Issue: 20020101

Tuesday, January 1, 2002
january 2002
1
True
260
Sunday, December 28, 2014

Articles
cover
1
1,5
[no value]
[no value]
popular science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0001.xml
advertisement
1_a
1_a,1_b
[no value]
[no value]
GM Corp.: SILVERADO HD
[no value]
GM Corp.
SILVERADO HD
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0002.xml
advertisement
2
2,3
[no value]
[no value]
Microsoft Corporation
[no value]
Microsoft Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0003.xml
advertisement
4
4
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Canon U.S.A., Inc.
Pro90 IS
Canon U.S.A., Inc.
S110 Digital ELPH
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0004.xml
tableOfContents
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
popular science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0005.xml
article
6
6
from the editor-in-chief
[no value]
Science vs. Story
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Scott Mowbray
OUR ANNUAL LOOK AT THE TOP 10 SCIENCE STORIES of the year was, like everything associated with 2001, colored by terrorism and the onset of war. In choosing the list, we found ourselves sometimes focusing on the story as much as on the science.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0006.xml
masthead
6
6,7
[no value]
[no value]
popular science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0007.xml
article
7
7
Letters
[no value]
Letters
IS THIS THE STAR WARS "FORCE"?
COOL CARS, NOT SO EFFICIENT
The Ugly View of MP3 Qualify
Save Us from the Virtual Celebrity
Correction
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
In "The Hunt for the God Particle” [Nov. 2001], you say “Higgs doesn't appear as a distinct particle. Instead, it takes the form of an ethereal field, an invisible vapor that pervades all space.” Can anyone tell me of a better candidate for the "aether” of old [the 100-year-old notion that light must travel through a ubiquitous but undetectable medium that was ultimately disproved by Einstein], or even better, the "force" from Star Wars'?
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0008.xml
advertisement
8
8
[no value]
[no value]
GARMIN Corporation: GPS V
[no value]
GARMIN Corporation
GPS V
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0009.xml
review
9
9,10,11,14,16,20
what’snew
[no value]
what’snew
Heart Restart Without the Big Cut
A PC That Takes Fingerprints
British Luxury for the Backcountry
Part Display, Part Holodeck
Personal Learning Assistant
This MP3 Player Is Actual Size
Fall Off Your Bike, Then Bounce
Green Is Its Orbit
Protect Your Ears, But Still Hear
Digital Stills from Your DVD
Here Comes the SUB
80 CDs on One MP3
Life-Saving Pajamas
Hello, Robokitty
Pocket Polaroid
theracardia
[no value]
theracardia
Heart Restart
The patient's heart goes flatline. A doctor—and by that we mean Anthony Edwards—rushes in, shocking him back to life with a defibrillator. Great TV, but it doesn't always work that way. The most effective way to restart the heart is to pump it manually, which means cracking the rib cage. But now comes a tool that massages the heart with much less trauma. InPulse slips into the chest through a 1.5-inch incision, then pumps the heart against the spinal column. It just entered trials, www.theracardia.com
theracardia
Acer TravelMate 740
$2,299
For travelers with ultrasensitive files, the Acer TravelMate 740 features fingerprint-recognition security. It also has a 1.13GHz Pentium III processor, 15-inch thin-film-transistor screen, and 30GB hard drive. Price: $2,299. aac.acer.com
theracardia
Range Rover
If you like to ford rivers while basking in sumptuous leather, we've got an SUV for you: The Range Rover has been redesigned for 2003. A 4.4-liter V8 powers its sturdy full-time four-wheel drive system, and it has the most luxurious interior—complete with burled walnut trim—this side of Buckingham Palace. Available in May. Price not set. www. landrover.com
theracardia
[no value]
$20,000
Think virtual reality without the helmet. Elumens' Vision Station is a fabric-covered shell that acts as a walk-in computer monitor, offering ultrarealistic simulations of everything from new homes to racecars. It could also be used for computer gaming, although early interest has come from companies looking for gee-whiz ways to sell products. There are two sizes, ranging from $20,000 (5.25 feet diameter) to $50,000 (8 feet), www. elumens.com
theracardia
iQuest
$100
It's like Cliffs Notes for math, science, and social studies. Leap-Frog’s handheld iQuest gives students an edge by supplementing their junior-high textbooks, helping them prepare for tests with a series of timed quizzes. The accompanying 4MB cartridge contains 1,000 questions. Join the company's online learning club and you get access to 34,000 more. The device also functions as a personal organizer. Price: $100 (includes a six-month learning club membership), www.leapfrog.com
theracardia
SV-SD80
$330
We haven't seen anything this tiny or energetic since Mary Lou Retton. Panasonic's new SV-SD80 is the smallest removable-media MP3 player you can buy. But defying its stature, it delivers a remarkable 50 hours of continuous play, thanks to a rechargeable NiMH battery. The 1 11/16by 1¾-inch device (shown actual size) comes with RealJukebox software and a USB reader, so you can download your favorite songs off compact discs or the internet. Pop in a loaded 64MB SD memory card, and you can rock out all weekend. Price: $330. www.panasonic.com
theracardia
D-Air jacket
Of course you're a defensive driver, even when you're tossing your motorcycle around twisty two-laners. But accidents happen, which is why we love Dainese's D-Air jacket. It monitors stability using sensors within the jacket and on the motorcycle. If it forsees a fall, it inflates in 30 milliseconds. Available in Europe this spring; no U.S. plans yet. Price not yet set. www.dainese.com
theracardia
Terra satellite
$3.9 billion
Considering all we are learning about the universe, you'd think we'd understand more about Earth's ecological moving parts. But much remains a mystery. That is changing, first with the December 1999 launch of NASA's Terra satellite and now with the European Space Agency's $3.9 billion Envisat. This semisized spacecraft's 10 instruments will monitor every facet of the global ecosystem, from ocean circulation to atmospheric composition. Scheduled to launch this month, envisat.esa.int
theracardia
[no value]
$60
You've heard it enough: Ear protection is essential in home workshops, where sound levels often exceed those of a Kid Rock concert. Yet many ignore the warnings, saying ear plugs prevent them from hearing anything. Now there's a better way. The Over & Out protector amplifies all sounds, then automatically reduces spikes over 85 decibels. So you can be working in the shop, but still hear the play-by-play on the tube. Price: $60. Power Aisle Inc., 193 West Hills Rd., Huntington Station NY 11746.
