Issue: 19410501

Thursday, May 1, 1941
MAY 1941
5
True
138
Thursday, December 25, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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CONTENTS For MAY, 1941
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0005.xml
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3
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GENERAL MOTORS
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GENERAL MOTORS
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0006.xml
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4
4
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UNITED STATES GYPSUM COMPANY
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0007.xml
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5
5
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0008.xml
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6
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CHAMPIONS
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CHAMPIONS
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0009.xml
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7
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0010.xml
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8
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0011.xml
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9
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0012.xml
article
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10
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Coming Next Month —
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SUBMARINES are not like other warships, which must either outfight or outrun their enemies. How they stalk their prey, strike, and dodge the shattering depth charges is told by Rear Admiral Yates Stirling, leading naval authority, in an article that explains why these relatively inexpensive vessels are the trump card of the weaker sea power in any conflict.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0013.xml
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R. M. Hollingshead Corp.
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R. M. Hollingshead Corp.
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0014.xml
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11
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AC SPARK PLUGS
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AC SPARK PLUGS
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0015.xml
article
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12
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From The Next Editors Desk
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SCIENTISTS of the University of Chicago Medical School have succeeded in killing bacteria both by spraying them into a mist of propylene glycol, and by spraying the mist onto the bacteria. They hope next to show that the technique will stop the spread of diseases like influenza and colds in crowded places.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0016.xml
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13
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0017.xml
article
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14,16,18
Readers Say
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Readers Say
How Did Robin Hood Get Along Without Knowing Calculus?
Perfect(ly Useless) Vacuum Is Easy To Produce
Gus Says: No, Thank You, Cars Are Cranky Enough
His Long-Intended Complaint Turned info a "Love Letter"
Our Home-Planning Contest Gets a Pat on the Back
Here's One That Will Put Droplets on Your Brow
He's Keen for on Article on Razor Honing
If You MUST Be Formal, You Can Wear That Tie
Wanted: A Practical Use for Waste Venetian-Blind Slats
Here's News! A Movie Actor Actually Reloads His Gun
He Doesn't Find a Headache in a Tankful of Problems
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As AN archery fan of long standing, I would like to know whether it is possible to calculate the speed of a shaft from a bow of given physical characteristics such as length, cross section and rate of taper of limbs, density, elasticity, etc.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0018.xml
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15
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0019.xml
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16
16
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MOBIL SPECIALTIES
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MOBIL SPECIALTIES
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0020.xml
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17
17
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HOMASOTE COMPANY
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HOMASOTE COMPANY
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0021.xml
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17
17
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L C Smith & Corona Typewriters Inc
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L C Smith & Corona Typewriters Inc
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0022.xml
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17
17
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G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
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G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0023.xml
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18
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0024.xml
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19
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popular science
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popular science
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0025.xml
article
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20,22,24,26
With the Inventors
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With the Inventors
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TOTALING 1,000 pages and including 46 drawings, an application for a recently granted patent covering an office dictation system is believed to be the longest ever filed with the U. S. Patent Office. Under this plan, any person in a company, an office building, or even a whole city, dictates his correspondence to a microphone on his desk.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0026.xml
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20
20
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SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
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SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0027.xml
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21
21
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CLARENCE A. O'BRIEN
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CLARENCE A. O'BRIEN
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0028.xml
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22
22
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Kester Solder Company
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Kester Solder Company
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0029.xml
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23
23
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VICTOR J. EVANS & Co.
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VICTOR J. EVANS & Co.
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0030.xml
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24
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American School
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American School
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0031.xml
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25
25
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McMORROW & BERMAN
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McMORROW & BERMAN
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0032.xml
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26
26
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Woolworth Bldg.
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Woolworth Bldg.
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0033.xml
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26
26
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L. F. Randolph
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L. F. Randolph
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0034.xml
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26
26
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U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
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U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0035.xml
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27
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0036.xml
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28
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0037.xml
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0038.xml
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0039.xml
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0040.xml
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0041.xml
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0043.xml
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35,36,37,38,39,40,41,42
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POPULAR SCIENCE Classified OPPORTUNITIES
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0044.xml
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43
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0045.xml
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44
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0046.xml
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0047.xml
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0049.xml
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NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
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NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0050.xml
article
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49,50,51
News
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INDUSTRY GIVES A LABORATORY TO AMERICA'S YOUNG SCIENTISTS
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YOUTHFUL IMAGINATION, an inexhaustible national resource, is being developed along scientific lines by the American Institute of the City of New York. This organization, chartered in 1828 and devoted throughout its existence to the promulgation of science and the encouragement of American industry, established its junior branch in 1928 and recently has intensified its efforts in this direction through the American Institute Laboratory at 310 Fifth Avenue, New York.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0051.xml
article
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52,53,54,55,56,57,58,220
News
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Pursuit Pilot
The Heart of a Fighter Plane Is the Pilot, and It Takes Three Years of Hard Work To Turn Out a Really Good One
Pilots' Wall Map Shows Course and Flying Distance
Lufberry Circle— a Basic Defense Fighter Formation
C.A.B. Warns Dozing Pilots
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HICKMAN POWELL
THE six little planes became visible suddenly as a string of tiny dots, and almost immediately were circling around the field. They swung around in their traffic pattern at 1,000 feet. Then the leader dropped off, came down in a short, tight spiral, sideslipping all the way to lose altitude quickly.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0052.xml
article
59
59,60,61
News
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How Much Exercise Do We Need?
Should sedentary workers take a heavy workout once a week?
Are setting-up exercises as good for adults as games?
Is exercise at bedtime good for sleep?
Is a day of shopping good exercise?
Is exercise itself a good way to reduce?
Will a dish of ice cream support a half hour of sawing wood?
Has electricity increased our need for exercise?
Is housework a good form of exercise?
Are there foods or pills which will take the place of exercise?
Does exercise after meals harm digestion?
