Issue: 20120201

Wednesday, February 1, 2012
FEBRUARY 2012
2
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280
Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0001.xml
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Mazda
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Mazda
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0002.xml
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1&1
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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contents
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0004.xml
masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0006.xml
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GEICO
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GEICO
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0007.xml
article
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PEER REVIEW
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Hit List
TOP-SECRET TUNNEL?
CAVE CARS
FACE DOWN
CORRECTION
Ranking
POPULAR SCIENCE
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I read with interest the story "Longest Train Tunnel" [Best of What's New, December 2011]. The only problem is that nowhere in the article did it say how long the tunnel is. Military secret? Or is it just "really long"? Tom Wright Lakewood, Calif.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0008.xml
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6,7
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Symantec Corporation.: Norton
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Symantec Corporation
Norton
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0009.xml
article
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MEGAPIXELS
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First Flight
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Amber Williams
Last October, near Karlsruhe, Germany, Thomas Senkel completed the first manned flight of an electric multicopter, flying it 10 feet off the ground for 90 seconds. Senkel, a physicist and paraglider pilot who helped found the company E-volo to build the craft, invented it after seeing a YouTube video of a German hobbyist's remotecontrolled hexacopter in action.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0010.xml
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Advertisements
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neat
DESKTOP SCANNER
neat
MOBILE SCANNER
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0011.xml
review
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what's new
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Robo Blocks
Create robots from square puzzle pieces
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Modular Robotics Cubelets KT06 Kit
$150
Bryan Gardiner
Building and programming robots is no small feat. Just to get a robot to perform a simple action—say, turning when someone claps—can require hours of coding. Cubelets make robot creation as simple as stacking blocks. Each 1.6-inch cube contains an eight-megahertz processor preprogrammed to execute one function.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0012.xml
article
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what's new
the goods
A Dozen Great Ideas in Gear
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Typical speaker docks recharge only iPhones or iPods. iHome's iC16 is the first dock that uses a USB port to link with and charge Android handsets as well. Listeners can also sync the speaker with an app that they can use to program music to play at set times, such as before bed or as an alarm in the morning.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0013.xml
review
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what's new
TECH TREND
Li-ion Landscaping
36-volt batteries give electric yard tools the power to compete with gas-guzzlers
THE TREND
THE BENEFIT
LEAF BLOWER
CHAIN SAW
LAWN TRIMMER
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Stihl BGA 85
$500
Most blowers draw air through vents in their sides and force it to turn 90 degrees before blowing it out, an inefficient route that wastes power. Instead, the Stihl blower pulls air from a rear vent and channels it straight out of the nozzle, saving energy. On its highest speed, users get 385 cubic feet of air per minute, comparable to gas-powered blowers.
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Oregon PowerNow CS250E
$500
Even months after charging, Oregon's lithiumion-powered chain saw will start instantly. It can cut a three-inch-diameter branch into 250 slices on one charge. And if it senses too much stress, it shuts itself off, preventing wear on the motor.
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Black Er Decker Cordless String Trimmer/Edger LST136
$170
Black & Decker's latest edger is 28 percent lighter than a gas model. Users can run it with less power for touch-ups or more for overgrown weeds and can cut a mile of lawn edges on a single charge.
Max Fischer
Battery-powered backyard tools have typically topped out at 18 volts—plenty for light work but not nearly enough for cutting fat branches, trimming dense grass, or blowing piles of wet leaves. Manufacturers are now introducing 36-volt lithium-ion-powered tools that can handle those more-demanding tasks, often as well as gas-powered ones can.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0014.xml
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Kowa Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.: LIVALO
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Kowa Pharmaceuticals America, Inc.
