Issue: 20120501

Tuesday, May 1, 2012
MAY 2012
5
True
280
Monday, December 1, 2014

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1,3
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0001.xml
advertisement
0_2
0_2,1
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
COUPE
American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
SEDAN
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0002.xml
advertisement
2
2
[no value]
[no value]
Chevron
[no value]
Chevron
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0003.xml
tableOfContents
3
3
[no value]
[no value]
contents
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0004.xml
advertisement
04
04
[no value]
[no value]
K& N
[no value]
K& N
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0005.xml
article
04
04
A WORD FROM THE EDITOR
[no value]
The Next Great Task
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARK JANNOT
AN OLD OIL PAINTING hangs prominently in my office, a portrait of a bespectacled gentleman dressed in a dark three-piece suit and white bowtie; a quill juts from an inkwell on the desk behind him, and his right index finger keeps his spot in the book he holds as he looks contemplatively off into the middle distance.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0006.xml
masthead
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0007.xml
advertisement
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
MOTHERS
[no value]
MOTHERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0008.xml
article
6
6,7
PEER REVIEW
[no value]
Matters of the Heart
Ranking
THE PRODIGY
MIND = BLOWN
GOOD GENES, BAD GENES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
I am a voracious 55-year-old reader, and "No Pulse" [March] was the best article I have ever read. 'Nuff said. Robert Paris Granada Hills, Calif. I just finished reading your article on the no-pulse heart, and I thought it was one of your best.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0009.xml
advertisement
6
6,7
[no value]
[no value]
Norton
[no value]
Norton
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0010.xml
advertisement
8
8,9
[no value]
[no value]
Ford: TAURAS SHO
[no value]
Ford
TAURAS SHO
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0011.xml
article
10
10,11
MEGAPIXELS
[no value]
Bombs Away
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Rose Pastore
The homemade bombs known as lEDs accounted for 60 percent of all U.S. military injuries in Iraq and have killed more than 21,000 Iraqi civilians. Last November, a month before the last U.S. troops departed, Iraq's federal bomb squad paraded with bomb-disposal robots in Baghdad.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0012.xml
advertisement
12
12
[no value]
[no value]
SAMSUNG
[no value]
SAMSUNG
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0013.xml
review
13
13
what's new
[no value]
Aerialist
The fastest, lightest, most maneuverable R/C jet plane
[no value]
F-86
$140
Lizzie Schiffman
Remote-control jets have never perfomed particularly well. Their engines are less efficient than exposed propellers at an R/C plane's speed, which makes the toys sluggish and difficult to steer, leading to crashes. To compensate for the lack of power, engineers at toy manufacturer Great Planes reduced the weight of their F-86 craft to 2.35 ounces—30 percent lighter than any comparably sized R/C jet.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0014.xml
article
14
14,15
WHAT'S NEW
[no value]
the goods
A Dozen Great Ideas in Gear
Universal Webcam
Puzzle Plus
Look Out
Air Play
Clean Shake
DIG DEEP
Phone Ball
Audio Mix
Multi-Pod
Ace Brace
Café Quality
Mouse for Life
[no value]
[no value]
Corinne Iozzio
Rose Pastore
Katherine Tweed
The five-megapixel Twist webcam can be reshaped to fit on any laptop or monitor. Its four-inch silicone arm bends to clamp onto even the smallest bezels, while its rubberized texture prevents slippage. HerculesHD Twist Webcam $35 Players get more than satisfaction when they finish one of Ravensburger's jigsaws.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0015.xml
review
16
16
WHAT'S NEW
TESTED
Half Charged
The long-awaited Fisker Karma plug-in hybrid is finally on the road. Now what?