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DONALD A. LAIRD
NO A daily walk of about one hour gives the office worker an adequate amount of exercise. An occasional vigorous workout is not as desirable as the regular daily exercise which does not bring on exhaustion. A strenuous week-end of hiking, golf, dancing, may do more harm than good.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0053.xml
article
62
62
Facts and Ideas
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Exhibit Allows Landlubbers To "Navigate" a Ship
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A FULLY EQUIPPED bridge and chart house, part of a nautical exhibit just installed in The Franklin Institute at Philadelphia, enables any visitor to go through the motions of guiding a merchantman or man-o’-war. A near-by wall chart, illustrated with diagrams, explains how to calculate latitude and longitude by “shooting the sun.”
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0054.xml
article
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62
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Dials Tell the Fighting Pilot How Many Bullets Are Left
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FOUR little dials tell a life-or-death story for pilots of military aircraft, in an Ammunition Remaining indicator developed by General Electric engineers. No matter where the guns may be placed on a plane, the instrument tells the number of bullets left in each, so that a pilot may know whether to pursue an enemy craft or break off an engagement.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0055.xml
article
63
63
Facts and Ideas
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TRAILER ZOO
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ANIMALS of all parts of the world are represented in a trailer zoo created by Luther Hinkle, a steel worker of Chesterton, Ind. In 24 miniature natural habitat groups, there are nearly 70 animals, reptiles, and birds, all whittled to scale from white pine and realistically painted.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0056.xml
article
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64,65,66,67,68,69,70
News
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Infantry’s New Weapons Give Fire Power and Punch
THE 1941 DOUGHBOY HAS MORE THAN ONE STRING TO HIS BOW
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JOHN WATSON
ONE DAY in 1941 Dick Brown, average young American, sound of body, alert of mind, answers the call of his country to become part of its combat manpower, and is assigned to the infantry. Dick’s father, let us say, was an infantryman 24 years ago, in that other great call to arms, but Richard, Sr., would find it difficult to recognize the infantry into which his son is inducted.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0057.xml
article
71
71
Facts and Ideas
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Animated Models Tell the Story of Prehistoric Times
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FIFTY-SEVEN models of prehistoric beasts, many of them ingeniously animated, occupy a 125-foot-long exhibit built by Lou Bedford, of Hollywood, Calif. Combining his skill, derived from 26 years of experience as creator of special movie effects, with information obtained from leading museums, he molded the lifelike animals from a pliable elastic compound.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0058.xml
article
72
72,220
Facts and Ideas
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Model Shipyard Shows Warships of the Past
Question Bee
Question Bee Answers
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To SHOW how warships of the past were built, an accurate model of an eighteenth-century shipyard has been completed by The Franklin Institute, in Philadelphia. On the building ways, in different stages of completion, so that their construction can be studied, are the frigates Constitution and Hancock.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0059.xml
article
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73,74,75,76
News
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Giant Locomotive
IS FIRST ALL-DIESEL FREIGHT ENGINE
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Schuyler Van Duyne
SPEEDING as no freight train ever did before across the western two thirds of the continent, the world’s first Diesel-powered freight locomotive hauling six special cars and 58 loaded freight cars has just signalized the first all-around Dieselization of an American railroad.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0060.xml
article
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77,78,79,80,218
News
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How Homes Can Be Protected from Air Attack
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A. M. PRENTISS
BY BREAKING DOWN the hours of work and leisure of the average citizen it has been estimated that the chances are better than three out of five that an enemy bombing attack will take place while he is at home. Thus, protection of the home and those within it becomes of paramount importance.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0061.xml
article
81
81,82,83,84
News
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Are Skyscrapers Bombproof?
AMERICAN TYPE OF BUILDING MAY BE ANSWER TO RAIDERS
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AMERICAN skyscrapers, often the butt of foreigners’ jokes, stand ready to attain a new and indispensable usefulness. In the view of experts, they constitute a highly satisfactory, if not impregnable, defense against all types of bomb attacks.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0062.xml
article
85
85
Aviation
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Fly Yourself in a Rented Plane
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NOW you can fly yourself in a rented plane, and pay only for the time you fly even though you keep the ship for a week or a month. Automatic clocks which keep an accurate record of the number of hours the ship is in the air are being installed in many rental planes to avoid arguments between pilot and owner as to just how long the ship was in use.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0063.xml
article
86
86,87
Facts and Ideas
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MAGIC-LANTERN CARTOONS TRAIN ARMY MECHANICS
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MAGIC LANTERNS have joined the Army. Projectors that are direct descendants of the parlor lanterns of a generation ago are now being used to train rookies in the mechanics of modern motor vehicles. They are used with what are known as “educational reading slidefilms,” because this has been found to be the speediest and most effective means of training mechanics.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0064.xml
article
88
88
Inventions
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Lightweight Metal Sunshades Protect Eyes of Sun Bathers
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FORM-FITTING sunshades now protect the eyes of a vacationist seeking a coat of tan. Joined by a light wire, a pair of spoon-shape covers enable a wearer to open or close the eyes beneath them. Made of aluminum, the shields are comfortably light in weight, and an outer finish of aluminum paint is said to reflect sunlight and prevent overheating.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0065.xml
article
88
88
Facts and Ideas
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Air-Line Pilot Gets Back to Earth Making Guns in Spare Time
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MAKING fine guns in his basement workshop provides a spare-time hobby for Capt. Joseph A. Hammer, American Airlines pilot. With a specially built lathe and tools he made for himself, he has turned out 25 precision weapons of original design.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0066.xml
article
89
89,90,91,92,93,94,95
News
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1,000-Acre Saltcellar
AMERICA'S LARGEST SALT MINE, WHERE WORKERS IN WHITE ENJOY NATURE'S AIR-CONDITIONING
Salt Well
Salt Mine
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MINERS in white overalls working “diggings” where nature provides the air-conditioning, may seem a coal miner’s dream. But they are commonplace features of the largest salt mine in the Western Hemisphere, buried 1,000 feet beneath the ground at Retsof, N. Y.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0067.xml
article
96
96,97
Here's My Story
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Here's My Story
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FRED M. ZEDER
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0068.xml
article
98
98,99,100,101,102,103
News
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American's Five Favorite Hobbies
PHOTOGRAPHY 19,500,000 CAMERAS
STAMPS 12,000,000 COLLECTORS
MUSIC 10,000,000 AMATEURS
MODELS 2,250,000 MODELERS
HOME WORKSHOP 2,000,000 SHOPS
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EDWIN TEALE
AMERICA is the hobby center of the world. More money is spent annually on hobbies in the United States than in any other country on earth. From old-fashioned whittling to polarized-light microscopy, a thousand and one spare-time interests provide Americans with relaxation and amusement.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0069.xml
article
104
104
Aviation
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Block-Signal System Checks Planes' Positions