theracardia
DVE-631CF
$250
Why boot up the PC when you have a perfectly good display in the living room? We're talking about your TV, which now doubles as a digital photo system thanks to Sampo's DVE-631CF. It's the first DVD player with a built-in Compact Flash slot. You just slip in the card from your camera. Price: $250. www.sampoamericas.com
theracardia
sport-utility bicycle
$1,500
Giant calls its Prodigy DX the world's first sport-utility bicycle. This is doubtful: What are hybrid bikes, if not sporty and useful? Nonetheless, the aluminum DX, designed with a cool-goofy futuristic-tubular look, does deliver unusual versatility. Dual adjustable shocks with 4-inch travel in the rear help with the rough pavement, as do antipuncture tires. The one-piece wheels never need realignment, and disc brakes stop the hefty bike with dispatch. The rear rack is sturdy: Leave the SUV at home, take the SUB for groceries. At $1,500, it is priced like an SUV. www.giantbicycle.com
theracardia
iPod
$399
Apple's new iPod, the computer maker's first MP3 player, stores 5GB of music—enough for a whopping 1,000 songs. To put that into perspective, consider: That's 125 times more data than the venerable Mac Classic held on its comparatively puny 40MB hard drive. And it's all in a stunning, if slightly bulky, 6.5-ounce package. Measuring roughly 2.5 by 4 inches, the iPod also incorporates a Firewire port and a rechargeable battery that provides 10 hours of continuous play. Mac only. Price: $399. www.apple.com
theracardia
Life-Saving Pajamas
Each year, more than 2,500 babies in the U.S. die from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, or SIDS. Preemies are more susceptible, so much so that parents outfit them with electrode monitors. But new pajamas being developed by Belgium's Verhaert could prevent SIDS and make monitoring comfortable. The PJs have five built-in sensors that watch heart rate and respiration; any ominous change triggers an alarm. It will be available within 18 months, www.verhaert.com
theracardia
Robokitty
$1,500
The Omron Corp., known for its complex sensors and medical devices, has built a cat. Like a pocket-pet Tamagotchi, the NeCoRo responds to care and neglect, in this case through its tactile sensors. Much like a real cat, it meows, purrs, sits around, stretches, and crouches. Unlike Sony's Aibo dog, though, it can't walk. Available only in Japan. Price $1,500. www.necoro.com
theracardia
Pocket Polaroid
$100
Even as the company moves into Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, Polaroid is releasing products. The new Mio borrows the appeal of the company's I-Zone [pocket camera, tiny pictures] —which teens love —but it's far more serious, producing wallet-size instant prints. Price: $100. www.polaroid.com
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0010.xml
review
11
11
WHY BUY?
[no value]
PDA vs. Cell
Do you want a PDA that acts like a cellphone, a cellphone that keeps you organized, or something in between? How to decide.
A PDA With a Phone Built In
A Phone Accessory for Your PDA
A Cellphone With a PDA Built In
[no value]
Handspring Treo
$399
GREAT FOR: Anyone who travels frequently on business. Having integrated high-speed communications leaves your PDA's expansion slots open for other devices THINK TWICE IF: You're constantly looking for a new cellphone service provider WHAT TO BUY: Handspring Treo ($399)
[no value]
Sprint PCS Wireless Web Digital Link
$200
GREAT FOR: The occasional traveler who wants to use his PDA as a laptop substitute for e-mail and Web browsing THINK TWICE IF: You plan on using the modem frequently—it's bulky and you have to charge it separately WHAT TO BUY: Sprint PCS Wireless Web Digital Link ($200), Casio Pocket Spider ($349)
[no value]
Casio Pocket Spider
$349
[no value]
Samsung 1300
$350
GREAT FOR: The businessman or socialite who’s always on the go—and on the phone THINK TWICE IF: You're concerned about how your suit hangs—these devices are monstrous in size compared with the latest cellphones WHAT TO BUY: Samsung 1300 ($350), Kyocera QCP-6035 ($499)
[no value]
Kyocera QCP-6035
$499
Suzanne Kantra Kirschner
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0011.xml
advertisement
12
12,13
[no value]
[no value]
TOYOTA
[no value]
TOYOTA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0012.xml
review
15
15
FIRST LOOK
[no value]
Why Does This PC Look Like a Duck?