THE TEST
THE RESULTS
[no value]
2012 Fisker Karma
$103,000
John Voelcker
At the 2008 Detroit Auto Show, the start-up Fisker Automotive unveiled its Karma concept, a high-end plug-in hybrid the company would use to challenge Tesla Motors. Cofounder Henrik Fisker said the Karma would go on sale in late 2009. Then the recession, a switch in battery suppliers and other delays kept Fisker from shipping the first trickle of cars until late last year.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0016.xml
advertisement
17
17
[no value]
[no value]
Energizer
[no value]
Energizer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0017.xml
review
18
18
WHAT'S NEW
TECH TREND
Live Long and Render
A new five-core chip makes smart devices more versatile ever
THE TREND
THE BENEFIT
QUICK ACCESS
BUSINESS-READY
MEDIA SAVVY
Acer
[no value]
Acer
A510
$450
Software designers at Acer made a single modification to the stock Android operating system in their 10.1-inch tablet: a quick-access pop-up menu. From the circular menu, users can easily jump among tasks, apps and recently visited sites. Acer A510 $450
Acer
Eee Pad Transformer Prime
$500
With its keyboard dock attached, the Transformer Prime morphs from a tablet into a de facto mobile workstation. The dock also houses an extra battery, which increases the tablet's standalone runtime from nine to 16 hours. Asus Eee Pad Transformer Prime From $500; keyboard dock, $150
Acer
LePad K2010
Lenovo engineers built the LePad K2010 with two speakers flanking either side of the 10-inch high-def screen. The speaker drivers are programmed to use acoustic tricks that create the illusion of surround sound within three feet of the screen. Lenovo LePad K2010 Price not set
Steve Morgenstern
Most tablets fall into one of two categories: low-power devices that last for a day in standby mode but sputter when playing high-def games, and high-power models that handle demanding tasks but suck power in standby. Nvidia engineers combined a low-power single-core CPU and four high-performance CPUs onto the same die, allowing tablets to run efficiently in any situation.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0018.xml
advertisement
19
19
[no value]
[no value]
Ameritrade
[no value]
Ameritrade
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0019.xml
review
20
20
WHAT'S NEW
TECH REBORN
Hear Buds
Originally intended to block sound, modified noise-canceling circuitry now helps people to hear
In Related News
[no value]
Able Planet Personal Sound Amplifier
$400
Tim Gideon
Of the estimated 36 million Americans who report some level of hearing loss, as many as 20 million have mild to moderate conditions, in which they struggle to pick out voices in cacophonous settings. Although the condition is common, treatment is limited.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0020.xml
advertisement
21
21
[no value]
[no value]
1&1 Internet
[no value]
1&1 Internet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0021.xml
article
22
22
WHAT'S NEW
OUTLOOK
The Pocket Console
How smartphones will become the only device a hard-core gamer needs
[no value]
[no value]
Scott Alexander
When Sony, Microsoft or Nintendo introduces a new videogame console, its obsolescence within six years is more or less assumed. Nintendo is likely to release the new Wii U later this year, and other console makers are rumored to be working on next-generation systems.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0022.xml
advertisement
23
23
[no value]
[no value]
1&1 Internet
[no value]
1&1 Internet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0023.xml
advertisement
24
24
[no value]
[no value]
iRobot Corporation
[no value]
iRobot Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0024.xml
article
25
25,26,28,29
HEADLINES
[no value]
Some Additional Flavoring
Anyone can preserve food— the hard part is making it taste good
[no value]
[no value]
Paul Adams
BARB STUCKEY hands me a plastic tray of mashed potatoes sealed with an opaque layer of film. “We packaged these up over a year ago,” she says. The United States Potato Board has asked Stuckey and her colleagues at Mattson, a commercial food lab in Foster City, California, to devise a way to put fresh, ready-to-eat mashed potatoes into a package that can sit unrefrigerated on a supermarket shelf for months.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0025.xml
advertisement
27
27
[no value]
[no value]
GEICO
[no value]
GEICO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0026.xml
advertisement
28
28
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0027.xml
advertisement
29
29
[no value]
[no value]
AutoStop
[no value]
AutoStop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0028.xml
article
30
30
HEADLINES
THE BIG FIX
Drill Dentists
Changing the teeth on the world's largest tunnel-boring machine
THE PROBLEM
THE SOLUTION
[no value]
[no value]
Tim Newcomb
NEXT YEAR, workers will start digging a 1.7-mile tunnel underneath downtown Seattle using the world’s largest tunnel-boring machine. The 57.5-foot-diameter, $80-million drill, which is currently under construction for the State Route 99 project, has about 600 cutting tools—steel bits and spinning disks on the borer’s face that break up dirt and rock.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0029.xml
