Issue: 20090101

Thursday, January 1, 2009
JANUARY 2009
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274
Monday, December 29, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0001.xml
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SUZUKI: SX4 Sport
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SUZUKI
SX4 Sport
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0002.xml
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2,3
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Intuit: QuickBooks
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Intuit
QuickBooks
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0003.xml
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4
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Nikon Inc.: D90
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Nikon Inc.
D90
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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5,6
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CONTENTS
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0005.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0006.xml
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P&G: DURACELL
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P&G
DURACELL
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0007.xml
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8,9
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Ford: F-150
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Ford
F-150
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0008.xml
article
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FROM THE EDITOR
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Tech President
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MARK JANNOT
On October 30, just five days before the presidential election, Barack Obama did something that snapped my head back: He devoted a solid chunk of an interview on an evening news show to detailing his plans, if elected, to overhaul the nation's electrical grid.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0009.xml
masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0010.xml
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CEA: CES
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CEA
CES
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0011.xml
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12
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SONY
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SONY
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0012.xml
article
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OTHER STUFF
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THE INBOX
Electrified
Corrections
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True, a plug-in would make sense for a majority of commuters, but there are definitely hurdles to overcome. The current electric infrastructure couldn't handle pumping electricity to millions of cars. Replacing today's gas-distribution process with electric charging stations will not be quick, easy or cheap.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0013.xml
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Sony Electronics Inc.
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Sony Electronics Inc.
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0014.xml
article
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14,15
MEGAPIXELS
THE MUST-SEE PHOTOS OF THE MONTH
FUNKY CHICKEN
FOLLOWING BIRD DEVELOPMENT FROM EGG TO HEN
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STUART FOX
To create this image, which won the popular vote in the 2008 Nikon Small World contest, 22-year-old Tomás Pais de Azevedo, a graduate student in evolutionary and developmental biology at the University of Lisbon in Portugal, removed an eight-day-old, two-inch-long chicken embryo from its egg and stained it with a dye that binds to cartilage.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0015.xml
article
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MEGAPIXELS
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TUNNEL VISION
THE LONG WALK TO A NUCLEAR-WASTE STORAGE FACILITY
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GREG SOLTIS
At the end of this tunnel, which snakes as deep as 820 feet below the Hungarian countryside, lies a new long-term nuclear-waste facility, set to open in 2010. Located on the outskirts of the village of Bátaapáti, it will store more than 10.5 million gallons of lowand intermediate-level waste produced at the Paks nuclear power plant, which is 40 miles away.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0016.xml
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SAMSUNG: 8 HDTV
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SAMSUNG
8 HDTV
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0017.xml
review
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19
WHAT'S NEW
TECH THAT PUTS THE FUTURE IN THE PALM OF YOUR HAND
FRAME WORK
A NEW CASTING TECHNIQUE PRODUCES A STRONGER, LIGHTER MOTORCYCLE
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BUELL 1125CR
$11,700
MATTHEW COKELEY
Buell did not break the mold when it made the 1125CR racing bike. Instead, it washed the mold away—to create a sturdier body. The frames of other motorcycles are formed by pouring molten metal into a mold of sand and clay. Buell engineers instead developed a water-soluble bonding agent to use in place of clay.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0018.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
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THE GOODS
12 MUST-HAVE PRODUCTS
EASY STEPS
SAFETY LINE
MOTOR HEAD
LIGHT COLORED
RECORDING ARTIST
DANCE, DANCE EVOLUTION
OVER THE HILL
PLUG AND PRINT
FASTER FRAMES
READY FOR YOUR CLOSE-UP
AUTO WASH
UNDER PRESSURE
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Track your daily calorie burn without expending extra energy. Fitbit's pedometer automatically uploads step counts to your computer whenever you walk by its Bluetooth-enabled base station. Fitbit Tracker $100; fitbit.com Back up your files just by plugging one end of this cable into your PC and the other into any USB hard drive.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0019.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
HOME TECH
EXTREME CLOSE-UP EXTRA-POWER TOOL
A REDESIGNED MOTOR GIVES THIS DRILL A SERIOUS BOOST IN JUICE
IN RELATED NEWS: COOL CORDLESS TOOLS
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RYOBI HYBRID SAW
$150
RYOBI HYBRID SAW Like the love child of a recip and a jigsaw, this tool pumps standard jig blades at 1,850 strokes per minute, perfect for cutting holes in drywall. It's part of an inexpensive set that includes an impact driver, compact drill, circular saw and work light. $150 (set); ryobitools.com
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BOSCH MULTI-X
$200
BOSCH MULTI-X This device can oscillate different attachments at up to 20,000 times a minute. Use tiny triangular sanding pads for nooks and crannies or a miniature saw blade that will cut in places you could never cram a hacksaw. $200; boschtools.com
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For guys on a job site drilling hundreds of holes a day, power matters—it lets them work faster and blow through knots, nails and other obstructions. That’s why corded tools, with their bigger, stronger motors, still reign for contractors, and why DeWalt challenged its engineers to deliver even more oomph.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0020.xml
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23
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GM Corp.: Chevy Tahoe Hybrid
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GM Corp.