Answer: As computer designers look to the future, they're blending portability, versatility, and beauty.
designedge
[no value]
designedge
[no value]
It’s one of the most innovative concepts in home computers we've seen since Macs became giant candy-colored teardrops. The Aria, created by Austin, Texasbased Design Edge, is a computer without a monitor. Instead, a small LCD projector flips out of the side of the duck-like machine, allowing you to view spreadsheets on your office wall or DVDs on a makeshift screen in your living room. Fold the optics back in, and the Aria can be carried home in one hand. Although the machine is still just a prototype, Design Edge's Mark Kimbrough says manufacturers have shown "great interest"; he hopes to see it on sale by 2004. www.designedge.com
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0013.xml
review
16
16
FIRST LOOK
[no value]
Russian Mir Offshoot to Launch a Mini Station
The Story So Far
mirstation
[no value]
mirstation
three-person Mini Station
$20 million
[no value]
First, Dennis Tito bought his way into space ["Top 10 Science Stories," this issue]. Now MirCorp, a spinoff of the Mir program that cut the Tito deal, plans to open the world's first private space station by 2004. A trip, via a Soyuz transport, to the three-person Mini Station 1 will cost $20 million per cosmotourist.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0014.xml
advertisement
17
17
[no value]
[no value]
SELECT COMFORT: THE SLEEP NUMBER BED
[no value]
SELECT COMFORT
THE SLEEP NUMBER BED
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0015.xml
review
20
20
NEXT TECH
[no value]
THE ELECTRIC WINTER COAT
[no value]
polartec
[no value]
polartec
plug-in Heat blanket
$159
In the past, manufacturing an electric blanket meant sandwiching a metallic pad between two layers of fabric; the result wasn't particularly supple, and only as portable as the cord was long. Now Polartec has found a way to eliminate the bulk and, for some applications, the cord. The key: a tiny resistive thread of metal and synthetic fiber that's woven into fabric —as with Polartec's new plug-in Heat blanket [$159 to $219]—or laminated between two layers, as with North Face's MET5 jacket [$499], which carries a battery for juice. Polartec is developing more products for release in 2003. Among them: gloves that heat fingertips, and thermal shoe inserts, www.polartec.com, www.northface.com
polartec
MET5 jacket
$499
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0016.xml
advertisement
21
21
[no value]
[no value]
EVERQUEST TRILOGY
[no value]
EVERQUEST TRILOGY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0017.xml
article
22
22
[no value]
[no value]
Dream Cars
With a new batch of prototypes, designers are having fun again.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
There are always a few outlandish concept cars at the auto shows, but Tokyo and Frankfurt yielded a bumper crop this year. Weirdest perhaps is the lunar-dunebuggy Peugeot Moonster❶, which is supposed to invoke the car of the year 2020. The exoskeletal Nissan Nails❷ is a pickup that does away with sheetmetal —its frame is its exterior.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0018.xml
advertisement
23
23
[no value]
[no value]
Bose Corporation: 3·2·1 home entertainment system
[no value]
Bose Corporation
3·2·1 home entertainment system
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0019.xml
article
24
24,26
e - life
DISPATCHES FROM THE DIGITAL FRONTIER
The Computer Inside You
Don't look now, but the next computer applications may happen within our bodies.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Chris O'Malley THE RAPID PACE OF MINIATURIZATION IN ELECTRONICS has become harder and harder to fathom. It's not the speed of that progress, really. It's the smallness of it. The latest developments are hard to comprehend because they're impossible for the human eye to see.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0020.xml
advertisement
25
25
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
ZAPWORLD
ZAPPY ELECTRIC SCOOTERS
ZAPWORLD
ITALIAN ELECTRIC SCOOTERS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0021.xml
advertisement
26
26
[no value]
[no value]
TIMEX
[no value]
TIMEX
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0022.xml
advertisement
27
27
[no value]
[no value]
TIMEX
[no value]
TIMEX
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0023.xml
advertisement
28
28
[no value]
[no value]
makita
[no value]
makita
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0024.xml
article
29
29
newsfronts
EDUCATION
WHO IS THE WEAKEST LINK?
We all are when it comes to science, says new research— especially women.
[no value]
[no value]
ANNETTE FOGLINO
IT'S NO SECRET THAT THE AVERage American knows very little about science. But according to new research, many women are more likely to know the difference between a Libra and an Aquarius than whether the Earth revolves around the sun. No one is more distressed by this than Florida State researcher Susan Carol Losh, who recently reviewed surveys of basic scientific knowledge conducted by the National Science Foundation.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0025.xml
article
30
30,31
newsfronts
MAPPING
WHOLE WORLD IN YOUR HANDS
You haven't seen it 'til you've felt it.
[no value]
[no value]
BOB SILLERY
NO ONE LOVES MAKING MODELS MORE THAN MICHAEL Bailey of the San Diego Supercomputer Center's TeleManufacturing Facility. His two "rapid prototyping" fabrication machines read geometric files and render them into 3-D physical representations.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0026.xml
article
30
30
newsfronts
HOME APPLIANCES
DISPENSE WITH CONDENSERS
Designing an air conditioner to blow more cheaply.
