Issue: 19430301

Monday, March 1, 1943
MAR. 1943
3
True
142
Monday, January 5, 2015

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1,2
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0001.xml
advertisement
0_2
0_2,1
[no value]
[no value]
D. Van Nostrand Co.
[no value]
D. Van Nostrand Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0002.xml
masthead
2
2
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0003.xml
tableOfContents
2
2,4,6,8
[no value]
[no value]
CONTENTS FOR MARCH, 1943
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0004.xml
advertisement
3
3
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0005.xml
advertisement
4
4
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: PEPSI-COLA
[no value]
[no value]
PEPSI-COLA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0006.xml
advertisement
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM
[no value]
[no value]
BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0007.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH AMERICAN MUTUAL INSURANCE CO.
[no value]
NORTH AMERICAN MUTUAL INSURANCE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0008.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0009.xml
advertisement
8
8
[no value]
[no value]
PIPER AIRCRAFT CORPORATION
[no value]
PIPER AIRCRAFT CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0010.xml
advertisement
9
9
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0011.xml
advertisement
10
10
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0012.xml
advertisement
11
11
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE
[no value]
NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0013.xml
advertisement
12
12
[no value]
[no value]
ILLINOIS MERCHANDISE MART
[no value]
ILLINOIS MERCHANDISE MART
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0014.xml
advertisement
13
13
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES ATLAS
[no value]
CHARLES ATLAS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0015.xml
advertisement
14
14
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0016.xml
advertisement
15
15
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0017.xml
article
16
16
[no value]
[no value]
Coming Next Month
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WELDING IS A WAR BABY that came along just in time to carry a big share of the arms-production load. Maybe you know all about welding already. If not, you’ll be interested in an article that explains how the man (or woman) in the mask is putting new strength into our sinews of war.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0018.xml
advertisement
16
16
[no value]
[no value]
LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
[no value]
LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0019.xml
advertisement
17
17
[no value]
[no value]
H. C. LEWIS. Pres.
[no value]
H. C. LEWIS. Pres.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0020.xml
article
18
18,20,22
Readers Say:
[no value]
Readers Say:
Two "Pipe Up" on Air Piped Down
One Thing We Won't Stand For Is a Slipshod Answer
They're Working For the Old Man With the Beard
P.S.M. Herewith Takes Another Modest Bow
A Beef That We Haven't Got Enough Meat in Our Problems
This Puzzler Will Have You Going 'Round in Circles
We're Happy To Give Credit Where Credit is Due
Dad Gets His Orders on Holding the Home Front
Credit the Italians. They Always Come to a Fast Stop
But What if a Dog Just Doesn't Like to Keep House?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAVE just finished reading in your January issue the idea that A. H. W. of Phoenix, Ariz., dreamed up for using light Pikes Peak air to fill balloons and dirigibles. It reminds me of a fellow up here who, in order to spare himself the expense of the antifreeze he needed for the cooling system of his car, rowed several miles out into Lake Michigan to get some of “that blue water that never freezes.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0021.xml
advertisement
19
19
[no value]
[no value]
Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company
[no value]
Westinghouse Electric & Manufacturing Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0022.xml
advertisement
20
20
[no value]
[no value]
SPRAYBERRY ACADEMY OF RADIO
[no value]
SPRAYBERRY ACADEMY OF RADIO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0023.xml
advertisement
21
21
[no value]
[no value]
CLARENCE A. O'BRIEN and HARVEY B. JACOBSON
[no value]
CLARENCE A. O'BRIEN and HARVEY B. JACOBSON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0024.xml
advertisement
22
22
[no value]
[no value]
MoToR BOOK DEPT.
[no value]
MoToR BOOK DEPT.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0025.xml
advertisement
23
23
[no value]
[no value]
DeFOREST'S TRAINING, INC.
[no value]
DeFOREST'S TRAINING, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0026.xml
article
24
24
[no value]
[no value]
From The News Editors Desk
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY MILITARY COMMANDER should have a psychiatrist on his staff, according to Dr. Emilio Mira, of the University of Buenos Aires. Under the terrific strain of seemingly unending battles that seldom gives them a chance to rest, Dr. Mira says, military leaders are very apt to push themselves far past the limits of their nervous endurance.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0027.xml
advertisement
25
25
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0028.xml
advertisement
26
26
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0029.xml
advertisement
27
27
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL SCHOOLS
[no value]
NATIONAL SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0030.xml
advertisement
28
28
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0031.xml
advertisement
29
29
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0032.xml
advertisement
30
30
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0033.xml
advertisement
31
31
[no value]
[no value]
WILCOX & FOLLETT CO.
[no value]
WILCOX & FOLLETT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0034.xml
advertisement
32
32
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0035.xml
advertisement
33
33
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0036.xml
advertisement
33
33
[no value]
[no value]
WARNER ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
WARNER ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0037.xml
advertisement
33
33
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0038.xml
advertisement
34
34
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0039.xml
advertisement
35
35
[no value]
[no value]
KNICKERBOCKER PUBLISHING CO.
[no value]
KNICKERBOCKER PUBLISHING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0040.xml
advertisement
36
36
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0041.xml
advertisement
37
37
[no value]
[no value]
WILCOX & FOLLETT CO.
[no value]
WILCOX & FOLLETT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0042.xml
advertisement
38
38
[no value]
[no value]
CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
[no value]
CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0043.xml
advertisement
39
39,40,41,42,43,44,45,46
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE Classified OPPORTUNITIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0044.xml
advertisement
46
46
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0045.xml
advertisement
46
46
[no value]
[no value]
WASHINGTON SCHOOL OF ART STUDIO
[no value]
WASHINGTON SCHOOL OF ART STUDIO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0046.xml
advertisement
46
46
[no value]
[no value]
NELSON CO.
