Issue: 20100701

Thursday, July 1, 2010
JULY 2010
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Wednesday, December 3, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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The Dow Chemical Company
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The Dow Chemical Company
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PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0004.xml
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CONTENTS
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POPSCI
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dyson
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Canon U.S.A., Inc.
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Canon U.S.A., Inc.
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FROM THE EDITOR
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OIL, TECHNOLOGY AND DISASTER
The oil industry has been using the same basic cleanup tech for decades.
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MARK JANNOT
WHEN AN EXPLOSION erupted on the Deepwater Horizon oil platform off the coast of Louisiana on April 20, we were roughly three weeks away from sending this issue, our Future of the Environment extravaganza, to the printer. A few days later, after the platform collapsed and the reality of over 200,000 gallons of oil pouring daily into the Gulf of Mexico hit home, and as we watched BP make one futile attempt after another to stanch the flow, I asked a couple of editors here to look into how we could cover the debacle in a PopScI-appropriate way.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0012.xml
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Canon
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Canon
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OTHER STUFF
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THE INBOX
Robot Chauffeurs
The Battery Conundrum
Inspiring Rocket Scientists Since 1872
CORRECTION
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IN RESPONSE to May's special issue on the future of the car, readers were enthusiastic about the promise of robot cars to alleviate traffic and about the newest crop of electric vehicles as a means to finally tame our gas habit. Of course, as one reader pointed out, the future can be too intoxicating.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0014.xml
masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0016.xml
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Volkswagen of America, Inc.: Tiguan
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Volkswagen of America, Inc.
Tiguan
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PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0017.xml
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MEGAPIXELS
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NEW VISIONS
Inexpensive cataract surgery is restoring sight in South Asia
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ALESSANDRA CALDERIN
In February, Raj Kaliya Dhanuk lay on an operating table in Nepal with weights on her eyes, preparing to undergo cataract surgery. The weights help reduce pressure within the eyeballs before surgery, which makes the procedure easier. During the operation that followed, Sanduk Ruit, the co-director of the Himalayan Cataract Project, removed Dhanuk’s clouded ocular lenses, the structures in the eye that focus light, and replaced them with synthetic ones.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0018.xml
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MEGAPIXELS
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STARTLINE HARVEST
The U.K.'s World Expo pavilion redesigns nature
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ALESSANDRA CALDERIN
These acrylic rods make up the Seed Cathedral, the centerpiece of the U.K. Pavilion at the 2010 World Expo in Shanghai, China. Encased at the tip of each 25-foot-long rod are seeds provided by Chinas Kunming Institute of Botany. Sixty-six feet tall and consisting of 60,000 rods, the structure took about four months to install at a rate of approximately 536 rods a day.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0019.xml
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SOPUS Products: Pennzoil
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SOPUS Products
Pennzoil
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PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0020.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
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THE NEXT DIMENSION
A camcorder that lets anyone create 3-D movies
dxgusa
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dxgusa
DXG 5D7V
$600
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With consumers projected to buy 2.5 million 3-D TVs this year, it would be a shame to watch only Blu-rays and sportscasts. A new crop of cameras, like this DXG and models expected from other companies, add another viewing option: home movies.
