Issue: 20100601

Tuesday, June 1, 2010
JUNE 2010
6
True
276
Tuesday, December 2, 2014

Articles
cover
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0001.xml
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Ford: SUPER DUTY
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Ford
SUPER DUTY
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0002.xml
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2
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SOPUS Products: PENNZOIL ULTRA
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SOPUS Products
PENNZOIL ULTRA
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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3,4
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CONTENTS
THIS MONTH'S GUIDE TO INNOVATION AND DISCOVERY
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0004.xml
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4
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0005.xml
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5
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Panasonic: LUMIX
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Panasonic
LUMIX
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0006.xml
article
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6
FROM THE EDITOR
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ROBOT THERAPY
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MARK JANNOT
WHEN I FIRST SAW the opening pages to our article on the dawning use of robots in therapy for autistic children ["The New Face of Therapy," page 68], I did a sort of triple-take, laughing out loud at the juxtaposition of the headline and the goofy, sweet gumball head beside it, while at the same time reflexively recoiling at the notion that robots are becoming a frontline treatment for autism.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0007.xml
masthead
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6
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0008.xml
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7
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TRANE
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TRANE
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0009.xml
article
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THE INBOX
INSIDE THE DARING RESCUE OF THE ALASKA RANGER
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In the April issue, “The 10 Worst Jobs in Science” took a humorous look at some shocking ways to earn a paycheck as a scientist, with jobs like armpit detective and dung curator topping the list. At least one scientist didn't like having his field included.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0010.xml
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9
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Ford: 365-HP TWIN-TURBO
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Ford
365-HP TWIN-TURBO
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0011.xml
article
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MEGAPIXELS
THE MUST-SEE PHOTOS OF THE MONTH
FIXER-UPPER, GREAT VIEWS
The International Space Station gets a welcome upgrade
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LANA BIRBRAIR
During a five-hour, 54-minute spacewalk, NASA astronaut Robert Behnken opens the insulation flap of a newly installed camera system for aligning modules during construction and reaches inside. He’s working on the last major American addition to the International Space Station, now 98 percent complete, with a pressurized volume of 28,947 cubic feet and a habitable volume of 12,420 cubic feet.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0012.xml
article
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12,13
MEGAPIXELS
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SLIMEOGRAPHY
One-celled organisms could make our road network more efficient
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LANA BIRBRAIR
The “roads” on this agar-gel map of the U.S. may not quite mirror reality, but they could help scientists build more-robust networks in the future. Physarum polycephalum, a type of slime mold, grows tendrils in search of food and withdraws extraneous arms to focus on the most efficient paths between sources.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0013.xml
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SAMSUNG
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SAMSUNG
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0014.xml
review
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15
WHAT’S NEW
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SHOCK TREATMENT
Ducati’s electronic suspension helps create the first four-in-one motorcycle
DUCATI
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DUCATI
MULTISTRADA 1200S
$20,000
MATTHEW COKELEY
Many of today’s motorcycles use an electronically controlled suspension to make adjustments that used to require busting out the tool kit. Yet most of these systems can handle only minor modifications, such as softening the suspension to accommodate an extra rider.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0015.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
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THE goods
A dozen great ideas in gear
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CORINNE IOZZIO
Wind Breaker This headset puts extra protection between your voice and call-disrupting wind. Its microphone is tucked behind two metal grills and a layer of foam, which disperses strong gusts before they hit the mic, to cancel noise twice as effectively as others.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0016.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
RECREATION HOW IT WORKS
YOU’LL WET YOURSELF
This waterslide does a gut-flipping —yet safe—loop-de-loop
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LADREN AARONSON
