Issue: 19390601

Thursday, June 1, 1939
JUNE 1939
6
True
134
Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Articles
cover
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0001.xml
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0_2
0_2,1
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0002.xml
masthead
2
2,51
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0003.xml
tableOfContents
2
2,4,6,8
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CONTENTS FOR JUNE 1939
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0004.xml
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3
3
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0005.xml
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5
5
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LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0006.xml
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6
6
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Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
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Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0007.xml
advertisement
7
7
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American School
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American School
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0008.xml
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8
8
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CLARENCE A. O’BRIEN and HYMAN BERMAN
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CLARENCE A. O’BRIEN and HYMAN BERMAN
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0009.xml
article
8
8
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STORY OF A ONE-MAN HOUSE
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ON THE outskirts of Ware, Mass., a two-story frame house is rapidly nearing completion. No gang of carpenters can be seen, but in the evenings and on week-ends a young man works away there single handed. Floods and last year's hurricane have hampered his task, but he refuses to be discouraged.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0010.xml
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9
9
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THERMO Air Conditioning Institute
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THERMO Air Conditioning Institute
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0011.xml
advertisement
10
10
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0012.xml
advertisement
11
11
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0013.xml
article
12
12,14,16
Our Readers Say
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Our Readers Say
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EVERYBODY’S heard of messages being sealed up in bottles and set adrift on the ocean, to be found thousands of miles away and long afterwards. Well, a friend and I thought up a new angle. We filled several rubber balloons (costing six cents) with some hydrogen which we generated at home from the action of acid on zinc.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0014.xml
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13
13
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Ironized Yeast Co., Inc.: IRONIZED YEAST Tablets
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Ironized Yeast Co., Inc.
IRONIZED YEAST Tablets
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0015.xml
advertisement
15
15
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Hemphill Diesel Schools
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Hemphill Diesel Schools
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0016.xml
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15
15
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U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
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U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0017.xml
advertisement
17
17
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0018.xml
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18
18
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0019.xml
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19
19
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0020.xml
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20
20
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0021.xml
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21
21
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0022.xml
article
22
22,24,26
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With the Inventors
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AN INGENIOUS window shutter devised by Edward Van Bosch and Reinhold H. Hoffman, of Chicago, Ill., raises or lowers itself automatically in response to outside weather conditions. Horizontal metal vanes, like those of Venetian blinds, ride up and down along window-frame grooves which prevent them from flapping in the wind.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0023.xml
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23
23
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CLARENCE A. O'BRIEN & HYMAN BERMAN
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CLARENCE A. O'BRIEN & HYMAN BERMAN
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0024.xml
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24
24
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CHARLES ATLAS
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CHARLES ATLAS
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0025.xml
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25
25
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0026.xml
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26
26
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Self-Study Foundation, Inc.
[no value]
Self-Study Foundation, Inc.
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0027.xml
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26
26
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LUCKY TIGER MFG. CO.: LUCKY TIGER With Oil
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LUCKY TIGER MFG. CO.
LUCKY TIGER With Oil
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0028.xml
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27
27
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American School
[no value]
American School
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0029.xml
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27
27
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THE FATE-ROOT-HEATH CO.
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THE FATE-ROOT-HEATH CO.
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0030.xml
advertisement
28
28
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0031.xml
advertisement
29
29
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0032.xml
advertisement
30
30
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0033.xml
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31
31
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0034.xml
advertisement
32
32
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0035.xml
advertisement
33
33
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0036.xml
article
34
34
New Ideas for Home Owners
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New Ideas for Home Owners
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WATER may be applied directly to the roots of a garden shrub with an underground irrigator now available. Buried around the roots of a plant, a tirelike rubber tube is connected to the surface by means of a small funnel that projects above the level of the ground.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0037.xml
advertisement
35
35
[no value]
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NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
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NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0038.xml
advertisement
36
36
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SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
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SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0039.xml
article
36
36
HELPS FOR THE HOME OWNER
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Attachment for Rakes Prevents Clogging
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RAKES are kept free from clogging while in use by an ingenious cleaning attachment that should appeal to amateur gardeners. An adjustable wire loop fitting closely around the rake prongs is held up out of the way near the base of the rake teeth, by a heavy wire spring.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0040.xml
article
36
36
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Questions FROM HOME OWNERS
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Q.—BEFORE putting up awnings for the summer, I plan to renovate them. Although the awning fabric is still strong, the colors have faded badly. How can I repaint them without having the paint sink through?— F.L.W., Powell, Pa.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0041.xml
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37
37
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0042.xml
advertisement
38
38
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0043.xml
advertisement
39
39
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Old Town Canoe Company: Indian Blade
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Old Town Canoe Company
Indian Blade
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0044.xml
advertisement
39
39
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0045.xml
advertisement
39
39
[no value]
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Advertisements
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SPORS COMPANY
ELGIN DRY SHAVER
SPORS COMPANY
HEAT-KWIK WATER HEATER
[no value]
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0046.xml
advertisement
39
39
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S. J. WEGMAN Co.