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WHAT'S NEW
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THE goods
A dozen great ideas in gear
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CORINNE IOZZIO
HzO Holes Plants potted in Aqualok plastic need only a quarter of the water of those in soil. The foamlike material is injected with thousands of small air pockets that, when flooded, hold onto water so it won’t drain out the bottom of the planter.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0022.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
AUTOMOTIVE COMING SOON
FOUR FEARSOME CYLINDERS
Hyundai’s new sedans pack unprecedented power and efficiency into tiny engines
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$30,000
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Despite being the world’s fastest-growing automaker, Hyundai isn’t known for its engine-building prowess. This year, however, the company is rolling out one of the most powerful yet efficient four-cylinders ever produced, putting it on track to become the first carmaker to meet the new federally mandated average fleet fuel-economy standard of 35.5 mpg by 2016.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0023.xml
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Bose Corporation
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Bose Corporation
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PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0024.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
GADGETS TECH REBORN
SET AHEAD
Advanced technology transforms the classic wristwatch—and keeps you on time
seikowatches
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HIGH-RESOLUTION
This prototype shows detailed graphics and text, not just blocky numbers. It’s the first watch to use a high-resolution version of an E Ink display-its 300 dots per inch far outstrip conventional LCD watches and even most e-readers. Yet its lowpower screen and chip let its battery last about two years. Seiko Active Matrix EPD Prototype Price not set (available fall); seikowatches.com
seikowatches
ULTRA-ACCURATE
$300
Butova’s Precisionist watches are among the most accurate in the world, gaining or losing just 10 seconds a year, not the typical 15 a month. They’re regulated by a high-frequency quartz crystal that vibrates 262,144 times a second, eight times the norm. That rate stays ultra-stable because the crystal’s three (instead of two) fork-like prongs resonate off one another to limit the fluctuations that result from changing temperatures. Bulova Precisionist From $300 (Sept.); bulova.com
seikowatches
SHOCKPROOF
$10,900
A collector’s watch that costs 10 grand is worth protecting. And this one can survive a drop from 65 feet, or 24,000 Gs, because four shock-dissipating arms hold its sensitive mechanical gear system in place. They’re filled with an elastic polymer that absorbs large amounts of energy. TAG Heuer Monaco 24 $10,900 (Dec.); tagheuer.com
seikowatches
ECO-POWERED
$1,545
The Pulsomatic is one of the few digital watches fueled by your movements, not a battery. A small generator inside converts the mechanical energy of a swinging weight into electrical energy, which it uses to run the quartz timekeeper and LCD. It can store enough power to last 120 days sitting on your dresser. Hamilton Pulsomatic $1,545 (Oct.); hamiltonwatch.com—LAUREN AARONSON
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WHAT'S NEW
RECRETION IT'S ABOUT TIME
CAGE MATCH
Jump into the next generation of arcade gaming
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Get ready to lose yourself in videogames—literally. In May, the Excalibur Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas installed the first public Virtusphere, a human-sized hamster ball that lets you move through virtual worlds by walking, running, or crawling inside it.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0026.xml
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WHAT'S NEW
RECREATION FULLY LOADED
KICK GRASS!
High-tech soccer gear makes the best players even better
adidas
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adidas
JERSEY
$150
Many players wear a loose jersey over a compression-type undershirt that keeps muscles warm and supported. TechFit jerseys, like this one for host team South Africa, build the compression right in. A tight-fitting polyester mesh has elastic bands around the ribcage and between the shoulder blades. Adidas TechFit Jersey $150; adidas.com
adidas
GOALIE GLOVES
$150
With balls flying toward the net at up to 90 mph, a goalie's hands would be toast without gloves. This pair lets keepers insert plastic spines behind each finger and thumb to keep them from bending backward. To help hold onto shots, the palm's foam compresses on impact instead of bouncing back. Reusch Magno Deluxe Ml Ortho-Tec Glove $150; reuschusa.com
adidas
BALL
$150
Center stage in every game will be the 2010 World Cup's official ball. It's made of eight curved polyurethane-and-foam panels, versus the usual 32 or the last Cup's U, and they're heatbonded rather than stitched. That makes for the roundest, and thus the most accurate, soccer ball yet. A grippy texture also helps improve control. Adidas Jabulani $150; adidas.com
adidas
SHINGUARDS
$40
Kicks, tackles: These 4.0-ounce guards, tucked into socks, make it all nearly painless. A quarter-inch-thick layer of foam molds to the shin's shape, and a firm but flexible polyurethane top-which triples the impact protection of foam alone-is cut asymmetrically to fit the leg’s curve. Uhlsport D.I.C. Vyper $40; uhlsportusa.com
adidas
CLEATS
$400