Chevy Tahoe Hybrid
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0021.xml
review
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24
WHAT'S NEW
PHOTOGRAPHY
TECH TRANSFER A MINI SLR
THIS NEW DESIGN BORROWS FROM BOTH PRO CAMERAS AND POCKET MODELS
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The big news in cameras is actually pretty small. A new format with the wonky name "micro four thirds" [referring to the image sensor's size and 4:3 aspect ratio], combines the interchangeable lenses of an SLR with the compact body of a point-and-shoot.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0022.xml
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Advertisement: SCIENCE ILLUSTRATED
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SCIENCE ILLUSTRATED
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0023.xml
article
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WHAT'S NEW
AUTO TECH
EXTREME CLOSE-UP MORE THAN SKIN-DEEP
INSIDE, PORSCHE'S 911 IS A WHOLE NEW CAR
LIGHTS
SUSPENSION
TRANSMISSION
ENGINE
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Look through the 2009 Carrera S's familiar skin, and you'll find the biggest redesign in years. The change starts with a dual-clutch transmission, taken straight from Porsche's racecars, that shifts gears in milliseconds. It’s bolted to a redesigned six-cylinder engine that uses direct fuel injection (a first for Porsche) to churn out higher horsepower while actually getting more miles per gallon.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0024.xml
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Discover Bank
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Discover Bank
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0025.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
GADGETS
GOOD, BETTER, BEST TURNING A NEW PAGE
TOUCHSCREENS MAKE DIGITAL BOOKS MORE LIKE THE REAL THING
GOOD SONY PRS-700 READER DIGITAL BOOK
BETTER IREX DIGITAL READER 1000S
BEST PLASTIC LOGIC READER
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SONY PRS-700 READER DIGITAL BOOK
$400
Weighing just 10 ounces, Sony's new reader is about the same size as earlier versions. But its 4.8-by-3.6-inch screen packs resistive sensors that respond to pressure from your finger or a stylus. Swipe the screen to turn a page, or drag across a word to highlight and copy it. You can't write freehand, but you can make notes by tapping on a keyboard that pops up onscreen. $400; sony.com SCREEN SIZE: PAPERBACK
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IREX DIGITAL READER 1000S
$750
Write or draw directly on a 6.3-by-8-inch display. Like iRex's smaller models (previously the only digital books with touchscreens), the 1000S uses a sensor board, placed under the screen, that reacts to a magnetic signal from an electronic pen. (It's the same Wacom tech that digital artists use.) Navigate pages with touch-sensitive panels on the unit's side. $750; irextechnologies.com SCREEN SIZE: HARDCOVER
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PLASTIC LOGIC READER
This spring, Plastic Logic will debut the thinnest e-reader yet—just over a quarter of an inch—with a screen the same size as an 8.5-by-11-inch sheet of paper. Its E-Ink display sits on a plastic base instead of glass, making it slimmer, lighter and more durable; even the transistors are plastic. The touchscreen relies on iPhone-style capacitance sensors, which react to the electrical conductivity of your fingertips. Price not set; plasticlogic.com SCREEN SIZE: OFFICE PAPER
SEAN PORTNOY
The latest electronic readers let you scrawl in the margins or swipe your finger to turn a page, just as with a traditional paper book. Their new realism comes from touchscreens of various kinds, which replace computer-like buttons. And with E-Ink displays that look like pigment on paper, these gizmos could convert even die-hard bookworms.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0026.xml
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BELTRONICS: GX 65
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BELTRONICS
GX 65
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0027.xml
review
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WHAT'S NEW
GADGETS
PARADIGM SHIFT MAKE THIS PHONE YOUR OWN
THE "GOOGLE PHONE" IS HERE. NOW PROGRAMMERS CAN MAKE IT INTERESTING
WHAT IT IS
WHY IT'S RADICAL
FOR EXAMPLE
T-Mobile
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T-Mobile
G1
$180
GET IT: T-Mobile G1 $180 with two-year contract (from $65/ month); tmobile.com
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Android, Google's cellphone operating system. When we curse at our phones, the culprit is usually the impenetrable software that requires five button presses just to save a number to its address book. But what if you could replace the address book with a better version—or with something completely different, like a program that links to your Facebook friends list instead?