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S. J. WEGMAN Co.
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0047.xml
advertisement
40
40,41,42,43,44,45,46,47,48
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Classified Section
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0048.xml
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49
49
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LaSalle Extension University
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LaSalle Extension University
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0049.xml
advertisement
50
50
[no value]
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R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company: Prince Albert
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R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Prince Albert
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0050.xml
article
51
51,52,53,54,55
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AIRWAY TO EUROPE
NEW SAFETY DEVICES GUARD TRANSATLANTIC PLANES
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PAUL A. CLARKSON
ON WINGS sixty-two feet longer than the ship in which Columbus sailed to the New World, Pan American Airways’ 82,500-pound “super-clipper” flying boat will soon lift from Long Island Sound on its initial passenger run to Europe. In twenty-four hours, it will cross the sea on which Columbus’s Santa Maria tossed for ninety-two days.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0051.xml
article
56
56
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
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Jiggles Cramps out of Jitterbugs' Feet
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TO TREAT foot muscles that have become bunched and knotted from the strain of the jitterbug jigging of modern dancing, a New York City foot specialist devised the exerciser pictured below. Patients stand shoeless on the hinged pedals of the apparatus while holding onto an upright handle.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0052.xml
article
56
56
AVIATION
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Parachutists Make Test Hops
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HARNESSED to a rope running through a pulley attached to the ceiling, students at a German parachute-jumping school leap from an elevated scaffolding to practice the correct way to start a parachute leap through the open doorway of a plane.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0053.xml
article
56
56
NEW INVENTIONS
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Tee Picker-Upper for Tired Golfers
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WOODEN tees are retrieved magnetically for weary golfers by a novel device now available. A tiny horseshoe magnet is tied to the tee with string. After driving off, the golfer touches the club head containing steel or iron against the magnet, which clings to the club, so that it can be picked up without stooping.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0054.xml
article
57
57,58,59
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Weatherproof Paintings
MURALS BAKED ON SHEET METAL USED FOR OUTDOOR DISPLAYS
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MARKING the introduction of a new form of art, an outdoor mural painting almost as big as a tennis court greets visitors to the Hall of Shelter at the New York World’s Fair. With its hues of blue, yellow, and orange imperishably fixed in porcelain enamel, it represents the first large-scale use of a medium that can withstand the utmost rigors of exposure to the elements.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0055.xml
article
60
60,61
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Guinea Pigs Test New Beauty Aids
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GUINEA PIGS are partly responsible for the beauty of many of the glamorous faces that flash across the screen of your neighborhood movie theater. Tests with these patient little rodents have even saved the film careers of actors and actresses whose skin reacted unfavorably to ordinary studio make-up.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0056.xml
article
62
62
RADIO
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Trick Dog Gets Orders by Radio
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BY TEACHING a dog to do tricks under “radio control,” Constable Denholm, of the Sydney, Australia, police force, has fulfilled a two-year-old ambition. In a recent demonstration, he strapped a miniature short-wave radio receiving set on the back of Zoe, an Alsatian police dog, and retired to a shack fifty yards away.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0057.xml
article
63
63
NEW INVENTIONS
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Simple Water Heater Run by Electricity
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ESPECIALLY suited to summer camps and cottages, a new electric accessory for bathrooms and kitchens furnishes a constant supply of hot water. Plugged into an electric outlet and connected to a cold-water pipe, the unit has a thermostatic switch that automatically turns current on or off to maintain two gallons of water at a desired temperature.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0058.xml
article
63
63
NEW INVENTIONS
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Trolley Taps Shop Power Line
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BETTER home-workshop lighting and increased working area for small electric power tools and accessories are the principal advantages claimed for a new movable wiring system. Current flows through copper bus bars in a ceiling duct which serves as a track for moving, current-collecting trolleys.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0059.xml
article
63
63
NEW INVENTIONS
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Novel Toy Bus Makes Stops To Discharge "Passengers"
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A NOVEL toy bus available scoots along the floor, flashes a red light rearward, stops automatically, opens its front door, waits while a bell rings, closes the door, and starts on its way again. Modeled after streamline buses of the type used on transcontinental runs.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0060.xml
article
64
64