This summer, Noah’s Ark Water Park in Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin, opens the country’s only looping waterslide. The Scorpion’s Tail gives you the thrills of a roller coaster without having to strap to a track (or wear a shirt)—and it uses sophisticated engineering to keep you secure as you slip any which way.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0017.xml
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MICHELIN
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MICHELIN
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0018.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
HOME TECH TECH TREND
ONE FOR ALL
New power tools single-handedly tackle a slew of jobs
THE TREND
WHY NOW
HDW YOU’LL BENEFIT
rock welltools
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rock welltools
Rockwell H3 Hammer Drill
$180
rock welltools
Skil Flooring Saw
$160
rock welltools
Ridgid 12V Lithium-Ion JobMax Kit
$180
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Multifunction power tools that combine the mechanisms of two or more pieces of equipment into one professional-grade item Contractors and ambitious DIYers want to do projects more efficiently. And in many cases, toolmakers are taking advantage of the zip and design flexibility offered by compact 12-volt lithium-ion batteries.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0019.xml
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SYNC
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SYNC
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0020.xml
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22,23
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Canon: Rebel T2i
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Canon
Rebel T2i
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0021.xml
review
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24
WHAT'S NEW
RECREATION FULLY LOADED
TAKE A SWING
Five innovative ways to play ball
badensports
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badensports
BASEBALL
$110
BASEBALL This bat’s ax-like handle is a tapered oval, not a cylinder. Its form means batters hold it so that balls strike perpendicular to its maple grain, which reduces the risk of breaks that can send shards flying. Baden Sports Axe $110; badensports.com
badensports
TENNIS
$250
TENNIS Head’s design combines the best of big and small rackets. Four raised strips on the outer frame extend strings a fraction of an inch; the longer strings hold more energy for more-powerful shots. Inside, four extra frames jut closer to the center to hold strings taut for better control. Head YouTek Six Star $250; head.com
badensports
LACROSSE
$250
LACROSSE More manufacturers are using drag-reducing tricks from racket maker Prince to trim weight without losing strength. Four holes in the graphite shaft of this stick, plus one at the base of the head, cut wind resistance and make the package lighter and more aerodynamic. Reebok 10K Lacrosse System $250; reebok.com
badensports
GOLF
$130
GOLF These prograde wedges' faces are the first you can swap out, to replace worn grooves and get the lift and backspin of a new club without buying one. Two 0.4-inch steel screws hold them on. TaylorMade TP Wedge with xFT $130(plus $40 per head); taylormadegolf .com
badensports
Brodmann Blades
$45
PING-PONG This paddle provides a bridge and thumb grip between two faces, nixing the usual handle. Moving your palm to the center gives a better feel for ball contact, which (with practice) allows a player to react more quickly and generate better spin. Brodmann Blades $45; brodmannblades .com
BRETT ZARDA
From shatterproof bats to palm paddles for ping-pong, these sticks reimagine your tried-and-true summer sports gear. Their smart designs make even your best shot a little better.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0022.xml
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MARINEOFFICER
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MARINEOFFICER
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0023.xml
review
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WHAT’S NEW
GADGETS TIMELINE
RICHER REALITY
Software and optic tricks that improve the real world
GET INFO
FALL: SEE VIRTUAL OBJECTS
2012: TOUCH VIRTUAL OBJECTS
CultureClic
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CultureClic
iPhone
Developers are creating customized applications with more-detailed info. CultureClic, a French tourism app for the iPhone 3GS, uses the phone’s GPS and compass to identify landmarks. It then overlays relevant images and info, like hours and entry fees, from a database of cultural institutions. Pointing the phone at the Louvre, for example, pops up previews of its collection. CultureClic for iPhone Free; cultureclic.fr
CultureClic
Vuzix Wrap 920AR
$800
Soon AR displays will be wearable. Two cameras in Vuzix's glasses feed real-time video to a connected computer, which superimposes graphics on the image and projects the results on two screens in the glasses. Vuzix recently showed off a maze game: A player holds a piece of cardboard and, as he tilts it, he sees a virtual ball roll past 3-D obstacles (which the computer inserts wherever it sees a bar code on the board). Expect developers using the system to come up with a range of design apps and games. Vuzix Wrap 920AR $800; vuzix.com
CultureClic
TOUCH VIRTUAL OBJECTS
Eventually AR will let you interact with virtual objects as if they were real. This system is similar to Vuzix, but its cameras also track your hands to sense when you “touch” an object, and it adds a mic to capture your voice for spoken commands. In the research prototype, users point to blocks and dictate color changes. As tracking improves, it could find more everyday uses. A home-remodeling app, for example, would allow you to place virtual appliances and cabinetry in your existing kitchen. University of Canterbury, New Zealand, Multimodal AR hitlabnz.org
