Issue: 20021101

Friday, November 1, 2002
NOVEMBER 2002
5
True
261
Saturday, November 29, 2014

Articles
cover
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0001.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0002.xml
advertisement
2
2,3
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0003.xml
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4,5
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0004.xml
advertisement
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6
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Circuit City Stores, Inc.
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Circuit City Stores, Inc.
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0005.xml
tableOfContents
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7
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POPULAR science
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0006.xml
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8
8,9
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Epson America, Inc.: Epson Stylus Photo 925
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Epson America, Inc.
Epson Stylus Photo 925
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0007.xml
masthead
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10
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POPULAR science
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0008.xml
article
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10
From the Editor
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PopSci's Brilliant 10
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Scott Mowbray
IT’S A CONCEIT OF THE MODERN MIND TO BELIEVE WE LIVE in the most interesting, volatile, and momentous of times. Measuring and documenting change has become a sort of ticker-tape obsession—and it's always been our lifeblood at POPULAR SCIENCE.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0009.xml
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11
11
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THE CROWN ROYAL COMPANY
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THE CROWN ROYAL COMPANY
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0010.xml
advertisement
12
12,13
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TOYOTA
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TOYOTA
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0011.xml
article
14
14,16
Letters
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Will Airports Ever Be Safe?
Two Sides on ID Cards
Deterrents to Peace
No Space Litter, Please
It's a Plane! It's a Bird!
Dangerous Numbers
C2C Car a Team Effort
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I really enjoyed the article “Blueprint for a Sterile Airport" [Sept.]. I travel extensively on business and feel that our country's airport security systems are in the lower percentile when compared with those of the rest of the world. Even the poorer countries I visit have implemented far better security measures than those in the States.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0012.xml
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14
14
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0013.xml
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15
15
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Nikon Inc.: Coolpix 5700
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Nikon Inc.
Coolpix 5700
[no value]
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0014.xml
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16
16
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Sears, Roebuck and Co.
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Sears, Roebuck and Co.
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0015.xml
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17
17
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Sears, Roebuck and Co.: CRAFTSMAN
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Sears, Roebuck and Co.
CRAFTSMAN
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0016.xml
advertisement
18
18
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Thomson multimedia, Inc.
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Thomson multimedia, Inc.
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0017.xml
review
19
19,20,22,24,24b
What'New
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Go Ahead, Take the Plunge
TWIN CUTTER
water safety
The Leather man of Life Vests
strength training
Spot-less Free Weights
telephones
CORDLESS CATCHES BIGGER AIR
hands on
WHY YOU WANT THE TABLET PC
digital cameras
Camera for the Surf (and Turf)
inventions
The Multiple-Outlet Extension Cord
A Smart Fridge Isn't Necessarily a Dumb Idea
prototype
SNAP-ON SCUBA FLIPPERS
photo archiving
Self-Feeding Scanner
cordless tools
It Saws, Then Sands
mmtwaam
DRESSING FOR DUMMIES
scubazombie
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scubazombie
water safety
scubazombie
[no value]
$180
Here's a flotation device that goes beyond life saving; It carries equipment to help you oiert rescuers. The 3.12-pound StayAlive life jacket has 11 survival tools built into its Velcro-lined flaps, including a sound-signaling device,floating distress flag, and mirror for daytime hours; plus a waterproof flashlight, flares, and phosphorescent light sticks for use after dark. A floating line and buddy lanyard keep everyone together. Price: $180. www.stayaliveinc.com
scubazombie
[no value]
scubazombie
[no value]
$3,295
Say goodbye to your weight training spotter: ProSpot Fitness' new P-500 Grab and Go home gym system won't let the barbell fall on you, no matter how far you push yourself. The key: A cable on each side of the barbell (and running through it) generates a small electric field, which the device monitors to anticipate your next move. To start a set, just grab the bar and it automatically unlocks. Raise it half an inch and it's free. When you're done with your reps, you simply open your hands and the spring-loaded system locks up within a millisecond. One additional safety feature: The inner rod is split into two pieces, so if one hand slips the barbell still locks up. Price: $3,295. www.prospotfitness.com
scubazombie
telephones
scubazombie
[no value]
$ 169
Cordless phone or cellphone? It's getting harder to tell the difference. New cordless phones from VTech and Uniden operate at a frequency of 5.8GHz, which means they'll likely work a half-mile from their base stations (inexplicably, the companies refused to release precise ranges). They'll also be subject to far less interference because, unlike 2.4GHz phones, which compete on that band with your microwave and wireless network, there's virtually nothing else operating at 5.8GHz. The VTech 5831 ($1 99) is the first to transmit at the new frequency; Uniden's TRU5865 ($ 149) and TRU5885 ($ 169) are the first to send and receive, www.vtech.com and www.uniden.com
scubazombie
[no value]
scubazombie
Tablet PC
The idea is simple: Take a full-fledged Windows XP Professional notebook and add a pen-shape electromagnetic stylus, touchscreen display, and the software to make it all work. This is the Tablet PC in a nutshell. The first generation, with models from Acer, HewlettPackard, Toshiba, ViewSonic, and others, will begin hitting the market this month. Why would you want one? It's all about the "digital ink." Anything you write on the LCD can be edited, colorized, cut-and-pasted, boldfaced, searched, converted to text, whatever. You quickly find that visual information —hand-drawn directions, for example —can coexist with text in ways never before possible. Also, sometimes a keyboard is inconvenient (in a car), impractical (grocery lists), or unacceptable (at a cafe). And since most Tablet PCs include wireless networking, they make dandy Web pads. As for price, expect a few-hundred-dollar premium over similarly configured laptops.— STEVE MORGENSTERN
scubazombie
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scubazombie
Sealife's ReefMaster Digital DC 100
$449
Sealife's ReefMaster Digital DC 100 Land and Sea is the first digital camera engineered exclusively for underwater use. The 1.3megapixel snapper, rated to 100 feet, features a Sea shooting mode that automatically adjusts aperture and shutter speed to compensate for low-light conditions. But it's comfortable above sea level too: Switch it to Land mode, remove the housing, and it works like a traditional digital. Price: $449. www.sealife-cameras.com
scubazombie
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scubazombie
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$25 to $70
Kevin O'Rourke's battle with Christmas lights was the last straw—too many cords and too few outlets. His resulting ElectraTrac is a 125-volt indoor-outdoor extension cord with multiple outlets at 8-foot intervals along its body. LED lights at each indicate power is flowing. Available in 25-and 50-foot lengths. Price: $25 to $70. www.nextep 1 .com
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It's not often that the average do-it-yourselfer embarks on a job that requires deep, precise holes in brick, mortar, drywall, or wood. But when that time comes, you'll want the ferocious-looking twin-blade Arbortech Allsaw 150. Teeth at the blade tips enable the hammer-type saw to plunge 5 inches into any dense material, while an internal V-belt drive slips the blades to prevent kickback.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0018.xml
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21
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Expedia, Inc.: msn
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Expedia, Inc.