advertisement
31
31
[no value]
[no value]
sporty's
[no value]
sporty's
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0030.xml
article
32
32
HEADLINES
FUTURE FORM
Bio-Armor
Printing protective plates from patterns in nature
OTHER THINGS THAT FALL FROM THE SKY
[no value]
[no value]
Ryan Bradley
Neri Oxman, the director of the Mediated Matter research group at the MIT Media Lab, designs skins and body armors inspired by human tissue. “Most patterns in nature—whether scales or spiderwebs—have some kind of logic that can be computationally modeled,” she says.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0031.xml
advertisement
33
33
[no value]
[no value]
APC
[no value]
APC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0032.xml
article
34
34
HEADLINES
WORK SPACE
The Big Fill
Pumping gas into a jet
[no value]
[no value]
Ryan Bradley
AT LONDON’S Heathrow, which moves more international passengers than any other airport, the fuel jockeys of the Aircraft Service International Group oversee refueling. Filling an Airbus A380 [pictured] can take two hours, at a rate of about 1,000 gallons per minute.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0033.xml
advertisement
35
35
[no value]
[no value]
PROGRESSIVE
[no value]
PROGRESSIVE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0034.xml
article
36
36
HEADLINES
ROUGH SKETCH
Helicopter Flock
"I build flying robots"
The New Planetary Habitability Index
[no value]
[no value]
Vijay Kumar
IF YOU WANT a robot to maneuver aggressively, it has to be small. As you scale things down, the “moment of inertia”—the resistance to angular motion—drops dramatically. Our nano-quadrotor robots are made to be as lightweight as possible: less than a fifth of a pound and palmsized.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0035.xml
advertisement
37
37
[no value]
[no value]
Purolator
[no value]
Purolator
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0036.xml
advertisement
37
37
[no value]
[no value]
Purolator: SYNTHETIC
[no value]
Purolator
SYNTHETIC
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0037.xml
article
38
38
HEADLINES
FUTURE PROOF
Take the Wheel
Who is to blame When a robotic car crashes?
[no value]
[no value]
Jacob Ward
SOCIETY MUST MAKE two big leaps in order to enable truly self-driving cars. The first is technological. Engineers need to improve today’s cars (which can warn a driver that he’s drifting out of his lane) beyond current Google and Darpa prototypes (which maintain the lane on their own) to the point where automobiles can edge forward through a construction zone while their owners sleep inside.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0038.xml
advertisement
39
39
[no value]
[no value]
Spyderco
[no value]
Spyderco
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0039.xml
article
40
40,41
Jet Setters
[no value]
Flying with Half the Fuel
NASA asked the world's top aircraft engineers to solve the hardest problem in commercial aviation: how to fly cleaner, quieter and using less fuel. The prototypes they imagined may set a new standard for the next two decades of flight
[no value]
[no value]
ANDREW ROSENBLUM
Passenger jets consume a lot of fuel A Boeing 747 burns five gallons of it every nautical mile, and as the price of that fuel rises, so do fares. Lockheed Martin engineers developed their Box Wing concept to find new ways to reduce fuel burn without abandoning the basic shape of current aircraft.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0040.xml
article
42
42,43
JET SETTERS
[no value]
Bringing Back Supersonic
SUPERSONIC GREEN MACHINE LOCKHEED MARTIN
[no value]
[no value]
ANDREW ROSENBLUM
The first era of commercial supersonic transportation ended on November 26, 2003, with the final flight of the Concorde, a noisy, inefficient and highly polluting aircraft. But the dream of a sub-three-hour cross-country flight lingered, and in 2010, designers at Lockheed Martin presented the Mach 1.6 Supersonic Green Machine.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0041.xml
article
44
44
JET SETTERS
[no value]
Making Hybrids Huge
SUGAR VOLT, BOEING
[no value]
[no value]
ROSE PASTURE
The best way to conserve jet fuel is to turn off the gas engines. That's only possible with an alternative power source, like the battery packs and electric motors in the Boeing SUGAR Volt's hybrid propulsion system. The 737size, 3,500-nautical-mile-range plane would draw energy from both jet fuel and batteries during takeoff, but once at cruising altitude, pilots could switch to all-electric mode [see "High Voltage," page 56], At the same time Boeing engineers were rethinking propulsion, they also rethought wing design.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0042.xml
advertisement
45
45
[no value]
[no value]
Rosetta Stone
[no value]
Rosetta Stone
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0043.xml
article
46
46,47,48,49,50,51,52,53
[no value]
[no value]
China Takes Off
The largest nation on Earth is flying more people more places than ever before. Its struggle to do so without (further) destroying the environment could show the rest of the world a greener way to travel
The Path Not (Yet) Taken
Zero Net Emissions by 2050?