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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New Dummy Is Almost Human
CHARLIE McCARTHY'S LATEST RIVAL CAN WIGGLE HIS EARS TO EXPRESS EMOTION
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MEET Reggie J. Treckpuss, the latest in ventriloquists' dummies, who boasts no less than thirteen different facial movements to captivate his admirers! Reggie is a masterpiece of mechanical ingenuity. His many accomplishments include wiggling his ears, raising his bushy eyebrows or his upper lip, sticking out his tongue, lowering either eyelid, and half closing both of his movable eyes in simulated emotion.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0061.xml
article
65
65
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Riderless Bike Balances Itself Automatically
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A RIDERLESS, stationary bicycle that “travels” 400 miles a day, balancing itself on three grooved driving rollers, is one of the features at the New York World’s Fair. Unsupported by wires or braces of any kind, the wheel is balanced by means of an electric eye which notes the slightest tilting of the cycle and energizes control mechanisms that adjust corrective weights on the front mud guard and handlebars.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0062.xml
article
65
65
NEW INVENTIONS
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Electric Razor Brushes Teeth
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TOOTHBRUSH and razor, both electrically operated, are now available in a single unit just placed on the market. The body of the device is a small, oblong container housing an electric motor that draws current through an extension cord plugged into a wall outlet.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0063.xml
article
66
66,67,230
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HOBBYIST CREATES Modern Swords of Damascus
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Walter E. Burton
A CANTON, OHIO, man has been amazing people with the product of a lifelong hobby, a sword that withstands the exacting tests of the legendary sword of Damascus. A true Damascus blade, according to tradition, was one made in the city of Damascus, in Syria, which could be bent until the point touched the hilt without breaking, yet would retain an edge so keen that it would shave hair from the arm.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0064.xml
article
68
68,69
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Setting-Up Exercises for Babies
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MOTHERS of a generation or two ago, who swaddled their infants in a dozen petticoats, harnessed them with bellybands, and kept them quiet with various soothing concoctions, might be alarmed, but the bright-eyed babies who have the good luck to be cared for by the Foundling Hospital in New York City, thrive on the hearty setting-up exercises pictured in the photographs on these pages.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0065.xml
article
70
70
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
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Movies Lure Youngsters to the Dentist
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INSTEAD of staring at the wall and wondering how soon the ordeal will be over, young patients of Dr. Harry Spiro, Chicago, Ill., dentist, can concentrate their attention on moving pictures that flash in front of them, while the dentist works on their teeth.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0066.xml
article
70
70
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Typewriter Artist Produces Pictures Like Tapestry
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PICTURES that resemble tapestry are produced with a typewriter by Rosaire J. Belanger, a mill worker in Saco, Me. Belanger first draws a pencil sketch on a sheet of paper, then inserts it in his typewriter and fills in the sketch with various characters to produce shading and outlines.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0067.xml
article
71
71
NEW INVENTIONS
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Phone Device Lets Secretary Listen In
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WITH a new “eavesdropping” earpiece attached to his receiver by a tube like that of a doctor’s stethoscope, an executive can have his secretary listen in during an important telephone conference or business deal. Thus she can take down exactly what is said by each party in the course of the conversation, and a permanent record is made available for future reference whenever it is wanted.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0068.xml
article
71
71
NEW INVENTIONS
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Razor-Blade Drier Protects Towels
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WHEN you’ve finished shaving, just pass the rinsed blade endwise through a slit in a handy new blotting pad —and presto, it’s dry. Absorbent flannel removes all the moisture from the blade, and avoids the danger of cutting fingers or towels.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0069.xml
article
71
71
AVIATION
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Freight Plane Has Hinged Cargo Fuselage
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ENGINEERING work on a “flying box car,” called the first airplane of basic freighter design developed in this country, is nearing completion at a Chicago, Ill., aviation factory. The whole rear part of the fuselage, with the tail, swings aside on hinges to give unimpeded entrance to bulky cargoes.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0070.xml
article
72
72,73,74,75
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Spare-Time Inventor
TURNS IDEAS INTO DOLLARS
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ANDREW R. BOONE
ON A frigid winter day in 1910, George A. Williams stepped carelessly in front of a six-inch pipe connected to an air compressor he was installing for a smelter at Salt Lake City, Utah. The vacuum pull caught him by the pants and pressed his thigh so firmly against the opening that not until the pulsations tore a piece of cloth and broke the tremendous suction was he able to escape.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0071.xml
article
76
76
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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A Weird Warrior of the Future?