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0028.xml
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GARMIN
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GARMIN
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0029.xml
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RichardSolo
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RichardSolo
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0030.xml
article
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33,35
HEADLINES
ENVIRONMENT
THE OTHER BIG MELTDOWN
IS GLOBAL WARMING SHIFTING INTO HIGH GEAR? A FEDERAL PROJECT AIMS TO FIND OUT
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LAURA ALLEN
To predict the unpredictable: That's the goal of a new government initiative on abrupt climate change. As the atmosphere reels under the influence of greenhouse gases, scientists fear the growing risk of dramatic environmental changes occurring within decades—far faster than current computer models predict.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0031.xml
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HEADLINES
DEFENSE TECH
SECURITY IN THE "FAST" LANE
A NEW SYSTEM SCANS CROWDS FOR THE BIOLOGICAL CUES THAT PRECIPITATE CRIME
FAST HAS YOU COVERED
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ARNIE COOPER
As you make your way through the security checkpoint of the 2020 Los Angeles Auto Show, visions of hydrogen sports cars occupy your mind. Not so for the well-dressed 25-year-old behind you. He plan to set off a bomb. But minute irregularities in his body temperature, heart rate and sweat content betray his nefarious intentions and trigger alarms, alerting security before he even enters the building.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0032.xml
article
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HEADLINES
WHAT'S THE BIG IDEA?
CHARGING AHEAD
WHY DOT-COM BILLIONAIRE ELON MUSK IS BANKING ON AMERICAN-MADE ELECTRIC CARS
Q: Why not go hybrid?
Q: How will drivers recharge the battery pack in the Model S?
Q: Tesla has delivered only 50 Roadsters. How do you plan to get 15,000 Model S cars out annually?
Q: You run a green company. Would you say you live a green lifestyle?
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If there's a gene for entrepreneurship, Elon Musk has it. From his first project at age 12 creating and selling a videogame called Blaster for $500, to his $1-billion-plus sale of PayPal to eBay in 2002, the 37-year-old South African is every bit the born mogul.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0033.xml
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Advertisements
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pulstar
SPARK PLUG
pulstar
PULSE PLUG
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0034.xml
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Rosetta Stone
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Rosetta Stone
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0035.xml
article
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HEADLINES
THE EQUATION
MINING LANDFILLS
A SMARTER WAY TO PULL PRECIOUS METALS FROM TRASHED ELECTRONICS
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GRAEME STEMP-MORLOCK
Instead of sifting mountain streams for gold, modern-day prospectors hit the landfills, "mining" for discarded cellphones and computers. Electronics contain valuable metals, like gold. But reclaiming the treasure requires melting circuit boards in acid, scooping up gold with nonbiodegradable plastic resins and films, and burning the plastic to free up the metal.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0036.xml
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Epilog Laser: Zing Laser
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Epilog Laser
Zing Laser
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0037.xml
article
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HEADLINES
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PLANET FIXERS
3 BODACIOUS GREEN INNOVATIONS
PLUG-N-PLAY CARS
ELECTRIC ASPHALT
SMART WATER
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MICHAEL BEHAR
Zero to 60 mph in about nine seconds may sound sluggish, but it's a breakthrough for a zero-emissions, all-electric car that can travel up to 100 miles on a single charge and hit speeds of 85 mph. That's the claim of the i MiEV (for "Mitsubishi Innovative motor Electric Vehicle"), a new plug-in four-door coupe. The i MiEV runs on a pack of 22 lithium-ion batteries, but unlike other electric cars, including the Chevy Volt and Tesla Roadster, the i MiEV doesn't require a liquid cooling system to avoid overheating.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0038.xml
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Advertisements
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American Power Conversion Corporation
P7GT
American Power Conversion Corporation
ES 750G
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0039.xml
article
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CONCEPTS & PROTOTYPES
TOMORROW'S TECHNOLOGY TODAY
STEALH REBORN
THE AIR FORCE WANTS A NEW BOMBER EQUIPPED WITH 21ST-CENTURY TECHNOLOGY. THAT COULD MEAN STEALTHIER SURFACE MATERIALS AND LASER WEAPONS—AND IT MIGHT EVEN SKIP THE PILOT
TODAY'S BOMBER FLEET
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DAWN STOVER
The B-2 stealth bomber, assisted by midair refuelings, can fly a 44-hour mission to the other side of the world, take out targets using laser-guided smart munitions, then sneak out of enemy territory undetected. Yet it runs on Intel 286 processors—state of the art in 1982, but these days, not so much.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0040.xml
article
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SCIENCE OF '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
LAST CALL?