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES FALLOWS
When discussing any environmental issue in China, it's always a struggle to decide which deserves more emphasis: how dire the situation is, or how hard Chinese authorities are trying to cope with it. China’s skies, waters and even sources of food are some of the most poisonously contaminated on Earth.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0044.xml
article
54
54,55
[no value]
[no value]
THE MACH-1 SUIT
How Felix Baumgartner will withstand a 120,000-foot free fall
[no value]
[no value]
STEVEN KOTLER
Sometime before the end of this year, skydiver Felix Baumgartner intends to climb into a capsule suspended beneath a helium balloon, rise 23 miles above Roswell, New Mexico, open the capsule door, and jump out. On the 120,000-foot free fall—the longest ever attempted—he will face temperatures as low as -70°F and speeds of more than 700 miles an hour, becoming the first person to accelerate through the sound barrier without a craft.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0045.xml
article
56
56,57
FEATURES
[no value]
HIGH VOLTAGE
Inside the first production-ready electric airplane
CANARD PUSHER AIRFRAME
CARBON-COMPOSITE PROPELLER
HYBRID POWERTRAIN
ELECTRIC MOTOR
ELECTRIC-CAR BATTERIES
RANGE-EXTENDING GAS ENGINE
[no value]
[no value]
Seth Fletcher
Engineers have historically faced two obstacles when designing electric aircraft. Batteries that run the electric motors have been too heavy and not energy-dense enough to provide sufficient power. And the consequences of failure were too high: Running out of power would all but assure a crash landing.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0046.xml
article
58
58,59,60,61,62,63
[no value]
[no value]
THE HUMAN ELEMENT
Why drones won't be taking over our wars anytime soon
[no value]
[no value]
C.J. CHIVERS
EARLY IN 2008 ON THE BLACK SEA COAST, a Georgian drone flying over the separatist enclave of Abkhazia transmitted an instantaneous artifact from the age of human flight—the video record of its own destruction by an attacking fighter jet. What happened that day was born of incendiary post-Soviet politics.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0047.xml
article
64
64,65,66,67,68
FEATURES
POPSCI CHALLENGE
Paper Lions
Two paper-plane master. Two designs. Which will fly the longest?
[no value]
[no value]
Corinne Iozzio
Engineers have long used paper to study flight. Everyone from da Vinci to Jack Northrop has tested their aircraft this way. Today making paper planes has become as much a sport as a learning tool. For this issue, we asked two top designers to turn a sheet of magazine paper into the longest-flying plane possible.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0048.xml
advertisement
69
69
[no value]
[no value]
gravity defyer
[no value]
gravity defyer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0049.xml
advertisement
70
70
[no value]
[no value]
Timepieces International Inc
[no value]
Timepieces International Inc
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0050.xml
article
71
71,72,73
HOW2.0
YOU BUILT WHAT?!
Boxful of Radiation
In his free time during high school, Adam Munich built a portable x-ray machine
Building an X-ray Machine
HOW IT WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
Gregory Mone
Late one night two years ago, Adam Munich found himself talking with two new acquaintances in a chatroom. One, a Pakistani guy, was complaining about rolling electricity blackouts in his country. The other had broken his leg in a motocross accident in Mexico and said his local hospital couldn't find a working x-ray machine.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0051.xml
advertisement
72
72
[no value]
[no value]
AEM
[no value]
AEM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0052.xml
advertisement
73
73
[no value]
[no value]
MOTHERS
[no value]
MOTHERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0053.xml
article
74
74
HOW2.0
REPURPOSED TECH
Added Touch
How to turn an old netbook into a touchscreen tablet
Transform a Netbook into a Tablet
[no value]
[no value]
Adam Dachis
Tablets are taking over the portable-computing market, but that doesn't mean the netbooks that they've replaced are useless. It's possible to jam the processing power and battery life of most netbook models into a smaller, touchscreen-equipped package.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0054.xml
advertisement
75
75,76
[no value]
[no value]
VIAGRA
[no value]
VIAGRA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0055.xml
article
77
77
HOW2.0
GRAY MATTER
Poison Light
One of the nastiest substances on Earth creates a beautiful glow
[no value]
[no value]
Theodore Gray
BEING A MAD SCIENTIST can be a thankless job, but every once in a while you get a chance to shine—literally. I recently had that opportunity when working with a TV show to film one of the most beautiful of all chemical phenomena, the cold luminosity of white phosphorus.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0056.xml
advertisement
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0057.xml
article
79
79
HOW2.0
SIMPLE PROJECTS OF THE MONTH
Time-Lapse Camera Stand
A panning platform made from a kitchen timer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STEP 1 Drill a 15/64-inch hole in the center of the dial of a kitchen timer such as Ikea's Stäm model. Insert a ¼-inch-20 set screw. STEP 2 Drill an 11/32-inch-diameter hole in the bottom of the timer. Screw a ⅜-inch bolt or a ⅜-inch tap cutter into the hole to create threads for a ⅜-inch to ¼-inch-20 bushing (a threaded insert that allows the timer to be mounted to a tripod).