LIVALO
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0015.xml
review
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17
what's new
DREAM MACHINE
Seventh Eleven
The reinvented Porsche 911 is lighter, faster and more efficient
Porsche
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Porsche
911 Carrera
$83,050
Lawrence Ulrich
Since unveiling the 911 in 1963, Porsche has built many dozens of variations, ranging from convertibles to racing editions to subtly tweaked versions distinguishable only to board members of the Porsche Club of America. Full-blown generational revamps have been rarer.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0016.xml
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FORD
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FORD
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0017.xml
review
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what's new
THE SETUP
Wi-Fidelity
Everything necessary to get a multi-room wireless stereo system running
Wireless router
Smartphone
Computer
Speaker
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D-Link Amplifi HD Media Router 3000 (DIR-857)
$170
D-Link's Amplifi prioritizes music and video streams so they'll play without sputtering, even if a bandwidth-heavy task, like a photo upload, is running at the same time. Outside the house, the Amplifi provides remote access to music. With an MP3-loaded hard drive plugged into the router's USB, listeners can play songs through a cloudbased smartphone app.
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HTC Rezound
$300
The HTC Rezound comes with the sharpest screen of any phone (342 pixels per inch, to be exact)—handy when navigating Altec's remote-control app or reading liner notes on the 4.3-inch screen. When used with headphones as a media player, the Android handset's audio equalization is pre-tuned for the deep bass of most pop and hip-hop.
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HP Pavilion HPE Phoenix
$1,150
HP's Phoenix has enough storage (160 gigabytes to start) to hold an entire music library, enough power for users to mix and edit their own original songs, and a one-gigabyte graphics engine-ideal for rendering high-def games and video. All the while, the liquid-cooled tower can easily handle continuous audio streaming to Altec's speaker.
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Altec Lansing MN5000
$500
The 100-watt MN5000 serves as both the amplifier and central speaker in a multi-room sound system. Over Wi-Fi, it combines songs on a user's hard drive with music from Pandora and other services into one mega-library. With a phone app, listeners can browse the catalog, choose the rooms in which music will play (the MN5000 syncs with other Altec gear), and adjust volume.
Tim Gideon
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0018.xml
article
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what's new
OUTLOOK
The Power of Speech
Siri is not just a voice, It's a brain—and It's capable of controlling more than a phone
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Corinne Iozzio
WHEN SIRI DEBUTED last October, it became the most intuitive voicerecognition software available. But Siri is more than just a speech-control app; it is a complete, artificially intelligent user interface. What Apple calls its “personal assistant” requires no programming and continually improves with use, as remote servers back up its ever-expanding vocabulary and understanding of natural conversation.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0019.xml
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MakeTheConnection
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MakeTheConnection
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0020.xml
article
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HEADLINES
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A New Standard
How disposable, networked satellites will democratize space
How to ready a CubeSat for space
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Jacob Ward
IN 1999, PROFESSORS Robert Twiggs of Stanford University and Jordi Puig-Suari of California Polytechnic State University began to standardize the satellite business. They designed a small orbital unit-a four-inch cube with little metal feet-that was wide enough for solar cells, basing their design on a plastic display box for Beanie Babies.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0021.xml
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Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Co.
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Santa Fe Natural Tobacco Co.
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0022.xml
article
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HEADLINES
THE BIG FIX
Freeing the Fish
What it takes to mend a dammed-up ecosystem
Remove dines Canyon Dam
Plant Trees
Remove Elwha Dam
Release Sediment
Restore Fish
Keeping Commerce Flowing
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Tim Newcomb
In 2010, engineers in the U.S. dismantled 60 dams, helping to reclaim rivers for wildlife. Most of these dams were small, though; removing large ones poses a much bigger challenge. In September, the National Park Service started the largest-ever dam-removal project in the U.S., on the 210-foot (the tallest ever removed) and 108-foot dams on the Flwha River in Olympic National Park in Washington State.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0023.xml
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HEADLINES
WORK SPACE
Inside the Landslide
Growing snow to help predict avalanches
MEASURING STABILITY
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Joshua Saul
Ed Adams, an engineering professor at Montana State University, used to study avalanches from inside a fortified shack. He would attach his shack to a boulder on a mountain, set small explosives in the snowpack, and trigger an avalanche, surrounding the shack.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0024.xml
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HEADLINES
ROUGH SKETCH
Little Light Traps
"We made carbon nanotubes that are blacker than anything else
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Flora Lichtman
OUR MATERIAL absorbs more than 99 percent of visible and ultraviolet light and 98 percent of infrared light. It’s at least 10 times as good at capturing light as black paint, so we can use it in telescopes, where stray light can contaminate measurements.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0025.xml
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CARAVAN
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CARAVAN
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0026.xml
article
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HEADLINES
THE ANNOTATED MACHINE
Hover Craft
How D-Dalus takes flight
ROTOR ASSEMBLIES
FRICTIONLESS BEARINGS
AUTOMATIC STABILIZATION
ADVANCED NAVIGATION
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Kaitlin Miller
Last year, the Austrian engineering firm IAT21 set out to construct a flying machine that floated like a hummingbird, traveled as fast as a jet, was as quiet as a hot-air balloon, and was simple enough that a car mechanic could repair it. The company's working prototype, called D-Dalus, is roughly five feet by three feet square and can lift about 100 pounds.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0027.xml
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Timepieces International Inc
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Timepieces International Inc
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0028.xml
article
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HEADLINES
THE PUBLIC SPHERE
Uncertainty Principles
Should scientists go to jail over their results?