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WEARING a grotesque-looking mask, the fantastic figure above might easily be mistaken for a soldier in some grim war of the future. Actually, he is a worker in a pug mill where clay is mixed for making bricks. The mask and goggles protect him against silicon-filled dust, which otherwise would destroy his lungs and eyes.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0072.xml
article
77
77
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Rabbit Killers Walk Backward
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SHOOTING, with no limit to the kill, is offered to hunters in Utah who form themselves into groups of hundreds to rid farming areas of hordes of jack rabbits and cotton-tails that ruin food crops and spread spotted fever, a dreaded cattle disease.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0073.xml
article
77
77
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Wishbones Made Her Dreams Come True
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SCRAPS from a thousand Sunday dinner tables form the raw materials for a novel and thriving industry built up by Delphine Binger of New York City. Miss Binger collects the wishbones from turkeys, chickens, and other poultry, treats them by a special electrical and chemical process, inscribes them with special greetings, dresses them up with ribbon bows and sprays of artificial flowers, and sells them as decorative good-luck novelties to accompany wedding, birthday, and graduation presents, and gifts for other special occasions.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0074.xml
article
78
78
News from the World of Medicine
[no value]
Frog Eyes Yield Rare Chemical
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROGS’ EYES have supplied scientists at Columbia University, in New York City, with experimental quantities of the amazing chemical compound known as visual purple. In the eye, this compound plays a part similar to that of the sensitive emulsion on a photographic film.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0075.xml
article
78
78
News from the World of Medicine
[no value]
Operating on the Heart
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SURGICAL life saving now includes a delicate operation on the heart itself to relieve the pain of angina pectoris. In this cardiac affliction, the arteries which normally carry blood to the heart become blocked. Dr. Samuel A. Thompson, of the Flower-Fifth Avenue Hospital, in New York City, recently reported a new method of operation.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0076.xml
article
78
78
News from the World of Medicine
[no value]
Medicine Planted Under Skin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PLANTING powerful chemical tablets beneath the skin to provide vital secretions needed by patients suffering from gland deficiency, is foreseen as the result of researches by two English physicians. At the National Institute of Medical Research, Dr. R. Deanesly and Dr. A. S. Parkes have succeeded in producing remarkable results in experiments with animals.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0077.xml
article
78
78
News from the World of Medicine
[no value]
Serum Deadens Extreme Pain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE history of medicine is the story of an unending battle against pain. One of the latest advances of the medical battle line was reported to the French Academy of Sciences, in Paris, when Dr. Robert Hirsch explained his method of injecting acidified blood serum into the veins of patients to stop pain too severe for even morphine to control.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0078.xml
article
79
79
News from the World of Medicine
[no value]
Laxative Shortens the Spine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS THE result of taking a saline laxative daily for thirty-five years, a patient in Denmark shortened his spine four inches. The laxative kept lime salts in food from being absorbed by his body. To compensate, his system took lime, bit by bit, from his spine and other bones.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0079.xml
article
79
79
News from the World of Medicine
[no value]
Mistletoe Lowers Blood Pressure
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MISTLETOE, the magic plant of the ancient Druids, is now being used to relieve the suffering of patients afflicted with high blood pressure. At a clinic in Vienna, Germany, Dr. Ferdinand Mattausch has used a preparation from mistletoe growing on apple trees in treating more than sixty patients successfully.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0080.xml
article
79
79
News from the World of Medicine
[no value]
Coming Storms Cause Headaches
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“STORM HEADACHES” and “low-barometer insomnia” have been brought to the attention of the American Medical Association by Dr. Dan Tucker Miller, of St. Louis, Mo. Preceding every storm, susceptible patients suffer from sleeplessness or headaches.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0081.xml
article
79
79
News from the World of Medicine
[no value]
New Skin-Grafting Technique
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW HOPE for those disfigured by accident or disease is held out by a skin-grafting technique recently outlined in “The American Journal of Surgery” by Dr. Maxwell Maltz, of New York City. It is the latest improvement in a surgical art more than 2,500 years old and involves the use of skin from the arm of the disfigured patient to provide material for the plastic surgery.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0082.xml
article
79
79
News from the World of Medicine
[no value]
Easy Test Diagnoses Brain Ills
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BRAIN ILLS are now being diagnosed with the aid of a test tube, according to recent word from Frankfort, Germany. At the Frankfort University Clinic for Mental and Nervous Diseases, Dr. H. Lehmann has conducted more than 1,000 experiments to prove the truth of his theory that mental troubles arising from the disintegration of certain brain substances can be discovered by a simple chemical test.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0083.xml