RECONDITIONING THE AIR CONDITIONER
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES WARDELL
AN OKLAHOMAN'S INVENTION could dramatically lower the cost of air-conditioning. Like any air conditioner, the Kelix transfers heat from inside to outside by raising and lowering the pressure of a liquid refrigerant— but without the power-hungry compressor that is mostly to blame for air-conditioning's notoriously high energy consumption.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0027.xml
article
31
31
newsfronts
SPACE TRAVEL
GOIN' ASTRO-NUTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
After five months in command of the International Space Station, astronaut Bill Shepherd was quoted as saying that noise on the craft was "unpleasant," dandruff was a nagging problem, and that certain procedures "basically suck." In case it gets worse, NASA has produced a crisp protocol on suicide prevention for the benefit of space station crews.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0028.xml
article
31
31
newsfronts
EMISSIONS
FILL 'ER UP, FIDO
Cleaner diesel engines, thanks to urine.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIESEL ENGINES ARE MORE FUEL-efficient than gasoline engines, but that doesn't mean they pollute less. The reason: Gas engines can be fixed with catalytic converters that clean their exhaust systems, but diesels cannot, due to the high oxygen content in diesel exhaust.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0029.xml
article
32
32
newsfronts
PALEONTOLOGY
A FOSSIL IN THE FLESH
For a dead dinosaur, Leonardo looks incredibly good.
[no value]
[no value]
MICHAEL CARROLL
ON THE LAST HOUR OF THE LAST DAY OF the Judith River Institute’s summer dig, a fossilized dinosaur was found in a sandy bank in northern Montana. It was a hadrosaur, or duck-billed dinosaur, of the genus Brachylophosaurus, only the fourth such specimen ever found.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0030.xml
article
32
32
newsfronts
EXPLOSIVES
THE LITTLE BIG BANG
Silicon blows its top.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SILICON IS RARELY DANgerous, so imagine the surprise of researchers at the Technical University of Munich when a tiny, porous, supercooled pellet of the stuff suddenly exploded in a bright flash. Nothing was left behind but a heap of ruined lab equipment.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0031.xml
article
32
32
newsfronts
NUTRITION
DON'T FORGET THE SOY. IF YOU DO, EAT SOY.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Everyone knows soy is great for the body, but new research shows it helps the mind too. Pharmacologists at King's College in London found that people who ate a highsoy diet for 10 weeks developed better memory than those who consumed the same amounts of protein, fat, and calories, but without the soy.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0032.xml
advertisement
33
33
[no value]
[no value]
Bose Corporation: The Bose Acoustic Wave music system
[no value]
Bose Corporation
The Bose Acoustic Wave music system
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0033.xml
article
34
34
newsfronts
BIOLOGY
WHY A SPERM WAGS ITS TAIL
[And how to make it stop.]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOST SPERM SWIM LIKE DOLPHINS, BUT SOME paddle along like sea turtles. Now scientists, led by David Clapham of Children’s Hospital in Boston, think they know why. Clapham and his colleagues have found a gene in mice that produces a protein that helps sperm swim.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0034.xml
article
34
34
newsfronts
COMPUTERS
THE TANDY'S STILL DANDY
A legend with a tiny screen and a tinier memory.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOU DON’T SEE MANY CARS, let alone laptops, still in use after 18 years. But the Tandy, which debuted in 1983 as the TRS-80 model 100, is still going strong. Its screen holds only eight lines of text and its miniscule memory is just 24K. But, boy, is it durable.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0035.xml
article
35
35
newsfronts
AUTO DESIGN
PUREBRED HYBRID
An intriguing take on an intriguing tech.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE NEED TO SAVE FUEL AND reduce emissions has given birth to several cars and trucks with hybrid drives that combine an electric and internal combustion engine. The idea is to use electric power to provide intermittent acceleration, which enables a small gas engine to run close to its peak efficiency.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0036.xml
article
35
35
newsfronts
HOUSING
AT HOME IN CENTURY 21
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
In 1900, there were no long-term home loans. You paid cash. No wonder the percentage of American homeowners has increased substantially. Source: National Association of Home Builders
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0037.xml
advertisement
35
35
[no value]
[no value]
Stoner: Invisible Glass
[no value]
Stoner
Invisible Glass
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0038.xml
article
36
36
newsfronts
METEOROLOGY
THE WIND CHILL WAR
Weather wonks get ready to rumbl-l-l-l-le!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DON'T BLAME THE NATIONAL Weather Service if you don’t feel any warmer this winter. The agency is raising its wind chill index twice in the next two years, based on skin temperatures taken from hearty volunteers thrown into a Canadian wind tunnel.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0039.xml
article
36
36
newsfronts
MILITARY TECH
POWER ON THE PROWL
These boots are made for walking and talking.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IMAGINE YOU'RE A COMMANDO, DEEP IN enemy territory, with every high-tech gadget a soldier could want: night vision goggles, GPS receiver, a radio hookup to the command post. There’s only one problem: Your battery is dead. If researchers at SRI International have their way, all a future commando in such straits need do is start walking.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0040.xml
advertisement
37
37,38
[no value]
[no value]
Pfizer Inc.: VIAGRA
[no value]
Pfizer Inc.
VIAGRA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0041.xml
article
38
38
newsfronts
HOMEBUILDING
METALHEADS
A framing system that's a do-it-yourselfer's dream.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN SIX unskilled white-collar workers try to frame a three-bedroom house? Recently, Carlton, Minnesota, landscape architect David Chmielewski and his wife, Jennifer, grabbed four helpers and gave it a try. In less than two days, armed only with hammers, they finished what Chmielewski calls "the squarest, straightest house I’ve ever been in."
