Issue: 20100301

Monday, March 1, 2010
MARCH 2010
3
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276
Thursday, December 18, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0001.xml
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LSB Industries, Inc. Company
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LSB Industries, Inc. Company
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0002.xml
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2
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BERNZOMATIC: QUICK FIRE TORCH
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BERNZOMATIC
QUICK FIRE TORCH
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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CONTENTS
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0004.xml
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0005.xml
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American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
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American Honda Motor Co., Inc.
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0006.xml
masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0007.xml
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FROM THE EDITOR
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Lower the Alarms
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MARK JANNOT
IN JANUARY, in a session typically reserved for "emergency" legislation, the Maine state legislature was slated to consider a measure requiring cellphone packaging to feature cigarette-style labels warning consumers that the devices may cause cancer.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0008.xml
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Outsmart The Elements: Rain-X
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Outsmart The Elements
Rain-X
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0009.xml
article
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THE INBOX
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Star Chasers
Correction
NOTES FROM THE FIELD
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In our January issue, we predicted what 2010 would hold for the world of science; attended Singularity University, a program that brings together brilliant minds to brainstorm world-changing businesses; and explored the science behind James Cameron's 3-D Avatar.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0010.xml
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vs. Ultra Digital: DURACELL
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vs. Ultra Digital
DURACELL
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0011.xml
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MEGAPIXELS
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COINCIDENCE OR CONSEQUENCE?
QUESTIONS LINGER A QUARTER-CENTURY AFTER THE WORST TOXIC-GAS LEAK IN HISTORY
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SANDEEP RAVINDRAN
Eleven-year-old Salu Raikwar, born with six fingers on both hands, walks near the Union Carbide pesticide plant in Bhopal, India. In December 1984 an estimated 27 tons of toxic methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas leaked from the plant and into the environment.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0012.xml
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MEGAPIXELS
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MATCH POINT
YOUR TABLE-TENNIS DYNASTY IS TOAST
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BROOKE BOREL
Meet TOPIO 3.0, the ping-pong-playing robot. Made by Vietnam's first-ever robotics firm, TOSY, the bipedal humanoid uses two 200-fps cameras to detect the ball as it leaves the opponent's paddle. TOPIO's brain—processors and an artificial neural network— analyzes the ball's path to choose the best return.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0013.xml
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Advertisement: 1-800-NEXTEL-9
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1-800-NEXTEL-9
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0014.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
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CONNECT THE SHOTS
ZAP PHOTOS FROM YOUR CAMERA TO YOUR LAPTOP WITH JUST A TAP
SONY
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SONY
CYBER-SHOT DSC-TX7
$400
REBECCA DAY
Now that even cellphones can take photos good enough to save, we end up with images scattered all over. So electronics makers are coming up with easier ways to move your snaps. Sony's new wireless solution, TransferJet, is built into this TX7 camera and Vaio F-Series laptop.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0015.xml
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WHAT'S NEW
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THE GOODS
A DOZEN GREAT IDEAS IN GEAR
LAUNDRY LEARNER
CURRENT ROTATION
SMART CONTROL
NEWS TICKER
COLOR DISPLAY
TEXT ANYWHERE
MULTIPLEX
STILL FILM
SLOPE INFO
TOTABLE TUBE
HANGING HELPER
TINY TRAINER
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CORINNE IOZZIO
This Whirlpool is the first washer you can teach how to handle clothes. Its built-in USB port will soon let you add custom cycles (downloaded to a flash drive from your computer) for garment-specific instructions. Whirlpool Vantage Price not set; whirlpool.com
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0016.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
GADGETS
HOW IT WORKS PAPER, REVISED
A BATTERY-POWERED NOTEPAD AS CONVENIENT AS THE REAL THING
HOW TO WRITE WITHOUT PAPER
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Boogie Board LCD
$30
SANDEEP RAVINDRAN
A new electronic notepad may be lifelike, cheap and energy-efficient enough to replace those wasteful paper slips we still use for memos and grocery lists. The four-ounce Boogie Board runs for years on a single watch battery and, thanks to a novel use of the material inside ordinary computer screens, even mimics the feel of putting pen to paper.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0017.xml
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TOYOTA
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TOYOTA
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0018.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
HOME TECH
TECH REBORN GREENER PASTURES
BARBECUE-GRILL GAS CREATES A CLEANER-BURNING MOWER
INSIDE PROPANE POWER
IN RELATED NEWS: SIT ON YOUR CAN
cubcadet
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cubcadet
Lehr Eco Mower
$300
cubcadet
Cub Cadet Z Force S LP
$5,500
NICHOLAS MOSQUERA
Propane fuels your camp stove and patio grill because it burns efficiently and is easy to store safely. Now the same canisters are making lawn mowers more ecoand user-friendly, too. The propane-powered Eco Mower spews 26 percent less greenhouse gases and 60 percent less carbon monoxide than a gasoline model, plus you can replace its fuel conveniently and inexpensively.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0019.xml
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R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.