msn
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0019.xml
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23
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shell
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shell
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0020.xml
review
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24
What'New
THE WHAT'S NEW WIRE: 11.02
BIG LITTLE ADVANCES
7 SMALL IMPROVEMENTS WITH MAJOR BENEFITS
sony
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sony
CyberShot U20
$269
HIGH-END ENTRY-LEVEL DIGITAL: Sony's CyberShot U20 is a 2-megapixel digital that focuses on speed and ease of use: There's no waiting for warmup and you can shoot during play mode, a rare feature on a camera at this price level. Price: $269. www.sony.com
sony
WHOA, BIG WHEELIE
$ 130 to $ 170
WHOA, BIG WHEELIE: Jeep's new wheelbarrows have locking disc brakes. Just squeeze the handbrake to stop and push a button to lock. Price: $ 130 to $ 170. www.jeep wheelbarrows.com
sony
TOUCH-SENSITIVE MIX MASTER
$799
TOUCH-SENSITIVE MIX MASTER: M-Audio's Surface One is the first audio mixer with a touch-sensitive interface. The virtual controllers respond to finger movementup, down, and sideways—as well as pressure. Price: $799. www.midiman.net
sony
LIGHTNING-PROOF ELECTRONICS
$9.95
LIGHTNING-PROOF ELECTRONICS: Using the same detection network as the National Weather Service, the Storm Shelter surge protector disengages your electronics if lightning strikes within 4 miles. Cost: $85, plus $9.95per month, www.stoplightning.com
sony
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$400
EASY-ENTRY BIKE PEDAL: At a half-pound, Crank Brothers' titanium Egg Beater—the first four-sided cleat bike pedal—is far lighter and requires a third fewer parts versus typical cleats. Bonus: Its egg-beater shape wicks away grime on muddy descents. Available in January for$400. www.crankbrothers.com
sony
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60-DAY CONTACT LENSES: Researchers at Texas Tech claim a thin coating of selenium could double the life of the most durable extended-wear contact lenses to two months. The coated lenses, tested on rabbits and a dedicated researcher, ward off bacteria. They could be available in two years, www.ttuhsc.edu
sony
[no value]
$ 1,000 to $ 1,200
THREE KAYAKS IN ONE: Designed by world freestyle kayaking champion E.J. Jackson, the Transformer is the first truly adaptable play-boat. With three sets of interchangeable tips you can go from a short big-air boat to a long vertical performance boat in seconds. Price: $ 1,000 to $ 1,200. www.wavesport.com
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0021.xml
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24a
24a
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GM Crop.: Escaalade
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GM Crop.
Escaalade
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0022.xml
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24c
24c
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PHILIPS: Philips DVD
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PHILIPS
Philips DVD
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0023.xml
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24d
24d
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Advertisement: MasterCard
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MasterCard
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0024.xml
review
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25,26,28
What'New
AUTO TECH
Fuel Cell Cars Are Here (Sort of)
alternative fuels
They're hitting the road in California this fall, but you can't have one. At least not yet.
HONDA FCX
TOYOTA FCHV
HOW THE HYDROGEN CARS STACK UP
safety
Lights that Corner
telematics
PARKING AVAILABLE. RESERVE ON THE WAY
alternative fuels
Ethanol Cars in Disguise
update
Robo-Vac Is Finally Here
combo devices
JACK OF BOTH TRADES
computing
World's Smallest (Full) Computers
Antelope Mobile Computer Core (MCC)
Tigit Eightythree
OQOPC
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HONDA FCX
It's not only one of the first fuel cell ehicles (at left, its fuel cell stack), it's the first to use an ultracapacitor for energy storage. Initially seen on the Honda Dualnote concept at this year's okyo Auto Show ["Hybrids Get Hot," April], the ultracapacitor provides a quick burst of energy when needed, without the weight and slow response of a conventional battery. The two fuel tanks under the rear seat can be refilled with hydrogen in 5 minutes.
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TOYOTA FCHV
Built around the Highlander sportutility vehicle (which is in turn built on the Camry platform), Toyota's take on the car of the future is distinctly roomier than Honda's. But with all that space comes some added weight, and the Toyota's extra 250 pounds hurts its range. But its fuel cell stack—which draws hydrogen through a reformer—produces more power than Honda's.
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More than 50 years after Preston Tucker had the idea, swiveling headlights are ready to shine. Audi and Mercedes are both developing the technology for production, though it's unclear if any of these vehicles will make it to our shores. With the Audi system, on the 2003 A8 in Europe, the headlights turn into corners in step with the steering wheel. Mercedes goes further by making speed a factor. Enter a corner fast, for example, and the swivel happens instantaneously; at low speeds, the headlights turn more slowly. Mercedes claims its system (shown), which could enter production as early as next spring, improves traffic-lane illumination by 90 percent, and enables drivers to see 75 feet farther ahead than is possible with conventional HEADLIGHTS.-WILLIAM G. PHILLIPS
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Your in-car navigation system will get you to your destination, but what if there's no parking when you get there? A prototype telematics system at Ford's Aachen, Germany, research center not only finds an open spot but allows you to reserve it. The system is being tested in Cologne with four cars and a selection of garages and on-street spots. Via your navigation screen (or Internet or PDA), it displays the location of available parking, the number of spaces, and whether availability is increasing or decreasing. You can then reserve a spot with your mobile PHONE.-JOHN MATRAS
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You could be driving an alternative fuel vehicle and not even know it. By the end of this year, more than 2.3 million U.S. vehicles will be capable of running on ethanol, a renewable fuel generated from agricultural waste. Auto manufacturers have quietly enabled ethanol use over the past decade, partly in response to federal fuel economy standards. What's held the fuel back has been availability at filling stations (and even where it's offered, it's mixed with 15 percent gasoline). But you can find ethanol in 22 states now, with more on the way. Most ethanol vehicles are Dodge and Chrysler minivans—233,466 delivered this year already. But they are by no means alone. Here's a sampling.—JONATHAN MARK
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$199
