Issue: 20111101

Tuesday, November 1, 2011
NOVEMBER 2011
5
True
279
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1,03
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0001.xml
advertisement
0_2
0_2,1
[no value]
[no value]
Dow: optimism
[no value]
Dow
optimism
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0002.xml
advertisement
2
2
[no value]
[no value]
Goldman Sachs
[no value]
Goldman Sachs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0003.xml
tableOfContents
03
03
[no value]
[no value]
CONTENTS
THIS MONTH'S GUIDE TO INNOVATION AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0004.xml
article
04
04
FROM THE EDITOR
[no value]
NOTHING PERSONAL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS WE WERE putting together this special issue on how Big Data is supercharging our ability to understand and transform the world, I was struck by the sheer range of ways that data itself can be understood. Data is information. It's numbers. It's bits.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0005.xml
masthead
04
04
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0006.xml
advertisement
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
FUJIFILM: X 10
[no value]
FUJIFILM
X 10
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0007.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
VF Jeanswear Inc.: Lee
[no value]
VF Jeanswear Inc.
Lee
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0008.xml
article
7
7
THE INBOX
[no value]
THE FUTURE OF THE CAR
Predictive Power
It's Just a Little Guy
Dog Pound
Cheat Sheet
CORRECTION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
In September, we explored the automotive laboratories of Silicon Valley, assessed the future of education, and showed how to build a drive-in theater at home. Surprisingly, the most spirited reader responses came in defense of a discontinued compact car, the Geo Metro.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0009.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0010.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0011.xml
advertisement
8
8
[no value]
[no value]
Chevron: Human Energy
[no value]
Chevron
Human Energy
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0012.xml
advertisement
9
9
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0013.xml
article
10
10,11
[no value]
[no value]
CODE BREAKERS
Scientists unravel gene networks to learn how worm gonads grow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The roundworm Caenorhabditis elegans has been a staple of biology research for almost 50 years, but, thanks to advances in molecular-biology techniques, scientists are just now able to study how multiple genes (C. elegans has 20,470 genes in its genome) act in concert to produce complex organs.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0014.xml
advertisement
12
12,13
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
pbs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0015.xml
advertisement
14
14
[no value]
[no value]
TOYOTA: prius
[no value]
TOYOTA
prius
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0016.xml
article
15
15
WHAT'S NEW
[no value]
HOT STUFF
Warm your home, without burning it down
[no value]
[no value]
SUSANNAH F. LOCKE
Space heaters cause approximately 20,000 home fires and 400 deaths in the U.S. every year, often because of the scorching devices' unfortunate tendency to set flammable objects within a three-foot radius ablaze. The Dyson Hot, on the other hand, stays at a safe temperature while still heating rooms faster than any other heater.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0017.xml
article
16
16,18
WHAT'S NEW
[no value]
THE goods
A dozen great ideas in gear
Doubling Sights
Super-Growler
Tent Light
Long Life
Flash Forward
Stink Buster
Hand Scan
Dust Ball
Quick Play
Game Goggles
Ear Grips
Level Headed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0018.xml
advertisement
17
17
[no value]
[no value]
IBM
[no value]
IBM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0019.xml
advertisement
19
19
[no value]
[no value]
IBM
[no value]
IBM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0020.xml
article
20
20
WHAT'S NEW
COMING SOON
ELECTRIC CONVERSION
After years of baby steps, BMW will enter the plug-in-vehicle race
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN VOELCKER