[no value]
NELSON CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0047.xml
advertisement
47
47
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0048.xml
advertisement
48
48
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0049.xml
article
49
49,50,51,52,53
A FAMOUS EXPLORER TELLS YOU
[no value]
How Lost Jungle Fighters Can Swwine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM BEEBE
THE letter above is a composite of several I have received, and of many conversations. Perhaps this is a good time to give a comprehensive answer. I began my explorations in tropical jungles about 35 years ago, the wilds of Venezuela. This experience has left me with an undying affection for these mighty trees and the wild creatures which live in their shadow, but this emotion is combined with a thorough respect which ever increases.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0050.xml
article
54
54
Aviation
[no value]
Pup Tents for Army Flyers Designed for Modern Comfort
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SLEEPING in jungle, desert, or arctic waste—or wherever their tasks may take them— still means a good rest for Army flyers equipped with the Air Corps A-2 shelter, this war’s modern descendant of the pup tent. It is a highly portable, waterproof covering that can be put up in a few minutes with four light aluminum tent poles and is easily camouflaged.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0051.xml
article
55
55
Aviation
[no value]
WHY PLANES MAKE Vapon Trails
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AIRPLANES leave trails in the atmosphere that can be picked up, if a spotter is quick enough, like those of game sought by a hunter. Some of them, especially trails left by a plane’s exhaust at high, cold altitudes, endure for some time, while those made by wing tips creating vortices are audible as well as visible.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0052.xml
article
56
56,57
News
[no value]
Microscopic Plants Paint Arctic Snows
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RED, green, purple, and yellow fields of snow and ice—rare curiosities of nature—owe their hues to myriads of microscopic, cold-enduring plants. Some of the world’s most striking displays recently have been discovered and studied in Alaska by E. Kol, Hungarian woman scientist.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0053.xml
article
58
58,59,60,61,212
News
[no value]
Polarized Light for the Eyes of the Army
NEW AERIAL PICTURES SHOW ENEMY TERRITORY IN THREE DIMENSIONS
[no value]
[no value]
ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
ENROLLED in classes at a Cambridge, Mass., laboratory, picked men of the Army, Navy, and Marine Corps are learning a new way to make aerial photographs possessing depth, or a third dimension. The pictures clearly reveal bomb damage to industrial plants.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0054.xml
article
62
62,63
Aviation
[no value]
WAR IDEAS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRUCK TRAILERS with telescoping axles are being used for hauling airplanes from factories to seaports and other shipping points. Axles can be extended to a width of 12 feet, and planes’ landing wheels are run up bridgelike ramps to rest in special troughs.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0055.xml
article
64
64,65,66
WHAT HAPPENS WHEN
[no value]
KAISER BUILDS A SHIP
A JIGSAW PUZZLE OF STEEL, WITH A QUARTER OF A MILLION PIECES AND 97 PREFABRICATED SECTIONS, FORMS A NEW VESSEL FOR VICTORY
[no value]
[no value]
STEWART ROUSE
WHEN the 10,500-ton Robert E. Peary,, on November 12, 1942, slid down way No. 1 of Henry J. Kaiser’s Richmond shipyard after being on the ways only four days, 15 hours, and 26 minutes, it did more than set a world’s record in speedy shipbuilding.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0056.xml
article
67
67
Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Power Houses Below the Sea
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DOWN the Valley of the Jordan, after the war, there may flow water from the Mediterranean to supply electric power for life and industry in the resettled land of the Bible. That is the plan of Pierre Gandrillon, a French scientist and engineer, who had completed his work to the point of actual survey when the war intervened.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0057.xml
article
68
68,69
News
[no value]
EXERCISING HEALTH TRICKS FOR WAR WORKERS
Muscles as Well as Minds Are Being Put to the Test in U. S. Plants. Here Are a Few Tips to Help Banish That War-Worker Weariness
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OF THE millions of men and women in U. S. war plants, many are "green" to hard physical labor, and most are learning for the first time the agony of muscle strain. As critical as the materials they are making, however, is the ability of these operatives to keep working long hours, day after day, without loss of efficiency.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0058.xml
article
70
70,71,72,73,74,75
News
[no value]
THE ARMY ASKED FOR A MIRACLE... THE ANSWER WAS The B-26
HOW GLENN L. MARTIN BUILT A MEDIUM BOMBER THAT FLIES LIKE A CLOSED-COURSE RACER
[no value]
[no value]
William S. Friedman
IF THE Japanese have not developed any profanity in their language in 2,000 years, they must be thinking up some at this late date to describe the U. S. Army’s B-26 medium bomber. On this side of the Pacific, no well-informed observer has offered a temperate opinion of this airplane.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0059.xml
article
76
76
Inventions
[no value]
Crewless Ships for Phantom Convoy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RIDING at anchor in the Capitol Yacht Basin at Washington is one of the strangest ships afloat. Appropriately named the Phantom, she resembles anything but a sea-going craft. Her deck is almost flush with the water line. Missing are smokestacks, superstructure, and cabins.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0060.xml
article
77
77
Inventions
[no value]
Reverse Oars Let Rowers Look Ahead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROWING a boat while facing forward is said to be made practical for the first time by an invention of Percy M. Griffin, of Albany, N. Y. The device consists of an oarlock in which the forward-and-backward motion of the oar handle is reversed in the oar by means of segment gears as shown in the drawing above.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0061.xml
article
78
78,79,80,81,82,83
News
[no value]
HOW SCIENCE IS Changing Your Clothes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOUR clothes are due for a lot of changes, and you will like them all. You'll soon be wearing suits made partly out of skim milk, soybeans, peanuts, seaweed, bark, cellulose, plastics, and possibly even glass, and you won’t even have to get used to it.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0062.xml
article
84
84,85,86,87,88,89,214
News
[no value]
Cheating the Axis Torpedoes
SOUND TRAINING AND GOOD EQUIPMENT NOW BRING SHIPWRECKED SEAMEN BACK TO PORT
MERCHANT MARINE SCHOOLS TEACH MEN TO PLAY SAFE
[no value]
[no value]
BERNARD WOLFE
IT WAS all over before you could say "All hands on deck—man the lifeboats!" One minute Marty was standing watch on the graveyard shift, wondering if he really saw a streak of foam creasing the inky waters— the next, the whole ship heaved and shuddered and, with a terrible splintering crash, split in two.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0063.xml
article
90
90,91,92,93,94,95
News
[no value]
MYSTERY MATERIAL OF A THOUSAND USES
SCIENCE HAS DISCOVERED UNDREAMED-OF WAYS TO USE GLASS—BUT STILL HASN'T FOUND OUT JUST WHAT IT IS
GLASS NOW DOES THE "IMPOSSIBLE"—AND PROMISES TO DO A LOT MORE
[no value]
[no value]
HERBERT ASBURY
ALTHOUGH man has manufactured glass for some 10,000 years, he still doesn't know precisely what it is or how to describe it accurately. The scientist may call it "a super-cooled liquid,” or "an amorphous solid,” but these and other definitions don’t describe glass in the sense that H2O, for example, describes water.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0064.xml