Eureka wowed us three years ago with a robotic vacuum that not only swept the floors clean but was smart enough (thanks to radar) to avoid furniture and walls ("Best of What's New," Dec. '99], That device is now shipping in Europe, but there are still no U.S. plans. Now there's another option: ¡Robot's Roomba Intelligent FloorVac isn't as sophisticated, but at just 4 inches high it can slip under most beds and sofas. And its edge brush, which handily passed our impromptu mashed-Cheerio test, gets at the dirt right up against the wall. The Roomba runs for 90 minutes on one charge, long enough to clean two 16by 20-foot rooms. Price: $199. www.irobot.com
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The Kyocera 7135 is the first combo cellphone-PDA that does both jobs equally well. On the phone side, it has a full keypad, headphone jack, and access to Verizon's high-speed network for the Web. As a PDA, it runs all the Palm apps, supports MP3 playback, and incorporates an SD expansion slot. Only downsides: It's a tad bulky at 3.97 by 2.43 by 1.17 inches, and the 160by 160-pixel screen disappoints, www. kyocera. com
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MCC
$2,600
BEST FOR: Versatility—it can become a handheld, desktop, laptop, or wearable SIZE: 3 by 5 by 0.75 inches WEIGHT: 9 ounces PROCESSOR: 800MHz Crusoe TM5800 BATTERY: 3 hours PRICE: MCC, $2,600; desktop cradle (left), $495; handheld cradle (below), $1/400
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Tigit Eightythree
$1,000 to $1,500
BEST FOR: Heavy travelers who send a lot of e-mail. It can't convert to a desktop, though it has a PC Card slot SIZE: 5.9 by 4 by 1.1 inches WEIGHT: 20 ounces PROCESSOR: 300MHz Pentium-class National Geode BATTERY: 4 hours PRICE: $1,000 to $1,500
[no value]
OQOPC
[no value]
[no value]
$1,500
BEST FOR: Those who want quick access to information— pen-and-thumb keyboard makes typing a pain. Built-in 802.11 and Bluetooth keep you connected SIZE: 4.1 by 2.9 by 0.9 inches WEIGHT 9 ounces PROCESSOR: 1GHz Crusoe TM5800 BATTERY: 8 hours PRICE $1,500
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The promise has been boundless, the execution nonexistent—until now. The first production fuel cell cars, from Honda and Toyota, will hit the road before the end of the year, and with them the dream of clean, efficient hydrogen-powered vehicles will come a step closer to reality.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0025.xml
article
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26
What'New
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AUTOTECHTICKER
UNCOLN'S WHITE LEDs
4-POINT SEATBELTS
PROACIIVE SAFETY
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The 2003 Lincoln Navigator and Aviator break ground in cockpit lighting: Nearly all of the gauges, controls, and switches are lit by white light-emitting diodes. The trick: Engineers combined a yellow and pale blue phosphor to produce white light.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0026.xml
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27
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Pinnacle Systems, Inc.: BINKY BOY
[no value]
Pinnacle Systems, Inc.
BINKY BOY
[no value]
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0027.xml
advertisement
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29
[no value]
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Buena Vista Home Entertainment, Inc.
[no value]
Buena Vista Home Entertainment, Inc.
[no value]
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0028.xml
review
30
30
What'New
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5 Ways to Buy a Big Screen
why buy
With many technologies to choose from, it can get complicated. Here's how to translate the specs.
1.REAR-PROJECTION LCD
2. PLASMA
3. LIQUID CRYSTAL ON SILICON
4. LCD
5 . DIGITAL LIGHT PROCESSING
Panasonic
[no value]
Panasonic
PT-45LC12 rear-projection LCD
$3,499
Enter a showroom this fall and you'll find the widest selection of big-screen HDTVs ever, each incorporating different tech. There are hang-on-the-wall plasma and LCD sets, along with DLP (digital light processing), LCD, and LCoS (liquid crystal on silicon) rear-projection TVs. Follow these guidelines: Look for a brightness rating of at least 400 candelas per meter squared (expressed as cd/m2), which is double the brightness of a typical direct-view set. Insist on a contrast ratio (the visual difference between the blackest black and the whitest white) of 400:1. And consider the angle at which you'll be watching the TV. Rear-projection TVs have poor viewing angles; LCDs and plasmas are more forgiving. Finally, keep in mind that digital displays must "upconvert" analog signals to their native resolution. Since a TV's ability to handle this conversion without artifacts varies greatly, be sure to check for a good internal converter. Any from Faroudja should be fine. Panasonic PT-45LC12 rear-projection LCD, $3,499
Panasonic
[no value]
Panasonic
[no value]
$2,999 to $6,500
ADVANTAGES: No burn-in; most affordable of the widescreens DISADVANTAGES: Color isn't uniform; blacks aren't very black; contrast ratio is low; limited viewing angle SIZE RANGE: 40 to 60 inches PRICE RANGE: $2,999 to $6,500 AVERAGE RESOLUTION: 1,280 by 720
Panasonic
PLASMA
Panasonic
[no value]
$4,999 to $20,999
ADVANTAGES: The biggest and brightest (500 cd/m2) of the hang-on-the-wall TVs; wide viewing angles (up to 160 degrees vertical and horizontal) DISADVANTAGES: The phosphors that create the picture are generally more orange than red—plus they can wear unevenly and with a static picture, cause permanent burn-in SIZE RANGE 32 to 63 inches PRICE RANGE: $4,999 to $20,999RESOLUTION RANGE: 852 by 480 to 1,366 by 768
Panasonic
[no value]
Panasonic
[no value]
$8,999
ADVANTAGES: Highest resolution of any rear-projection; no burn-in DISADVANTAGES: Limited viewing angle SIZE: 57 inches (others coming next year) PRICE: $8,999 RESOLUTION: 1,920 by 1,080
Panasonic
LCD
Panasonic
[no value]
$1,299 to $9,999
ADVANTAGES: The thinnest of the hang-on-the-wall TVs, with the widest viewing angle (170 degrees vertical and horizontal); very bright (450 cd/m2); no burn-in DISADVANTAGES: Fastmoving images tend to blur, so look for 25-millisecond or less refresh rate; blacks aren't completely black on some models (though it's improving) SIZE RANGE: 15 to 40 inches PRICE RANGE: $1,299 to $9,999 AVERAGE RESOLUTION: 1,280 by 720
Panasonic
[no value]
Panasonic
[no value]
$3,499 to $10,999
ADVANTAGES: Very accurate color reproduction; no burn-in; excellent contrast DISADVANTAGES: Some units create "glitter" artifacts on solid blocks of color; limited viewing angle SIZE RANGE: 43 to 65 inches PRICE RANGE: $3,499 to $10,999 AVERAGE RESOLUTION: 1,280 by 720
Suzanne Kantra Kirschner
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0029.xml
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PENTAX: PENTAX OPTIO DIGITAL CAMERA
[no value]
PENTAX
PENTAX OPTIO DIGITAL CAMERA
[no value]
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0030.xml
review
32
32,37,38
What'New
WINTER SPORTS TECH
It's All Downhill
skiing
THE SMARTEST SKIS
1 STYLE: ASPIRING SKIER SKI: HEAD MONSTER I.M 85
2 STYLE: INTERMEDIATE PLAYER SKI: NORDICA BEAST 69
3 STYLE: BACKCOUNTRY SKIER SKI: GOODE CARBON COMPOSITE SKI
4 STYLE: EXPERT CARVER SKI: BLACK DIAMOND CROSSBOW
5 STYLE: COUNTRYSIDE CRUISER SKI: FISCHER NORDIC CRUISING ORBITER
