smoke detector, say, or an age-spot-erasing skin cream. In 1998 he was ice skating at his local rink when an idea popped into his head: a hockey skate that used springs to harness a skater's kinetic energy.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0050.xml
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1&1 Internet
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1&1 Internet
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0051.xml
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INVENTION AWARDS
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Revitalizing Cloud
A POWERFUL, AFFORDABLE MISTER TO SAVE OVERHEATED FIREFIGHTERS
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NICOLE DYER
One evening last fall in Heiskell, Tennessee, Michael Robinson was battling a house fire when he saw a fellow firefighter struggling to pick himself up off the ground. The man, who was wearing 70 pounds of gear, was delirious from heat and overexertion.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0052.xml
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1&1 Internet
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1&1 Internet
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0053.xml
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INVENTION AWARDS
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Sectional Healing
A MODULAR CAST THAT SHORTENS RECOVERY TIME FROM INJURED LIMBS
HOW IT WORKS
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LAUREN AARONSON
When Kelly Anderson shed her arm cast two months after a wrist operation, her joints were so stiff she couldn't turn a doorknob. She didn't fully recover for another four months. Daniel Amante suffered similar post-cast complications after he injured his knee; Amanda Harton watched her soccer teammates struggle following various injuries; and Clara Tran saw even greater suffering among the frail patients in the nursing home where she volunteered.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0054.xml
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Schneider Electric: APC
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Schneider Electric
APC
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0055.xml
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INVENTION AWARDS
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They Made It!
Some favorite award winners from years past and where they are now
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2008 Composite Beams Extra-strong bridge support "Last summer we opened the Knickerbocker Bridge in Maine, the Longest composite bridge in the world at 540 feet."—JOHN HILLMAN 2009 Vegawatt Waste-cooking-oil power station "We have shipped 20 systems.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0056.xml
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YORK
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YORK
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GARAGE BIOLOGY
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Guess What's Cooking in the Garage
The next big breakthrough in synthetic biology just might come from an amateur scientist
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Jack Hitt
On Fillmore Street in San Francisco, in that stretch that’s still mostly boho coffee joints with a head shop and an art gallery or two, I met Meredith Patterson. She didn’t exactly stand out among the denizens of the Lower Haight. In her 30s and pushing 5'10" in her combat boots, she had on a tough-looking leather jacket and cat’s-eye glasses that finished off her look with a nice hint of 1950s girl nerd.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0058.xml
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GravityDefyer
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GravityDefyer
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0059.xml
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Ashland Inc.
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Ashland Inc.
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0060.xml
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HOW 2.0
YOU BUILT WHAT?!
Swing Pong
A group of young designers reinvent ping-pong with a fiashing, tilting table
Building a Swing Pong Table
HOW IT WORKS
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Gregory Mone
Internships more often than not are mindless, coffee-fetching black holes of boredom. But not at Syyn Labs, a Los Angeles collective that creates unusual interactive art and science projects for commercials and music videos. Last summer, student interns Hoon Oh, Robb Godshaw and jisu Choi took it upon themselves to reinvent the sport of table tennis.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0061.xml
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Purolator Filters NA LLC
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Purolator Filters NA LLC
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0062.xml
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Advertisement: Introducing Mothers California Gold Synthetic Wax
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Introducing Mothers California Gold Synthetic Wax
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PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0063.xml
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H2.0
THEME BUILDING
Creating a Monster
A programmer uses Microsoft's motion-sensing Kinect game system to make striking (and weird) distorted images
Two More Far-Out Kinect Projects
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Andrew Rosenblum
While experimenting with new applications for Kinect's real-time, 3-D imaging capability, San Francisco freelance coder Robert Hodgin discovered a way to make people's bodies appear puffy and grotesgue onscreen. The Kinect uses a near-infrared camera and sensors to produce a 3-D depth map that indicates a person's spatial location.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0064.xml
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Tempur-Pedic Management, Inc.
[no value]
Tempur-Pedic Management, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0065.xml
article
80
80
H2.0
BUILD IT
Homemade Clapper
A sound-activated device that adjusts the lights and sets the mood
[no value]
[no value]
Pete Mills
One night, I was trying to draw a circuit on a chalkboard, but it became too dark to see. The next day I bought a new lamp, only to find that the board gave off too much glare. I needed a light I could easily adjust. I could have just installed a dimmer, but where's the fun in that?
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0066.xml
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81
81,82
[no value]
[no value]
Pfizer Inc.: VIAGRA
[no value]
Pfizer Inc.