article
96
96,97,98,99,100,101,223,224
ANTHROPOLOGY SHOWS YOU
[no value]
THE TYPICAL AMERICAN FLYER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HICKMAN POWELL
SHORTLY after America entered the war it was discovered, in the testing of an experimental bombing plane, that while a flyer of average size could easily squeeze through the escape hatch to bail out of the ship, a big flyer could not possibly make a jump without first taking off his parachute.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0065.xml
article
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
AIRPLANE CONTROLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AIRPLANE CONTROLS can now be studied, and their operation quickly learned, with the scale model shown at the right. Here an aviation student at Franklin and Marshall College, with his hand on the “stick” and his feet on the “pedals,” puts the model through precisely the same maneuvers that he will have to perform in an actual plane.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0066.xml
article
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
PLASTIC SCABBARDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PLASTIC SCABBARDS for bayonets, which will help to lighten a soldier’s equipment, are now being issued to U. S. troops in all parts of the world. Made of Tenite, a plastic material made from cellulose acetate butyrate, the new scabbard, besides being light, is tough and durable, and comes as a welcome replacement to the old scabbard which was made of leather and wood.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0067.xml
article
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
TEST RUNS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TEST RUNS on new Pratt & Whitney airplane engines are now being utilized to generate electricity in one of the company’s New England plants. By means of equipment developed by engineers of the company and General Electric, the engines, instead of turning propellers during their testing, now turn generators and pump electricity into the plant’s power system.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0068.xml
article
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
HANDLEBARS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HANDLEBARS attached to a .50 caliber antiaircraft machine gun make firing the weapon seem much like riding a bucking motorcycle at high speed over a bumpy road. The photograph at the right, taken on a patrol vessel somewhere on the Pacific, shows a steel-helmeted Coast Guardsman in action.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0069.xml
article
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
RUBBER FROM THE FARM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RUBBER FROM THE FARM has become a reality with commercial production of Agripol by Reichhold Chemicals, Inc., Detroit, Mich. Made from soybean oil and ethyl alcohol, the chemurgic rubber is not now offered as a substitute for natural rubber in automobile tires but will be used for many industrial and domestic purposes.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0070.xml
article
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
AIR-RAID WARDENS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AIR-RAID WARDENS and other civilian-defense workers have enlisted an “electric sentry” manufactured by the Zenith Radio Corporation to listen for urgent telephone calls. A transmitter unit plugged into an outlet near the phone, as below, relays the ringing of the bell to a receiver unit plugged in anywhere about the house.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0071.xml
article
104
104
Aviation
[no value]
THE "SENTINEL"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE "SENTINEL" is the Army’s latest fast-climbing, highly maneuverable liaison plane. Capable of landing in or taking off from a cow pasture, it has been designed to hover at low speeds so that its observer can “hang” in the air to direct artillery fire and troop movements by radio.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0072.xml
article
104
104
Aviation
[no value]
UNDERGROUND
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNDERGROUND production of aircraft is speeded up in this British plant by means of a tiny railroad which carries parts from one shop to another. Visiting American plane builders are shown getting a ride.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0073.xml
article
104
104
Facts and Ideas
[no value]
COMMAND BOATS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COMMAND BOATS for use by the Army in the landing of invasion forces are one of the many types now being turned out by Chris-Craft. 42 feet long, and particularly seaworthy, the boat carries guns fore and aft, and has been especially designed to meet all requirements of transporting officer personnel.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0074.xml
article
105
105
Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Nature's "Modern" War Weapons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOTHER NATURE was the first war inventor. To protect her creatures against their enemies, or to help them hunt their prey, she has provided them with weapons and tactics that in many cases anticipated the vaunted “new weapons” of modern human warfare.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0075.xml
article
106
106
Inventions
[no value]
Stitcher Speeds Surgical Sutures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ADAPTATION of the sewing machine's "uninterrupted thread supply" to surgical suturing has resulted in a new stitcher that cuts precious minutes from operating time and eliminates the danger of spreading infection. The secret of the instrument’s speed is that the needle can shuttle back and forth without stopping for fresh thread with every stitch.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0076.xml
article
107
107
Facts and Ideas
[no value]
War Drafts Young Scientists
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOUTHFUL student scientists are now getting a real break at the Alexander Smith & Sons Carpet Company in Yonkers, N. Y., largest carpet manufacturers in the world. Looking ahead to the time when their technical personnel would be reduced by war demands, the Smith company last summer began employing, as “junior specialists,” Yonkers High School seniors who had shown a marked proficiency in science courses.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0077.xml
article
108
108,109,110,111,112,113,216
News
[no value]
Studios on the Battlefield
DAREDEVIL CAMERAMEN SHOOT HISTORY'S MOST PHOTOGRAPHED WAR
This Is the Army’s Mobile Photo Unit
[no value]
[no value]
JACK O'BRINE
CAMOUFLAGED machine-gunners wriggle to the edge of a thicket and peer into a clearing below. We see their faces at close range—strong, alert faces with the same purposeful glint as their guns. Then we get a view of the other side of the small valley where a second machine-gun detachment is crouching among the trees.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0078.xml
article
114
114
Inventions
[no value]
New Tools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIRECT READINGS are possible with a new caliper for machinists, which measures down to 1/32 of an inch and has a maximum capacity of four inches. Its white scale markings on a black background are easily read even in a poor light, and the simplicity of its operation makes it an accurate and speedy tool to use.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0079.xml
article
115
115
Facts and Ideas
[no value]
How To FIGHT THE NEW EXPLOSIVE INCENDIARY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW type of incendiary bomb carrying a delayed-action explosive charge, now being used extensively by both Germany and Japan, has made it necessary for the Office of Civilian Defense to revise its instructions on fire fighting. Because it is impossible to tell when the bomb will explode—the time fuse can be set to ignite anywhere up to seven minutes after the bomb has struck—it is necessary to use the greatest caution in fighting the blaze which is set immediately on impact.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0080.xml