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AN AUTOMATIC block system for commercial or military planes, developed by radio engineers of the TWA airway system, gives a flight dispatcher an animated picture of craft operating in any area under his control. Ordinarily, dispatchers have depended upon radio reports from planes to fix their position.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0070.xml
article
105
105,106,107,108
News
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New Textile Research Brings You BETTER CLOTHES
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DAVID M. STEARNS
TODAY you can buy rainproof clothing that looks like an ordinary cotton or linen fabric, is soft and pliable, and can be worn, laundered, and dry-cleaned indefinitely without losing its rainproof qualities. Even the flimsiest fabrics can be flame-proofed at low cost.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0071.xml
article
109
109
Automobiles
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Beads Brighten Traffic Lines
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TINY glass beads, held in place by white or yellow lacquer, are being used by California highway authorities to brighten traffic stripes at places where fog, curves, and hills obscure the vision of night drivers. Measuring as little as 1/100 of an inch in diameter, the spheres reflect headlight beams and return the color of the painted line, making the striping brighter and more effective after darkness falls.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0072.xml
article
110
110
Facts and Ideas
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Old Man River Gets a Streamlined Boat
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A NEWCOMER to Mississippi River traffic, the twin-screw towboat Stanolind A, offers a striking contrast to the stern-wheel type long in use for pushing lines of barges lashed together. The 1941 model transmits 1,200 horsepower to its 76-inch propellers, of tunnel type for service in shallow waters.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0073.xml
article
111
111
Aviation
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Want a Shine?
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LIKE BOOTBLACKS for Gargantua, workers on the Douglas B-19, largest plane over built, dust and polish its wings and fuselage every day. More than 8,500 square feet of metal are being brought to a brilliant gleam, in preparation for the great craft’s emergence from its construction hangar.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0074.xml
article
112
112,113
Facts and Ideas
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A Home TO YOUR ORDER IN 50 Hours
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIX eight-hour working days, plus a couple of hours, after the contract is signed your new home will be ready for occupancy. That’s the guaranty of Hal B. Hayes, 29-year-old California builder, who has developed his own system of mass-producing houses with pre-cast concrete.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0075.xml
article
114
114,115,116,117,118,119
News
[no value]
Highballing the Hotshots
EDWIN H. BROWN and RALPH MORSE, writer and photographer, rode a fast overnight freight train between New York and Buffalo to bring you a word-and-picture story of steam and steel. It’s today’s big news in American railroading.
[no value]
[no value]
EDWIN H. BROWN
RALPH MORSE
FREIGHT SCHEDULES list her as the Merchandiser, but all along the main line of the New York Central Railroad they call her the Moneymaker. Before the glare of her searchlight has painted the sky, loading platforms at Rensselaer, Utica, Syracuse, and Rochester have been prepared for her reception and cars laden with rush goods are on the sidings.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0076.xml
article
120
120
Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Radio Spies Are Trapped by Direction Finders in Prowling Motor Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SPY-OPERATED radio transmitters don’t stand much chance of remaining undetected under the new set-up of the Federal Communications Commission. Direction-finding units in automobiles, fixed listening posts at 200-mile intervals, and ten long-range direction-finding stations now keep a 24-hour watch over ether activities in the United States and its territories.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0077.xml
article
121
121
Un-Natural History
[no value]
Un-Natural History
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gus Mager
[no value]
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0078.xml
article
122
122,123,124,125
News
[no value]
Quick-Freeze Your Food For $10 a Year
Community Cold-Storage Plant
[no value]
[no value]
BARRETT McGURN
A NEW $35,000,000 industry which boasts it is saving a total of $50,000 a day for 1,250,000 American families is one of the good things that the country got out of the late unlamented Depression. It is the cold-storage-locker system for preserving foods, the invention of a group of financially hard-pressed but bravely imaginative farmers of the Pacific Northwest, who saw no reason why they should continue forever to sell their livestock and their crops at rock-bottom at slaughtering and harvest time, only to buy the same goods back as food at four or five times the price a few months later.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0079.xml
article
126
126,127
Aviation
[no value]
Bombproof Plane Factories
ROLL INTO MOUNTAIN SIDE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AIRPLANE FACTORIES that literally run to shelter from raiding bombers have been invented by Antoine Gazda, noted Swiss armament designer, and erected at undisclosed places in Switzerland by the Pilatus aircraft concern as a national-defense precaution.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0080.xml
article
128
128
Inventions
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Citrous Groves Cleared by Tractor-Drawn Rock Picker
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TRACTOR-DRAWN rock picker, invented by William Teucher of Claremont, Calif., clears citrous groves for less than a third the cost of hand labor. A sloping horizontal blade at its front (right, in picture) skims beneath the ground’s surface, guiding earth and stones to a sievelike, shaking platform that returns the soil.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0081.xml
article
128
128
Inventions
[no value]
"Gloves" for Feet, Transparent, Keep Out Cold and Wet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WET OR COLD feet are avoided with “foot gloves” of transparent, flexible, and waterproof material. Sold in packages of eight pairs, they may be put on before the shoes, as at left, or worn between shoes and overshoes. The maker recommends them to fishermen, hunters, and participants in winter sports; to policemen, firemen, and mailmen; and to women who wear open-toe shoes, or who wish to protect footwear.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0082.xml
article
129
129
Facts and Ideas
[no value]
The Old Army Mule Takes Guns Where Wheels Won't Go
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IN SPITE of mechanization, the Army mule still has work to do. Part of it is carrying the latest type of 75-mm. howitzer in rough country where wheeled or tracked vehicles would be helpless. This gun breaks down into six pieces for transportation.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0083.xml
article
129
129
Aviation
[no value]
Camera Plane Takes 790 Square Miles in One Shot
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To SPEED the work of photographing strategic stretches of America’s coastline, Coast Guardsmen have prepared a twin-engine Consolidated PBY-5 plane, similar to the Navy’s long-range patrol bombers, to carry a 750-pound, nine-lens camera developed by the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0084.xml
article
130
130
Aviation
[no value]
Glass Cloth for Airplane Covering Passes Flight Tests
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLAMEPROOF, rotproof, and weather-resistant coverings for airplane wings and fuselages may soon be made of glass cloth, replacing the linen and cotton that have been used since the Wright brothers made their first flights at Kitty Hawk.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0085.xml
article
130
130
Facts and Ideas
[no value]
U. S. Tries Alaskan Crabbing To Prove It Economical
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[no value]
TO PROVE that the Japanese are not the only fishermen who can catch crabs, the Fisheries Division of the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service last summer dispatched an expedition to Alaskan waters. The United States imports annually almost $4,000,000 worth of canned crab meat, much of it king crab caught near Alaska.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0086.xml
article
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Getting a Job in Aviation
The Farmer's Place in the World Today
Handbook for Users of Midget Motors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXPANSION of the American aviation industry and air forces, civil and military, is creating thousands of opportunities for American youth. What these opportunities are, what training and education are required to take advantage of them, and what they offer is discussed in “How to Get a Job in Aviation.”