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R.J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0020.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
AUTOMOTIVE
TECH TREND REMOTE-CONTROL CARS
SMARTPHONE-BASED SYSTEMS THAT LET YOU COMMANDEER YOUR CAR FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY
THE TREND
WHY NOW
HOW YOU'LL BENEFIT
MERCEDES MBRACE
FORD SYNC
GM ONSTAR
mbusa
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mbusa
MERCEDES MBRACE
Developed by Georgia-based Hughes Telematics, Mbrace allows you to use your iPhone or BlackBerry to find your car in a crowded lot, lock the doors from any distance (provided you have a cell signal), lead you to a nearby dealership, or track your car in case of theft. The app will get more features over time, starting with real-time traffic information. Mbrace is available on all Mercedes models. mbusa.com/mbrace
mbusa
FORD SYNC
Ford’s in-car system already links with phones and MP3 players to offer voice-activated access to music, contact lists and more, and this year Ford plans to let third-party developers create other SYNC programs. Engineers have worked with University of Michigan students on prototype iPhone apps, including one that streams Internet radio and another that sends GPS directions from a lead vehicle to several followers, fordvehicles.com
mbusa
GM ONSTAR
GM's telematics system and its human operators can already call an ambulance after a crash, among other things. With the arrival of the Chevy Volt later this year, OnStar will link to your smartphone as well, with an app for Droid, iPhone and BlackBerry phones that will help Volt owners track their car's battery-charging status, fuel-economy history and other functions. It will even send a text if you forget to plug in your car. onstar.com
MIKE SPINELLI
Fly cross-country and forget to lock your car back in the parking lot? Now there's an app for that scenario. Many cars already have built-in computers with cell data chips and Bluetooth connections for linking to cellular phones. Fully integrating your app-rich smartphone and the cell-capable computer in your dashboard is the logical next step.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0021.xml
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Michelin North America, Inc.
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Michelin North America, Inc.