It’s been hard in recent years to tell how seriously BMW takes electric cars. In 2009, BMW-owned Mini put 600 experimental electric Mini Coopers into test fleets, but the cars were clunky and the program was beset with logistical problems.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0021.xml
advertisement
21
21
[no value]
[no value]
SAMSUNG
[no value]
SAMSUNG
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0022.xml
article
22
22
WHAT'S NEW
IT'S ABOUT TIME
THE CASH KILLER
Google's payment app makes your phone as good as gold
HOW MOBILE PAYMENTS WORK
IN RELATED NEWS: YOUR PHONE AS A TRAINER
[no value]
[no value]
CORINNE IOZZIO
In 2003, MasterCard introduced PayPass, a system in which a credit card outfitted with a near-field communication (NFC) chip could be passed within a couple inches of a reader to pay without swiping. Google Wallet, a new app for Android smartphones, takes NFC a step further, allowing users to make purchases with a wave of a smartphone.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0023.xml
advertisement
23
23
[no value]
[no value]
BOSE
[no value]
BOSE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0024.xml
review
24
24
WHAT'S NEW
TESTED
THE CUTTING EDGE
Two new saw blades that easily tear through lumber, asphalt and even nails
THE TECH
THE TEST
THE RESULTS
dewalt
[no value]
dewalt
[no value]
$10
As the DeWalt blade works its way through cuts, eight resinfilled slots absorb the vibration that's usually transferred to the arm of the person holding it. To help the blade glide easily across rough materials, DeWalt glazes the blade's teeth with a Teflon-like coating. $10; dewaltdewalt.com
dewalt
[no value]
$10
The Daredevil's cutting edges also have a nonstick coating to inhibit friction. Meanwhile, Bosch reinforced its 7.25-inch steel blade with manganese, an element that slightly raises the metal's melting point so that it won't warp and wobble during long cutting sessions. $10; boschtools.com
MAX FISCHER
We tested the blades on the same 15-amp heavy-duty circular saw. First we made 71 eight-foot cuts through a 2.5-inch-thick stack of plywood with each blade. After neither one so much as flinched, we pushed them through two layers of asphalt shingles sandwiched between two-inch-thick pressure-treated boards interlaced with 15-gauge nails.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0025.xml
advertisement
25
25
[no value]
[no value]
T.RowePrice
[no value]
T.RowePrice
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0026.xml
review
26
26
WHAT'S NEW
TECH TREND
WIRELESS WATCHMEN
Cell-connected home monitors put security within reach, no matter where you are
THE TREND
WHY NOW
HOW YOU'LL BENEFIT
Garage-door opener
Home-automation control
Smoke alarm
craftsman
[no value]
craftsman
Craftsman AssureLink
$290
Forgetting to close the door to an attached garage can leave a home vulnerable to theft. The AssureLink garage-door opener allows users to check the door in a password-protected app and close it remotely. Craftsman AssureLink $290; craftsman.com
craftsman
2GIG Go!Control Panel
$500
Controllable via the Web, the Go!Control console acts as the hub of a DIY wireless security system. The panel works with accessories, such as motion sensors and cameras, over ultra-high-frequency radio. If a yard motion sensor goes off, it could lock doors and send you a video feed. 2GIG Go!Control Panel $500 (est.); 2gig.com
craftsman
FireText Smoke Alarm
$145
The FireText sends a text message to you and up to three neighbors when it senses a problem. The alarm works with prepaid AT&T and T-Mobile SIM cards and draws so little power that you'll only have to change the batteries once a year. FireText Smoke Alarm $145; firetext.me
SARAH FECHT
Home security devices that text, e-mail, or stream video online, enabling users to monitor and control their abode from afar As telephone landlines become obsolete, so do the hardwired security systems that rely on them. Cellular modems and Wi-Fi receivers are now so affordable that manufacturers can install them in security devices for a nominal cost.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0027.xml
advertisement
27
27,28
[no value]
[no value]
Livalo
[no value]
Livalo
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0028.xml
review
29
29
WHAT'S NEW
TIMELINE
CHEATING DEPTH