article
116
116,117,118,119
[no value]
[no value]
Home Spotter's Guide
YOUR CLOTHES HAVE TO LAST LONGER NOW—AND IT WILL HELP IF YOU KEEP THEM SPOTLESS. HERE’S HOW TO DO IT:
THESE MATERIALS WILL MAKE YOUR CLEANING EASY AND THOROUGH
[no value]
[no value]
ANDREW R. BOONE
ABOUT your clothing and other textiles around the house: better keep 'em clean. Most of them must survive the war, because goods of that sort are disappearing from the market. So be prompt in cleaning them, for all stains, from blood to ink and perspiration, get tougher with age.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0081.xml
article
120
120,121,122,123,124,125,126,127,218,220,221
News
[no value]
WHY AMERICA’S TANKS ARE THE WORLD’S BEST
Guns, Speed, Armor, Durability —These Have Given Us the Lead on the Proving Grounds of War
HERE ARE SOME OF THE POINTS IN WHICH OUR TANKS EXCEL
WHAT TANKS SHOULD NOT DO
WHAT TANKS SHOULD DO
BOGIES
VOLUTION OF AMERICA’S MECHANIZED MIGHT. OUR TANKS FROM 1917 TO TODAY-AND TOMORROW
[no value]
[no value]
ARTHUR GRAHAME
THE battlefield value of a tank depends on three qualities: the power of its guns, its ability to take those guns where they can do the greatest possible damage to the enemy, and its mechanical durability. In the fighting on the African desert which was climaxed by Rommel’s rout, American light and medium tanks lend-leased to the British—a few of them handled by American crews—consistently outmatched German tanks of their classes in all of these qualities.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0082.xml
article
128
128,129,130,131
Automobiles
[no value]
Putting a Stop to Brake Troubles
HYDRAULIC SYSTEMS CALL FOR PERIODIC CHECK-UPS
HOW TO DIAGNOSE THE CAUSE OF TEN COMMON BRAKE FAILURES
[no value]
[no value]
RALPH ROGERS
CHECKING and servicing your own automobile regularly becomes of primary importance now that more and more mechanics are being called into war work and parts are becoming harder to replace. And in your periodical check-up, do not fail to test your brakes and readjust them when necessary—their efficient operation, aside from the safety factor, will save wear on many other parts.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0083.xml
article
132
132
Auto Ideas
[no value]
GIANT TRAILER TRUCKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GIANT TRAILER TRUCKS 73 feet long, like the one shown below, are to haul bomber parts from factories to assembly plants 1,300 miles away. Two of these units, which were designed to relieve rail congestion, are equivalent to seven freight cars and can be loaded in less time.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0084.xml
article
132
132
Automobiles
[no value]
How Neglected Puncture Holes Can Destroy Your Tires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TIRES may be sabotaged from within, points out A. L. Murray, president of the Auburn Rubber Corporation. If tiny holes in the casing due to punctures are neglected, the destruction of the tire is only a matter of time. The average car owner, Mr. Murray says, looks only at the outside of his tire and doesn’t realize that while the tread is its wearing surface, its true strength really lies in the inside structure.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0085.xml
article
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
CARBONIZED VALVE GUIDES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CARBONIZED VALUE GUIDES are quickly cleaned with a set of five interchangeable brushes, which remove hard or soft carbon without scratching the side walls. One handle takes all brush sizes, and the metal shank is sufficiently long to protect the hands from projecting studs.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0086.xml
article
133
133
Automobiles
[no value]
New Headlight Hoods Solve Problems of Dim-Out Driving
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SALESMAN motoring to New England a short time ago was stopped seventeen times by the local police between New York and Boston because his lights did not comply with various local wartime regulations. There were, he found, different rules in different areas, and while some enforced dim lights or none at all, others required that head lamps be as bright as usual.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0087.xml
article
134
134
Automobiles
[no value]
USEFUL AUTO HINTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
1 OLD-STYLE TIRES of large rim diameter can be made to serve on small wheels by the use of the adapter shown in the drawing. Here a 5.00-by-19 tire and rim are mounted on the rim of a 6.00-by-16 wheel, but with slight changes the method can be applied to other sizes.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0088.xml
article
135
135,136,137
Automobiles
[no value]
One On the House
Gus Foots the Bill as a New Mechanic Bungles a Job
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
IT WAS a fine sunny morning, and Gus Wilson should have been whistling as he went about his work in the Model Garage shop. But he wasn’t. George Knowles noticed this the moment he came in. "What’s biting you this grand and glorious morning ? ” he wanted to know.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0089.xml
article
138
138,139,140,141,142
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
PROJECTING Your Black-and-White
SLIDES MADE FROM ORDINARY NEGATIVES PRODUCE BRILLIANT IMAGES ON THE SCREEN
[no value]
[no value]
WALTER E. BURTON
FOR a new thrill in photography, try making black-and-white slides for projection, instead of prints on paper. An ordinary print is seen by reflected light, but the maximum beauty of a photograph is best brought out by transmitted light. Transmitted light pictures, or transparencies, are capable of showing a fuller range of tones, and possess greater brilliancy.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0090.xml
article
143
143
Photography
[no value]
EXPOSURE METER MANUAL.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXPOSURE METER MANUAL Issued by a manufacturer of exposure meters, this handy 97page manual deals with the more scientific aspects of photography, particularly those relating to exposures. The technique of using an exposure meter is explained in considerable detail, and the text is illustrated with striking pictures by well-known photographers, and with diagrams and charts.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0091.xml
article
143
143
Photography
[no value]
A PLASTIC PROJECTION REEL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PLASTIC PROJECTION REEL with a patented threading feature and a self-locking film catch is now available to home-movie fans. It has a convenient slot in one of the reel arms for the film to slip through, enabling one to thread it quickly and easily even in darkness.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0092.xml
article
143
143
Photography
[no value]
TRIPLE-PURPOSE PROJECTOR.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRIPLE-PURPOSE PROJECTOR Color slides, black-and-white slides, single-or double-frame film can all be shown with the portable projector pictured above. Film is held flat in the optical plane by glass pressure plates and is ready for showing again immediately after use without rewinding.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0093.xml
article
143
143
Photography
[no value]
Pen Forms Handy Scoop for Photo Chemicals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM SWALLOW
FOR WEIGHING or otherwise handling small amounts of chemicals, a novel scoop can be made from an ordinary pen nib and holder. The pen nib is placed point first into the holder, which forms a convenient handle for manipulating the scoop. With this you can place as small an amount as a crystal or a grain of chemical on the scales.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0094.xml
article
144
144,145
Photography
[no value]
FAST, HEATLESS ENLARGER USES FLUORESCENT TUBES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John W. Campbell