6 STYLE: FREERIDER SKI: SALOMON TENEIGHTY skiers ski
snowboarding
4 Innovations Coming Down the Pipe
BURTON ANALOG CLONE MD
BURTON T6 159 ALUMAFLY CORE SNOWBOARD
SALOMON 3-PLY PRINTED PANT
DEMON ESCAPE SHOVEL
emerging sport
NEXT BIG THING WATCH: SKI-BIKING
wild idea
The Run That Never Ends
resort tech
The White Stuff, Whenever
[no value]
[no value]
$550
It's almost impossible to choose bad blades these days thanks to masterful production technology, carve-maximizing designs, and electrical innards. The real question: Are they the right skis for you? So check your style, then check your ski. This ski's piezoelectric fibers transform mechanical energy into electricity, then send the information to a microchip. The chip fires back a counterforce to correct for torsional instability and vibration. Price: $550. www. head .com
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[no value]
$935
The Beast's first-of-its-kind binding has 3 centimeters of movement, with "expert" and "easy carving" settings marked on the ski. Ride forward for ice, or sit back for powder. Price: $935(with bindings), www.nordica.com
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$790
At under 5 pounds, these backwoods specialists are less than two-thirds the weight of conventional skis. The secret: a to-the-core flexible carbon composite body that turns easily but maintains lateral rigidity. Price: $790. www.goode.com
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[no value]
$500
Unlike traditional fat skis, the Crossbow— with a 3-D asymmetrical bow across its body — increases stiffness edge-to-edge without giving up tip-to-tail flex. That means less chatter on pack and better float in powder. Price: $500. www. blackdiamondequipment.com
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$230
The Orbiter's extra-fat middle gives the rider a more stable platform for control, while a unique crown pattern on the flip side under the foot grips the snow for better climbing "kick." Price: $230. www.fischerskis.com
[no value]
[no value]
$675
Terrain park skiers require a ski stable enough for hard landings but light enough for big air spinning. The Teneighty's space frame enables Salomon to alter the ski's shape and wall thickness throughout, for a wide platform and light tips. Price: $675. www.salomonsports.com
[no value]
[no value]
$1,000
No more fumbling for buttons: Burton's Analog Clone MD jacket has controls for power, volume, and track changes built into its sleeve. Just slip the (inducted) Sony Net MZ-N1 MiniDisc Walkman into its breast pocket and plug it in. Only 100 jackets will be produced initially—hence the $1,000 price—but Burton is hinting at a cheaper fflS version with multiple player options next year, www.burton.com
[no value]
[no value]
$600
What do a Black Hawk helicopter blade and a Burton Alumafly Core snowboard have in common? "Both need to be long, thin, flexible, and yet superstrong," says engineer Scott Barberi. Thus, the board's core is made from the same honeycomb-patterned aluminum found on the chopper. The result is a lightweight, flexible board with great acceleration and one of the best strength-to-weight ratios on the mountain. Price: $600. www.burton.com
[no value]
[no value]
$240
They don't call it shredding for nothing: A good morning of hardcore carving and big air can leave your pant cuffs looking like they've been through an Enron office. Salomon's new snow trousers have thermoplastic scuff guards; run a warm iron over them and the tears disappear. Price: $240. www.salomonsports.com
[no value]
[no value]
$50
A shovel is standard equipment for backcountry snowboarders, in case someone gets trapped in the deep stuff. This one's built for the task. Demon's 1.8-pound aluminum Escape breaks into three pieces, is adjustable up to 12 inches, and has a compass and thermometer embedded in the handle. It's also perfect for building jumps. Price: $50. www.demonsports.com
[no value]
Winter-X-Bike
$300
Winter-X-Bike's $300Ski-M-X kit converts any mountain or BMX bike into a high-performance ski-bike. Just remove your wheels, pop the bracket-mounted skis info the forks, and slide the foot Degs through the crank housing. Ski-biking is now permitted at nearly 50 U.S. resorts, including Big Bear, Telluride, and Vail, www.winterxbike.com
[no value]
[no value]
$233
If the builder can overcome the remaining structural hurdles, a proposed 1 3-story indoor Ski-Trac could debut in Wales within three years. The idea: Skiers travel counterclockwise down the revolving slope—which is supported by magnetic levitation—at the same time it's moving clockwise, prolonging the ride to the bottom. During each revolution, the 570-foot-diameter metal deck travels through a 5°F snow chamber for a blast of fresh powder. According to Australian inventor Kevin Ferris, who has successfully tested a one-tenth-scale model, if the slope were to spin at max speed, nearly 19 miles per hour, riders would never reach the bottom of the 0.2-mile decline. Price: $233 million to build it; $20 per hour to ski it. www. ski-trac. com
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[no value]
You can ski year-round on plastic-covered slopes in the U.K. and Asia, but the runs are lame—no moguls, jumps, or pipes. The exception: Briton Engineering's 12 Snowflex centers in the U.K. Here, the turf-like surface is slippery for forward motion but has lateral resistance for carving. The trick: It self-lubricates every 4 minutes. The first U.S. Snowflex center should open next year; the location hasn't been announced, www.snowmaker.com
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0031.xml
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33
33,34,35,36
[no value]
[no value]
Delphi: XM Satellite
[no value]
Delphi
XM Satellite
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0032.xml
review
38
38
What'New
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5 FOR YOUR SLIDE
GEAR YOU DON'T NEED, BUT PROBABLY WANT
NO-SWEAT WATER BACKPACK
KNEE-FRIENDLY BINDING
WATCH MADE FOR THE MOUNTAIN
MULTIPOSITION POLE
PERFECT-FIT BOOTS
[no value]
NO-SWEAT WATER BACKPACK
$75
The Camelbak Rocket's contoured H-shape polyethylene frame and Air-Mesh pads anchor the pack away from the body, keeping sweat to a minimum. Available in February. Price: $75. www.camelbak.com
[no value]
[no value]
$350
Line's Reactor 12 is the first binding that can pivot and release from the toe, meaning less knee strain if you fall backward on the slopes. Price: $350. www.lineski.com
[no value]
[no value]
$369
The Suunto S6's built-in altimeter and clinometer measure degree of slope, speed, and total vertical drop for each run. Price: $369. www.suuntousa.com
[no value]
MULTIPOSITION POLE
$135
Goode's 9303 all-carbon Quick Adjust pole is just 11 millimeters around and two-thirds lighter than aluminum poles. A twist of the shaft lets you adjust length up to 18 inches. Price: $135. www.gooae.com
[no value]
PERFECT-FIT BOOTS
$775
Plug Tecnica's Icon Alu HotForm boots into a wall outlet, and in 10 minutes the pliable liners mold to your feet and to the inside of the boots, improving energy transfer to the skis. Price: $775. www.tecnicausa.com
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0033.xml
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39
39
[no value]
[no value]
GM Corp.: AVALANCHE
[no value]
GM Corp.