AIRBORNE LASERS. THE CELLPHONE-CANCER LINK. BIG BUCKS FOR X PRIZE WINNERS? HERE, WE GIVE YOU A PEEK AT WHAT PROMISES TO BE A REVELATORY YEAR OF SCIENCE
THE MOST DEFINITIVE STUDY YET COULD FINALLY DETERMINE WHETHER CELLPHONE USE CAUSES CANCER
JANUARY
A Year of Stars
FEBRUARY 12
Darwin's Birthday Bash
FEBRUARY 17
TV Goes to All-Digital
FEBRUARY
Hubble Repair
SPRING
Sci-Fi Sequels
SPRING
LHC Restart
SPRING
Solar Airplane Test Flights
SUMMER
South Korea's First Space Launch
JULY
Lithium-Polymer Batteries Now in Cars
SUMMER
Nanny State Arrives in Vehicles
FALL
Near-Endless Power
FALL
Electric Cars to Market
LATE YEAR
1,000 Human Genomes
LATE YEAR
Dreamliner to First Customers
DECEMBER
Copenhagen Climate Conference
END OF YEAR
Rwanda and Computing
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MELINDA WENNER
GREG SOLTIS
Nearly five decades ago, Americans learned that one of their most treasured habits-smoking-was lethal. This year, we could get more scary news, when scientists announce the results from Interphone, the largest-ever study to investigate whether cellphones cause cancer.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0041.xml
article
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SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
COSMIC HOUSE-HUNTING
NEW ORBITING OBSERVATORY WILL SEARCH FOR EARTH-LIKE PLANETS
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M.W.
Earth's twin could be waiting for us hundreds of light-years away. In fact, thousands of Earth doppelgängers may be lurking in the cosmic distance, orbiting stars just like our sun and maybe, just maybe, harboring life of their own. Although telescopes have identified more than 300 planets outside our solar system, most of them are too harsh to host life.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0042.xml
article
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48
SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
MEANWHILE, CLOSER TO HOME
LOOK FOR THESE NOTABLE LAUNCHES TO EARTH-ORBIT THIS YEAR
SPACESHIPTWO
GLORY
WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER
CRYOSAT-2
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M.W.
The first flight of Virgin Galactic's SpaceShipTwo could take six customers to 360,000 feet and offer them weightlessness and 1,000mile views in all directions. In June, NASA's Glory satellite will launch to help predict future climate change by gauging the magnitude of the sun's energy and studying atmospheric aerosols.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0043.xml
article
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49
SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
HEAVY LIFTER
NASA TEST-DRIVES A NEW ROCKET
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M.W.
NASA will fire up its latest rocket this April for its first test flight. Ares 1 is designed to haul a 25-ton payload, making it capable of ferrying either six astronauts to the International Space Station or four astronauts to low-Earth orbit, where they can transfer to another vehicle and head to the moon.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0044.xml
article
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SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
BEYOND EARTH
THIS YEAR'S MOST POPULAR DESTINATIONS FOR UNMANNED LANDERS
MARS SCIENCE LABORATORY
LUNAR RECONNAISSANCE ORBITER
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M.W.