READER W. S. is making a good choice. The fluorescent tube comes so close to being the ideal light source for enlargers that it seems a poor compromise to use anything else in homemade ones. Fluorescent tubes give a brilliant bluewhite light of very high photographic value, and are so nearly heatless that negatives can be left in the carrier of the light box illustrated for several hours and still come out cool to the touch.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0095.xml
article
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Flash Gun Is Adapted to Standard Plugs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Louis HOCHMAN
OWNERS of flash guns that take special plugs for their miniature outlets are finding it difficult to get plugs. Such an outfit can be adapted simply to standard 110-volt plugs by slipping a so-called 110-volt “three-way socket” into the gun, as shown.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0096.xml
article
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Glass Palette Fitted in Flat Box Is Aid in Spotting Prints
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. H. COLES
HERE'S an easy way to do your print spotting without staining the family china. Take a shallow box like the ones in which cut films come, and fit pieces of blotting paper to both halves, inserting them snugly so they won’t slip out. Then cut a piece of clear glass the right size to go into the bottom half of the box, and you have a palette on which to smear water colors for matching print tones.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0097.xml
article
146
146,HW1,HW2,HW3,HW4
HOME & WORKSHOP
[no value]
Building Model Planes Without Balsa
DOMESTIC SUBSTITUTES SERVE CRAFTSMEN AS MODEL MATERIALS MARCH OFF TO WAR
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK ZAIC
WHEN war was thrust upon us, it became evident that model builders would have to do without many of the materials they normally took for granted. Rubber became very precious, and in January, 1942, the manufacture of rubber thread for model use was suspended.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0098.xml
article
HW4
HW4
Shop Data
[no value]
CONVERTING DECIMALS TO FRACTIONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY occasions arise in the shop when decimal dimensions must be measured with an ordinary rule graduated in fractions of an inch. To determine the fractional equivalent of a given decimal, multiply the decimal by the denominator of the fraction most convenient for your use.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0099.xml
article
HW5
HW5
Woodworking
[no value]
Collapsible Clothes Hamper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS attractive folding clothes hamper is easily carried to the laundry for sorting clothes before they are washed. The simple frame is made of dowels, while the cloth bag is so designed that the framework holds it open rigidly and, at the same time, allows it to be folded easily.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0100.xml
article
HW6
HW6,HW7
Home Building
[no value]
OF INTEREST TO HOME OWNERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BLACKOUTS ARE CAMOUFLAGED from the inside through the use of the decorative shade above. Made of heavy black paper and absolutely opaque, it looks like a Venetian blind by reason of a design applied to its interior surface. It may be hung in place or rolled up for storage in few seconds, and is available in four convenient sizes designed to fit almost any window in the home.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0101.xml
article
HW8
HW8,HW9
Home and Workshop
[no value]
STORAGE UNITS FOR THE MODERN KITCHEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH ARONSON
FOR complete modernization of a kitchen, a systematic method of storing equipment in use every day must be provided. Whether you are making a fresh start by remodeling, or already have some up-to-date units installed, it will pay to give additional thought to timesavers of this nature.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0102.xml
article
HW10
HW10
Craftwork
[no value]
Colonial Plant Boxes
WALL HOLDERS MADE FROM A CHOPPING BOWL
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH ARONSON
A PAIR of attractive wall holders for ivy or other potted plants can be made from one wooden chopping bowl and a little ½" lumber. For the two designs shown, a bowl 11" in diameter and 2¾" deep was sawed in half with the grain, and each half was fastened to a wooden back-board with wood screws.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0103.xml
article
HW11
HW11
Craftwork
[no value]
Occaional Mirror
Has Three Shelves for Displaying Knickknacks
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK PIZARRO
DESIGNED on simple, sweeping lines, this decorative mirror harmonizes well with modern furnishings. Making it is a comparatively simple job, although the work must be carefully laid out. The dimensions given are for an 11¾" mirror. It is simplest to use a paper pattern, which will serve for both the main parts.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0104.xml
article
HW12
HW12,HW13
[no value]
[no value]
VICTORY SERVICE PLAQUES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JUAN OLIVER
FROM thousands of American homes, offices, shops, and factories, men have gone forth to join the armed services of the United States. “Let’s not forget them" is the slogan of those who stay behind, and to this end service flags and plaques of various kinds are displayed.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0105.xml
article
HW14
HW14,HW15
Woodworking
[no value]
Folding Luggage Stand
Holds a Guest's Suitcase for Easy Packing and Unpacking
[no value]
[no value]
BENJAMIN NIELSEN
SOLVING the problem of where to put suitcases for packing and unpacking, this sturdy luggage stand saves wear and tear on bedspreads and furniture, and folds so compactly it takes up little room in a closet when not needed. Although the one shown was made from walnut, any strong, durable wood can be used.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0106.xml
article
HW16
HW16,HW17,HW18,HW19
Home and Workshop
[no value]
9 LIVES FOR YOUR LEATHER GOODS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF A SOCIETY for the prevention of cruelty to leather were formed, there is no doubt that many of us would be found guilty of abuse and neglect. These days, however, careful maintenance is the watchword for all goods that cannot be conveniently replaced, and leather—one of the oldest and most useful materials known to man—may have its life multiplied many times over with proper treatment.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0107.xml
article
HW19
HW19
The Handy Man
[no value]
Mounting Stripped Bicycle Pedal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the threads of a bicycle pedal are stripped at the end, the pedal can still be made to serve by countersinking the crank on both sides, and beveling the pedal spindle on the grinding wheel, as shown in the drawing, so that good threads will project far enough through the crank for the nut to get a firm grip.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0108.xml
article
HW19
HW19
Shop Data
[no value]
DRAWING ELLIPSES TO EXACT SIZE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE method of drawing a perfect ellipse with a pencil and a loop of string placed around two brads or thumbtacks, as shown in the diagram at the left, is frequently used in laying out work. An easy way to find the proper spacing between the brads and the correct length of string to be used is as follows:
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0109.xml
article
HW20
HW20
Craftwork
[no value]
POPCORN CART
Holds Four Individual Servers
[no value]
[no value]
ELMA WALTNER
HOT buttered popcorn, that perfect snack for frosty evenings, will be welcomed even more enthusiastically, by children and grownups alike, if served in this attractive cart. The four scoops, which are lifted out by handy finger holes, make convenient individual servers for guests.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0110.xml