STEVE MORGENSTERN
Mobile augmented-reality (AR) apps already enhance live video images on your phone to show you real-time info about what’s around you. Upcoming systems take it a step further by actually letting you interact—whether by touching or talking—with miniature virtual Worlds.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0024.xml
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MOTHERS
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MOTHERS
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0025.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0026.xml
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SUBARU
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SUBARU
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0027.xml
article
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HEADLINES
CYBERACTIVISM
OPENING THE INTERNET
New software subverts Internet censorship abroad
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CYRUS FARIVAR
Austin Heap is an unlikely international saboteur, but last summer the San Francisco-based Web developer staged a digital coup in Iran shortly after presidential-election protests took place there. Heap’s Haystack software, smuggled into the country on USB flash drives and passed secretively from citizen to citizen, allowed Iranians to get around the government’s notorious Internet filters and, for the first time, freely explore and communicate on the Web.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0028.xml
article
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HEADLINES
CHEMISTRY
OUT OF OUR ELEMENT
The planet has limited resources. Here’s what’s left of the periodic table
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SANDEEP RAVINDRAN
Most congresspeople probably haven’t thought about chemistry since high school, but they’ll soon have to in order to protect the economy. In March, Colorado representative Mike Coffman introduced a bill to ramp up mining of 17 "rareearth” elements, so called because large deposits of them are hard to find.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0029.xml
article
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HEADLINES
MEDICINE
TOBACCO MAKES GOOD
New tobacco that produces flu vaccines could rescue the plant’s reputation
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LYNNE PEEPLES
Smoking tobacco is well known to endanger human health, but a cousin of the plant could help protect us from a flu pandemic. This February, Darpa, the Pentagon’s R&D branch, awarded $40 million to Texas A&M University and pharmaceutical manufacturer G-Con to launch Project GreenVax, an effort to speed vaccine production by growing it in tobacco.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0030.xml
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DHL
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DHL
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0031.xml
article
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HEADLINES
THE ANNOTATED MACHINE
OLD MACDONALD HAD A PYROLYSIS DOOHICKEY
Mobile biofuel refineries provide sustainable energy for farms
HOW TO TURN TRASH INTO POWER
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MAGGIE KOERTH-BAKER
A hundred years ago, threshing machines chugged from farm to farm across the plains, separating stalk from grain and turning raw crops into valuable commodities. By sharing the machine, farmers could boost productivity without owning the prohibitively pricey equipment.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0032.xml
article
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HEADLINES
ENGINEERING
MAKE SOME NOISE
A soundproof stadium keeps the neighborhood quiet
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PATRICK ALBERTSON
When the World Cup kicks off in South Africa this month, the 69,070 soccer fans inside the new Cape Town Stadium will scream at the top of their lungs to urge on their favorite team. But thanks to some clever engineering, the people living nearby will hear hardly a peep.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0033.xml
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DRYLOK: FAST PLUG
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DRYLOK
FAST PLUG
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0034.xml
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CITRIX
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CITRIX
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0035.xml
article
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39,40,41,42
2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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FASTER, SAFER SNOWMOBILING
4th ANNUAL
A rear-axle-drive system that makes snowmobiles go faster, brake quicker, and consume less gas
NOBODY WOULD HAVE
WHERE ARE THEY NOW?
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MARK ANDERS
Almost everyone has had an idea for the perfect invention-that single innovation that solves an intractable problem, makes our lives easier, or even changes the world. For most of us, it stops at the fantasy. But the annual POPULAR SCIENCE Invention Awards celebrates those individuals who are inspired, tenacious and, frankly, obsessed enough to turn their vision into a reality.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0036.xml
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BOSE: QuietComfort 15
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BOSE
QuietComfort 15
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0037.xml
article
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2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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FISH-FRIENDLY TIDAL TURBINE
An underwater energy extractor that doesn't harm sea life
WHERE ARE THEY NOW?