AVALANCHE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0034.xml
article
40
40,42
Man&Machine
HARD. FAST. SHINY OBJECTS & WHY WE LOVE THEM
Swabbing the Rig After a Gory Run...
Our rig must be guarded lest tfie contents of the rolling pharmacy be pilfered by stoned locals.
[no value]
[no value]
Stephan Wilkinson
the most insulting thing you can call a paramedic or EMT is "ambulance driver." He or she despises the term, for drivers are the bottommost link on the medical food chain, dangling directly below the people who rinse out bedpans. I never wanted to be a doctor but always wanted my very own siren, so I’m proud to say I am an ambulance driver.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0035.xml
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41
41
[no value]
[no value]
GM Corp.: TRAILBLAZER
[no value]
GM Corp.
TRAILBLAZER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0036.xml
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43
43
[no value]
[no value]
GM Corp.: SILVERADO
[no value]
GM Corp.
SILVERADO
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0037.xml
article
44
44,46,48
GeekDIY
WHAT'S UP IN THE WIRED WORKSHOP
The PC-Based Tivo Emulator
There's Linux code to turn an old PC into a personal video recorder. Some people don't like that idea at all.
For now, this is still mostly legal. But that could change if the entertainment industry gets its way.
[no value]
[no value]
Paul Wallich
ake one digital video capture card, a big cheap hard disk, a home-brew infrared receiver, and a seven-year-old PC out of your nearest closet or dumpster. Add some free software and—voila!— you have a personal video recorder, your own homemade Tivo.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0038.xml
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45
45
[no value]
[no value]
GM Corp.: CHEVY TRUCKS
[no value]
GM Corp.
CHEVY TRUCKS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0039.xml
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46
46
[no value]
[no value]
Brown-Forman Beverages
[no value]
Brown-Forman Beverages
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0040.xml
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47
47
[no value]
[no value]
CANADIAN MIST
[no value]
CANADIAN MIST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0041.xml
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48
48
[no value]
[no value]
Stoner, Inc.: Invisible Glass
[no value]
Stoner, Inc.
Invisible Glass
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0042.xml
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49
49
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Creative Technology Ltd.
Audigy
Creative Technology Ltd.
Extigy
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0043.xml
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50
50,51
[no value]
[no value]
Sony Electronics Inc.
[no value]
Sony Electronics Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0044.xml
article
52
52,53
Concept/Prototype
[no value]
Full Tilt Boogie Machine
Segway not hot enough? Go headfirst.
HONDA HERMES
WHICH END UP? Stare at the pictures long enough and you'll finally get it: big single wheel in back, feet parked just above it, two wheels up front, chest on top, hands on the black loop. Having a hard time holding your head up while racing through town? Forsgren is designing a helmet with a builtin wing to help riders keep their chins up. >
OTHERS
ENGINE: Electric, powered by hydrogen fuel cell CONTROL CPU analyzes gyroscope output and rider movements to control motor speed and pneumatic pistons, which aid in turning LOP SPEED: 60 mph WIDTH: 22 in. at front HEIGHT: 52 in. parked, 35 in. stretched LENGTH: 52 in. parked, 63 in. stretched WEIGHT: 150 lbs. (est.)
SPECS
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[no value]
Preston Lerner
THE PROBLEM: MODERN SPORTS CARS ARE SO CAPABLE THAT it’s impossible to have fun driving them within the speed limit. The solution, according to Swedish transportation design student Tommy Forsgren: Ditch the sports car. Forsgren proposes a new breed of single-occupant three-wheel vehicle in which the driver assumes a chestdown, headfirst position and uses an intuitive control system.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0045.xml
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54
54
[no value]
[no value]
Castrol
[no value]
Castrol
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0046.xml
article
55
55,56
NewsFiles
chemistry
Attacking an Arsenic Plague
New, cheap gadgets could cut poisoning in one of the poorest countries. Will it happen?
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fOR MILLIONS OF PEOPLE IN RURAL BANGLADESH, drinking water is like playing Russian roulette. Thousands will die in years to come from cancer caused by arsenic, a natural element in their water. Thousands more will suffer hideous skin lesions.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0047.xml
article
56
56,57
NewsFiles
astronomy
Brovo, Galileo
A tribute to the little spacecraft that could.
JUPITER
GALILEO
CALLISTO
GANYMEDE
10
EUROPA
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[no value]
[no value]
It took to the skies 13 years ago and journeyed a circuitous 3.2 billion miles before arriving at Jupiter in December 1995. NASA hoped the Galileo space probe could complete a two-year tour of the massive planet and its moons. Armed with an atmospheric probe and 11 instruments (including cameras, spectrometers, and gizmos for measuring energy, magnetic fields, and charged particles) Galileo did that and much more.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0048.xml
article
58
58
NewsFiles
flight
WHY SNAKES DON'T NEED WINGS
FLIGHT OF A SERPENT
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"IF YOU WERE TRYING TO DESIGN A GLIDER," SAYS JAKE SOCHA, "A snake is certainly not what you'd come up with." But the Paradise Tree Snake (Chrysopelea paradisi) glides nonetheless, and Socha, a University of Chicago biologist, has figured out how the creature manages it.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0049.xml
article
58
58
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climate
Unhappy Trails
Would the weather be different without jets? After 9/11, scientists gota rare look.
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jET CONIRAILS, THE WHITE LINES LEFT BEHIND BY HIGH-FLYING PLANES, SOMEtimes outnumber the clouds-and, like clouds, they influence our weather. The trails consist of water vapor and exhaust particles that turn into ice crystals in the cool air.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0050.xml
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59
59
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[no value]
GM Crop.
[no value]
GM Crop.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0051.xml
article
60
60
NewsFiles
chemistry
MOUTH MACHINE
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICANS WANT TO REDUCE fat and cholesterol, but when it comes to ice cream, "most figure, if they're going to eat it, they'll have the highoctane stuff," says Chrystie Heimert of Ben & Jerry's. Low-fat substitutes just don't satisfy. But food scientists at the University of Missouri-Columbia have developed a new tool in their search for a low-fat ice cream that doesn't taste light: an artificial mouth.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0052.xml
article
60
60
NewsFiles
psychology
Visitors Get Blitzed
Home is where the hormones are.