This boot instantly extends its traction on soft ground. Forceful pressure on the forefoot, as when starting a sprint, briefly pushes plastic studs up to 0.12 inch beyond their usual 0.20-inch length. (Hard ground keeps them at their shorter, faster size.) The shoe is an airy 6.5 ounces, with a carbon-composite sole and liquid-crystal-polymer-thread ribbing. Nike Mercurial Vapor Superfly II $400; nike.com
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This month, more than 700 million people will watch the finals of the FIFA World Cup, the planet’s most popular sports event. Soccer is mainly about stamina and coordination, but players rely on cutting-edge gear to help score (or save) more GOALS.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0027.xml
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BRIDGESTONE
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BRIDGESTONE
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WHAT'S NEW
COMPUTING HOW IT WORKS
CLEAN THE SLATE
Reversible heat-sensitive dye makes reusable paper possible
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Soon you'll be able to recycle your own paper right at home,just not in the way you think.A new paper-thin plastic film from Ricoh contains a shapeshifting dye that turns from clear to black—and back—up to 1,000 times,perfect for printing direction,grocery list or anything else you'll need only once.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0029.xml
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Advertisements
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worldclassdriving
Audi R8 V10
worldclassdriving
Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren
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HEADLINES
EXTRATERRESTRIAL LIFE
LIFE ON MARS, REBORN
Scientists strengthen the case that a three-billion-year-old Martian meteorite contains signs of life
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In April, Kathie Thomas-Keprta told a standing-room-only audience at the Astrobiology Science Conference that she had found evidence of life on a three-billion-year-old Martian meteorite. And no one was surprised. That’s because she and eight other researchers at several universities and NASA’s Johnson Space Center had reported the same thing about the same meteorite in 1996.
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HEADLINES
SECURITY
EMERGENCY HOTLINE
Sensors built into cellphones could detect hazardous chemicals and spread the word to people nearby
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Your smartphone can post Twitter updates and find latenight pizza. But warn you of a hazardous chemical spill? Soon there will be an app for that too. The Department of Homeland Security is working on technology that allows cellphones to double as chemical detectors.
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HEADLINES
CRIME TECH
BODY OF EVIDENCE
Technology takes the guesswork out of identifying skeletal remains
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For seven years, David Achord, a detective with the Nashville Metropolitan Police, failed to match the skeleton of an unidentified white female to missing-persons reports. Then a computer program called ForDisc compared the bones against thousands of solved cases and revealed that the forensics lab had made a critical mistake: The white female was really a black male.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0034.xml
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wagan
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HEADLINES
FOOD TECH
KETCHUP, NOT CANCER
Science serves up carcinogen-free fries, but industry might not follow
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SUSANNAH F. LOCKE
There’s a new recipe that could make the four billion pounds of french fries Americans eat every year a little healthier. Don’t worry, it doesn’t cut delicious salt or fat but a possible carcinogen. All it takes is an enzyme and a little patience.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0037.xml
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Schneider Electric Industries SAS
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Schneider Electric Industries SAS
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HEADLINES
INVENTION OF THE MONTH
ROBO-BAYWATCH
The hottest, fastest lifeguard on the beach is named EMILY
HOW IT WORKS
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ALESSANDRA CALDERIN
You’re caught by the ocean’s riptide, exhausted and barely keeping your head above water. Then your unlikely hero appears: a four-footlong talking buoy. It’s EMILY, the robot lifeguard. Grab on, and it can bring you safely back to shore. This summer, EMILY (for EMergency Integrated Lifesaving lanYard) began patrolling Malibu’s dangerous Zuma Beach and will watch over about 25 more by December.
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Pfizer Inc.: VIAGRA
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Pfizer Inc.
VIAGRA
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HEADLINES
ASTRONOMY
CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF ROCKS
As NASA gets ready for new destinations, astronauts prepare to survive extraterrestrial weather
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STEPHEN ORNES
The next giant leap for mankind will be on an asteroid or Mars, President Obama said at an April press conference. When astronauts begin exploring those distant rocks in 2025 or so, they will encounter hellacious space weather, such as solar storms, the high-energy radiation blobs that the sun spits out.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0041.xml
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Honda Motor Co., Ltd.: acura
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Honda Motor Co., Ltd.