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RENA MARIE PACELLA
W. SCOTT ANDERSON spent the past five decades creating complicated machines for manufacturing, including a lipstick labeler and a plastic-straw maker. So when two years ago the 77-year-old industrial engineer invented a fish-friendly underwater turbine that looks like a giant screw, it seemed a cruel twist of fate that every manufacturer he approached said it was too complex to produce economically.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0038.xml
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BONNIER: POPULAR SCIENCE
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BONNIER
POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0039.xml
article
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46
2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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WATERING PLANTS IN THE DESERT
A box that quenches thirsty plants without irrigation
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COREY BINNS
DUTCH FLOWER EXPORTER Pieter Hoff often spent nights in his beloved lily heids to monitor them. One evening, he noticed that the first droplets of morning condensation were collecting on the leaves of his lilies well before midnight. The plants lost heat to the air at night, and the cool surface of the leaves sucked water droplets from the warm, humid air.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0040.xml
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47
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Advertisements
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gravity defyer
TB902MBBB
gravity defyer
TB703FB
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0041.xml
article
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48,49
2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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A SOLDIER’S THIRD EYE
A gun sight that lets a shooter hit his target while staying out of harm's way
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NICOLE DYER
THE ROLLING GREEN hills of Sonora, California, no longer lure prospectors with the promise of gold, but for Matthew Hagerty the draw is just as powerful: They’re a secluded hideaway ideal for perfecting his military invention, called SmartSight.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0042.xml
article
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2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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PLUG IN AND ROCK OUT
A bridge that keeps guitars perfectly tuned, all the time
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BROOKE BOREL
IN A SMALL engineering studio in Bronxville, New York, Cosmos Lyles and Paul Dowd eagerly take turns at the dry-erase board, sketching out diagrams of springs, levers and tension curves. This may not seem very rock 'n' roll, but what they’re creating will let the musicians on their current client list, including Slash and Rob Zombie's guitarist John 5, shred harder than ever: a bridge that keeps the instrument continuously in tune.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0043.xml
article
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52,53
2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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BREATHING, EASY
An inexpensive portable ventilator designed to save lives during a pandemic
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ELIZABETH SVOBODA
FOUR YEARS AGO, when Matthew Callaghan was a surgery intern at the University of California at San Francisco, the medical world was buzzing over the prospect of a global flu pandemic. One of the biggest potential problems was logistical: Because 95 percent of the ventilators in the U.S.—which keep critically ill patients breathing when their respiratory system is unable to function—are already in use, thousands of patients would die for lack of available life support.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0044.xml
article
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54
2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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HEARING REPAIRED
A device that restores hearing by transmitting sound through the teeth and bones
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ELIZABETH SVOBODA
ONE DAY in 2006, stuck in bumper-to-bumper Bay Area traffic, Amir Abolfathi had a eureka moment. Formerly vice president of R&D for Invisalign, a company known for transparent dental braces, he had recently been chatting with a friend who was working on hearing aids.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0045.xml
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1&1
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1&1
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0046.xml
article
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56
2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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THE RIGHT DOSAGE EVERY TIME
A pump that uses a unique expandable material to dispense medications perfectly
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LISA KATAYAMA
INJECTING hospital patients with medications is fraught with difficulties—with nurses filling hundreds of orders daily, delays and miscalculations are inevitable and costly Mark Banister recognized the financial rewards of a solution that his business partner estimates could save $1 billion annually, and set out to design a disposable infusion drug pump to improve on mistake-prone IVs and complex mechanical pumps.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0047.xml
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1&1
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1&1
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0048.xml
article
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58
2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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MAKING THINGS CLEAR
A system that can predict condensation to keep goggles and windshields free from fog
WHERE ARE THEY NOW?
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SUSANNAH F. LOCKE
VALERIE PALFY was at a four-way intersection near her home in Chester County, Pennsylvania, with no traffic lights when her windshield fogged up. While rolling the windows down to see her way across, she had a flash of inspiration. Why not come up with a way to prevent fog altogether?