article
80
80,81
[no value]
[no value]
Lifelike Movie Puppets Act Out Ancient Fable
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIFELIKE puppets, that change their expressions realistically, replace the usual drawn cartoon figures in a new animated movie depicting an old-time fable in which a nimble-witted hedgehog plots with his wife and wins a race with a fleet-footed hare.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0084.xml
article
82
82
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Electric Pad for Sinus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO RELIEVE his sinus trouble, a Minneapolis business man designed his own heating pad and hired an electrical engineer to make it. The aid proved so successful that it has now been placed on the market. Moist heat is provided by a cellulose sponge in the washable cover, and the user “dials” an adjustable thermostat for the temperature wanted.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0085.xml
article
82
82
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Bit Curbs Thumb-Sucking
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CLIPPED to a child’s teeth by a pair of gold crowns, the device shown above is said to end the harmful habit of thumb-sucking. Two gold wires block the thumb, but a gold bead strung on one of them may be slid back and forth with the tongue as a substitute for sucking the thumb.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0086.xml
article
82
82
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Tiny Trailer Makes Novel Dog House
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN Poochy, pet dog of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Cannon of Chesaning, Mich., goes trailer-camping with his owners, he enjoys streamline accommodations of his own. In the picture at right, you see him getting into what his master calls “the world’s smallest trailer.”
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0087.xml
article
83
83
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
Speedy Motor-Cycle Car Runs on Two Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHETHER it's a car or a motor cycle would be hard to say, but the inventor of the novel vehicle above declares it has the advantages of both. In motion, it rides upon two wheels, guided by a steering wheel. The driver experiences a pleasant swaying sensation as the machine tips like a plane or motor cycle for the turns.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0088.xml
article
83
83
MODELS
[no value]
Accurate Model of World's Fair Carved in Soap
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER four months of spare-time work, Ralph Fiordelise, Philadelphia radio-cabinet maker, has just completed a model of the New York World’s Fair grounds in soap. The miniature buildings are wired for lights, and even painted. A kitchen knife was the only tool used in fashioning more than 500 pieces of soap that went into the three-foot-square model.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0089.xml
article
84
84
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Water Screen Protects New Fire Boat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PRIDE of the smoke eaters who man the floating fire engines guarding the harbor of New York City is the Fire Fighter, a $1,000,000 ship that embodies all the latest fire-fighting features and refinements, including a piping system around the deck that provides a heavy screen of water to protect the hull against fire.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0090.xml
article
85
85
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
English Surgeons Are “Men in Green"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GOWNS worn by surgeons, assistants, anesthetists, and nurses while performing operations in St. Thomas’s Hospital, London, are green in color instead of the conventional white almost universally used in other hospitals both in the United States and in England.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0091.xml
article
85
85
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Sugar Gives Sweet Hair-Do
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SUGAR-COATED hair-do is a new type of beauty treatment now being given to film stars. Sydney Guilaroff, hair specialist for a major film studio, is shown in the photograph at the right, setting curls in the coiffure of Ina Claire, stage and screen actress, with a solution of plain water and sugar.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0092.xml
article
85
85
RADIO
[no value]
Vest-Pocket Telephones
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TELEPHONE that can be carried about and used anywhere without connecting wires is a possibility in the near future. Research on the project has been carried on for several years by the Southern California Telephone Company and, according to latest reports, is now nearing practical application.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0093.xml
article
86
86
MODELS
[no value]
Big Cake Is World's Fair Model
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BILL BAKER, California baker, worked six hours a day for an entire year to design, model, and bake the mammoth cake now on display in the Pure Foods Building at the San Francisco World’s Fair. Carefully constructed to scale, models of nineteen California missions, set against a realistic background of miniature mountains, surround the base of the huge delicacy, while its top bears a diminutive reproduction of the Golden Gate area, including its two famous bridges, portions of the cities of San Francisco and Oakland, warships lying at anchor in the harbor, and Treasure Island, the man-made site of the fair.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0094.xml
article
87
87
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Old Locomotives Chug Again in Movie
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OLD locomotives and passenger cars that once hauled pioneers toward the West and new-found gold back East were recently reconditioned for an appearance in the motion picture “Union Pacific.” At Iron Springs, Utah, the venerable engines chugged toward each other to reënact the scene of seventy years ago when a golden spike was driven to complete the first transcontinental railroad.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0095.xml