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0022.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
RECREATION
EXTREME CLOSE-UP TREADMILL TRAVELING
A MAP-EQUIPPED EXERCISE MACHINE CAN REENACT ANY HIKE ON EARTH
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NordicTrack X7i
$2,000
JASON DALEY
Dreaming of running up Mt. Kilimanjaro? Do it today. The NordicTrack X7i Incline Trainer raises and lowers itself to mimic the dips and hills of real-world topography. The X7i downloads maps over Wi-Fi from a Web site called iFit, which lets you pick popular routes like San Francisco's Golden Gate Trail, as well as treks you've designed on your computer across any territory covered by Google Maps.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0023.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
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FOUR MORE: FITNESS GADGETS
SCALE OF SHAME
H2O HOLDER
RUN TO THE MUSIC
BIKER BYTES
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SCALE OF SHAME
$160
This scale adds peer pressure to your battle against the bulge. It uses Wi-Fi to send your weight, body-fat percentage and body-mass index to your computer, iPhone or even your Twitter followers. Withings WiFi Body Scale $160; withings.com
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H2O HOLDER
$8
Stay hydrated without strapping a bulky water bottle to your hip. The Platypus reusable, flexible nylon and polyethylene pouch squishes to stow in a pocket and shrinks as you drink. When empty, it rolls up for easy storage, and a bacteria-fighting lining means it won't get skunky. Platypus SoftBottle From $8; platy.com
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RUN TO THE MUSIC
$130
The Activa MP3 player chooses songs that match your jogging pace. An accelerometer judges how fast you're moving, and software picks tunes with a similar tempo. Or it can select music similar to your favorite motivational anthem. Philips Activa $130; philips.com
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BIKER BYTES
$70
Attach SoundofMotion's magnetic sensor to a bike's rear wheel, and it measures torque, rotations and speed and beams the info to your cellphone. Or, for less-exact stats, strap an accelerometer-containing phone to your leg and let an app count its turns. Soundof Motion VeloComputer $70 (est.); velo computer .com
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0024.xml
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Advertisements
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Schneider Electric
The energy-efficient ES 750G
Schneider Electric
The best-value ES 550G
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0025.xml
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K&N Engineering, Inc.
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K&N Engineering, Inc.
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0026.xml
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HEADLINES
RESEARCH
HEAD CASE
TWO COMPANIES SAY THEIR BRAINSCANNING TECHNOLOGY CAN FIND THE TRUTH IN CRIMINAL CASES
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JUSTIN MCLACHLAN
It was a courtroom first. Late last year, an Illinois judge allowed functional magnetic-resonance imaging (fMRI) as evidence during the sentencing phase of a murder trial. Defense attorneys argued that the scan showed signs of mental illness and hoped it would convince the jury to show mercy.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0027.xml
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HEADLINES
DISASTER TECH
FIRE ESCAPE
HOW IT WORKS
STEP 1: GEAR UP
A NEW SYSTEM COULD HELP FIREFIGHTERS SURVIVE DEADLY BLAZES AND FIND FALLEN COMRADES IN THE SMOKE
STEP 2: DROP THE BOX
STEP 3: COLLECT DATA
STEP 4: SEE THE SCENE
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SANDEEP RAVINDRAN
This month, James Duckworth and David Cyganski, engineering professors at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, will fill a building with expensive sensors—10 years' worth of R&D—and set the whole place on fire. If their system works in the 1,100°F inferno produced inside the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy's burn building, the tech could give a fire chief everything he needs to make sure his crew returns safe and sound every time.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0028.xml
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HEADLINES
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OVERACHIEVERS WE LOVE
BIGGER
THE QUAKE-PROOF AIRPORT
GREENER
THE FLOATING FREIGHTER
FASTER
BLEEDING BLOCKER
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CARINA STORRS
There's a 60 percent chance that an earthquake will level Istanbul by 2040. But when it does, the newest terminal at Sabiha Gökçen International Airport can soldier on. The world's largest earthquake-protected building, which opened last November, can absorb 80 percent of backand-forth shaking, the most destructive movement.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0029.xml
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Bose Corporation: QuietComfort
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Bose Corporation
QuietComfort
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0030.xml
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0031.xml
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HEADLINES
ASTRONOMY
SCOPES ON A PLANE!
A TELESCOPE-TOTING 747 IS ABOUT TO BECOME ASTRONOMY’S MOST VERSATILE TOOL
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MARK WOLVERTON
In the movies, opening the door on a plane at 45,000 feet is disastrous. But this spring it will be standard procedure on one 747—one carrying a telescope high enough to capture the cosmos better than ever before. Built into the tail end of a Boeing 747, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) will soar above the atmospheric water vapor that blocks most infrared light from ground observatories, to shoot detailed images of star-forming nebulae, planets' atmospheres and clouds of organic molecules.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0032.xml
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Apple Computer, Inc.