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0049.xml
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Advertisements
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worldclassdriving
Audi R8 V10
worldclassdriving
Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0050.xml
article
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60
2010 POPSCI INVENTION AWARDS
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WEARABLE WOOFER
An accessory that makes you feel—literally —like you’re in the videogame you're playing
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GREGORY MONE
SHAHRIAR S. AFSHAR has spent the past five years perfecting a device that pumps sound vibrations directly to your ribcage, intensifying videogame and movie experiences. But when we meet near his office, the 38-year-old first spends an hour talking physics.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0051.xml
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Advertisements
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APC
ES 750G
APC
ES 550G
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0052.xml
article
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HOLLYWOOD SCIENCE
BLOCKBUSTERS
POPSCI'S SUMMER SCI-TECH MOVIE PREVIEW
This season’s blockbusters prove that great science fiction and futuristic-tech-filled flicks don’t need to rely solely on CG tricks— innovative props can still blow an audience’s mind. Here are the best examples from this summer’s lineup (we’ll try not to spoil anything)
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GREGORY MONE
The technical chops necessary to create a believable exoskeleton out of CG are nothing compared with what it takes to build one in real life. Star Robert Downey Jr.’s Mark VI suit is made of 10 different materials, including industrial urethanes and automotive paints that coat the dense, foam-rubber core, giving it a hardened, metallic look, according to suit designer Shane Mahan of Legacy Effects.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0053.xml
article
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64,65,66,67
HOLLYWOOD SCIENCE
FEAR
HORROR SHOW
Scanning your brain while you watch horror movies might hold the key to making them even more frightening. The findings could reshape the way scary movies—perhaps all movies—are filmed
THE FOCUS GROUP THAT CAN’T LIE
THE NEXT 3-D?
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STEVEN KOTLER
THERE’S NO POPCORN sold in this movie theater. The screen is tiny, the seating awkward. In fact, I’m lying on my back inside a narrow tube, with maybe two inches of wiggle room on all sides. But more unnerving than my accommodations is the serial-killer flick projected on the screen a few inches above my face.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0054.xml
article
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68,69,70,71,72,73,90,92,95
THE FUTURE OF MEDICINE
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The New Face of Therapy
With one in 110 children diagnosed with autism, and therapists in short supply, researchers are developing humanoids to fill the gaps. But can robots help patients forge stronger bonds with people?
HELP WANTED
THE MAN-MACHINE DIVIDE
HEALING MACHINES
UNLOCKING THE POTENTIAL
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GREGORY MONE
IN A SMALL, SPARSELY furnished room, a young boy in a black T-shirt backs himself into a corner. He's cautious. Cameras capture his movements, and microphones record every sound. But this doesn't intimidate him; he doesn't even seem aware that he's being observed. His mom, sitting nearby, is not the object of his focus either.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0055.xml
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Advertisement: HD Vision
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HD Vision
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0056.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
YOU BUILT WHAT?!
A REAL IRON MAN
A homebuilt superhero suit that looks as good as the silver-screen version
HOW IT WORKS
• WEAPONRY
• POWER
• CONTROLS
• BACKUP
5 THINGS YOU DIDN’T KNOW YOU COULD DO WITH TWITTER
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GREGORY MONE
Anthony Le, 25, has been a fan of Iron Man since he was a kid, but when he heard that the comic-book superhero was hitting the big screen in 2008, he was inspired to build his own Iron Man suit. That version was more of a costume, but his new one, finished just in time for the movie’s sequel, edges closer to the real thing.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0057.xml
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RosettaStone
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RosettaStone
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0058.xml
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0059.xml
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UNITED STATES
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UNITED STATES
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0060.xml
article
80
80
HOW 2.0
BUILD IT
BRING INFORMATION TO LIGHT
Create an LED-lit cube that changes color while monitoring any kind of data you want
DATA CUBES
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VIN MARSHALL
The vast amount of information at our fingertips these days can be as distracting as it is useful. Tracking something like the movement of an index on the stock market by feverishly checking a ticker all day is often more than you want to deal with.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0061.xml
article
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81
HOW 2.0
USE IT BETTER
THROW OUT YOUR DVR
With a few tricks, you can get more content than you ever thought possible off your computer and onto your TV screen
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DARREN MURPH
It’s been a fun ride, but it may be the beginning of the end for conventional cable subscriptions and DVRs. A ton of original TV programming and other media is on the Web, and there are a number of ways to stream it to your flat screen. Many methods use equipment you may already own, but to really access all the content that’s out there, you’ll need to make a few hardware and software tweaks.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0062.xml
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82
HOW 2.0
ASK A GEEK
SHOULD I RE-BUY CLASSIC MOVIES WHEN THEY COME OUT ON BLU-RAY?