How watching 3-D will become as natural as staring out the window
NOW: LIGHTER GLASSES
SOON: LIGHTER GLASSES, BETTER PICTURE
LATER: NO GLASSES AT ALL
lg
[no value]
lg
LG LW9800 Nano full LED Cinema 3D HDTV
$3,800
Instead of flickering the screen between left and right images, as is necessary with active glasses, LG’s system puts both images onscreen at once. A filter polarizes each alternating horizontal line on the screen to match the polarization of pairs of passive glasses. The trade-off with this type of 3-D: Each eye receives only half of a high-def image-540 horizontal lines per frame, instead of 1,080. LG LW9800 Nano full LED Cinema 3D HDTV $3,800 (includes four pairs of glasses); lg.com
lg
RealD RDZ 3D
RealD, a company that makes movie theaters 3-D, is developing a screen that will work with polarized glasses without halving resolution. While the TV flickers at 120 hertz between left and right images, a polarizing filter shifts with it, directing the light alternately toward either side, providing each eye with a full 1080p picture. The display will pop up in Samsung computer monitors next year and HDTVs soon after. RealD RDZ 3D Price not set; reald.com
lg
MIT HR3D
Current glasses-free 3-D TV prototypes use a static, thinly striped LCD overlay to point images left and right, but such displays have limited viewing angles and can come out looking like cheap holograms. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Media Lab have refined that technique, replacing the old pinstripe overlay with a matrix of thousands of tiny slits. A processor pre-scans the images to identify the subject of each frame. The system then configures the overlay to match the contours of the picture, so there’s the illusion of depth only where it’s needed. A Mini Cooper's roof, for example, gains a more pronounced curve. MIT HR3D media.mit.edu
STEVE MORGENSTERN
3-D TV is still experiencing some growing pains, in large part because of its reliance on bulky, uncomfortable and expensive active-shutter glasses. That's now changing. A new wave of 3-D sets are using lighter glasses to make immersing yourself in the third dimension less cumbersome.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0029.xml
advertisement
30
30
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Hankook Tire America Corp
VENTUS ST
Hankook Tire America Corp
VENTUS AS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0030.xml
article
31
31,32,33
ESSAY
THE DATA AGE SPECIAL ISSUE
THE GLORY OF BIG DATA
Suddenly, we can know the world completely. Next, we reprogram it
ADVANCE OF THE DATA CIVILIZATION
THE SCALE
[no value]
[no value]
JUAN ENRIQUEZ
Late in the first day of this year's TED Conference, its understated curator, Chris Anderson, took the stage and made a pronouncement. "The computing power in some of the things that we're seeing is really startling," he said. "It feels to me as if things have suddenly notched up a level in an unexpected way.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0031.xml
advertisement
34
34,35
[no value]
[no value]
ecomagination
[no value]
ecomagination
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0032.xml
article
36
36,37
BY THE NUMBERS
THE DATA AGE
The Data-Centric Universe
How information makes the world a bigger place
[no value]
[no value]
MARA GRUNBAUM
Before the telescope was invented in 1608, our picture of the universe consisted of six planets, our moon, the sun and any stars we could see in the Milky Way galaxy. But as our light-gathering capabilities have grown, so too have the boundaries of the visible universe.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0033.xml
article
38
38,39,40,41,42,43,45,49,97
FIELDWORK
THE DATA AGE
THE SANTA CRUZ EXPERIMENT
Can a criminal act be prevented before it begins? By turning its crime problem into a data problem, one city is reinventing police work for the 21st century
TOMORROW'S CRIMES TODAY
[no value]
[no value]
KALEE THOMPSON
For a city of 60,000, that's about average. And so are the challenges facing its police force. Since 2001, the SCPD has laid off 10 of its 104 officers, even as the city's population grew by 5,500. The department now has to do more with less, which is the story of just about every police force in America.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0034.xml
advertisement
44
44
[no value]
[no value]
Rosetta Stone Ltd.