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[no value]
[no value]
a NOTHER NFL SEASON IS HERE, and though there's no scientific way to win the office pooi, keep an eye on the home field. NFL teams win at home about 60 percent of the time, and British stud ies of soccer matches do much to explain why. First, try as they might to ignore the fans, referees can’t.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0053.xml
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60
60,61
[no value]
[no value]
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
[no value]
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0054.xml
article
61
61
NewsFiles
transportation and communication
Radio Uh-Oh
Ultra-wideband wireless is a killer tech. Could it kill a 737?
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iT LOOKED LIKE A CATASTROPHE: THE FAIL LIGHT LIT UP ON THE 737'S air traffic control receiver. The Traffic Alert & Collision Avoidance System lost track of nearby planes and the instrument land ing system went haywire. All because NASA electromagnetics research engineer Jay Ely had switched on an ultra-wideband (UWB) transmitter-a much-ballyhooed new technology that uses low-power, high-speed pulsed radio signals instead of conventional radio waves to send information over a broad spectrum of frequencies.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0055.xml
article
62
62
NewsFiles
environmental management
Let Loose the Llamas
An organic method of detoxing the Andes.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
fOR 500 YEARS, THE BOLIVIAN ANDES HAVE BEEN HEAVILY MINED. TODAY, the water that seeps out of them is nasty stuff. It's tainted red with iron and laden with toxic metals such as cadmium that pollute rivers for hundreds of miles. The water can be so poisonous that, over time, it destroys the livers and kidneys of area residents. In Bolivia, expensive high-tech solutions aren't an option.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0056.xml
article
62
62
NewsFiles
nanotechnology
SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL, SMALLER IS GOLDEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ETIENNE BENSON
GOLD NANOPARTICLES MAY ONE DAY prove as precious as the mythic Golden Fleece. Scientists say such specks, ¡ust billionths-of-a-meter wide, could be used to create hyperfast microchips or be attached to organic molecules to help cure diseases.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0057.xml
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63
63
[no value]
[no value]
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.: AMD Athlon
[no value]
Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.
AMD Athlon
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0058.xml
article
64
64
NewsFiles
the PopSci unscrambler: making hard science a little less hard
The Weather Magnet
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
iT NEVER FAILS. EVERY 100,000 YEARS, JUST when the glaciers have retreated and you've been enjoying 10,000 years of balmy weather, another ice age comes along. It's been that way for the past million years, with Earth's climate swinging between glacial and interglacial (warm) periods.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0059.xml
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65
65
[no value]
[no value]
Panasonic: Ultra-Compact Camcorder
[no value]
Panasonic
Ultra-Compact Camcorder
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0060.xml
article
66
66,67,68,69,70,71,72,73
stories
[no value]
SCRAM!
DEAD SIMPLE ON PAPER BUT VERY TRICKY TO BUILD, THE HYPERSONIC SCRAMJET ENGINE GETS A BOOST FROM A NEW JET-FUEL-BASED DESIGN. MACH 8 HERE WE COME?
Ramjets, and Visions of Scram jets
[no value]
[no value]
Bill Sweetman
YOU DON’T RUN THIS WIND TUNNEL. You fire it. With the help of air pumped to 160 times atmospheric pressure and a highly explosive combination of hydrogen, oxygen, and a megawatt generator, the tunnel, set in a suburban Long Island business park, can reproduce the hellacious conditions an aircraft would encounter while traveling 20 miles above Earth at 5,300 mph— Mach 8—a speed at which the violent airstream packs enough energy to soften and melt solid nickel alloys.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0061.xml
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74
74,75
[no value]
[no value]
Ford: KING RANCH
[no value]
Ford
KING RANCH
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0062.xml
article
76
76,77,78,79,80,81,82,84,85,86
stories
[no value]
MONEY WIRED
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN A GAMBLING TOWN FALLS HARD FOR THE COMPUTER NETWORK? HACKER CROOKS, MEGAJACKPOT SLOTS CUTTING-EDGE SURVEILLANCE SOFTWARE? AND THAT'S JUST THE START.
HOWLOOSE?
THE BIG SPRITZ
[no value]
[no value]
Dan Koeppel
Kathleen Budz had been at the slots in the New York-New York casino for only a couple of hours when the big money came along. The Chicago grandmother was seated at one of four chattering Wheel of Fortune games in the Big Apple-themed casino—a rococo affair with a mock Empire State Building, Statue of Liberty, and Coney Island roller coaster.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0063.xml
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83
83
[no value]
[no value]
NovaLogic, Inc.: NVIDIA
[no value]
NovaLogic, Inc.
NVIDIA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0064.xml
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84a
84a
[no value]
[no value]
Pioneer
[no value]
Pioneer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0065.xml
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84b
84b
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Canon
Optura 200 MC
Canon
ELURA 40 MC
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0066.xml
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87
87
[no value]
[no value]
General Motors Corp.: SIERRA
[no value]
General Motors Corp.
SIERRA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0067.xml
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88
88
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0068.xml
article
89
89
stories
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POPSCI'S BRILLIANT10
OUR FIRST ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF SCIENTISTS WHO ARE SHAKING UP THEIR FIELDS AND WHOSE WORK WILL TOUCH YOUR LIFE
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_The scientists you're about to meet aren't famous. Yet. They haven't won the Nobel Prize or written best-selling books. But they are ground-breaking, risk-taking, maniacally committed researchers. Most are doing work that is ushering in technological advances that will change our lives.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0069.xml
article
90
90
stories
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CHARLESLIEBER
A BIG PLAYER IN THE WORLD OF THE SUPER-SMALL TURNS GOLD INTO NANOWIRE.
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[no value]
[no value]
Spend a day with Charles Lieber and you’ll come away viewing even the most intricate human activity—say, cramming 55 million transistors onto a Pentium 4 computer chip—as clumsy, inelegant, imprecise. Lieber is among a new class of control freaks, the ones who seek to manipulate the structure of materials at the molecular level, where they exhibit unique properties not seen in traditional technology.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0070.xml
article
90
90,91
stories
[no value]
•David Clemmer
FORGET THE GENOME. HE'S ONTO A BIGGER CHALLENGE: PROTEINS.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
David Clemmer builds funky rigs. His latest is a room-size stainless-steel contraption sprouting an array of tubes, churning pumps, and wires. Inside, biological molecules are separated, sorted, sifted, and measured with a speed and precision once unimaginable.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0071.xml
article
92
92,93
POP 10 SCI
TISSUE ENGINEERING MIT
LINDA GRIFFITH
SCAFFOLDING A HUMAN EAR & OTHER WEIRD FEATS OF BIOENGINEERING.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Linda Griffith began her career trying to manufacture transplantable human livers for the thousands of patients who die each year waiting for donor organs. She hasn’t succeeded yet (nor has anyone else), but she's done some amazing things along the way: She helped grow a human ear on the back of a mouse, and, most recently, made a miniature "liver" on a silicon chip.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0072.xml
article
93
93
POP 10 SCI
COSMOLOGY PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
Zoltan Haiman
WHAT EXACTLY HAPPENED AROUND HERE 14 BILLION YEARS AGO, ANYWAY?