article
88
88,89,90,91,92
[no value]
[no value]
Amazing Snapshots of Animals
BRING FAME TO DESERT PHOTOGRAPHER
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT E. MARTIN
IN A desert shack that cost less than fifty cents to build, Fred V. Sampson, of Barstow, Calif., has found not only contentment but a curious road to fame. Three years ago, he left his job as a commercial artist in Los Angeles and built the low, one-room hut on the edge of the Mohave Desert.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0096.xml
article
93
93
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Horse Neighs O. K. to Tray-Farm Hay
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRAY agriculture—the ultramodern scheme of intensive hothouse farming with the aid of chemical plant food—has just received an enthusiastic O.K. from one of New York City’s leading animal stars of the stage. “Bill,” the white horse that performs at the Radio City Music Hall, is shown in one of the illustrations enjoying a meal of oats grown six days by the new method.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0097.xml
article
93
93
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Light Flashes in Piano Keys Guide Fingers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO MAKE it easy to learn to play the piano lamps flash through translucent surface of the keys in an instrument of new design. Actuated by perforations in a player roll, the “prompting” lights show the student just where to place his fingers to sound the proper notes for the selection of music he is studying.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0098.xml
article
94
94
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Cycle Fleet To Warn Paris of Gas Raids
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EQUIPPED with poison-gas detectors of new design, masked Paul Reveres on a fleet of 100 motor cycles will dash through the streets of Paris, France, in case of air raids. Turning a hand crank draws air into a chemical sampler and through a telltale liquid, which turns from blue to yellow in the presence of toxic war gases.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0099.xml
article
94
94
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Canoeing Classes Held in Swimming Pool
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY GOING canoeing in a swimming pool, at a New York Y.W.C.A., novices are learning to handle their craft safely. Experts teach them how to launch a canoe, dive from one without upsetting it, and save themselves if it capsizes. Even when overturned, the instructors point out, a canoe has plenty of buoyancy to keep you afloat; ignorance causes most canoe accidents.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0100.xml
article
95
95
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
"Health Bank" Stores Serum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BLOOD is the commodity deposited in and withdrawn from a novel serum bank set up in the Children's Hospital, Hollywood, Calif. The bank’s depositors, who receive ten dollars for each half-pint deposit, are persons who have recovered from such diseases as scarlet fever, measles, mumps, whooping cough, and infantile paralysis.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0101.xml
article
96
96
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Operating Cage Protects Lion Doctor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A UNIQUE “operating cage” protects a veterinarian from injury when he treats the ills of 200 lions at an El Monte, Calif., farm. When a lion has been lured into the cage with meat, an end gate closes behind it. Assistants then operate ratchet levers that move one of the side walls inward, pinioning the dangerous beast against the opposite wall.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0102.xml
article
96
96
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Portable Clipper for Hedges Has Gasoline-Electric Drive
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GASOLINE-ELECTRIC power furnishes hair cuts for hedges in Miami, Fla., where the park employees have to barber miles of borders of waist-high Australian pine. To give the feathery tips the frequent grooming that they need, the pneumatic-tired truck shown below may be wheeled to any spot.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0103.xml
article
96
96
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Odd Egg Resembles Electric Bulb
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO BACK his claim that one of his hens had laid an egg shaped like an electric-light bulb, a Russellville, Ky., farmer forwarded the evidence to the Rural Electrification Administration office at Washington, D. C. The freak egg and a standard household bulb, compared in the picture above, seem to prove his point.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0104.xml
article
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Wealth from Toys SAVES BACKWOODS VILLAGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY TURNING toy maker, Seaverns Hilton, poster designer, of New York and Boston, has saved a picturesque New England village from ruin and restored it to prosperity. Forgotten among the heights of Mount Blue and Tumble-Down Mountain, since a retreating timber line closed the spool mill that was its last industry, the town of Weld, Maine, had dwindled from 4,000 to 437 inhabitants when Hilton visited it one summer.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0105.xml
article
98
98,99
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Dare-Devils of the Forest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN E. LODGE
AT A lumbering site in the State of Washington, Pete Peterson, veteran high-climber, snapped his climbing rope onto his heavy safety belt, dug his spurs into the trunk of a giant evergreen, and started a 170-foot scramble skyward. His job was to lop off the trunk’s tip so the big tree could be used as an improvised derrick for swinging heavy logs out of the forest.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0106.xml
article
100
100
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
Machine Tests Auto Wheels for Balance