[no value]
Rosetta Stone Ltd.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0035.xml
advertisement
46
46,47,48
[no value]
[no value]
Enbrel
[no value]
Enbrel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0036.xml
article
50
50,51
BY THE NUMBERS
THE DATA AGE
The Rise of the Machines
They are cheaper, smaller, and way, way faster
POWER DENSITY
PORTABLE POWER
[no value]
[no value]
RITCHIE S. KING
Charles Xavier Thomas de Colmar invented the first commercially successful mechanical calculator in 1820. It was 100 years before mechanical calculators gave way, in the 1930s, to electromechanical calculators, which then quickly gave way to the first general-purpose electronic computer, ENIAC, in 1946.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0037.xml
article
52
52,53,54,55,56
PICKS
THE DATA AGE
WHERE DATA LIVES
A database isn't a vault—it's a garden. The 10 most amazing among them do more than store knowledge. They provide researchers with new ways to solve long-cold crimes, predict economic recessions, and save lives
COMBINED DNA INDEX SYSTEM
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF LIFE
FAOSTAT
THE GENOGRAPHIC PROJECT
INTERNATIONAL PANEL ON CLIMATE CHANGE DATA DISTRIBUTION CENTRE
MD:PRO
OKCUPID OKTRENDS
SLOAN DIGITAL SKY SURVEY DATABASE
THE WAYBACK MACHINE
WORLDCAT
[no value]
[no value]
RENA MARIE PACELLA
Solving cold cases with genetic data In 1990, when the FBI began building its master DNA database—the Combined DNA Index System, or CODIS—investigators could generally use DNA analysis only for cases in which they possessed both crime-scene evidence and a specific suspect.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0038.xml
article
54
54,55
PICKS
[no value]
GREEN BITS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KATHERINE BAGLEY
Data storage takes power, and the world is storing about 40 percent more data every year. U.S. data centers now draw about 2 percent of the electricity used here—enough to light one fifth of the country. By some estimates, data centers worldwide will emit more carbon dioxide than airlines within a decade.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0039.xml
article
56
56
PICKS
[no value]
THE DATABASE OF DATABASES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
In 1989 the English engineer Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web by linking together documents on the Internet using hypertext. Now he plans to create the world's largest and most useful database: Linked Data. Just as today's Web links HTML documents, Linked Data will connect information found in open databases on the Web.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0040.xml
advertisement
57
57
[no value]
[no value]
Tip Top SHOES: gravity defyer
[no value]
Tip Top SHOES
gravity defyer
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0041.xml
article
58
58,59,60
ESSAY
THE DATA AGE
THE UNSPLITTABLE BIT
As scientists cache, crunch and quantize the world, will they ever reach the end? (Answer: Yes)
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES GLEICK
A HARD LESSON to learn was the difference between a message and the paper on which it was written. The telegraph was a great teacher. The information had to be divorced from the physical object. It was abstracted— encoded, first as dots and dashes and then again as electrical impulses, to be sent along wires and, soon, beamed through the ether.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0042.xml
article
61
61
ESSAY
[no value]
PARTICLE MAN
Seth Lloyd, director of the Center for Extreme Quantum Information Theory at MIT, answers some (very) big questions
[no value]
[no value]
Flora Lichtman
Q How are quantum computers different from ordinary ones? Quantum computers operate at the smallest, most fundamental levels allowed by physics. On a regular computer, a single bit of information is represented by a whole bunch of electrons.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0043.xml
article
62
62,63,64,66
PROFILE
THE DATA AGE
THIS MAN COULD RULE THE WORLD
How Albert-László Barabási went from mapping systems to controlling them
[no value]
[no value]
GREGORY MONE
In 1736 the Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler ended a debate among the citizens of Königsberg, Prussia, by drawing a graph. The Pregel River divided the city, now Kaliningrad, Russia, into four sections. Seven bridges connected them. Could a person cross all seven without walking over the same one twice?
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0044.xml
article
64
64
PROFILE
[no value]
A UNIVERSE OF HUBS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To illustrate how hubs act as an organizing principle within complex networks, Mauro Martino, a computer scientist and interactive designer in Albert-László Barabási's lab, plotted 325,729 Web pages in the University of Notre Dame Web domain [green nodes].