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0042.xml
article
39
39
newsfronts
MILITARY MEDICINE
MINIATURE M.A.S.H.
A new mobile X-ray system gives wounded soldiers a better shot.
BATTLE READY
[no value]
[no value]
HEATHER SPARKS
THE FATE OF A WOUNDED SOLdier is tied to time. Typically, a medic will try to stanch the bleeding before the soldier is airlifted to a hospital hours away. But engineers at the U.S. Army Soldier Systems Center in Natick, Massachusetts, hope to save lives with a new Mobile Digital Imaging System.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0043.xml
article
39
39
newsfronts
ROBOTICS
GO AHEAD, SLUG... MAKE MY DAY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIANE LANIGAN
The slug has bedeviled gardeners since Adam was expelled from Eden, and British engineer Chris Melhusih is anxious to end the torment with a robot slug-killer. SlugBot looks like a cross between a lawnmower and a Tonka truck. Its 6-foot arm is mounted on a turntable and a modified camera scans the soil for slugs.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0044.xml
article
40
40
newsfronts
ELECTRONICS
ROCKIN' PHOTONICS
The soul of a new guitar is infrared.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM THE DAYS OF LES PAUL and Charlie Christian to those of Eric Clapton and Metallica, the electric guitar has remained basically the same. A "pickup” consisting of a magnet surrounded by a coil of wire is placed close to a metal string. The string’s vibration changes the magnetic field, which transmits an electric signal through the coil.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0045.xml
advertisement
40
40
[no value]
[no value]
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
[no value]
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0046.xml
advertisement
41
41
[no value]
[no value]
Sears, Roebuck and Co.: CRAFTSMAN
[no value]
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
CRAFTSMAN
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0047.xml
article
42
42
newsfronts
PEST CONTROL
HOW TO FOOL A FLY
Artificial cows are foiling a deadly pest.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SLEEPING SICKNESS IS BLAMED FOR SOME 25,000 deaths in Africa each year. The disease— along with nagana, a similar illness that annually kills some 3 million cattle—is caused by the tsetse fly, an insect that, to the untrained eye, looks similar to the American housefly.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0048.xml
article
42
42
newsfronts
NEUROSCIENCE
NO MORE...PLEASE!
A chocolate orgy for science's sake.
WHEN GOOD TASTES TURN BAD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW DOES YOUR BRAIN KNOW WHEN YOU'VE HAD too much of a good thing? Dana Small, a cognitive neuroscientist at Northwestern University's School of Medicine in Chicago, decided to look into it by feeding people chocolate. She stood in the hallway of her department and recruited nine selfproclaimed cocoa-bean lovers, hooked them up to MRI machines, gave them chocolate, and then measured blood flow in their brains while they ate.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0049.xml
advertisement
43
43
[no value]
[no value]
Tempur-Pedic, Inc.
[no value]
Tempur-Pedic, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0050.xml
article
44
44
newsfronts
MATERIALS SCIENCE
STRONG AND STRETCHY
The secret to muscular ceramics: ductility.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM COFFEE MUGS TO AIRplane parts, ceramics are all around us. Prized for light weight and versatility, they also have a well-known weakness: A swift, hard blow will break them. But B.N. Kim and his colleagues at Japan's National Institute for Materials Science may have solved this problem with a ceramic that stretches—and stretches—before it breaks.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0051.xml
article
44
44
newsfronts
COUTURE
KILLER UNDERPANTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"It's said there's no such thing as bad publicity, but now I'm not so sure," says Roger Freeman. Four years ago, he started Infectious Awareables [www.iawareables.com], selling ties, scarves, and boxer shorts decorated with prints of harmful microbes—from dental plaque to Ebola.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0052.xml
article
44
44,45
newsfronts
MARINE BIOLOGY
MOCK-TO-PUS
A tasty mollusk is a master of disguises.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS OCTOPUS MAY NOT APpear very appetizing to you, but to many a saltwater predator, it looks a lot like a "walking rump steak." So says oceanographer Mark Norman of the University of Melbourne, Australia, who recently discovered an extraordinary new species in the waters off the Indonesian islands of Bali and Sulawesi: the mimic octopus.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0053.xml
article
46
46,47,48,49,50,51
Features
[no value]
rise of the covert choppers
You're looking at the prototype of an unmanned helicopter that will stop its rotor midair and fly, very fast, like a plane. Covert copter technology could be a key element in tomorrow’s shadow warfare.
CRW Dragonfly
Blasts from the Past
Hovering Like a Hummingbird
A160 Hummingbird
Darting Like a Dragonfly
Future Fighters
[no value]
[no value]
Bill Sweetman
ON THE OUTSKIRTS OF A city hundreds of miles inside enemy territory, a small, windowless helicopter hovers almost silently, 100 feet up. A night vision camera mounted beneath the fuselage scans the area. Detecting no signs of danger, the unmanned craft settles to the ground, deposits a robot, then lifts off and disappears into the night.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0054.xml
article
52
52
the top 10 science stories of 2001
[no value]
the top 10 science stories of 2001
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INTEREST IN SCIENCE IS ON THE RISE IN America. Around the same time that Internet mania cooled, our attentions turned to a world in which stem cells, even more than dotcoms, could be vitally important to our future. America in 2001 became a society in which an enormous decoding endeavor—the human genome project—could, at least for a few days, make the front pages of newspapers.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0055.xml
article
52
52,53
[no value]
SPACE
launch of a tourist trade
The cash-hungry Russians took a rich American businessman into orbit. Is space poised to become the next tourist trap?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN 2001, THE RIGHT STUFF TURNED out to be green. Dennis Tito's April ascent to the International Space Station made for a spectacular media story, but his debut as the first paying space tourist raised troubling questions about the role of commerce in space.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0056.xml
article
54
54,55
launch of a tourist trade
MATERIALS SCIENCE
plastic that heals itself
When cracks form, they repair like wounds.