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Apple Computer, Inc.
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0033.xml
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HEADLINES
MED TECH
SWEET SENSOR
AN IMPLANTABLE GLUCOSE SENSOR COULD HELP DIABETICS LEAD HEALTHIER LIVES
STATISTICALLY SPEAKING: THE DIABETES EPIDEMIC
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SANDEEP RAVINDRAN
Nurses usually pluck splinters from people's flesh, not put them in. But a new rice-size implantable glucose sensor that monitors blood sugar all day might mean less pain for diabetics. A nurse would inject the sensor, called Glucowizzard, in a patient's wrist and fit him with a wristband that powers the chip's photovoltaic cells by flashing light pulses through the skin.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0034.xml
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1&1 Internet, Inc.
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1&1 Internet, Inc.
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0035.xml
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A FIELD GUIDE TO FLYING ROBOTS
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A FIELD GUIDE TO FLYING ROBOTS
Inside the wild kingdom of the world’s newest and most spectacular species of unmanned aircraft, from swarming insect 'bots that can storm a burning building to a seven-ton weaponized spyplane invisible to radar
SPECIES:
DEMON
SPECIES:
VULTURE
SPECIES:
RQ-170 SENTINEL
SPECIES:
EMBLA
SPECIES:
ION TIGER
SPECIES:
EXCALIBUR
SPECIES:
S-100 CAMCOPTER
SPECIES:
SKYLITE
SPECIES:
AVENGER
SPECIES:
MANTIS
BATS, BEES AND OTHER FEATS OF BIOMIMICRY
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ERIC HAGERMAN
NEW BREEDS of winged beasts are lurking in the skies. Bearing names like Reaper, Vulture and Demon, they look nothing like their feathered brethren. Better known as unmanned aerial vehicles, or UAVs, these strange and wily birds are quietly infiltrating vast swaths of airspace, from battlefields to backyards.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0036.xml
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FRONTIERS OF MEDICINE
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REBOOTING THE BODY
The ability to reprogram the immune system is one of the most sought-after goals in medicine. Now researchers are closer than ever to pulling it off in patients with Type 1 diabetes, one of whom happens to be our correspondent
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CATHERINE PRICE
A SIGN RESTS on the windowsill in the office of Jeffrey Bluestone, director of the Immune Tolerance Network and the Diabetes Center at the University of California at San Francisco. Measuring nearly three feet across, it reads "Club Bluestone" in pink and blue neon.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0037.xml
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FRONTIERS OF MEDICINE
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RADICAL CURES
Blindness, brain cancer, vegetaives states: These are amoung the most hopeless conditions without cures—yet. Now doctors are turning to unorthodox methods to solve some of medicine’s most intractable challenges. The early results are in, and they look promising
RESTORING SIGHT
HOW IT WORKS
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COREY BINNS
Tami Morehouse was afraid to open her eyes at the sound of her alarm clock every morning. Her vision had deteriorated to a brown haze over the past three years. She couldn't tell the sky from the ocean or make out people's faces. The 45-year-old mother of three knew that, eventually, she would wake up one day and her world would be black.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0038.xml
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FRONTIERS OF MEDICINE
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WAKING UP THE BRAIN-DEAD
HOW IT WORKS
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Steven Domalewski had just released the ball when the batter smacked it right back at him, hitting his chest so hard that his heart stopped. A doctor put the then 12-year-old pitcher on life support and said that he would never wake up from the vegetative state.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0039.xml
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FRONTIERS OF MEDICINE
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REVERSING AUTISM
HOW IT WORKS
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Mark Bear’s mice weren't well. They were aggressive, slow learners, and kept convulsing in seizures—classic signs of Fragile X syndrome. But when the Massachusetts Institute of Technology neuroscientist tweaked a single receptor in the mice's brains, they began acting as if they had never been sick.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0040.xml