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0045.xml
advertisement
65
65
[no value]
[no value]
APC
[no value]
APC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0046.xml
advertisement
67
67
[no value]
[no value]
SCOTTEVEST
[no value]
SCOTTEVEST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0047.xml
advertisement
68
68
[no value]
[no value]
Timepieces International Inc: DANIEL STEIGER
[no value]
Timepieces International Inc
DANIEL STEIGER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0048.xml
article
69
69,71,72,73,74
BY THE NUMBERS
THE DATA AGE
Ways of Seeing
A gallery of data visualization
WHERE LOCALS AND TOURISTS GO
WIKIPEDIA EDIT HISTORY, "ABORTION
WHERE BURGER JOINTS RULE
THE MAKING OF A THEORY
EATING EXPENSES ACROSS U.S. CITIES
CROSS-REFERENCES IN THE BIBLE
HOW POPULAR THE NAME
[no value]
[no value]
NATHAN YAU
THE AMOUNT of digital data available to us more than doubles every year, but the amount of time and energy we can devote to understanding it remains the same—and, as anyone who has ever stared at an overstuffed tax table knows, too much information is no less confusing than too little.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0049.xml
advertisement
70
70
[no value]
[no value]
Hyundai Motor America
[no value]
Hyundai Motor America
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0050.xml
advertisement
75
75
[no value]
[no value]
HYUNDAI
[no value]
HYUNDAI
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0051.xml
article
76
76,77,78,92
ESSAY
THE DATA AGE
AND YET... AND YET...
A second take on the ceaseless profusion of data, from a writer of the old school beset by misgivings and by misgivings about his misgivings
[no value]
[no value]
LAWRENCE WESCHLER
I find myself online all the time, mining for data, merrily skipping from one site to the next, passing the time of day after day (and night after night) in scattershot dalliances (sampling this and sampling that in a virtual delirium of free association), deploying my trove of finds in ever more elaborate collages of discovery (or is it recovery?
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0052.xml
advertisement
79
79,80
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE GIFT GUIDE
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE GIFT GUIDE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0053.xml
article
81
81,82
HOW 2.0
[no value]
SPY IN THE SKY
A remote-controlled drone designed to hack into communications systems
HOW IT WORKS
FLIER
INTERCEPTOR
EAVESDROPPER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Richard Perkins and Mike Tassey both worked in information technology in the U.S. Air Force before decamping to various cybersecurity consulting roles in and around the Department of Defense. But throughout their careers they've always considered themselves hackers at heart, which is why they spent the past two years developing the ultimate mobile hacking device: a drone aircraft that can discreetly break into Wi-Fi networks, emit jamming signals, and even pose as a cellphone tower to intercept communications from the ground.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0054.xml
advertisement
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE GIFT GUIDE
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE GIFT GUIDE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0055.xml
article
83
83
HOW 2.0
USE IT BETTER
CRACK SHOTS
Turn an iPad into an accessory that can frame, light, and store professional-looking photographs
THREE NEW JOBS FOR AN IPAD
1 LIGHTS AND PROMPTS
2 REMOTE CONTROL
3 BACKUP AND EDITING
[no value]
[no value]
JAKE LUDINGTON
Photographers have been using Apple's tablet for viewing and sharing photos since it came out, but the device can also be a useful tool for enhancing shoots in the studio and on location. With the right apps and, in some cases, a few additional accessories, the iPad can work as a remote for setting up shots, an easy-to-maneuver light source, a second screen for editing, and more.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0056.xml
advertisement
84
84,85
[no value]
[no value]
RadioShack
[no value]
RadioShack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0057.xml
article
86
86
HOW 2.0
GRAY MATTER
FIRE BIRD
Deep-frying a turkey can be a delicious Thanksgiving treat— or a deadly conflagration
WARNING
[no value]
[no value]
THEODORE GRAY
Oil and water don't mix: It's an old saying, but it's never more true than when you're talking about a pot of hot cooking oil and the moisture condensed on the surface of a frozen turkey. It's pretty incredible the amount of fire that simple combination can create.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0058.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Gorilla Glue Company
[no value]
Gorilla Glue Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0059.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