Runners Up
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN THIS ERA OF WORKS-TODAY, breaks-tomorrow gadgetry, the idea of a plastic that not only endures but actually repairs itself may sound far-fetched. But scientists at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have created just that: a synthetic material that automatically seals any tiny cracks that develop within it.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0057.xml
article
54
54,55
launch of a tourist trade
ANTHROPOLOGY
man of the year
A 3.5-million-year-old fossil suggests the human family tree is a lot more complicated than we knew.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A QUARTER-CENTURY AGO, ANTHROpologists found a skeleton in Ethiopia that they named Lucy, and since then she has held her position as a key human ancestor, But a newly discovered skull has cast doubt on Lucy's pedigree, throwing the study of human origins into confusion.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0058.xml
article
56
56
launch of a tourist trade
PHOTONICS
light stopped dead
Impossible as it sounds, a scientist halted a beam of light, then sent it on its way.
[no value]
[no value]
MICHAEL MOYER
IT SEEMED THE WORK OF A MAGIcian, not a physicist. In her darkened laboratory at Harvard University, Lene Hau slowed light to a stop. Hau froze a laser beam within a cloud of gas no bigger than a grain of sand. There it sat, suspended in the air for a millisecond, until she fired a second beam into the gas, knocking the first out of place and sending it along its way.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0059.xml
article
56
56,57
launch of a tourist trade
RESCUE TECH
manhattan becomes a lab
Within hours of the Sept. 11 attacks, experts rushed high-tech aid to Lower Manhattan.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE SHOCKING EVENTS OF SEPT. 11 had barely dented our consciousness when reports emerged about cellphone calls—some real, some wishful thinking—made by survivors buried beneath the devastation at the World Trade Center. The Federal Emergency Management Agency responded by setting up a system to trace the cellphone signals sent to nearby antennas.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0060.xml
article
58
58
launch of a tourist trade
BIOETHICS
stem cells storm D.C.
Basic research slows for a fundamental ethical debate.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF IT WASN'T FOR THE POLITICAL AND ethical turmoil surrounding them, stem cells would hardly be a household term—showing up on the covers of Time and Newsweek and on talk shows like "Larry King Live.” But by now almost everyone knows that the once-obscure stem cell could someday become a cureall for everything from cardiac and Alzheimer's disease to diabetes and cancer.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0061.xml
article
61
61
[no value]
[no value]
Cloning Update
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIRST THERE WAS A CLONED sheep named Dolly in 1997. Then came cloned goats, cows, mice, and other animals. And last spring, the ultimate bombshell: World-renowned Italian fertility expert Severino Antinori—the man who made headlines a few years ago when a 63-year-old woman under his care gave birth —announced that his team of international researchers was poised to clone human beings.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0062.xml
article
61
61
launch of a tourist trade
CLIMATOLOGY
watching the glaciers go
Another confirmation of the rise in global temperatures: Big ice is melting.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOUNTAIN GLACIERS AND ICE CAPS in tropical areas of the world are melting fast and may vanish altogether by the year 2020. That was the chilling news last year from Lonnie Thompson, a geologist at Ohio State University's Byrd Polar Research Center who has been studying icy areas near the equator in South America, Africa, and the Himalayas for two decades.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0063.xml
article
62
62
launch of a tourist trade
HUMAN GENOME
less code, more complexity
Humans have fewer genes than expected, but geneticists reassure us that less is more.
[no value]
[no value]
GUNJAN SINHA
LAST YEAR, THE INTERNATIONal scientific team that's sequencing the human genome determined that a human being possesses only a few thousand more genes than a mustard weed plant. Instead of the textbook estimate of 100,000 human genes, the new official count put the number at just over 30,000.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0064.xml
article
62
62,63
launch of a tourist trade
PALEONTOLOGY
a dino with feathers
A new fossil find from China hints at the mysterious origin of birds.
[no value]
[no value]
AUDE LECRUBIER
THIS ODD-LOOKING SKELETON BElongs to an equally bizarre dinosaur. Called a dromaeosaur, it was a mere 2 feet long and had two skinny legs, sickle claws on its middle inside toes and stiffening rods in its long tail. But what really makes this creature stand out is, rather, its covering:
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0065.xml
article
62
62,63
launch of a tourist trade
NANOTECHNOLOGY
the first nano circuit
IBM makes the tiniest computer part ever.
[no value]
[no value]
MICHAEL MOYER
EVEN THE MOST OPTIMISTIC SEMIconductor researchers say that silicon-based computer chips may only have 15 years or so left in them. After that, it will be impossible to fit any more circuits onto these increasingly minute wafers to power inexorably smaller and smarter computers.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0066.xml
article
64
64,65,66,67,68
Features
[no value]
finding the edge of the cloud
We need a smoke alarm for blo-attacks. Progress is being made, but don't hold your breath.