acura
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PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0042.xml
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT
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TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY YEARS AGO, there were no internal combustion engines, no coal-powered factories, no jumbo jets—in short, none of the nowfamiliar technologies that have transformed our planet The next 250 years promise even more sweeping technological change; only this time, we have the opportunity to do right by the environment.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0044.xml
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT VISIONARIES
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THE URBAN REMODELER
It would be easy to dismiss Mitchell Joachim’s fantastical vision for ecological supercities, with their flocks of jetpacks and mass-transit blimps that look like flying monster jellyfish, as science fiction—if he wasn’t actually building them
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JOHN BRADLEY
Architect Mitchell Joachim points out, frequently and without prompting, that his futuristic proposals are always based on existing technologies. No wonder he feels the need to say it. Consider some of his ideas: jetpacks tethered together in swarms, houses grown from living trees, low-altitude blimps prowling New York City with chairs hanging below them for pedestrians to hop on and off (24/7 ski lifts on Broadway!), and WALL-E-like machines that erect buildings and bridges from recycled waste.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0045.xml
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT VISIONARIES
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THE SAND SCULPTOR
With the Sahara desert rapidly encroaching on livestock-nourishing grassland, architect Magnus Larsson proposes a 3,728-mile-long barrier wall—built by bacteria
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J.B.
Could a student architecture project help save millions of Africans from the relentless advance of the Sahara desert, a phenomenon that’s fueling drought, starvation and poverty? There’s one that has people talking. Borrowing from an experimental solution for firming up building foundations in earthquake-prone areas, Swedish architect Magnus Larsson, 34, has proposed solidifying the sand dunes at the leading edge of the Sahara to create a habitable 3,728-milelong desert-blocking wall.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0046.xml
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT VISIONARIES
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DIAPER FARMER
Willem van Cotthem’s super-soil harnesses the power of Pampers to turn dirt into lush gardens
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BRUCE GRIERSON
When asked to imagine the Earth in 2040, many scientists describe a grim scenario, a landscape so bare and dry, it’s almost uninhabitable. But that’s not what Willem van Cotthem sees. "It will be a green world,” says van Cotthem, a Belgian scientist turned social entrepreneur.
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT VISIONARIES
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THE BIG GUN
David Keith believes strong-arm strategies could soon be our last resort for reversing record levels of carbon in the atmosphere
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J.B.
In the 1992 film Unforgiven, Clint Eastwood spends most of the movie slowly and methodically avoiding violent confrontation with the bad guys before finally turning things around with a bloody burst of gunslinging. That’s something like the approach of Canadian physicist and environmental scientist David Keith.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0048.xml
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT VISIONARIES
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THE SOLAR ROADRUNNER
Highways baking in the hot sun are wasted energy. Scott Brusaw’s solution? Make them out of solar panels
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The road ahead is paved with photovoltaics. That’s how Scott Brusaw sees it, anyway. His company, Solar Roadways, is embedding PV cells and LED lights into panels engineered to withstand the forces of traffic. The lights would allow for "smart” roadways and parking lots with changeable signage, while the cells would generate enough energy to power businesses, cities and, eventually, the entire country.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0049.xml
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT VISIONARIES
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THE CARBON SLAYER
Jeffrey Martin’s closed-loop plan for recycling heat-trapping carbon emissions into gasoline
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Into the category of things that sound too good to be true, add Green Freedom. If the scientists behind this federally funded proposal are correct, we'll be able to continue driving gas-powered cars and flying in gaspowered aircraft indefinitely, in a closed, netzero-emissions system that won’t contribute to global warming.