article
HW21
HW21
Electrical
[no value]
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
QUICK-GLANCE SPEED CHARTS mounted on machine tools having step pulleys tell instantly how to obtain the nearest correct speed for working various materials, and do away with constant thumbing of the instruction book. The speeds obtainable on a drill press, for example, may be typed or lettered on paper and glued to the belt-guard, as in the photograph at left.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0111.xml
article
HW22
HW22,HW23,HW24,HW25,HW26,HW27
MACHINISTS FOR WAR WORK
[no value]
Turning Work of Two Diameters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL the power that drives America's mighty war machines is transmitted through wheels of steel. These must be carefully designed and skillfully machined. In making the spur gear and shaft of a U. S. Army “blitz buggy,” for example, time is saved and strength and precision are gained when both the shaft and gear are turned from a single piece of steel, eliminating the use of fragile pins, keys, or splines, such as would be required to lock the gear on the shaft if the two parts were produced separately.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0112.xml
article
HW28
HW28,HW29,HW30
Craftwork
[no value]
WORKING TIME: TWO EVENINGS
Many craftsmen have scraps of plastic left over from completed work. Here are three projects that can be made from such odds and ends. None calls for a piece longer than 4", yet all show off the beauty of this material to the full.
[no value]
[no value]
ERNEST R. DEWALT
CIGARETTE BOX. Clear plastic, maple, and walnut are combined in this unique occasional piece, displaying both the plastic and the woods to good advantage. A clear-plastic tube 2⅛" in diameter and 3½" long is sawed apart as shown in the drawings at the left to form both the body and the lid.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0113.xml
article
HW30
HW30
Shop Data
[no value]
PLATING NONMETALLIC WORK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE plating of nonmetallic articles is generally thought of in connection with baby shoes, but other objects that can be encased in electroplated metal include flowers and insects, leaves and fruit, plaster casts, pottery, textiles, wooden handles, buttons, drinking cups, and so forth.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0114.xml
article
HW31
HW31
New Shop Ideas
[no value]
ADJUSTING THE CUT-OFF TOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. W. W.
ADJUSTING THE CUT-OFF TOOL is generally considered one of the most difficult of lathe operations. The tool must be ground properly and adjusted to exact lathe center height. At the left is shown a quick and accurate way of doing this. A machinist’s rule is used to measure up from the ways to exactly the height of either center, and the tool is set at precisely that height.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0115.xml
article
HW31
HW31
New Shop Ideas
[no value]
NEW CUTTING OILS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW CUTTINF OILS adapted to specific machine operations now eliminate in large part older trial-and-error methods of prescribing proper grades. They permit faster speeds and new methods of tooling, closer tolerances, and increased use of alloy steels with lower machinability ratings than metals normally used.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0116.xml
article
HW31
HW31
Miscellaneous
[no value]
GROTESQUE WELDING MASKS.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GROTESQUE WELDING MASKS. Fighting planes painted to resemble sharks may have inspired these welders at North American Aviation to apply war paint to their helmetsߞ or perhaps it’s an old Indian custom they’ve adopted to scare the Axis. Other workers have followed suit, and many weirdly decorated masks glower from the walls of the plant’s locker rooms.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0117.xml
article
HW32
HW32,HW33,HW34,HW35
Home and Workshop
[no value]
Using Special Blades on the Circular Saw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWIN M. LOVE
SPECIAL accessories and jigs greatly increase the usefulness of the circular saw. Often they enable it to double for machines that may be lacking in the home workshop. Many useful attachments can be made of wood in the shop. Others must be purchased, and among the most important of these are planer saws and dado heads.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0118.xml
article
HW35
HW35
Woodworking
[no value]
Tenoning Jig on Miter Gauge Provides Parallel Heads
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS jig permits the miter gauge to be kept in one groove for tenoning, as the working edge of the stock bears against a second parallel guide for cutting the opposite cheek. Not only does this prevent any misalignment of shoulders due to the stock being not quite parallel, but it also allows tapering stiles to be tenoned.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0119.xml
article
HW36
HW36,HW37
Electrical
[no value]
KEEPING THE HOME SHIPSHAPE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0120.xml
article
HW38
HW38,HW39
Craftwork
[no value]
Two-Rail Operation
AUTOMATIC SIGNALING
[no value]
[no value]
David Marshall
CAN we have two-rail operation and automatic signaling, too? Only a few years back the answer would have been a flat “no.” It was pretty well known, of course, that the trick was not altogether impossible—two-rail pikes, completely signaled, were already in operation.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0121.xml
article
HW40
HW40
Woodworking
[no value]
SIMPLE STORAGE RACK FOR SKIS
Sturdy Frame Prevents Warping
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SKIS often present a difficult storage problem be cause of their length and shape. Although some experts prefer simply to tie them together and stand them in a corner, other skiers favor the use of a frame in which the skis can be clamped. Such a frame prevents them from becoming warped in the wrong direction, and so preserves their camber.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0122.xml
article
HW41
HW41,HW42,HW43
Home and Workshop
[no value]
SULPHUR
CORNERSTONE OF MODERN INDUSTRY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TAKE sulphur from the chemist's kit of magic, and almost every manufactured article of daily life would either be altered or cease to exist. Sulphuric acid, which enters into more commercial processes than probably any other chemical, as well as other sulphur compounds, play important roles in many basic industries.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0123.xml
article
HW44
HW44,HW45
Electrical
[no value]
home EXPERIMENTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHORT CIRCUITS and their effects can be demonstrated with two dry cells, a small battery bulb, and a battery-testing meter. First, connect the bulb in series with the dry cells and the meter. Now scrape a bare spot on the wires leading to the bulb and away from it.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0124.xml
article
HW46
HW46,HW47,HW48,HW49
Home and Workshop
[no value]
WARTIME CARE OF ELECTRIC MOTORS
PROPER MAINTENANCE METHODS INSURE TOP PERFORMANCE
[no value]
[no value]
HAROLD P. STRAND
WITH most factories engaged in war production on a 24-hour schedule, it is more imperative than ever that the electric motors which drive their machinery should be given every care. A motor breakdown may slow up production or even close an entire department for a time.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0125.xml
article
HW50
HW50,HW51,HW52
Home and Workshop
[no value]
FIRST STEPS IN ELECTRONICS
PART 1 — THE ELECTRON
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES I. HELLMAN
ELECTRONS, although the smallest particles in existence, are doing a big job in helping Uncle Sam win this war. The problem of producing them and putting them through their paces is a comparatively new branch of science called electronics.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0126.xml
article
HW53
HW53
What's Wrong?