Racing Against Time
[no value]
[no value]
Frank Vizard
TALK ABOUT THE UNTHINKABLE: ONE LETTER containing a potent, "militarized” form of anthrax was sent to the office of the Senate Majority Leader and, postal machine by postal machine, envelope by envelope, it spread to other federal buildings throughout the capital, contaminating a large area and, temporarily, bringing some government operations to a halt.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0067.xml
review
69
69,70,71,72,73
[no value]
[no value]
PUSH HERE to start the car of the future
BMW boldly goes where no 7 Series has gone before. Our car editor learns to drive the thing.
IN THE COCKPIT OF BMW'S RADICAL NEW 7 SERIES
Steer, Stop: The Last Bastions of Mechanical Linkage Fall
BMW 7 SERIES Basic specs of a new flagship luxury machine.
BMW
[no value]
BMW
7 SERIES
$70,000
Dan McCosh
LET'S SET ASIDE, FOR NOW, THE FACT THAT when I needed to put my brand-new test-drive BMW 7 Series into reverse on a narrow Italian road, I couldn’t: For an instant, I found my hand on a computer joystick where the shifter should have been, and the car drifted forward as I toggled through some computer commands.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0068.xml
article
74
74,75,76,77
Features
[no value]
looks can be deceiving
New genetic tools bring surprises about who's cousin to whom in the animal world.
[no value]
[no value]
Dawn Stover
IF IT LOOKS LIKE A DUCK, WALKS LIKE A DUCK, AND QUACKS like a duck, it is a duck, right? Not anymore, unless a DNA test says so. Scientists at Pennsylvania State University and the University of Wisconsin recently used genetic evidence to prove that the duck-like grebe is actually more closely related to the exotic flamingo than to ducks. The finding defies common sense, because the flamingo and grebe don't look anything alike:
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0069.xml
advertisement
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
Carpenter Co.: sleep better
[no value]
Carpenter Co.
sleep better
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0070.xml
article
79
79
firsthand
HOME SECURITY
E-CATCHING THE CAT BURGLAR
First look at a self-installed PC and Web security system.
THE SHORT LIST
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES WARDELL
THE SIMPLEST WAY TO TEST A NEW residential security system, it seemed to me, was to set it up and then break into my own house. I buy a ski mask, approach the house in question, crack open the front door, and set off a piercing alarm that fills my home and spills into the neighborhood.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0071.xml
article
80
80
firsthand
FOOD PREP
HIGH TECH VS. RETRO TECH
Can microchips make the perfect piña colada?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OSTER'S NEW IN2ITIVE BLENDER/FOOD PROCESSOR looks like your basic kitchen blender—mated with, say, the control panel from a Star Trek Mobile Phason Regenerator. Press the power button and an LCD lights up to confirm that Mission Control is ready for its next salsa assignment.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0072.xml
article
80
80
firsthand
HOMELAND SECURITY
WAR REHEARSAL
We ride along as fighter jets intercept a hostile commercial airliner.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE RADIO CRACKLES AS TWO ARMED F-15C EAGLES ROLL PAST US, lighting their afterburners and ripping the air apart. "There they go," squawks Lt. Col. Art Crain, steering us onto the runway. He pushes the throttles forward, unleashing 50,000 pounds of thrust.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0073.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
TECHNOSCOUT.com
Bare Ground Solution System with Sprayer
TECHNOSCOUT.com
Gallon Refill
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0074.xml
advertisement
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: popular science
[no value]
[no value]
popular science
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0075.xml
review
82
82
firsthand
PREVIEW DRIVE
2002 AUDIS6 AVANT
All-season transit for when you have to get there fast.
AUDI
[no value]
AUDI
S6 AVANT
$58,700
[no value]
BLITZING ACROSS THE WINDING BACKROADS OF RURAL Virginia in the Audi S6 Avant, I’m reminded of what wagons used to be: big, boxy boats with faux paneling outside and faux leather inside. Reminded because this vehicle is the polar opposite.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0076.xml
article
82
82
firsthand
UPDATE
HEAD SHOTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
In September, I visited Dr. Jeffrey Epstein in Miami for a hair transplant using the very latest technology (see www.popsci.com/firsthand). A few weeks later, the transplanted hair began to fall out and I was ready to panic, until I looked at the information sheet supplied by the doctor's office. "DO NOT PANIC,” it read, "for these are only the hair shafts.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0077.xml
article
83
83
firsthand
WORLD'S FASTEST
THE PLANE TRAIN
Magnetic levitation feels a lot like flying.
WHAT ABOUT ME?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF MY EYES HAD BEEN SHUT, I MIGHT have mistaken it for a 737's takeoff roll. A gentle force pushes me into my seat as the train, on tires, accelerates. As we near 100 mph, onboard superconducting magnets and coils on the U-shaped guideway lift the cars 4 inches.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0078.xml
advertisement
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
The Armor All/STP Products Company
[no value]
The Armor All/STP Products Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0079.xml
review
84
84
firsthand
VIDEO RECORDING
DVD DISARRAY
The new DVD recorders leave us with too many questions.