Launching in the fall, this research rover will collect and examine Martian soil and rock samples for traces of carbon, life's most common building block. To find that carbon, ChemCam will fire lasers at the ground and analyze the vapor produced by the impact.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0045.xml
article
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SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
AIRBORNE LASER BLASTS OFF
ANTI-BALLISTIC-MISSILE PLANE GETS FIRST TEST
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MELINDA DODD
Should they cast their eyes skyward at just the right moment, a few lucky observers could see something spectacular this summer: a Boeing 747 splitting open a ballistic missile with a laser in mid-flight. After 12 years and $5 billion in R&D, the Missile Defense Agency's Airborne Laser (ABL) will make its first real-world attempt to shoot down a missile in midair.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0046.xml
article
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50
SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
PREDICTING THE HEADLINES
DINOSAURS' TRUE COLORS REVEALED
FEDS AIM TO SAVE ECOSYSTEMS
STEM-CELL SCIENCE GETS REBOOTED
MISSION: INVISIBLE
ELUSIVE BLACK HOLE CAPTURED
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A.S.
Last year, researchers at Yale University discovered organelles called melanosomes on a 100-million-year-old dino feather. This year they will examine the shape and concentration of the melanosomes to determine the original colors of winged dinosaurs.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0047.xml
article
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50,51
SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
POLITICAL SCIENCE
THE HOT-BUTTON RESEARCH ISSUES FACING THE NEW ADMINISTRATION
ENDANGERED SPECIES
SPACE EXPLORATION
CLIMATE CHANGE
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Over the past eight years, the rift between the scientific community and the federal agencies that govern it has deepened. What opportunities will President Barack Obama's administration have to bridge the divide?—COREY BINNS THE ISSUE:
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0048.xml
article
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50,51
SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
LIGHTS OUT
ENERGY-EFFICIENT TECH DIMS EDISON'S BRIGHT IDEA
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C.B.
On March 1, the Republic of Ireland becomes the first democratic country in the world to ban the traditional incandescent lightbulb. Stores there will no longer carry the century-old technology, which converts only between 5 and 10 percent of electricity into light, losing the rest as radiant heat.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0049.xml
article
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51
SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
POWERED BY SUN, WIND AND SEA
THE BIGGEST RENEWABLE-ENERGY PROJECTS OF 2009
OFFSHORE WIND
SOLAR FARMS
WAVE POWER
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C.B.
Hull, Massachusetts This resort town, population 11,000, plans to moor four 260-foot-tall turbines a mile and a half offshore, at a total cost of $40 million. Along with Hull's two existing onshore turbines, wind power could generate 14 megawatts, enough to supply energy to the entire community.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0050.xml
article
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SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
SHOW ME THE MONEY
GET PAID FOR YOUR BRILLIANT, WORLDSAVING INVENTIONS
PROGRESSIVE INSURANCE AUTOMOTIVE X PRIZE
ARCHON X PRIZE FOR GENOMICS
SPACEWARD SPACE ELEVATOR GAMES
GOOGLE LUNAR X PRIZE
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AMANDA SCHUPAK
Nothing inspires innovation like a seven-figure check, which is why more and more private and government sources are offering big money for creative technologies—and plenty of Americans are rising to the challenge. The California company Scaled Composites won the $10-million Ansari X Prize in 2004 for its trips to suborbital space on SpaceShipOne, a feat that all but launched the private space industry.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0051.xml
article
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SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
RAINYDAY RICE
ASIAN FARMERS WILL GET A DISASTERPROOF VERSION OF AN ESSENTIAL CROP
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M.D.
After years of testing in muddy fields, genetically enhanced flood-resistant rice is about to hit agricultural markets in tropical Asia, following Indonesia, with India and Bangladesh up for approval later this year. Cambodia, Laos, Nepal, Thailand, the Philippines and Vietnam are expected to follow suit.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0052.xml
article
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SCIENCE IN '09
POPSCI PREDICTS
PUT A LID ON IT
CURBING CARBON FOR PROFIT
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C.B.
This year, in conjunction with talk about climate change, you'll probably hear the words "cap and trade" being tossed around, and President Obama is expected to sign climate-change legislation that includes a cap-and-trade bill. But what does the term mean?