[no value]
CAN YOU FIND EIGHT ERRORS?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
How much do you know about radio? In the sketch of a four-tube A. C.-D. C. TRF receiver above, the artist has made eight intentional errors. Can you find them? As a clew, look for omissions and unnecessary inclusions, and study the parts themselves and their position on the chassis.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0127.xml
article
HW53
HW53
What's Wrong?
[no value]
Pocket-Size Kit Contains Dial and Knob Parts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A COMPLETE assortment of knob springs, setscrews, dial pulleys, idler pulleys, and drive rubbers is contained in a radio kit, at left, equipped for repairing dials and knobs. The kit is convenient to take on jobs, since it measures only ⅞" by 2¾" by 4¾".
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0128.xml
article
HW54
HW54
Radio
[no value]
Servicing Your Radio
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHANGING PILOT LIGHTS is a simple operation in servicing a small A.C.-D.C. receiver, but be sure that you disconnect the radio at the wall socket—don’t just turn off the switch. A serious short can occur if the pilot-light bracket and holder drop on the tuning condenser or chassis.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0129.xml
article
HW55
HW55
Miscellaneous
[no value]
Can You Name These Knives?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SHARP shell or bit of flint was probably the first knife, so the origin of this tool undoubtedly dates from the dawn of human history. There is no tribe today, even among the most primitive peoples, that does not use knives of some kind. War, hunting, fishing, manufacturing, and the arts have all developed their special types, and at least seven different kinds of steel are used in the manufacture of modern knives.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0130.xml
article
HW56
HW56
Woodworking
[no value]
Pine Rack Holds Shop Lumber
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Dear Workshop Editor: Most home craftsmen need some kind of lumber rack badly. I know I do. Stook left on a damp floor is likely to warp or split, and if it's stacked up in a corner you may fall over it and you always have a hard time finding the piece you want. How about a plan for a simple rack that can be placed against one wall, with some way of keeping different kinds or thicknesses of stock separate?
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0131.xml
article
HW57
HW57
The Handy Man
[no value]
Clock Spring Replaces Shop-Apron Strings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK LAMBERT
AN OLD clock or phonograph spring sewn around the waist of your shop apron will eliminate bothersome strings and hold the apron firmly in place. Cut the spring to a length equal to the width of the apron. It is wise to use the innermost part of the spring, since it has more tension, and will cling more closely to the body.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0132.xml
article
HW57
HW57
The Handy Man
[no value]
Detachable Bag Catches Litter from Workbench
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. H. WILSON
A bag attached at the end of a workbench as shown below is useful for catching sawdust or shavings. A straight piece of wood as wide as the bench, with a curved piece of stock bent around it and screwed fast at each end, forms the bag frame. A burlap bag is fitted into this curve.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0133.xml
article
HW57
HW57
Miscellaneous
[no value]
Stretcher Doubles as Cover for Fire Cart
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BLAINE KLUM
HEAVY, unbleached muslin—waterproofed and cut out to cover civilian-defense equipment, such as a mobile fire cart— can also serve as an emergency stretcher. If the cover is wider than a standard 27" stretcher, a third pole pocket should be stitched in.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0134.xml
article
HW58
HW58,HW59
AIDS TO WARTIME Housekeeping
[no value]
PROLONGING THE LIFE OF YOUR IRON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOUR iron sticks to the clothes, starch or other foreign material has probably collected on the sole plate. Remove this by rubbing the hot iron on a piece of paper sprinkled with salt, as shown above. The metal surface should then be waxed by rubbing it with beeswax or paraffin.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0135.xml
article
HW60
HW60
The Handy Man
[no value]
Frame Is Bowed at Center to Pull Wire Screening Taut
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WIRE screening can be made taut by bowing the frame ½" or so at the center while the ends of the screening are being tacked on. Place the ends of the frame on sawhorses, and fasten a C-clamp at the center of each side. Lay a sturdy board under the clamps, nail one end to the floor, and attach an eyebolt to the board midway between the two clamps.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0136.xml
article
HW60
HW60
New Shop Ideas
[no value]
Angle-Painting Problems Solved with Adjustable Brush
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE'S an adjustable-angle brush for painting inaccessible corners on cameras, recording instruments, and similar equipment. Saw off an ordinary brush about two thirds of the way up the ferrule. Drill corresponding holes in the metal ends, and join the two parts with a machine screw and nut, as shown.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0137.xml
article
HW60
HW60
Shop Data
[no value]
REMOVING UPPER WINDOW SASH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Upper sash cords do not often need replacement, but when they do, a stop must first be removed and the lower sash taken out and laid aside. Then pry out the parting bead from the same pulley stile. This member, sunk in a groove, is often held by a nail near the center, and if the runs are painted, may be stuck tight.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0138.xml
article
HW61
HW61,HW62,HW63,HW64
Home and Workshop
[no value]
Sabotage under Your Roof
HOW CONDENSATION CAUSES A HOUSE TO DETERIORATE . . . AND WHAT YOU CAN DO TO CORRECT IT
VITAL SPOTS IN YOUR HOME WHERE CONDENSATION CAN CAUSE COSTLY DAMAGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN THOUSANDS of loyal American homes, sabotage is going on. This sabotage is unintentional, but scarcely less severe than if it were enemy inspired. When paint blisters and peels or brown stain appears on the outside walls of a new home—look for sabotage.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0139.xml
advertisement
211
211
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0140.xml
advertisement
212
212
[no value]
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE CO.