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Juliet Lapidos
ON MARCH 31, 2009, a panel of scientists and civil servants met to assess the risk presented by a recent series of tremors in the Abruzzo region of Italy. They concluded that a major seismic event was unlikely. Soon thereafter, Bernardo De Bernardinis, the vice-director of Italy’s Department of Civil Protection, the organization that put together the panel, told reporters that citizens should not worry, and even agreed with a journalist who suggested that people relax with a glass of wine.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0029.xml
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ShoesOnSteroids
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ShoesOnSteroids
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0030.xml
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Features
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Did Global Warming Destroy My Hometown?
WARMING TRENDS
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SETH FLETCHER
The tornado that destroyed my hometown was born in an otherwise unremarkable atmospheric collision over the American Central Plains. On May 22, 2011, a geostationary satellite 22,300 miles overhead recorded a large collection of cloud lines drifting over southeastern Kansas.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0031.xml
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THE FUTURE OF FUN
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GRAVITY HAS ALWAYS BEEN A MAJOR PART OF MY LIFE
PART I ORIGINS
PART II NEW WAY'S TO FALL DOWN
PART III LOOKING FOR MORE
AN ORAL HISTORY OF EXTREME SPORTS
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PAUL KVINTA
In the waning decades of the 20th century, men from New Zealand began inventing new ways to injure themselves. They jumped from bridges with elastic bands attached to their ankles, ran class-5 rapids without boats, and fixed themselves to large kites to achieve great speed.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0032.xml
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THE FUTURE OF FUN
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State of Play
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Geoff Manaugh
Playgrounds are competing for kids' time and losing. Nearly 25 percent of children ages 9 through 13 have no free time for physical activity, and a child is six times as likely to play a videogame as to ride a bike. The playgrounds of tomorrow must offer something that even the most enticing virtual offerings cannot: real spaces that look at least as amazing as anything virtual.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0034.xml
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THE FUTURE OF FUN
CONCEPTS & PROTOTYPES
Zero-Gravity Roller Coaster
A $50-million plan to make riders weightless, for eight long seconds
INSIDE THE RIDE
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Ben Austen
KINGDA KA, the tallest roller coaster on Earth, drops its passengers a life-flashing 418 feet. Ferrari World’s Formula Rossa, the fastest, literally takes riders’ breath away at speeds of up to 150 mph. Though thrilling, these are phenomena of degree, not kind.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0035.xml
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THE FUTURE OF FUN
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Game of Life
WILL KEEPING SCORE OF ABSOLUTELY EVERYTHING MAKE YOU A BETTER PERSON? AN EXPERIMENT IN SELF-IMPROVEMENT
DAY ONE
DAY TWO
DAY THREE
DAY FOUR
DAY FIVE
DAY SIX
DAY SEVEN
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Matthew Shaer
The experiment began at 11 a.m. in my bedroom in Brooklyn. I bought an app from the iTunes store called EpicWin, a fantasy-themed game designed to improve users’ lives by motivating them to accomplish real-world goals with virtual-world rewards.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0036.xml
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THE FUTURE OF FUN
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ENGINEERING THE Ultimate TOY
What six inventors would build-if money, safety and the very laws of physics were no object
Print-a-Pet
Projecting Fantasy
2-D to 3-D
Living Blocks
Liquid Fireworks
Drivable Dinosaur
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"The personal pet creator would be the size of a mini-fridge and have a touchscreen interface. You would choose a robotic platform from a menu and then start adding features: How many legs? Is it aquatic? Amphibious? Avian? What length of fur or color of scales?