ShurTech Brands: FROGTAPE
[no value]
ShurTech Brands
FROGTAPE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0060.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
envi
[no value]
envi
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0061.xml
article
88
88
HOW 2.0
ASK A GEEK
WHAT FEATURES WILL THE NEXT GENERATION OF SMARTPHONES HAVE?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
One of the most significant changes might be in speed, says Avi Greengart, the research director for consumer devices at market-intelligence firm Current Analysis. Carriers are rolling out faster 4G LTE (Long-Term Evolution) networks, and hardware manufacturers will soon produce smartphones with powerful multicore processors.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0062.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
MacNeil AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED: WeatherTech
[no value]
MacNeil AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED
WeatherTech
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0063.xml
article
89
89
How 2.0
TECH SUPPORT
MARSHALL'S PLANS
TUBING
GAROLITE BOARD (A.K.A. "G-10")
CABLE CLAMPS
SOLENOID VALVES
PANEL LAMPS
[no value]
[no value]
VIN MARSHALL
When I'm building something weird—my pedal-powered Panzer, for instance—I have to pull together all sorts of obscure parts. Over the years I've noticed that I continually reuse some of them in project after project. Here are the five that I can't live (or work) without.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0064.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
BELTRONICS: PERFORMANCE RULES
[no value]
BELTRONICS
PERFORMANCE RULES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0065.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
EdgeCraft Corp.
[no value]
EdgeCraft Corp.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0066.xml
article
90
90,91
FYI
[no value]
STUFF YOU JUST NEED TO KNOW
Q WHY DO WE GET GOOSE BUMPS AND CHILLS WHEN WE'RE SCARED?
Can humans trigger earthquakes?
Why do old married couples look alike?
[no value]
[no value]
SARAH FECHT
NICK STATT
MADHUMITA VENKATARAMANAN
A For the same reason cats fluff up when they're threatened. "The general principle is, if you are going to be attacked, try to look as big as you can," says David Huron, a musicologist at Ohio State University. People don't have as much hair as cats, but goose bumps are a holdover from when we were furrier.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0067.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
Valentine Research, Inc.
[no value]
Valentine Research, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0068.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
Davis Instruments: Vantage Vue
[no value]
Davis Instruments
Vantage Vue
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0069.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
GLOBAL MEDIA EXPLORER
[no value]
GLOBAL MEDIA EXPLORER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0070.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Vitali-T-Aid
[no value]
[no value]
Vitali-T-Aid
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0071.xml
advertisement
94
94,95
[no value]
[no value]
HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0072.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
SmileTrain
[no value]
SmileTrain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0073.xml
advertisement
97
97,98,99,101
[no value]
[no value]
psshowcase
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0074.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
BIE Health Products
[no value]
BIE Health Products
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0075.xml
advertisement
102
102,103
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE DIRECT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0076.xml
article
104
104
THE FUTURE THEN
[no value]
138 Years of POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
In 2009, POPULAR SCIENCE worked with Google to digitize the magazine's archives back to its inception in 1872, transforming 1,563 issues into mineable data. By counting the frequency of every word and two-word phrase in a 1.35-gigabyte file containing the full text from those issues, data visualizers Jer Thorp and Mark Hansen captured the rise and fall of technological trends throughout the magazine's history.
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0077.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Penske Racing, Inc.: Pennzoil Ultra
[no value]
Penske Racing, Inc.
Pennzoil Ultra
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0078.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
[no value]
American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20111101_0279_005_0079.xml