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AUTOMOBILE wheels are quickly and accurately tested for balance with the electrically operated machine shown in the illustration below. When the wheel to be checked is mounted on the device and whirled at speeds ranging from twenty-five to eighty-five miles an hour, a neon light flashes on to indicate just which section of the wheel is out of true balance.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0107.xml
article
100
100
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
New Artificial-Fever Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SAID to have tremendous advantages over any previous form of treatment, a new type of fever machine developed by two University of Pennsylvania scientists produces artificial body temperatures in patients suffering from rheumatic heart disease, meningitis, and other illnesses.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0108.xml
article
100
100
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Electric Nail File Is Beauty-Shop Aid
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NAILS are manicured by electricity with a new motorized nail file recently introduced in England for beauty-shop use. Driven by a small electric motor, a tiny emery wheel mounted on the end of a flexible shaft shapes finger nails quickly and smoothly.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0109.xml
article
101
101
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Double Movie Gives Odd Effects
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SPECTACULAR movie effects are made possible in a dual projection system devised by a California inventor. For example, a trapeze performer may be shown apparently leaping from the top of a theater into the arms of a fellow acrobat at stage level.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0110.xml
article
102
102
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Rare Chemicals Made from Human Hair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT becomes of the hair that finds its way to barber-shop floors? Some of it, at least, now goes into the manufacture of rare “amino acids,” the chemical compounds that might be considered a sort of missing link between non-living and living matter.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0111.xml
article
102
102
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Heels and Flowerpots Go Plastic
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLOWERPOTS, and heels for women’s shoes, have now joined the growing list of uses for synthetic plastics. An ingenious “honeycomb” construction of the heel, illustrated at right, makes it possible to nail it to the shoe with existing machinery.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0112.xml
article
103
103
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Turbine Steels Get Rigid Tests
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO TEST steel designed for use in the construction of giant steam turbines, to determine the amount of expansion and contraction that will take place in the metal during the life of the generating units, General Electric research engineers are subjecting sample rods to ten years’ confinement in electric furnaces where constant temperatures of 1,200 degrees F. are maintained.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0113.xml
article
104
104
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
College Students Taught To Fish
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GONE are the days when a student had to play hooky from school to get in an afternoon's fishing. Columbia University in New York City has added a course in angling to its regular curriculum. Under the guidance of Dr. Francois D’Eliscu, an ardent angler, the subject is treated in all its phases, from selecting baits and lures to mounting or cooking the catch.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0114.xml
article
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Trailer Hitch Built To Fit Any Make Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIMPLY and quickly attached to practically any late-model automobile, a universal trailer hitch now on the market requires no drilling, cutting, or welding to install. Made in styles for either straight or rounded rear ends, the drawbar attachment can be adjusted to raise or lower the hitch ball to level the trailer.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0115.xml
article
105
105
AVIATION
[no value]
Airport Perches on City-Hall Roof
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THREE HUNDRED feet wide and nearly a quarter of a mile long, an airplane landing field which can be revolved to point into the wind perches atop a thirty-one-story building designed as a city hall, in a unique model recently presented for the consideration of Detroit, Mich., municipal officials.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0116.xml
article
105
105
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
New-Type Light Bulb Eliminates Glare
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GLARE from the glowing filament is practically eliminated in a new type of electric-light bulb now available. A special treatment of the inside of the glass bulb breaks up the harsh, glaring rays so that they are claimed to be perfectly diffused over the entire bulb surface and at the same time transmitted evenly through the glass itself.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0117.xml
article
106
106,107,108,109,226,228
[no value]
[no value]
NEW CLEWS AID SEARCH FOR Oak Island's Gold
Old Pirate Maps Reveal a Strange Resemblance to the Hiding Place of Captain Kidd's Treasure
[no value]
[no value]
EDWIN TEALE
WHEN compressed-air drills begin biting through blue clay and brown marl on a tiny island off the Nova Scotia coast, a few weeks hence, gold seekers will be returning once more to the long search for the most elusive treasure in the world. One hundred and forty-four years have passed since the shovels of the first searching party cut through the sod of Oak Island.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0118.xml
article
110
110
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Man Rolls Up Incline in a Ball