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0058.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA
[no value]
THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH DAKOTA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0059.xml
article
80
80
HOW2.0
FROM THE POPSCI DIY ARCHIVES
Kiddie Cannon
June 1955: Carbide Mortar Makes Big Bang
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"This little mortar can be heard for blocks. A thin 3/8-inch-20 nut, soldered over a hole in the bottom of the [juice] can, forms a fitting for the detonator—a model-engine spark plug. The mortar base houses a small ignition system, consisting of two flashlight batteries, a model-airplane spark coil, a 20-microfarad radio condenser and a doorbell button.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0060.xml
article
80
80
HOW2.0
APP OF THE MONTH
GameSalad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
With the free Mac OS X application, users can build, test, and publish videogames without doing any coding. The simple drag-and-drop interface allows aspiring game designers to add new images, sounds and rules to classic arcade templates, or start from scratch to come up with the next great first-person shooter or Angry Birds.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0061.xml
advertisement
80
80
[no value]
[no value]
ROCKAUTO, LLC
[no value]
ROCKAUTO, LLC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0062.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
ZOYSIA FARM NURSERIES
[no value]
ZOYSIA FARM NURSERIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0063.xml
advertisement
82
82,83
[no value]
[no value]
HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS
[no value]
HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0064.xml
article
84
84
fyi
[no value]
Q MY DOG IS A VERY GOOD LISTENER, BUT HOW MUCH CAN HE UNDERSTAND?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Vanessa Dopker
THAT DEPENDS. Dogs aren’t linguists, but they have remarkably good social cognition skills. Daniel Povinelli, a psychologist at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette, tested dogs’ ability to read cues from people. He placed a reward (a scrap of food, for example) under one of two buckets while the dog was out of sight, and he masked both buckets with an odor.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0065.xml
advertisement
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Valentine One
[no value]
Valentine One
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0066.xml
article
85
85
fyi
[no value]
Where is the center of the universe?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Rose Pastore
First, it's important to know that the big bang wasn't an explosion of matter into empty space—it was the rapid expansion of space itself. This means that every single point in the universe appears to be at the center. Think of the universe as an empty balloon with dots on it.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0067.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
MOTHERS
[no value]
MOTHERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0068.xml
advertisement
86
86
[no value]
[no value]
iPage
[no value]
iPage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0069.xml
advertisement
86
86
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0070.xml
article
87
87
fyi
[no value]
Is this glass really half-full?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ryan Bradley
No one is entirely sure. Water has high surface tension, yet the molecules at its surface are unstable, which makes the air-surface interface mysterious and difficult to describe. Satoshi Nihonyanagi, a researcher at a molecular-spectroscopy lab in Japan, studies water and its surface—"specifically probing the interface," he calis it—using isotopically diluted H2O, which doesn't vibrate and is easier to observe.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0071.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: FROGTAPE
[no value]
[no value]
FROGTAPE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0072.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
CIGARS INTERNATIONAL
[no value]
CIGARS INTERNATIONAL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0073.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
MacNeil IP LLC: WeatherTech
[no value]
MacNeil IP LLC
WeatherTech
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0074.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
DR® STUMP GRINDER
[no value]
DR® STUMP GRINDER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0075.xml
advertisement
89
89,90,91,92,93,94,95
[no value]
[no value]
psshowcase
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0076.xml
article
96
96
FROM THE POPULAR SCIENCE ARCHIVES
[no value]
A Mystery 140 Years in the Making
Something odd in our archives
[no value]
[no value]
The Editors
The complete back-issues of this magazine—all 1,680 of them—are stored in a walk-in closet in our New York offices. We don't often visit the place. It's musty and locked, and only one person keeps a key. But to put together this issue, which arrives the same month that Edward L. Youmans founded Popular Science Monthly in 1872, we spent many hours there.
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0077.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
TAMRON
[no value]
TAMRON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0078.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Allstate
[no value]
Allstate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20120501_0280_005_0079.xml