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0087.xml
article
132
132
Aviation
[no value]
Air-Raid Suits Are Made of Fireproof Cloth
[no value]
[no value]
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NEW YORK style experts are turning from spring fashions to air-raid clothes. The latest creations, shown at the right in light brown and blue, have pointed hoods to protect the face and are made of fireproofed cloth. For protection against shrapnel fragments, plates of one-quarter-inch thick plastic can be slipped into pockets in the lining to cover the chest, back, and midsection.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0088.xml
article
132
132
Inventions
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Illuminated Typewriter Roll Speeds Stencil Cutting
[no value]
[no value]
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AN ILLUMINATED typewriter roll recent placed on the market simplifies the problem of cutting mimeograph stencils. Made of transparent plastic and lighted by a six-watt fluorescent tube mounted in a special fixture, the new roller illuminates the stencil from beneath so that each letter becomes easily visible as it is cut.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0089.xml
article
133
133,134,135,136,137
AUTOS
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TRICKS YOU CAN LEARN FROM THE WORLD'S STINGIEST DRIVERS
The Drivers in This Year's Gilmore Economy Run Tell How to Get More Miles from a Gallon of Gasoline
ECONOMY TIPS: YOUR CAR
. . . AND HOW TO DRIVE IT
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[no value]
ANDREW R. BOONE
LET’S take a few tips from the nation’s stingiest drivers. We can get far more mileage and greater economy from our automobiles by following their advice. We’ll sacrifice no pleasure from our motoring, and there’ll be a dividend of unspent dollars at the end of the year.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0090.xml
article
138
138,139
Automobiles
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EIGHT HANDY IDEAS FOR THE MOTORIST
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[no value]
[no value]
A. Z.
M. R.
H. W. R.
W. L.
A. E. O.
L. O. D.
F. M.
1 DIMMING THE DASH LIGHT often makes it possible to see more clearly when driving at night, particularly in fog or rain. With a rheostat-type heater switch installed between the dash lamp and the main light switch as shown, the driver can control the amount of light on the dashboard, or turn the light off completely if driving conditions make it desirable.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0091.xml
article
140
140,141,142,218
Automobiles
[no value]
GUS learns something new
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MARTIN BUNN
A HORN honked raucously outside the open shop door of the Model Garage. As Gus Wilson looked up from the carburetor adjustment on which he had been intent, a coupe, vintage of 1935, which he had never seen before, was driven in. From it emerged a cheerful-looking pooch of obviously scrambled ancestry, which ran over to him with shrill yaps of greeting, followed by a tall and lean young man whose thin-cheeked face was topped by a shock of touseled yellow hair and decorated by a pair of rubber-tired spectacles.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0092.xml
article
143
143
Auto Ideas
[no value]
Ornamental Rib-Type Spokes Dress Up Old Steering Wheel
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STEERING wheels with solid spokes can be modernized with the auxiliary chrome-plated ribbed spokes shown in the illustrations at the right. Available in attractively boxed sets of three at a moderate cost, they come equipped with all necessary hardware for attaching them over the existing steering-wheel spokes.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0093.xml
article
143
143
Auto Ideas
[no value]
Magnetic Gauge Measures Thickness of Car Enamel
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ENAMEL thickness—an important criterion of its durability—is measured quickly and accurately on Ford cars by means of a magnetic tester that registers the thickness on a dial when a tiny detector is touched to either a flat or rounded enameled-metal surface.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0094.xml
article
143
143
Auto Ideas
[no value]
Emergency Car Battery Has Power To Spare
[no value]
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AN EMERGENCY starter battery for garages and service stations engaging in road service has just been announced. Provided with a rubber-composition case to withstand rough usage, the battery has four cells supplying eight volts instead of three cells supplying the usual six.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0095.xml
article
144
144
Auto Ideas
[no value]
Special Tool Kit Helps in Embarrassing Moments
[no value]
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[no value]
MOTORISTS who like to be prepared for emergencies such as may result from unexpected encounters with mud, snow, or mechanical troubles, will appreciate a kit of tools to aid in extricating the car from unpleasant situations. It contains cotton working gloves, a towing cable, a combination ax and shovel, two auto rafts or tracks on which to run the rear wheels out of a mud hole, twelve-minute flares, and a folding canvas bucket with a spout, for filling radiators.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0096.xml
article
144
144
Auto Ideas
[no value]
Coiled Wire Inside Hose Saves Radiator Trouble
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CURVED radiator hoses which are not sufficiently reënforced, combined with the powerful water pumps on many modern cars, occasionally collapse and interfere with proper circulation of the cooling water. To overcome this difficulty, coiled wires in sizes to fit inside the hoses and prevent collapse are now available at service stations and garages.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0097.xml
article
144
144
Auto Ideas
[no value]
Extra Car Goes Inside Trailer on Family Trip
[no value]
[no value]
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NOT SATISFIED with one car in the family when they are traveling, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Van Blois, of Fenville, Mich., made room in the dining section of their trailer for a “junior” car. When they stop for a few days along the road, portable runways are adjusted, and they have a car to use on shopping and sightseeing trips without unhitching the trailer from the car which tows it.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0098.xml
article
145
145
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HOME and WORKSHOP
Prize-Winning Medicine Cabinet
[no value]
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AS MODERN AS TOMORROW, THIS DESIGN TOOK FIRST HONORS IN OUR CONTEST. COMPLETE PLANS ON A FOLLOWING PAGE
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0099.xml
article
146
146,147,148
Home and Workshop
[no value]
Medicine Cabinet Contest Winners