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT VISIONARIES
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THE NUCLEAR REVIVALIST
For environmentalist Jesse Ausubel, going green means land conservation and energy efficiency—and forgetting “boutique” renewables like windmills and biofuels
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It’s 2070. You’re on a train from New York to Boston. If you could see outside, it would be mostly open landscape. Maybe a nuclear plant or two, but otherwise green space—none of the urban sprawl, wind farms, solar arrays or biomass operations we’ve been taught to expect from an ecologically responsible future.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0051.xml
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT ECOTOPIAS
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BUILDING A CARBONNEUTRAL PARADISE
In the global race to reduce carbon emissions, these eco-minded communities, from Kansas to the Maldives, lead the pack. Here’s how they’re making their carbon footprints disappear
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PATRICK DI JUSTO
“CARBON NEUTRAL” sounds pretty straightforward—simply remove as much carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as you put in. The trouble is, civilization began emitting CO2 when humans burned the first lump of coal about 4,000 years ago. Ever since, we’ve been digging up carbon in the form of fossil fuels and sending it skyward.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0052.xml
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT CONCEPTS
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PLANS FOR TOMORROW
Architects and engineers are already prepared for the future. These ingenious conceptual structures scrub away pollution, heat themselves, and generate power for us all
THE LIFE AQUATIC
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SUZANNE LABARRE
PHYSALIA IS HALF-BOAT, half-building, and all green. This mammoth aluminum concept by Belgian architect Vincent Callebaut is meant to travel Europe’s rivers, making filthy water drinkable. At the same time, the ship generates more energy than it uses.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0053.xml
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT CONCEPTS
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A LIVE-IN POWER PLANT
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AT FIRST GLANCE, the plans for the 10MW Tower have all the trappings of pre-crash Dubai: the improbable height, the flashy facade, the swagger of a newbie in a crowded skyline. On closer inspection, however, it’s an ecomachine. The A-shaped, 1,969-foot concept skyscraper is designed to turn out as much as 10 times the energy it needs, enough to power up to 6,000 nearby homes.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0054.xml
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THE FUTURE OF THE ENVIRONMENT CONCEPTS
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GREEN GAMBLE
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THE DICE HOUSE looks like part of a Monopoly set, but the design has real-world ambitions. The 30-by-30-by-30-foot concept home, designed by the British architecture firm Sybarite, improves on standard building tech to erase its carbon footprint.
PopularScience_20100701_0277_001_0055.xml
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THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE
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OFFSHORE OPERATIONS
Droves of patients are heading overseas for stem-cell therapies unavailable in the U.S. Is it a dangerous scam—or is America just behind the curve?
CHASING A CURE
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ELIZABETH SVOBODA
IT’S 2:30 IN THE AFTERNOON in the Dominican Republic, and Karen Velline, a 66-year-old grandmother from Cold Spring, Minnesota, is lying on an operating table, swaddled in sterile surgical sheets. She's just moments away from a procedure so experimental that no doctor will perform it on U.S. soil.
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Bose Corporation
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THE GREEN DREAM
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GOING GRAY, SAVING BLUE
Conserving water by using shower and sink runoff to flush the toilets
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JUST BECAUSE residential water is cheap and plentiful here in upstate New York is no reason to waste it, and the average household does plenty of wasting: A single flush consumes three to seven gallons of water. Inefficient toilets and long showers are two of the biggest water wasters, together accounting for more than 40 percent of the 350 gallons of water used daily in a typical American home.
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RosettaStone
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HOW 2.0
YOU BUILT WHAT?!
THE AEROCYCLY
A motorcycle with an aerodynamic shell gets more than 200 miles per gallon
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Dutch vehicle designer Allert Jacobs knew that his fuel-sipping, shell-encased motorcycle was street-legal. Unfortunately, the police didn't, and impounded it after pulling him over during a test run. But Jacobs has a lot of patience.
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HOW 2.0
YOU BUILT WHAT?!
3 MORE MPG-BOOSTING MODS
DUCT-TAPED DREAM
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Chang Ho Kim, who runs an autorepair shop in Massachusetts, skipped doing airflow calculations and modified his 1989 Honda CRX HF largely on instinct. He added a narrow, wedge-shaped acrylic nose to move the air over the hood and roof, taped the seams between the body panels to prevent turbulence, and installed acrylic skirts to keep air flowing past the rear tires.
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HOW 2.0
ASK A GEEK
HOW CAN I EXTEND THE LIFE OF MY COMPUTER?
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Before you rush out to replace your old computer, consider a few minor hardware upgrades and software tweaks that can keep it working like (almost) new. Over time, the memory demands of the programs you rely on increase as they get revised and new features are added, so if you’re willing to invest a little money, add more RAM to help the system keep pace.
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Air & Water, Inc.
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HOW 2.0
TECH SUPPOR
AN LED CHESS SET
PROJECT OF THE MONTH
A CELLPHONE SCREEN PROTECTOR
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Billy Gordon built a chessboard out of wood and a copper plate and outfitted a set of clear glass pieces with colored LEDs. The board is wired to a power transformer, and when the LEDs’ leads touch any of the individual spaces on the board, the pieces light up.