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[no value]
[no value]
Zoltan Haiman knows the confines of Communist Hungary and the hallowed halls of Cambridge; he's gone bungee jumping over the Zambezi River and taught kids on the island of Mauritius. But what Haiman dreams of exploring—in his models, at least—is the first object to appear in the universe after its chaotic beginnings in the big bang.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0073.xml
article
94
94,95
POP 10 SCI
MATHEMATICS PRINCETON UNIVERSITY
MANJUL BHARGAVA
PRINCETON WUNDERKIND BANGS THE DRUM FOR THE BEAUTY OF NUMBER THEORY.
[no value]
[no value]
PAUL HOFFMAN
Manjul Bhargava is sitting on the floor of his sparse apartment in front of his tabla, a pair of small Indian drums. "They really need to be tuned," he says self-consciously. But then his tapping fingers glide over the drums, and a rhythmic, bell-like sound fills the room.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0074.xml
article
95
95
POP 10 SCI
MATERIALS SCIENCE MIT
Angela Belcher
DON'T BUILD A FACTORY. GET A VIRUS TO DO THE WORK FOR YOU.
[no value]
[no value]
REBECCA SKLOOT
For years aeronautics engineers have tried to learn from birds, and robot designers from insects. Now, though, rather than making machines that mimic animals, scientists are coaxing living creatures to produce machines. Seeking to make electronics ever smaller and faster, they are turning to nature, an old pro at building at the microscopic level.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0075.xml
article
96
96
POP 10 SCI
CRYPTOGRAPHY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY
DAVID WAGNER
COMPUTER WHIZ SEES TROUBLE IF SWISS-CHEESE CYBERSECURITY ISN'T TIGHTENED.
[no value]
[no value]
TIM FOLGER
His mile-long rap sheet began when he was 21. September 1995: Cracks Netscape security system, gaining access to credit card numbers and bank accounts. March 1997: Finds a way to steal personal digital cellphone codes and charge calls to strangers.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0076.xml
article
96
96
POP 10 SCI
COMPUTER SCIENCE RICE UNIVERSITY
Lydia Kavraki
HOW CAN THE ROBOT KNOW HOW TO MOVE THROUGH THE EVER-CHANGING HUMAN WORLD?
[no value]
[no value]
JR MINKEL
Lydia Kavraki credits her parents with instilling in her a desire to understand how the world works when she was still a schoolgirl on the Greek isle of Crete. They didn't want her to think only mechanically, however; they also taught her that "technology should serve humans, and in the best possible way." Kavraki was exposed to computers from an early age because of her father's work in the airline industry.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0077.xml
article
97
97,98
POP 10 SCI
ATMOSPHERIC SCIENCE NASA AMES RESEARCH CENTER
AZADEH TABAZADEH
ENVIRONMENTAL WARS ARE POLITICAL, BUT SCIENCE IN HER HANDS WILL HAVE ITS SAY.
[no value]
[no value]
LAURIE GOLDMAN
Nearly a decade ago, Azadeh Tabazadeh helped demolish the claim that human activity wasn’t destroying the ozone layer. Critics and commentators insisted that natural events, including volcanic eruptions, were the cause—not coolants from air conditioners and refrigerators.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0078.xml
article
98
98
POP 10 SCI
PHYSICS HARVARD UNIVERSITY
Raphael Bousso
HE WONDERS: IS THE WORLD JUST A HOLOGRAPHIC ILLUSION?
[no value]
[no value]
MICHAEL MOYER
Raphael Bousso is using the most intricate physics to prove that the world isn't as complicated as we thought. The 31-year-old is one of the leading proponents of a controversial idea called the holographic principle, which, if true, would provide an important clue to how space, time, information, and the laws of physics are intertwined at the most fundamental level.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0079.xml
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99
99
[no value]
[no value]
SUBARU: OUTBACK
[no value]
SUBARU
OUTBACK
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0080.xml
article
100
100,101,102,104
stories
[no value]
HY-WIRE ACT
FIRST LOOK AT THE GUTS OF GM'S FUEL CELL AUTONOMY CAR
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[no value]
[no value]
When General Motors rolled out its "skateboard” vision for a fuel cell car at the 2002 Detroit auto show in January, there was buzz, and there was a big question. The skateboard concept, called Autonomy, was the product of GM's Design and Technology Fusion Group, and it radically reordered automobile physiology: Fuel cells, hydrogen, motor, and brakes were all crammed into a 15-foot-long, 6-inch-thick chassis onto which modular car bodies could be snapped.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0081.xml
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103
103
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BOSE
[no value]
BOSE
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0082.xml
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105
105,106,107,108,109,110,111,112
[no value]
[no value]
GLADIATOR GARAGEWORKS: DODGE
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GLADIATOR GARAGEWORKS
DODGE
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[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0083.xml
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113
113
[no value]
[no value]
LENNOX
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LENNOX
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0084.xml
article
114
114,115,116,117,118,120
stories
[no value]
uDrive Me Crazy
BMW's iDrive cockpit-of-the-future concept has taken some heat since the 745i debuted. We rode shotgun with an interface design expert to see what works, what doesn't.
Jef Raskin’s Rules for Interface Design
Heads Up: Civic at 3 O'clock
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[no value]
STEPHAN WILKINSON
modulated by an aerospace-grade, color-coded contraption marked in tiny Centigrade numerals. That was after I finally located the utterly counterintuitive water tap in the first place and then flooded the bathroom floor with a flexible-hosed nozzle that found every gap in the sharp-edged chrome-andglass tub door.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0085.xml
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119
[no value]
[no value]
BOSE
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BOSE
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[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0086.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
Networks Associates Technology, Inc.
[no value]
Networks Associates Technology, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0087.xml
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122
122
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[no value]
Ryobi Technologies, Inc.: CORDLESS SIX PACK
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Ryobi Technologies, Inc.
CORDLESS SIX PACK
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0088.xml
article
123
123,124
TestPages
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Near the Belly of the Beast
Our man gets exclusive access to the crews and tech that keep the weird, scary B-2 flying.