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[no value]
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THE ideal bathroom medicine cabinet should have a mirror on the inside as well as on the outside. This was the opinion of the majority of readers who entered our contest for better medicine-cabinet designs (see P.S.M., Nov. ’40, p. 163). They stressed the importance of having ready access to the shelves, or at least to some of them, while using the mirror.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0100.xml
article
149
149,150,151
Home and Workshop
[no value]
House Screens AND HOW TO CARE FOR THEM
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IF HOUSE screens are properly cared for and stored away each fall, hanging them in the spring becomes a pleasant chore. Each screen should be permanently identified with the window on which it belongs. Numbered tacks may be used, or Roman numerals chiseled into the edges of the frames.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0101.xml
article
152
152,153
Home Building
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IDEAS For HOME OWNERS
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REMOVABLE WINDOWS. For cleaning or substituting screens, windows of the type shown at the right can be lifted out bodily. They have no cords, straps, pulleys, or sash weights, but slide smoothly in zinc-alloy guide strips, which are said to afford a positive and rattleproof seal against wind and water.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0102.xml
article
153
153
Home Building
[no value]
Try for a Prize in Our $1000 CONTEST on "The Home You'd Like to Build"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LAST CALL for our home-planning contest! You have only up to April 15. All entries must be mailed on or before that date. New readers—or old readers who have for any reason missed the announcements in the preceding three issues—still have ample time to enter, provided they get to work promptly after this issue goes on sale.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0103.xml
article
154
154,155
The Handy Man
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KEEPING THE HOME SHIPSHAPE
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0104.xml
article
156
156,157,158,159,160
Home and Workshop
[no value]
First Aid for Typewriters
[no value]
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[no value]
R. M. KASTEN
SO YOUR typewriter creaks and groans, prints letters half clogged up and askew, responds to your touch as if it were lubricated with glue? Don’t imagine for a moment it is the fault of the dealer, the manufacturer, or the mechanism! Modern typewriters are constructed to take the worst beating of any precision machine of ranking quality in the world.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0105.xml
article
161
161
Home and Workshop
[no value]
MODERN COFFEE TABLE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH ARONSON
THE distinctive feature of this coffee table is a quality of softness often lacking in modern designs. This is obtained by the slight curvature at the ends of the top and the molded edge across the ends. The rabbet or sinkage, ⅛" deep by ¾" wide, under the top can be cut into the apron and legs either before or after they have been assembled.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0106.xml
article
162
162,163
Home and Workshop
[no value]
Basement Recreation Room
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MAKE the most of your basement! This typical basement is now a comfortable recreation room, with no hint of the laundry and heating apparatus. The separating partition is no mere wall; it is built to form a bay window with a deep, roomy window seat.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0107.xml
article
164
164,165,166,167
Woodworking
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WIRING A HOME WORKSHOP For LIGHT AND POWER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWIN M. LOVE
ANY home workshop can be wired for light and power by the approved methods shown in the accompanying illustrations. It is here assumed that the layout is identical with the model arrangement suggested in the preceding installment, but the principles will be the same no matter how the plan is modified to suit individual conditions.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0108.xml
article
168
168,169
Miscellaneous
[no value]
New Appliances for the Household
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0109.xml
article
170
170
Craftwork
[no value]
Folding Wall Brackets TURNED ON THE LATHE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BENJAMIN NIELSEN
THE unique construction of these beautiful wall brackets challenges the skill of anyone interested in wood turning, and permits them to be folded flat for packaging. Mount a disk of ⅞" walnut or other hardwood, 8½" in diameter, on waste stock.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0110.xml
article
171
171
Craftwork
[no value]
Treble-Clef Bud Vase IN COPPER OR PLASTIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SCRAPS of material and a five-cent test tube form this whimsical little vase. Given dimensions are for a tube ⅝" in diameter. To make the vase of metal, cut the oval openings with a jeweler’s saw, file smooth, and finish the strip either by machine buffing or by rubbing to a satiny luster with 00 emery cloth.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0111.xml
article
172
172,173
Craftwork
[no value]
WORKING TIME: ONE EVENING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOVEL KITCHEN MEMO HOLDER. This project is sure to arouse curiosity because of the ingenious way it works. It is necessary only to open the cover, insert the bill or memo to be filed, and close the cover against it. Upon opening the cover from the other edge, it will be found that the paper slip has magically become lodged beneath the elastic bands.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0112.xml
article
174
174
Craftwork
[no value]
Leather Fly Swatters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN W. DEAN
ORDINARY fly swatters are so ugly that they have to be kept out of sight, but it is not difficult to make a decorative one of leather. The handle may be any close-grained wood at least ⅜" thick and 15" long. It can be carved as shown or a plain stick tapering in width from ¾" at one end to ½" at the other.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0113.xml
article
175
175
Craftwork
[no value]
Cake Server or Cocktail Tray
ASSEMBLED IN ONE HOUR FROM DIME-STORE PARTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PARTS for this attractive cake server or cocktail tray, which can be made by anyone in an hour or less, cost exactly 57 cents and should be available in most large five-and-ten-cent stores. The base is a round or rectangular maple bread board or cutting board with an enameled edge.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0114.xml
article
176
176,177
Craftwork
[no value]
BIRD HOUSE WITH BATH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KENNETH MURRAY