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FRONTIERS OF MEDICINE
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STOPPING BRAIN TUMORS
HOW IT WORKS
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A diagnosis of glioblastoma is a death sentence. A surgeon can remove as much of the brain tumor as is safe and prescribe chemoand radiation therapy, but the cancer will grow back. The luckiest few live half a decade; most survive just months.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0041.xml
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VITAL SIGNS
SIGNAL STRENGTH
DISCONNE CTED
Your cellphone does not in itself cause cancer. But in the daily of radiation we all travel, there may be subtler dangers at work, and science is only just beginning to understand how they affect you
SEA OF RADIATION
VOICES ON THE LINE
WHAT IT FEELS LIKE
WHAT WE KNOW
CAUSE VS. PROMOTER
CELLPHONE HABITS OF THE EXPERTS
POSSIBLE THREATS
WHAT WE DON’T KNOW
THE DISCONNECTED LIFE
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JAMES GEARY
PER SEGERBÄCK lives in a modest cottage in a nature reserve some 75 miles northeast of Stockholm. Wolves, moose and brown bears roam freely past his front door. He keeps limited human company, because human technology makes him physically ill. How ill? On a walk last summer, he ran into one of his few neighbors, a man who lives in a cottage about 100 yards away.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0042.xml
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HOW 2.0
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THE JET-POWERED ATV
POPSCI'S BUILDER-IN-RESIDENCE OUTFITS HIS FOUR-WHEELER WITH A SCREAMING TURBINE
HOW IT WORKS
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CASSANDRA CLAWSDN
When John Carnett—POPULAR SCIENCE staff photographer, inventor and tinkerer-about-town—began confiding in people about plans for his latest project, he found few allies. Not surprisingly, almost no one wanted any part of his scheme to stuff a jet-turbine engine in a Polaris RZR all-terrain vehicle.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0044.xml
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HOW 2.0
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IF YOU’RE A BOOK LOVER
1 MAKE TRADES
2 TRACK YOUR STATS
3 SOCIALIZE
4 BORROW
5 HEAR THE STORY
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AMANDA SCHUPAK
Get free books at PaperBackSwap.com. Post titles you’re willing to give away and earn credits when other users take them. When one of your listings is requested, you can print a mailing label from the site—just pay the postage and pop it in a mailbox.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0045.xml
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HOW 2.0
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BUILD IT RAISE YOUR VOICE
MAKE SURE YOU GET HEARD WITH A COMPACT HOMEBUILT MEGAPHONE
A COMPACT DIY MEGAPHONE
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HERE'S A PROJECT sure to head off your road rage. Instead of silently fuming the next time you're stuck in traffic behind some attention-deficient driver who fails to move when the light turns green, just give him a friendly yet firm word of encouragement through your DIY megaphone.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0046.xml
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Zoysia Farm Nurseries
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Zoysia Farm Nurseries
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0047.xml
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HOW 2.0
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GRAY MATTER A LIGHT MYSTERY
ALTHOUGH WE’VE LONG SEEN LEDs GLOW, WE HAVEN’T ALWAYS KNOWN WHY IT HAPPENS
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THEODORE GRAY
The first light-emitting diodes went on sale in 1962, and you could have any kind you wanted as long as it was dim and red. Green, yellow and orange came next, but blue LEDs didn't debut until 1989. So it may surprise you that the first LEDs, discovered in 1907, included blue—and were made of sandpaper.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0048.xml
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Advertisement: ABSORB SHOCK
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ABSORB SHOCK
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0049.xml
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HOW 2.0
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WHAT’S THE SAFEST AND CHEAPEST WAY TO BACK UP MY COMPUTER?