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0053.xml
article
54
54,55,56,57,58,59,60,61,84,85
FIELDWORK
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KILLER CONNECTION
America is haunted by 100,000 missing persons and 40,000 unidentified sets of remains. Only one lab can truly connect the lost and the dead-and it's revealing the secrets of serial killers in the process
THREE KEY FACTS
THE SILENT MISSING
ONE IN A MILLION
CONNECTING DN A’S DOTS
SCALING THE BACKLOG
THE MATCH
THE FINAL IDENTIFICATION
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JESSICA SNYDER SACHS
LIKE A COWBOY loosely holding the reins, Larry Weatherman steers up Deer Creek Road with his left hand on the wheel, his right arm ready at his side. His upper body rocks with the motion of the pickup as he navigates the dirt road's gauntlet of potholes and rocks.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0054.xml
article
57
57,59,61
FIELDWORK
MEDICAL MURDERS
KILLERS IN THE ICU
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High on the back wall of the New Jersey Poison Center in Newark, beyond a display case filled with bottles of ant killer, antifreeze and other ingredients of noteworthy cases, hangs an electronic map of the state. It displays dozens of glowing red dots.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0055.xml
article
62
62,63
HOW IT WORKS
YOUR PEEK INSIDE THE MYSTERIES OF EVERYDAY LIFE
DIGITAL MAPMAKING
THOSE MAPS ON GPS DEVICES AND GOOGLE DON'T JUST APPEAR. HERE'S HOW A FLEET OF MINIVANS IS WORKING TO DIGITIZE EVERY ROAD, BUILDING AND SIGN IN THE WORLD
HOW A MAPPING VAN WORKS
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DOUG CANTOR
1. SHOOTING The Netherlands-based Tele Atlas is one of two companies that build and update street maps to feed to GPS-device makers and Web sites such as Google Maps. Its raw data: photographs captured by more than 300 drivers, who collectively covered 350,000 miles last year.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0056.xml
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64
64,65,66,67,68,69,70,71
THE FUTURE OF ENERGY
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THIS MACHINE MIGHT SAVE THE WORLD
TWO DESKTOP-PRINTER ENGINEERS QUIT THEIR JOBS TO SEARCH FOR THE ULTIMATE SOURCE OF ENDLESS ENERGY: NUCLEAR FUSION. COULD THIS HIGHLY IMPROBABLE ENTERPRISE ACTUALLY SUCCEED
HOW GENERAL FUSION'S PLAN COULD WORK
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JOSH DEAN
THE SOURCE OF endless energy for all humankind resides just off Government Street in Burnaby, British Columbia, up the little spit of blacktop on Bonneville Place and across the parking lot from Shade-O-Matic blind manufacturers and wholesalers.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0057.xml
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72
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Advertisements
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HUSTLER
SPORT
HUSTLER
ZEON
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0058.xml
article
73
73,74
HOW 2.0
TIPS, TRICKS, HACKS AND DO-IT-YOURSELF PROJECTS
YOU BUILT WHAT ?! STRAIGHT TO VIDEO
A CARD TABLE THAT TURNS ANY GAME INTO THE WORLD SERIES OF POKER
HOW THE VIDEO POKER TABLE WORKS
CAPTURING THE ACTION
FOLLOWING THE MONEY
PUTTING IT ONSCREEN
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ANDREW MILNER
Every Friday night, about 10 regulars gather at my place in Perth, Australia, to play Texas Hold 'Em. I'm the co-founder of a technology-services company, L7 Solutions. I'm also a chronic tinkerer and a poker lover. Last fall I decided to up the ante, so to speak, and started planning a table that could generate a video display showing what cards each player has, how much they bet, and their chances of winning the hand.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0059.xml
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74
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MATHTUTORDVD
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MATHTUTORDVD
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0060.xml
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75
75
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Tempur-Pedic North America, Inc.
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Tempur-Pedic North America, Inc.
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0061.xml
article
76
76
HOW 2.0
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GRAY MATTER HOMEMADE TITANIUM
WITH HEAT AND COMMON CHEMICALS, THE AUTHOR TURNED ORE INTO METAL
TITANIUM IN A POT
ACHTUNG!