DESIGNED for comfort, this 1941 style bird house has a sunken bath in its front yard. A reservoir tank stores rain water and automatically meters it into the pool. Where rainfall is infrequent, the tank may be refilled by hand occasionally, so that water will be available to birds that might otherwise lack it.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0115.xml
article
178
178,179
Home and Workshop
[no value]
AIRCRAFT MECHANIC'S Rolling Tool Box
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PETER KLEIN
AIRCRAFT mechanics and others whose work requires a large kit of expensive assembly tools will find it worth while to construct a rolling tool box of the type illustrated. This resembles a small safe and serves as a portable workbench and tool cabinet.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0116.xml
article
180
180
New Shop Ideas
[no value]
Base Increases Working Range of Flexible-Shaft Tool
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RICHARD HANSCOM
THE simple base illustrated makes any flexible shaft tool independent of its wall support. Fasten two ½" by ¾" feet to a piece of 3/16" plywood, slot the latter in the center, insert the motor-bracket ring, and lock it with a small hardwood wedge.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0117.xml
article
180
180
New Shop Ideas
[no value]
Heat Lamp Dries Drawing Ink Quickly in Humid Weather
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WALTER E. BURTON
A SMALL therapeutic or “heat” lamp is a valuable aid to the draftsman in drying ink on drawings in damp weather. Hold the lamp a few inches away, and blow gently across the wet ink. Even on humid days the ink will dry in a matter of seconds. This simple trick may save much valuable time when a succession of lines has to be drawn in a hurry.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0118.xml
article
180
180
Shop Data File
[no value]
FACEPLATES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Many pieces that cannot be held between centers or in a chuck can be fastened to a faceplate by means of bolts engaged in slots or tapped holes as at A. Work to be bored may be mounted with an angle plate as at B. Precision work may be accurately located with one or more toolmaker’s buttons and a dial indicator as at C. If work tends to shift under heavy cuts, place a sheet of paper between it and the faceplate.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0119.xml
article
181
181
New Shop Ideas
[no value]
Leaky Blowtorch Plug Sealed with Application of Soap
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOWARD R. HEYDORF
PERSISTENT leaking around the filler plug of a blowtorch can be stopped by applying soap generously to both the threads and seating surface. The plug may then be screwed in by hand and should require no excessive tightening.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0120.xml
article
181
181
New Shop Ideas
[no value]
Vibrationless Motor Mount
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. O. LISSAMAN
THIS rubber-cushioned motor mount is exceptionally free from vibration, and makes a quiet-running unit. The motor is entirely insulated from its support. Use double sponge - rubber insulation between the mounting bolts, as shown.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0121.xml
article
181
181
New Shop Ideas
[no value]
Quick Way to Widen a Crack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDGAR WALKER
WHEN a crack in a heavy casting has to be welded or brazed, the work of chipping it V-shaped can be made easier by first drilling a line of shallow holes along it with a sharp, lightly fed drill.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0122.xml
article
181
181
Shop Data File
[no value]
ALIGNING LATHE CENTERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
If lathe work held between headstock and tailstock centers is to be accurate, the centers themselves must be accurately aligned. They may be checked by means of a test bar and dial indicator as shown. The steel bar—in this case 1" in diameter—is center-drilled, mounted between centers, and turned to exactly ⅞" for a short distance at each end.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0123.xml
article
182
182,183
New Shop Ideas
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Mirror Making
THE SECRET OF SUCCESS LIES IN CLEANING THE GLASS PROPERLY
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[no value]
WILLIAM H. SHIPPEE
THERE is more to mirror making than pouring a silvering solution over glass. The secret of success lies in preparing the glass so that it will be physically and chemically clean. Even the pores in the glass surface—and glass does have pores— must be cleaned of every particle of dirt and grease in order that the silver will properly deposit in them.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0124.xml
article
184
184,185,186,187
Outdoors
[no value]
Cruising Sailboat
PART III: PUTTING THE PLANKS ON "WHITECAP"
[no value]
[no value]
Bruce
Willard Crandall
PLANKING makes the hull of a boat. Properly fitted and fastened, it keeps the water where it belongs after the boat is launched—outside. For that reason, careful workmanship at this point in the construction of the 19' Whitecap will go far toward assuring the utmost pleasure and satisfaction when the finished boat takes the water.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0125.xml
article
188
188,189,190,191
Home Building
[no value]
Fun-for-all Court
FOUR NEW GAMES TO PLAY ON OUR
DISK CROQUET
TWELVE-HOLE
QUOITS
TENPINS
[no value]
[no value]
Charles
Bertram Brownold
VERY little additional equipment is needed to adapt the POPULAR SCIENCE portable game court (see P.S.M., Apr. ’41, p. 150) for playing four more games —tenpins, disk croquet, twelve-hole, and quoits. The accessories for these games are: Tenpins.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0126.xml
article
192
192
New Shop Ideas
[no value]
Terminal Loops Formed on Flexible Wires by Using Solder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. P. S.
STRANDED wires such as those in flexible cords may be connected to terminal screws neatly and securely by the use of solder. Trim the wires in the usual manner, bare the ends, and form these into a loop as shown. Solder is applied with a hot iron to weld the wires into a single, solid conductor at the loops.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0127.xml
article
192
192
The Handy Man
[no value]
Old Rubber-Stamp Holder Acts as Rack for Cord Plugs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. L.
AN EXCELLENT plug holder for an overworked power outlet in the workshop can be made from an old rubber-stamp holder of the type illustrated below. With this device, the plugs are always at hand when wanted, and are less likely to get broken.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0128.xml
article
192
192
New Shop Ideas
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Block Holds BX for Sawing
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C. L. S.