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Yes, assuming you own a high-def TV. Even the older 35-millimeter film used to shoot classics like Spartacus can deliver upward of 6,000 lines of resolution—far more than DVD’s 480 or Blu-ray’s (and your HDTV's) 1,080. When movie studios create their Blu-ray versions, they digitize directly from the original film print, so a remastered Blu-ray will get you much closer to the original quality than a DVD, and for the foreseeable future it will probably remain the maximum resolution widely available for home use.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0063.xml
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82
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ROCKAUTO
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ROCKAUTO
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0064.xml
article
83
83
HOW 2.0
TECH SUPPORT
FILLANYPDF.COM
WEB SITE OF THE MONTH
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In what may be the final death knell for the fax, FillAnyPDF.com lets you upload PDF forms to the Web, where you and others can fill them out and digitally sign them, even if they don’t already have text entry built in. The site also supports other formats, including JPG and GIF.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0065.xml
article
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83
HOW 2.0
TECH SUPPORT
THE WATER-BOTTLE KAYAK
RECYCLING PROJECT OF THE MONTH
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Christopher Campbell used nothing but sticks, chicken wire and every empty plastic water and laundry-detergent bottle he could find to cobble together a seaworthy six-foot kayak. To maneuver it, he uses a paddle made from plywood and zip ties.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0066.xml
article
83
83
HOW 2.0
TECH SUPPORT
A SELF-PORTRAIT MIRROR*
5 MINUTE PROJECT
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1 Find a oneto two-inch-diameter mirror (try a makeup compact). 2 Attach it with Velcro to the front of the camera, as close as it can get to the lens. 3 Hold the camera so that your face is in the mirror, and click away.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0067.xml
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83
83
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MacNeil AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED
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MacNeil AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0068.xml
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84
84,85,86
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Dads&Grads Gift Guide
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0069.xml
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86
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0070.xml
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87
87
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SmileTrain
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SmileTrain
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0071.xml
article
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88,89
FYI
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DOLPHINS AND RODEO BULLS
ABSURD-BUT-USEFUL COMPARISON OF THE MONTH
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BJORN CAREY
ALESSANDRA CALDERIN
All vertebrates have tiny structures called semicircular canals inside their ear that help them to maintain balance even when their heads are bobbing around vigorously. That's why rodeo bulls can buck wildly and not fall over. The rule of thumb is that the greater the ratio of canal size to body weight, the more agile the beast.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0072.xml
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89
89
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ShurTech Brands, LLC: FROGTAPE
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ShurTech Brands, LLC
FROGTAPE
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0073.xml
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89
89
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SOLATUBE
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SOLATUBE
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0074.xml
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90
90
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Gorilla Glue Company
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Gorilla Glue Company
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0075.xml
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90
90
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Chef'sChoice: Pronto
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Chef'sChoice
Pronto
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0076.xml
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90
90
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0077.xml
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91
91
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HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS
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HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0078.xml
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92
92
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Valentine Research, Inc.
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Valentine Research, Inc.
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0079.xml
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92
92
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0080.xml
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93
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0081.xml
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94
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0082.xml
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95,96,98,99,100,101
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psshowcase
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0083.xml
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97
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biehealth
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biehealth
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0084.xml
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102
102,103
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POPULAR SCIENCE DIRECT
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0085.xml
article
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104
THE FUTURE THEN
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The Mono Motorcycle
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LANA BIRBRAIR
As cars became smaller and nimbler, Italian motorcycle policeman Davide Gislaghi became convinced that shrinking his bike would increase its efficiency as well. In his Milan workshop, he mounted a standard cycle engine and pedals onto a single wheel five feet in diameter.
PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0086.xml
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105
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Allstate MOTORCYCLE
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Allstate MOTORCYCLE
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0087.xml
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106
106
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R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.
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R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.
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PopularScience_20100601_0276_006_0088.xml