VIAGRA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0067.xml
article
83
83
H2.0
TECH SUPPORT
Wake-Up Bomb
The defusable alarm clock
[no value]
[no value]
Kaitlin Miller
Inspired by the iconic look of time bombs in old movies, software engineer Michael Krumpus set out to build an alarm clock that would make his mornings more action-packed. When the alarm goes off in defuse mode, the clock starts a 10-second countdown; the correct wire, which is randomly assigned each day, has to be cut or pulled out to stop the detonation, or the clock will "explode" with noise and flashing LEDs.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0068.xml
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83
83
[no value]
[no value]
ROCKAUTO
[no value]
ROCKAUTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0069.xml
article
84
84
H2.0
SIMPLE PROJECT OF THE MONTH
Speech Bubbles
A way to make photographs into real-life comic strips
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0070.xml
article
84
84
H2.0
APP OF THE MONTH
Transparent Screen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
It begins with a tweet and ends with a twisted ankle. Still, since everyone seems intent on continuing to stumble along looking down at their smartphones, Transparent Screen can help minimize accidents. The Android app overlays any screen content on top of a live image from the phone's camera, so users can keep their eyes on the display without bumping into others or wandering into the street.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0071.xml
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84
84
[no value]
[no value]
iPage
[no value]
iPage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0072.xml
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85
85,86,87,88,89
[no value]
[no value]
Dads & Grads Gift Guide
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0073.xml
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89
89
[no value]
[no value]
THE IRON SHOP
[no value]
THE IRON SHOP
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0074.xml
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89
89
[no value]
[no value]
VRI
[no value]
VRI
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0075.xml
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90
90
[no value]
[no value]
popsci
[no value]
popsci
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0076.xml
article
90
90,91,93
fyi
[no value]
Q Can a bladder actually burst?
Q Can humans hibernate?
Q Are there traffic laws in space yet?
[no value]
[no value]
Susan Du
Rose Pastore
Ian Chant
Only under special circumstances. "I mean, it doesn't just happen to any joe Schmo walking down the street holding his urine too Long," says Scott Eggener, a urologist at the University of Chicago. "But for someone who has had major surgery or cancer or had radiation in his bladder, or whose bladder had been removed and we make them a new bladder out of intestine, then yes—those are situations where the bladder can rupture."
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0077.xml
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91
91
[no value]
[no value]
MOTHERS: Mothers California Gold paint care products
[no value]
MOTHERS
Mothers California Gold paint care products
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0078.xml
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92
92
[no value]
[no value]
MacNeil IP LLC
[no value]
MacNeil IP LLC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0079.xml
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92
92
[no value]
[no value]
EPILOG LASER
[no value]
EPILOG LASER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0080.xml
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93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0081.xml
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93
93
[no value]
[no value]
eclecticproducts
[no value]
eclecticproducts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0082.xml
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94
94
[no value]
[no value]
K&N Engineering, Inc.
[no value]
K&N Engineering, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0083.xml
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94
94
[no value]
[no value]
ERN LLC
[no value]
ERN LLC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0084.xml
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95
95
[no value]
[no value]
timepiecesusa
[no value]
timepiecesusa
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0085.xml
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96
96
[no value]
[no value]
U.S. Money Reserve
[no value]
U.S. Money Reserve
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0086.xml
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97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Gorilla Glue Company
[no value]
Gorilla Glue Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0087.xml
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97
97
[no value]
[no value]
EdgeCraft Corporation
[no value]
EdgeCraft Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0088.xml
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97
97
[no value]
[no value]
ShurTech Brands
[no value]
ShurTech Brands
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0089.xml
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98
98
[no value]
[no value]
HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0090.xml
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99
99
[no value]
[no value]
THE GREAT COURSES
[no value]
THE GREAT COURSES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0091.xml
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100
100,101,102,104
[no value]
[no value]
psshowcase
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0092.xml
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103
103
[no value]
[no value]
biehealth
[no value]
biehealth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0093.xml
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105
105,106
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE DIRECT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0094.xml
article
107
107
FROM THE POPULAR SCIENCE ARCHIVES
[no value]
Digging for Fire
Bombed Out
[no value]
[no value]
Naomi Major
John Raleigh, an inventor in Peshtigo, Wisconsin, had an idea—to build a portable, wearable, water-free apparatus designed to extinguish forest fires using nothing but earth. With the motor strapped to his back, a firefighter would use the machine's auger-like mechanism to scrape up dirt, sand or gravel; a fan would fling the material onto the fire, suffocating it.
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0095.xml
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108
108,109
[no value]
[no value]
CHRYSLER GROUP LLC.: DODGE
[no value]
CHRYSLER GROUP LLC.
DODGE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0096.xml
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110
110
[no value]
[no value]
amazon: kindle fire
[no value]
amazon
kindle fire
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120601_0280_006_0097.xml