ENDS of flexible armored cable or BX are hard to hold while being trimmed with a hack saw, but a device to aid in gripping them can be made as shown above by driving three BX staples into a 12" length of two-by-four. A piece of rubber stair tread tacked to the bottom of the block keeps it from slipping on the bench.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0129.xml
article
192
192
Shop Data File
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ELECTROPLATING, PART 2
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The electrolyte, often called the solution or bath, is a conducting medium that supports the passage of an electric current from the anode, or plating metal, to the work, or article to be plated. To the solution of salts of the metal to be plated are added other chemicals so that the electrolyte will (a) conduct current readily; (b) dissolve from the anode approximately the same amount of metal deposited at the cathode, doing so evenly and in sufficient quantity; (c) remain in good working order over an extended period of time.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0130.xml
article
193
193,194,195
Miscellaneous
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OSCILLATING STEAM ENGINE with Reverse Gear PART II
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C. W. WOODSON
IN CONSTRUCTING our small oscillating steam engine with reverse gear, the next problem is chucking the cylinder head to run true. This may be done as shown in Fig. 20. It is held by the chucking lug in a tailstock chuck while the scroll-chuck jaws are tightened down.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0131.xml
article
196
196,197
Miscellaneous
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Science Stunts
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IF THE Wright brothers hadn’t invented the airplane, someone else would have. Steam engines, automobiles, radios, were bound to come sooner or later. With all credit to their actual inventors, these things logically evolved as applications of nature’s basic laws—which were deduced, in turn, through brilliant experiments and observations by science’s pioneers.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0132.xml
article
198
198,199
Miscellaneous
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Fun with Photochemistry
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WHENEVER a camera clicks, or a photographic print is made, we witness an amazing feat of chemical magic, in which light is the magician. Exactly what happens when light strikes the silver salts of a photographic emulsion is not known. Usually, it leaves no visible trace nor apparent chemical change.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0133.xml
article
200
200
RADIO IDEAS
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Versatile Radio Quickly Adapted to Cars, Boats, Planes
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EQUALLY effective as a portable or fixed set, on wave lengths from 540 kilocycles to 30.5 megacycles, a radio receiver now available will operate on 110-120 A.C. or D.C., or its own batteries. It is designed for use with any car, airplane, or boat.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0134.xml
article
200
200
RADIO IDEAS
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Double-Disk Aligner Checks Up Tuning of Loop Antennas
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HERE is an instrument ideal for radio service or production men, or for radio fans who build their own sets. It is a loop-antenna aligner, consisting of a metallic disk on one end of a jointed bar, and a disk of high-permeability material on the other end.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0135.xml
article
201
201
Radio
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Stroboscopic Label Tests Phonograph's Speed
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THAT OLD BUGABOO of having your recordings turn out poorly because the turntable was not rotating at the proper speed when the recording was made can be avoided by using a blank with a stroboscopic label. When the record is revolved under any light operating on a 60-cycle alternating current, the label will show at a glance when it is turning at its designed speed of 78 revolutions per minute.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0136.xml
article
201
201
Radio
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Acoustical Filter Kills Unwanted Record Noises
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To ELIMINATE objectionable mechanical noises and permit distortion-free reproduction even at low volume, an electric phonograph is now manufactured with a built-in tone guard. Of simple construction, it is merely two grooves cut around the edge of the record-playing compartment of the phonograph directly beneath the lid.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0137.xml
article
201
201
Radio
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Pocket-Size Oscillator Used to Test Radio Sets
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A HIGH-FREQUENCY audio buzzer that can be used as an all-wave oscillator for testing radio sets is now available in a unit the size of a large fountain pen. A short metal prod is mounted on one end, and on the other is a plunger-type switch for turning the instrument on and off.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0138.xml
article
202
202,203,204
Radio
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Universal Power Supply for Battery Receivers
EASILY BUILT UNIT FOR FARMS AND VACATION CAMPS USES STORAGE BATTERY OR 110-VOLT HOUSE LINE
PARTS FOR POWER SUPPLY
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[no value]
ARTHUR C. MILLER
NO MORE worrying about “B” batteries for that battery-operated radio at the summer camp or on the farm if this universal power supply is hooked to the set. One 6-volt battery is all that is needed. And, by simply snapping a switch, the power supply can be converted to operate a battery set on 110-volt A. C.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0139.xml
article
204
204,205
Radio
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MIDGET RADIO USES TWO DETECTORS
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GREATER EFFICIENCY from the detector stage is achieved in this simple detector set by using separate tubes for detection and regeneration. It is so efficient that in some localities it will operate a small magnetic speaker. When using a screen grid or even a pentode in the detector stage, it is necessary to apply a low “B” voltage on the screen, sometimes as low as 22 volts, so the tube cannot be operated at maximum efficiency.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0140.xml
article
206
206,207,208,209
PHOTOGRAPHY
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What a Picture Judge Looks for in a Print
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A NEWS photographer by profession, a photographic artist by choice, William H. Zerbe has been taking pictures since 1884 both as a business and a hobby. Today, still an active member of the staff of the “New York Herald Tribune,” he ranks as a dean in both fields—a veteran among news cameramen and salon exhibitors alike.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0141.xml
article
210
210,211,212,213
Home and Workshop
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Make-Up Home Movies
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MOVIE make-up has undergone a revolution in recent years. Often male actors, especially the tanned he-man type, appear with no paint and powder whatsoever. Actresses, excepting for character parts, may face the cameras as though dressed for the street.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0142.xml
article
214
214
Photography
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Winning Entry IN OUR Funny Photo Contest
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HERE’S the winning entry in the funny photo contest that was announced in the January issue of POPULAR SCIENCE. Ernest Robson, of Lafayette, I11., won the $25 prize for a study in shadow entitled “Beauty and the Beast.” There were a lot of laughs in examining the hundreds of photographs submitted, some of which were taken ten or twenty years ago.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0143.xml
article
215
215
Photography
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FOR CAMERA USERS
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VOICE AND MUSIC can be added to amateur movies with split-second accuracy by means of a new device that automatically synchronizes the film and recording disk. Any 8or 16-mm. camera and projector can be altered so synchronizing units can be attached or detached, as desired.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0144.xml
article
216
216
Photography
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Developing Solutions Filter Quickly Through Glass Coffee-Maker Top
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K. S.