Panasonic
[no value]
Panasonic
DMR-E20
$1,500
Panasonic
DVR7000
$2,800
Panasonic
DVDR1000
$2,000
Stephen A. Booth
SINCE THE FIRST DVD PLAYERS HIT the market four years ago, we’ve been longing for the day when we could record our favorite television programs. That time has come, only now we're longing for the days when we were still longing. The manufacturers have created a real mess—in fact, they may have inadvertently extended the life of the humble VCR a few more years.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0080.xml
review
85
85
firsthand
MOVIES
PATENTS PENDING
Inside the inventions of a new animated film.
NEUTRON'S WORLD & BEST CURRENT CHOICE
solotrek
[no value]
solotrek
Jet Pack Backpack
Jet Pack Backpack All kids' backpacks are heavy, but Jimmy's has boosters: Stowaway jets get him to school on time via the stratosphere.
solotrek
Super Bubble Gum Mobile
Super Bubble Gum Mobile One blow on this bubble, and Jimmy's cruising to class inside a bouncing sugar sphere. But it pops easily.
solotrek
Intergalactic Communicator
Intergalactic Communicator This toaster communicates very effectively with aliens. The aliens then come calling. This is bad.
solotrek
Jimmy's Hair Machine
Jimmy's Hair Machine It looks diabolical but cuts, combs, and dries without nicking ears or expecting a tip.
solotrek
Goddard the Robotic Dog
Goddard the Robotic Dog An artificially intelligent pup with an internal cellphone, it can mimic Jimmy's voice to fool his parents.
solotrek
SoloTrek XFV
SoloTrek XFV This DARPA-funded manned flight machine is a third of the way through testing. It flies, but not without tether. www.solotrek.com
solotrek
Sparrow Electric Vehicle
Sparrow Electric Vehicle Almost as cute, this oneman, three-wheeled electric car gets 50 miles per charge, so the juice costs about as much as a pack of gum. www .corbinmotors.com
solotrek
NASA's Voyager Spacecraft
NASA's Voyager Spacecraft Both versions carry pictures and music on the so-called Golden Record. But the machines haven’t left the solar system yet. www.nasa.gov
solotrek
The Flowbee
The Flowbee Attaches to your vacuum, then sucks your hair into its blades for an even cut—which, come to think of it, is rather diabolical. www.flowbee.com
solotrek
Sony Aibo
Sony Aibo Cutest of the robopets, it walks, rolls over, barks, chases a ball. Not particularly loyal, and needs its batteries changed. www.sony.com
[no value]
JIMMY NEUTRON: BOY GENIUS, IN THEATERS December 22, begins with the question: What would happen if kids could make their parents disappear? Jimmy gets his wish but doesn’t like it. But he is a boy scientist, and fashions all manner of outlandish inventions to defeat aliens, rescue his parents, and generally save the planet from evil.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0081.xml
article
85
85
firsthand
POP CULTURE Q&A
WHAT'S THE REEL DEAL?
Questions inspired by the film of Tolkien's tome.
[no value]
[no value]
Ted Johnson
THE FELLOWSHIP OF THE RING, OPENing on December 19, brings the first book of J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings trilogy to the big screen. Fellowship is a tale about a mythical place called Middle Earth. Which got us thinking: How far have humans actually gone toward the center of Earth?
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0082.xml
article
86
86
fyi
THE FACTS
Ribbit!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The earliest known frog appeared 190 million years ago. Frogs can leap up to 20 times their body length. The longest jump on record is 33 ft. 5.5 in. The North American wood frog hibernates with as much as 65 percent of the water in its body crystallized into ice.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0083.xml
article
86
86,88
fyi
[no value]
fyi
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BRAD DUNN
DIANE LANIGAN
Is there any difference between an identical twin and a clone? Ralph Raffio Cape Elizabeth, Maine Genetically, the two are virtually the same. Your identical twin and your clone would each share your exact nuclear DNA—the type of molecules that account for more than 99.9 percent of an individual's genetic makeup.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0084.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Bloussant
[no value]
[no value]
Bloussant
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0085.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: EnerX
[no value]
[no value]
EnerX
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0086.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
MacNeil AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED: WeatherTech
[no value]
MacNeil AUTOMOTIVE PRODUCTS LIMITED
WeatherTech
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0087.xml
advertisement
89
89,90,91,92,93,94
[no value]
[no value]
psshowcase
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0088.xml
article
89
89
fyi
HOW IT WORKS
Scramjet Engines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARC DEFANT
LAST JULY, RONKONKOMA, NEW YORK-BASED GASL, WITH FINANCIAL SUPPORT from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, brought hypersonic (that is, five or more times the speed of sound) travel a little closer to reality with the first successful flight of a scramjet-powered vehicle.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0089.xml
advertisement
94
94,95,96,97,98,99
[no value]
[no value]
psdirect
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0090.xml
article
100
100
lookingback
[no value]
lookingback
Two-in-One Engine
Wearable Helicopter
Parallel Parking Made Easy
Antarctic Exploration
Scourge of the Prairie
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
25 YEARS AGO Ford’s new dual-displacement engine improves fuel economy by 10 percent, running on six cylinders for power, then switching to three for economy. From sensors, a computer gets data on engine temperature, load, and speed; transmission gear; and throttle opening.
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0091.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
circuitcity
[no value]
circuitcity
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0092.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
PURINA
[no value]
PURINA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_20020101_0260_001_0093.xml