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0037.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
YOU BUILT WHAT?!
Mobile Gaming
An engineer puts an arcade cabinet on wheels
HOW IT WORKS
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Gregory Mone
IN THE LATE 1980s, millions of arcadeaddicted kids sat in the faux racing seats of Sega’s OutRun videogame, grabbed the rubber-covered wheel of the imitation Ferrari Testarossa, pressed down on the pedals, and imagined they were roaring down the street.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0038.xml
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HOW 2.0
REPURPOSED TECH
Pocket Arcade
How to get yesterday's games on today's mobile devices
THE BEST RETRO GAME EMULATORS
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Adam Dachis
Fans of classic videogames have long been able to mimic old game systems on their computers using apps called emulators. Now, smartphones and tablets can also run them. With the right emulator and game files (downloaded separately), virtual versions of the Nintendo Entertainment System, Sega Genesis and other consoles—as well as dozens of vintage arcade titles that can't be found as standalone downloads— will be available anywhere.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0039.xml
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QuietRelief
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QuietRelief
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0040.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
GRAY MATTER
Getting the Lead Out
Seemingly harmless children's toys have long been made from highly hazardous materials
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Theodore Gray
Among the most strictly enforced consumer-protection laws are those banning lead in toys. Lead is an insidious poison: It's slow-acting and results not in immediately noticeable effects like rashes but in behavioral problems and a slightly lowered IQ.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0041.xml
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HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0042.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
TECH SUPPORT
Make Your Own Fun
Do-lt-yourself projects that deliver endless hours of play
1 Sledding winch
2 Oversized Operation
3 Videogame robot
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Amber Williams
Two years ago, Web developer Josh Smith and telecom engineer Brian Freed took their families sledding at an old ski resort in Pennsylvania but found that the 45-minute walk to the top of the 1,200-foot hill limited their runs. By the next winter, they had a solution to the problem: a homemade sledding lift.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0043.xml
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ROCKAUTO
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ROCKAUTO
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0044.xml
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epiloglaser
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0045.xml
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Advertisement: Vitali-T-Aid
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Vitali-T-Aid
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fyi
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Q Will listening to Mozart really make me smarter?
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Joseph A. Bernstein
Kaitlin Miller
Amber Williams
YES, BUT NO MORE than listening to Justin Bieber. The misconception that there’s something unique about Mozart’s ability to increase brainpower began in 1993, with a paper in Nature. Neurobiologists Gordon Shaw, Frances Rauscher and Katherine Ky of the University of California at Irvine found that students who listened to 10 minutes of a Mozart sonata demonstrated a temporary increase in spatial-temporal reasoning, as measured by an IQ test.
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SunSetter Products
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SunSetter Products
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eheat.com: envi
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eheat.com
envi
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0050.xml
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Smile Train
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Smile Train
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0051.xml
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FrogTape
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FrogTape
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Advertisement: PHOTO HUNT HD
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PHOTO HUNT HD
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ThelronShop
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ThelronShop
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0054.xml
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Valentine Research, Inc.: The Radar Locator
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Valentine Research, Inc.
The Radar Locator
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0055.xml
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POPULAR SCIENCE DIRECT
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PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0057.xml
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HERE WE GO WITH A RIDICULOUS
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POPSCI FOLD-IN
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In this issue, the editois of POPULAR SCIENCE have CalefuILli Consideled the future of fun. But what about its past? We Can't be impartiaL about our own efforts to amuse readers, so we asked MAD magazine's ALjaffee, distinguished inventor of the "fold-in," for his expert opinion.
PopularScience_20120201_0280_002_0058.xml
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amsoil
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HYUNDAI
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HYUNDAI
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