Do YOU hesitate to filter your photographic solutions because it is slow work to keep the funnel full while the liquid oozes through drop by drop? Then use a discarded or extra glass top of a vacuum coffee maker as a funnel. These come in various sizes, and for this purpose, the larger it is, the better.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0145.xml
article
216
216
Photography
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Negative Holder Has Grid for Focusing
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A. H. HONEST
EQUIPPING a negative holder with a permanent focusing grid as shown below will save time in using an enlarger. This can be done by drilling a 3/16" or ¼" hole through both leaves of the holder as close to the opening as possible, but take care to allow room for the negatives.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0146.xml
article
216
216
Photography
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Ordinary Corks Covered with Rubber for Use in Chemical Bottles
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ROBERT SCOTT
BOTTLES containing photographic or other chemical solutions may be stoppered by cutting a piece from an old rubber glove and placing it over the bottle neck before the cork is inserted, as shown in the photograph at the left above. Another and more convenient method is to cut a finger from the glove and stretch it over the cork, as at the right.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0147.xml
article
216
216
Photography
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Test Strip Focuses Movie Projector
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H. R. S.
A MOTION picture projector can be focused beforehand by means of a piece of clear film about 8" long, down the center of which a line has been drawn with a ruling pen. In setting up the projector, open the gate and insert this strip of film. With the motor off and the lamp turned on, throw the image of the ruled line on the screen and focus the lens until the line appears sharply defined.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0148.xml
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217
217
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THE ELECTRIC AUTO-LITE COMPANY
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THE ELECTRIC AUTO-LITE COMPANY
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0149.xml
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218
218
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HASTIGS
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HASTIGS
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0150.xml
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219
219
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GENERAL MOTORS ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION
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GENERAL MOTORS ACCEPTANCE CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0151.xml
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220
220
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J. Stevens Arms Company
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J. Stevens Arms Company
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0152.xml
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221
221
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UNDERWOOD ELLIOTT FISHER COMPANY
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UNDERWOOD ELLIOTT FISHER COMPANY
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0153.xml
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221
221
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Old Town Canoes
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Old Town Canoes
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0154.xml
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221
221
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CASEIN COMPANY
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CASEIN COMPANY
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0155.xml
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222
222
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THE MARLIN FIREARMS CO.: MARLIN MODEL 101
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THE MARLIN FIREARMS CO.
MARLIN MODEL 101
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0156.xml
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222
222
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JOHNSON MOTORS
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JOHNSON MOTORS
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0157.xml
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222
222
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TRUE TEMPER PRODUCTS
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TRUE TEMPER PRODUCTS
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0158.xml
article
223
223
New Shop Ideas
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Cutting Out Sheet Metal Disks on a Scroll or Band Saw
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K. M.
WHEN a number of thin metal disks have to be cut on a scroll or band saw, the work can be done much faster if the center is deeply indented with a prick punch. This causes a projection on the underside that will rest on the saw table and form an axis around which the metal turns freely and accurately.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0159.xml
article
223
223
New Shop Ideas
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Preparing Rubber for Patching
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[no value]
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O. B.
To ROUGHEN the surface of an inner tube, hot-water bottle, football bladder, or other rubber article before applying a patch, either a wad of coarse steel wool or a wood rasp is better than the usual tin scraper.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0160.xml
article
223
223
New Shop Ideas
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How to Tap Aluminum Alloys
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MANY mechanics find that it is difficult to tap perfect threads in aluminum and light alloys containing this metal. A method used by a pump engineer is first to fill the threads of the tap, particularly those at the end, with ordinary yellow beeswax.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0161.xml
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223
223
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HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
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HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0162.xml
advertisement
224
224
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NICHOLSON FILE CO.
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NICHOLSON FILE CO.
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[no value]
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0163.xml
advertisement
224
224
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[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0164.xml
advertisement
225
225
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0165.xml
advertisement
226
226
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0166.xml
advertisement
226
226,229
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Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0167.xml
advertisement
227
227
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0168.xml
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227
227
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JAMES BEISS & CO., INC.
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JAMES BEISS & CO., INC.
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0169.xml
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227
227
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THE ENTERPRISE MFG. CO.
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THE ENTERPRISE MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0170.xml
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227
227
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0171.xml
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228
228
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0172.xml
advertisement
229
229
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0173.xml
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230
230
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0174.xml
article
231
231
Photography
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Midget Photo Lamp Freezes Motion with Fast Flash
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A NEW photoflash lamp known as the “speed midget” produces such a brief flash that it freezes moderate motion and greatly simplifies the problem of synchronization. The flash lasts only 1/100 second. The peak is reached in 1/200 second, which is four times faster than with the ordinary No. 5 midget bulb.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0175.xml
article
231
231
Photography
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Metal Printing Box Adaptable for 35-mm. Strip Printing
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SPECIAL provision for printing 35-mm. negatives in uncut strips, one frame at a time, is made in a new all-metal printer. Negatives up to 3¼" by 5½" can be accommodated, and margins can be varied from ¼" to A convenient guide allows rapid insertion of the print paper in precise position.
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0176.xml
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231
231
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BELL & HOWELL COMPANY
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BELL & HOWELL COMPANY
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[no value]
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0177.xml
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232
232
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0178.xml
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233
233
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0179.xml
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234
234
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0180.xml
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235
235
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0181.xml
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236
236
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0182.xml
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237
237
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0183.xml
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238
238
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0184.xml
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239
239
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0185.xml
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240
240
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SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
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SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0186.xml
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241
241
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National Educational Alliance, Inc.
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National Educational Alliance, Inc.
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[no value]
PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0187.xml
advertisement
242
242
[no value]
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R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company: CAMEL
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R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
CAMEL
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PopularScience_19410501_0138_005_0188.xml