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MARK FARMER
WHOA!" SHOUTS MAJ. Steve "Tex" Addison, banking our Northrop T-38A Talon sharply as a B2A stealth bomber closes in from 300 feet. The Spirit of Florida, as this B-2A is known, pulls alongside us like a remora on a manta ray, allowing me to snap a few photos before it rolls quickly about its axis and meanders out of sight.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0089.xml
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125
125
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[no value]
Tempur-Pedic, Inc.
[no value]
Tempur-Pedic, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0090.xml
article
126
126
Test Pages
in the lab
Secrets of Easton's Superstick
NHL players have 90 sticks to choose from. Here's why 40 percent of them choose this one.
HOW TO MAKE A SUPERSTICK
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JENNY EVERETT
SO HOW MANY LAYERS OF CARBON FIBER MAKE UP THE SHAFT?" I ASK Ned Goldsmith, vice president of Easton's hockey division. Uncomfortable silence is followed by whispering and then, finally, “We can’t tell you that.” Geez, is this hockey stick a matter of national security or what?
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0091.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
Cobra Electronics Corp.: BELTRONICS
[no value]
Cobra Electronics Corp.
BELTRONICS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0092.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0093.xml
article
128
128
Test Pages
all-terrain test
Two Tests in ATV Paradise
New models from Kawasaki and Cannondale raise the all-terrain technology bar.
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ROCKS FLY AS I POWER MY WAY TO THE CLEARING AHEAD, 10,000 FEET ABOVE SEA level in Montana's Gallatin National Forest. At the crest is one more switchback, and then ... nothing but the northern Rocky skyline. What better place to test the 2003 crop of ATVs?
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0094.xml
article
131
131
TestPages
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To Suppress Hail, We Make More
It was an attempt to save Calgary from one of the summer's most vicious storms.
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TREVOR THIEME
OUR PIPER CHEYENNE II shudders as we enter the 40,000-foot thunderhead. Lightning, intermittent at first and then steady and spectacular, illuminates the tempest like Grucci fireworks. Walnut-size hail follows, shattering our left navigation and right landing lights, denting our external water gauge, and dimpling our right wing.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0095.xml
review
132
132,133
TestPages
THE POPSCI CAR TEST
The Toys Go Turbo
Boosted Bugs, pumped-up PTs, monster Minis. Collect the full set today.
HE POPSCI G-TEST
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Chrysler PT Turbo
$3,500
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Mini Cooper S
$3,000
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Volkswagen Beetle Turbo S
$1,900
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fROM THE BEGINNING, THE NEW BEETLE, PT Cruiser, and Mini Cooper all asked the same question: “What will I be when I grow up?” Meet the New Beetle Turbo S, PT Turbo, and Mini Cooper S—cute cars that offer serious performance. After milking every last sale out of the original Beetle and PT, Volkswagen and Chrysler have added turbochargers for 2003, with the hope of catching the attention of enthusiasts.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0096.xml
article
134
134
TestPages POP CULTURE & MEDIA
film tech
Apollo 13 on the Even Bigger Screen
New tech transforms the Hollywood blockbuster into an Imax event.
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tHE MATRIX ON AN EIGHTstory screen? What's not to like? Well, the graininess, 20-foot scratches, and soft picture. That’s what happens when theaters try to enlarge traditional 35mm film to fit Imax's 15/70 format. We've seen a better way, and it's called DMR, for digitally mastered release, a proprietary Imax technology that debuted when the company rereleased Apollo 13 nationwide in September.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0097.xml
article
134
134
TestPages POP CULTURE & MEDIA
books
Captain Kirk's Reality Check
Is there actual science to Harry Potter and Star Trek?
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New books from Roger Highfield (The Science of Harry Potter, Viking Press) and William Shatner (I'm Working on That, Simon & Schuster) suggest the gulf between today's science fiction and fact is closing fast. Do they get the science right?
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0098.xml
article
135
135
TestPages POP CULTURE & MEDIA
television
Who Was Galileo?
A new documentary about the man, his discoveries, and how he was abandoned by Rome.
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In the eyes of the Catholic Church, Galileo Galilei crossed the line in 1632. That's when the noted astronomer published Dialogue on the Two Chief World Systems, a book that seemingly mocked the church's Earth-centered view of the universe.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0099.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
The Armor All/STP Products Company
[no value]
The Armor All/STP Products Company
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0100.xml
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136
136
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[no value]
sonicare
[no value]
sonicare
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0101.xml
article
136
136,137,138,140
FYI
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FYI
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[no value]
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BOB SILLERY
All computers lock up or crash, and no operating system is immune (as a matter of fact, we crashed once as we wrote this answer), but singling out specific reasons oversimplifies the issue, explains Daniel Jackson, a computer science professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0102.xml
article
137
137,140
PUZZLE
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MAKING THE CUT
THE RULES
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At a birthday party, three cakes are cut in straight lines to give each of 34 children a single slice. If the slices do not have to be the same size, what is the minimum number of cuts required? Each cake must receive at least two cuts. See page 140.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0103.xml
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137
137
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ESCORT: PASSPORT 8500
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ESCORT
PASSPORT 8500
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0104.xml
article
138
138
JUST THE FACTS
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Beer
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[no value]
BOB SILLERY
The first step in brewing beer is malting, a process in which grain (usually barley or wheat) is soaked in water and softened. Stimulated by moisture, seedlings begin to grow. Next, blasts of hot air stop this sprouting. The grain has now become malt.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0105.xml
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138
138
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Advertisement: Gorilla Glue
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Gorilla Glue
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0106.xml
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139
139
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0107.xml
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140
140
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MacNeil AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED: WeatherTech
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MacNeil AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED
WeatherTech
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[no value]
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0108.xml
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141
141
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0109.xml
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142
142
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psshowcase
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0110.xml
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143
143
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Alum-A-Pole Corporation Scranton: SuriTamer Hat
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Alum-A-Pole Corporation Scranton
SuriTamer Hat
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0111.xml
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144
144,145,146
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psshowcase
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0112.xml
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147
147
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0113.xml
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148
148,149,150,151,152
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psdirect
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0114.xml
article
153
153
Looking Back
FROM THE POPULAR SCIENCE ARCHIVES
November 1932
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"Canal locks on wheels" was the term used by a French engineer for these giant bathtub-like railway cars, which were to be 650 feet long and carry ships from the Mediterranean to the Atlantic on a route just north of the Spanish border. The concept called for embedding the rails in concrete and powering the 10-axle, 120-wheel vehicle with electric motors.
PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0115.xml
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154
154,155,156,157
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DODGE: NEW DODGE RAM
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DODGE
NEW DODGE RAM
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0116.xml
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158
158
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Advertisement: roxio
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roxio
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PopularScience_20021101_0261_005_0117.xml