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0141.xml
advertisement
213
213
[no value]
[no value]
TEXACO DEALERS
[no value]
TEXACO DEALERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0142.xml
advertisement
214
214
[no value]
[no value]
EVEREADY
[no value]
EVEREADY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0143.xml
advertisement
215
215
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0144.xml
advertisement
216
216
[no value]
[no value]
SNAP-ON TOOLS CORPORATION
[no value]
SNAP-ON TOOLS CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0145.xml
advertisement
217
217
[no value]
[no value]
THE CASITE CORPORATION
[no value]
THE CASITE CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0146.xml
advertisement
218
218
[no value]
[no value]
CASEIN COMPANY
[no value]
CASEIN COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0147.xml
advertisement
219
219
[no value]
[no value]
Atlas Press Co.
[no value]
Atlas Press Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0148.xml
advertisement
220
220
[no value]
[no value]
EVINRUDE MOTORS
[no value]
EVINRUDE MOTORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0149.xml
advertisement
221
221
[no value]
[no value]
INDIAN MOTOCYCLE COMPANY
[no value]
INDIAN MOTOCYCLE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0150.xml
advertisement
222
222
[no value]
[no value]
American Pad and Textile Company
[no value]
American Pad and Textile Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0151.xml
advertisement
222
222
[no value]
[no value]
Old Town Canoe Company
[no value]
Old Town Canoe Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0152.xml
advertisement
222
222
[no value]
[no value]
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORPORATION
[no value]
UNITED STATES PLYWOOD CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0153.xml
advertisement
223
223
[no value]
[no value]
J. H. Williams & Co.
[no value]
J. H. Williams & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0154.xml
advertisement
224
224
[no value]
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0155.xml
advertisement
225
225
[no value]
[no value]
THE DELTA MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
THE DELTA MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0156.xml
advertisement
226
226
[no value]
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS AND COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0157.xml
article
226
226
[no value]
[no value]
Striped Shank for Star Drill
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. MODROCH
AN EASY way to insure giving star drills the proper amount of rotation with each hammer blow, in order to produce the maximum depth of cut, is to paint the shank with alternate vertical stripes of black and white. This will provide a means of telling how much the drill is turned each time.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0158.xml
article
226
226
[no value]
[no value]
Old Spring Dresses Grinder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. P. DIRKS
PIECES of an old phonograph or clock spring cut about 6" long are useful for dressing grinding wheels. Hold such a piece about 1" or less from its tip in a pair of pliers and place it against the revolving wheel, making sure your eyes are adequately protected.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0159.xml
advertisement
227
227
[no value]
[no value]
SAVAGE
[no value]
SAVAGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0160.xml
article
228
228
[no value]
[no value]
Mesh Keeps Roof Gutters Clear
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARTHUR H. MARTINI
WHERE a house is surrounded by large trees, the gutters and leaders are likely to become clogged with wind-blown leaves. This difficulty can be overcome by covering the gutter with ¼" galvanized wire mesh. If the gutter is of the metal type, cut the mesh into strips ½" wider than the distance from the outer top edge of the gutter to the cornice board and turn the extra ½" to form a right-angle lip.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0161.xml
article
228
228
[no value]
[no value]
Making Springs by Hand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. H. VON DER OHE
COMPRESSION and expansion springs can be wound on a rod with the help of a notched pipe having an inside diameter the size of the spring to be made. Clamp the end of a length of piano wire with the rod in a vise so that the wire is held at an upward angle.
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0162.xml
advertisement
228
228
[no value]
[no value]
Smooth-On Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
Smooth-On Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0163.xml
advertisement
229
229
[no value]
[no value]
MIDWEST RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
MIDWEST RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0164.xml
advertisement
230
230
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0165.xml
advertisement
231
231
[no value]
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR COMPANY
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0166.xml
advertisement
231
231
[no value]
[no value]
CLEVELAND MODEL & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
CLEVELAND MODEL & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0167.xml
advertisement
231
231
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0168.xml
advertisement
232
232
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0169.xml
advertisement
233
233
[no value]
[no value]
JOHNSON MOTORS
[no value]
JOHNSON MOTORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0170.xml
advertisement
233
233
[no value]
[no value]
HEWIG CO.
[no value]
HEWIG CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0171.xml
advertisement
233
233
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Homecraft
[no value]
Popular Homecraft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0172.xml
advertisement
234
234
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0173.xml
advertisement
235
235
[no value]
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0174.xml
advertisement
235
235
[no value]
[no value]
WARNER RESEARCH LABORATORIES
[no value]
WARNER RESEARCH LABORATORIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0175.xml
advertisement
235
235
[no value]
[no value]
THOMPSON BROS. BOAT MFG. CO.
[no value]
THOMPSON BROS. BOAT MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0176.xml
advertisement
236
236
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0177.xml
advertisement
237
237
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0178.xml
advertisement
238
238
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0179.xml
advertisement
239
239
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0180.xml
advertisement
240
240
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0181.xml
advertisement
241
241
[no value]
[no value]
The Vacu-matic Co.
[no value]
The Vacu-matic Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0182.xml
advertisement
242
242
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0183.xml
advertisement
243
243
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0184.xml
advertisement
244
244
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19430301_0142_003_0185.xml