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THEOOORE GRAY
An iron crowbar costs about $8; one made of titanium, $80. Solid-titanium scissors start at $700, and don't even ask about the titanium socket wrench. Titanium must be a rare and precious substance, right? Actually, as raw ore, titanium is 100 times as abundant as copper.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0062.xml
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77
HOW 2.0
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CHEAP TRICKS UNWIRE YOUR XBOX
GET YOUR XBOX 360 ONLINE WIRELESSLY WITH AN OLD ROUTER AND FREE SOFTWARE
TOTALLY FREE WIRELESS
DIY WIRELESS FOR YOUR XBOX
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DOUG CANTOR
This 50-foot Ethernet cable snaking all the way through my apartment from the router in the bedroom to my Xbox 360 in the living room? That's how I used to play videogames online. The Xbox doesn't come with wireless capability built in, and I didn't want to shell out the extra $100—a third the price of the console itself—for Microsoft's wireless adapter.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0063.xml
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78
HOW 2.0
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POPSCI 5 MINUTE PROJECT INTEGRATED-CIRCUIT CUFF LINKS
TO COMPLETE YOUR GEEK-CHIC LOOK:
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1. Thread a small piece of wire through a button. 2• Strip the ends of the wire, and solder it to an integrated circuit. 3• Flash some cuff for the ladies. HAVE AN IDEA FOR A 5-MINUTE PROJECT? SEND IT TO US AT h20@bonniercorp.com.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0064.xml
article
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78
HOW 2.0
WEB SITE OF THE MONTH
IKEA HACKER
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Who says you have to put together your IKEA furniture exactly the way the Swedish instructions tell you to? IKEA Hacker (likeahacker.blogspot.com) is a showcase of ingenious ways people have assembled things from the store to change their look and function—from installing a Linux computer cluster into a Helmer cabinet, to making a terrarium out of a Benno TV unit, to adding a comic-book top to an Alleby stool [pictured].
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0065.xml
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78
HOW 2.0
BUILD OF THE MONTH
THE CASSETTE CLOSET
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Needing a space divider in his office, Dutch product designer Patrick Schuur built a giant cabinet intended to "remind people of how good-looking technology used to be." Schuur and his co-workers began by making a large wooden frame and then created the retro exterior by screwing on, one by one, 918 old cassette tapes.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0066.xml
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78
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CiTRiX
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CiTRiX
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0067.xml
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79
HOW 2.0
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ASK A GEEK WHAT'S A GOOD WAY TO SEND MYSELF REMINDERS?
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It's a fine time to ditch paper for good and move to an all e-mailand SMS-based system. Start with Google's online calendar (google.com/calendar), which lets you set up multiple alerts for one event—for example, a text message one week before Mother's Day, then another the day before in case you still managed to put off sending flowers.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0068.xml
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79
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MacNeil Automotive Products Limited: WeatherTeach
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MacNeil Automotive Products Limited
WeatherTeach
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0069.xml
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80
80,82
FYI
SOMETIMES YOU JUST NEED TO KNOW
Q IF YOU DROPPED A CORN KERNEL FROM SPACE, WOULD IT POP DURING REENTRY?
What's the difference between artificial and natural flavors?
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AMY GEPPERT
A There's a little bit of water inside each kernel of popcorn, and if you can heat the kernel above 212°F, that water should boil, turn into high-pressure steam, and pop the kernel. But in orbit, things aren't so simple. First off, the cold vacuum of space would suck all the water out of the kernel before it could pop the corn.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0070.xml
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81
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Plasma CAM Inc.
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Plasma CAM Inc.
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0071.xml
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82
FYI
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ASK A MARS CAREER COUNSELOR
What would be the best job to have in a Mars colony?
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You've just landed on the Red Planet and are looking for a fresh start. Sure, that job selling respirators at the local space-hardware store sounds cozy, but it's a dead-end career. Mars will be ripe with opportunity; you just have to figure out how to tap it.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0072.xml
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82
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0073.xml
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83
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0074.xml
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83
83
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0075.xml
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84
84
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Valentine Research, Inc.: DOUBLE ZAP
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Valentine Research, Inc.
DOUBLE ZAP
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0076.xml
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84
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0077.xml
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85,86,87,88,90,91,92,93
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psshowcase
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0078.xml
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89
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CRYSTAL CLEAR Dept.
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CRYSTAL CLEAR Dept.
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0079.xml
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93,94,95
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POPULAR SCIENCE DIRECT
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0080.xml
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OTHER STUFF
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PPX THE POPSCI PREDICTIONS EXCHANGE
(TURING)
[BPA]
[ISPLAW]
WHAT IS THE PPX?
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To pass a Turing test, a computer must be able to communicate with people well enough that 30 percent of observers can't tell they're speaking with a computer rather than a human. Last October, a computer called Elbot came close to succeeding in the Loebner Prize competition at the University of Reading in England.
PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0081.xml
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97
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T-Mobile USA, Inc.: gameloft
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T-Mobile USA, Inc.
gameloft
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PopularScience_20090101_0274_001_0082.xml