ASK A GEEK
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When it comes to preserving your data, there's no such thing as overkill. Your safest bet is actually to employ multiple methods. Fortunately, most of them are cheap—or free. Start by leveraging the other computers in your house. Microsoft's free Windows Live Sync tool (sync.live.com) will sync selected folders on your system, automatically or on-demand, with any other computer(s) you own.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0050.xml
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Advertisements
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MacNeil Automotive Products Limited
Toyota Prius Hybird
MacNeil Automotive Products Limited
Dodge Caliber
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0051.xml
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RosettaStone
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RosettaStone
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0053.xml
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HOW 2.0
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POPSCI 5 MINUTE PROJECT A CELLPHONE WALL DOCK*
SO YOU NEVER WONDER WHERE YOU THREW YOUR PHONE DOWN
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1. Cut off the bottom of an empty shampoo or conditioner bottle, and cut a piece off the side of the bottle the size of your phone. 2. Stick a picture-hanging strip on the back of the bottle and the connecting strip on the wall. 3. Hang the bottle, and connect the phone's power cable through the bottle's neck and into a wall outlet.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0054.xml
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HOW 2.0
WINDOWS APP OF THE MONTH
THE PC DECRAPIFIER
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New computers come with lots of fancy applications pre-installed—as well as lots of junk. The free PC Decrapifier software (pcdecrapifier.com) finds the extraneous programs that commonly clog up new systems and gives you a list for simple removal.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0055.xml
article
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HOW 2.0
PROJECT OF THE MONTH
THE HACK-A-SKETCH
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As a kid, Michael Krumpus spent hours drawing with his Etch-A-Sketch. Now a 39-year-old software engineer, he decided to mod his laptop with potentiometers, an Arduino microcontroller board and code he wrote so the screen forms images that look just like the toy's.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0056.xml
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75
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THE TEACHING COMPANY
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THE TEACHING COMPANY
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0057.xml
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76,78,79
FYI
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Q Can we dispose of radioactive waste in volcanoes?
SOMETIMES YOU JUST NEED TO KNOW
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Riley Jameson
A Dumping all our nuclear waste in a volcano does seem like a neat solution for destroying the roughly 29,000 tons of spent uranium fuel rods stockpiled around the world. But there's a critical standard that a volcano would have to meet to properly dispose of the stuff, explains Charlotte Rowe, a volcano geophysicist at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0058.xml
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0059.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0060.xml
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77
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0061.xml
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77
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Solatube
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Solatube
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0062.xml
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78
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Woodland Power Products, Inc.
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Woodland Power Products, Inc.
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0063.xml
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78
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ShurTech Brands
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ShurTech Brands
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0064.xml
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79
79
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Gorilla Glue Company
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Gorilla Glue Company
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0065.xml
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79
79
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Valentine Research, Inc.
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Valentine Research, Inc.
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0066.xml
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80
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0067.xml
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0068.xml
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82
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Costello & Sons
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Costello & Sons
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0069.xml
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83
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United States Rare Coin and Bullion Reserve
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United States Rare Coin and Bullion Reserve
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0070.xml
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84
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The Smile Train
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The Smile Train
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0071.xml
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85
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0072.xml
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psshowcase
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0073.xml
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91
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POPULAR SCIENCE DIRECT
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0074.xml
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THE FUTURE THEN
JULY 1992
Ozone Drone
AIRWARE: MORE REMOTE-CONTROL AIRCRAFT THROUGH THE YEARS
COMMAND AND CONTROL
DECEMBER 1945
TRICKY TARGET
FEBRUARY 1959
DRONE BEE
FEBRUARY 1971
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KRISTYN BRADY
In 1992, research into the depleted ozone layer required eyes where scientists couldn't go: 82,000 feet up. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) seemed to be the answer. Perseus, an unmanned power glider, was unveiled in 1991 to search for ozone-killing chemicals over Antarctica.
PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0075.xml
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STIHL
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STIHL
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0076.xml
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ford
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ford
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PopularScience_20100301_0276_003_0077.xml