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ROCKAUTO
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HOW 2.0
GRAY MATTER
HACKING LIGHT
Make groovy glowing designs with a little drain cleaner and a light stick
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Once a piece of magic technology becomes so common that you can buy it at the gas station, people start taking it for granted. That happened with light sticks sometime in the 1990s. But with a little creativity, diagonal cutters and Drano, you can reveal—and control—that old black, green, red and blue magic inside.
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HOW 2.0
KIT OF THE MONTH
MAKING THE MAKERBOT
For less than $1,000, the MakerBot kit provides nearly everything you need for your very own 3-D plastic printer. We find out what it takes to build and use one
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It sounds like the promise of an ad in the back of a POPSCI issue from the 1950s. Build your own replicating machine! Make anything you desire in your own garage! But that’s exactly what veteran hacker Bre Pettis and his pals offer with their CupCake CNC kit: a computercontrolled 3-D printer that can whip up almost any object of less than four inches on a side from two kinds of plastic.
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FYI
SOMETIMES YOU JUST NEED TO KNOW
CAN PHYSICIANS TREAT ANIMALS?
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ALESSANDRA CALDERIN
A Physicians and veterinarians agree: If it looks like a duck, walks like a duck, and is sick like a duck, it’s best for it to be treated by someone trained to treat a duck. Faced with such a scenario, physicians would be armed only with what they know about human biology.
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MacNeil Automotive Products Limited
Toyota Prius Hybrid
MacNeil Automotive Products Limited
Dodge Caliber
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HarborFreight
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Select Comfort
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Select Comfort
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psshowcase · www.popsci.com/ps-showcase
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FUTURE THEN
FROM THE POPULAR SCIENCE ARCHIVES
A Monorail for Train Tracks
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Designers have been dreaming up more-efficient ways to get from point A to B for centuries. But while today’s designs are about saving energy and cutting pollution, decades ago it was about a different kind of green: money. With that in mind, an Ohio inventor designed a commuter monorail that could ride on existing railroad tracks to and from his Cleveland suburb.
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R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.
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Leading technology
Responsible solutions
MEETING THE ENERGY CHALLENGE
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Special advertorial section
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Engineering the New Energy Future
Today’s world is hungry for energy—and demand is expected to soar, likely doubling by 2050. Tackling this challenge—and doing so in responsible ways—requires innovation and cutting-edge technology. Shell is at the forefront of both.
DEVELOPING NEW RESOURCES
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The race is on to develop more energy from new and existing resources. And Shell has a long, productive history of exploring and producing in challenging deep oceans, between mountains and beneath arctic ice. Each frontier presents major challenges for recovery.
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Special advertorial section
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CLOSE-UP OF THE WORLD’S DEEPEST PLATFORM
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Located 200 miles off the Texas coast, the Perdido platform floats in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico. What may look like a typical rig from above water belies an impressive feat of modern technology below. Setting a new water depth record for an offshore platform, Perdido is anchored in 8,000 feet of water (about a mile and a half)—a depth that would hold nearly six Empire State Buildings stacked one on top of another.
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THINKING AHEAD
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Q: What technologies is Shell using and developing to protect our natural resources in these areas and secure energy in a safe and environmentally sustainable way? A: There are many things we do in a responsible way, from the inspiration start all the way to the actual project development and production.
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Natural Gas
Building a Bridge to a Low-Carbon Future
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Many new sources and technologies are needed to meet demand. For Shell, finding new energy, producing fewer emissions and helping to preserve the environment are high priorities. Ramping up alternatives to build a low-emission economy will take time—in fact, decades.
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Natural Gas
WHAT IS CCS?
How is CO2 captured?
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Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technology-driven plan to prevent CO2 emissions by capturing the gases at their source and either chemically changing them or diverting them into storage layers deep underground, such as deep saltwater aquifers, or in deep ocean water.
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Greater Ffficiencies
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SHELL: IMPROVING ITS OWN OPERATIONS
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Enhancing the energy efficiency of Shell's operations Improves performance and operating costs and lessens environmental impact. Shell considers this important and has dedicated a program and team to this effort in its upstream and downstream operations.
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