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INCASED in a metal ball, a European performer lifts himself “by his own bootstraps” up a high spiral runway and then rolls down to thrill carnival crowds. Hand holds within the hollow sphere enable the skillful contortionist to shift his weight so as to climb the incline, in apparent defiance of the law of gravitation.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0119.xml
article
111
111
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Diver Tidies Pool with Vacuum Cleaner
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KEEPING a swimming pool tidy by vacuum-cleaning it is the odd method employed at a Long Beach, Calif., tank for bathers. Wearing a diving helmet, a workman periodically goes over the bottom with the business end of an ordinary vacuum cleaner.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0120.xml
article
111
111
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Electric Board Adds Thrills to Bridge Game
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PLAYED upon a special board with flashing lights, "electric bridge" combines the fascination of the standard game with the fun of “pitch” and the strategy of chess. Bidding is for points instead of tricks. Then each player, in turn, sets an individual control lever on one of several electric contacts.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0121.xml
article
112
112
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Pictures by Wire Arrive Ready for Use
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
USING paper that is sensitive to electricity, just as photographic paper is sensitive to light, telegraph engineers recently demonstrated how pictures ready for instant viewing or reproduction without additional processing now can be transmitted by wire.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0122.xml
article
112
112
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Novel Program Can Be Read in Dark Theater
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT good is a program in a darkened theater during a show? No good, decided an English inventor, so he developed a semitransparent program which theater-goers simply hold up so that light from the stage or moving-picture screen is behind it.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0123.xml
article
113
113
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Folding Board Makes It Easy To Rest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PERFECT relaxation is declared possible with an adjustable “posture board” designed by a California inventor. Recently placed on the market, the device is shown above in use by a seashore sun bather. With head back, and knees comfortably elevated, it is easy to “let go” completely, according to the maker.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0124.xml
article
113
113
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Remote Control Steers Toy Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY TURNING a tiny steering wheel connected to a flexible cable, a toy clockwork-driven car of new design can be guided through intricate maneuvers without stooping or crawling on the floor. A complete outfit includes two of the cars, twelve small pillars for obstacles, and instructions for a number of entertaining games that require skill in steering the toys.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0125.xml
article
114
114
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Handy Pram Has Built-in Cradle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BABY won’t wake up—a boon to a busy mother— when lifted from a new baby carriage of English design. The whole interior of the carriage forms a detachable cradle that may be removed bodily. Convehient straps at the sides serve as handles for lifting the cradle with the baby in it, or replacing it in the carriage, as demonstrated in the illustration below.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0126.xml
article
114
114
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Precious Metals Used To Solder Porcelain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GOLD and platinum make it possible to solder porcelain to metal, in a process just perfected by Westing-house engineers, and used to make leakproof joints between porcelain insulators and the metal cases of oil-filled transformers. Applied to the spinning insulator with a brush, a colloidal solution of the precious metals is transformed into a gold-platinum film by heat.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0127.xml
article
114
114
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
De Luxe Autos Have Special Touring Aids
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DE LUXE cars exhibited at a recent foreign auto show offered several unusual conveniences for long trips. One model has a folding washbasin built into a fender and fed by a concealed reservoir, permitting tourists to wash up by the roadside.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0128.xml
article
115
115
AVIATION
[no value]
Telltale Safeguards Big Plane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AUTOMATICALLY checking the functioning of each of forty - seven separate operating details, an amazing electrical tell-tale panel installed in the cockpit of an eighteen - ton, twin - motor transport plane now nearing completion, flashes on indicating lights to warn pilots of instruments, controls, or vital parts of the plane that need adjustment.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0129.xml
article
116
116
MODELS
[no value]
Model-Railroad Village in Kits
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COMPLETE in every detail, scale-model buildings in kit form are now available at moderate cost to model-railroad enthusiasts. The buildings are copied from actual railroad structures to an exact scale of one quarter inch to the foot, and are easily assembled by following the detailed instructions supplied with each kit.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0130.xml
article
116
116
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
House Boat Is an Old Oil Tank
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MADE from an old 20,000-gallon oil tank, an unusual four-ton house boat built by Rene Tatro, of Kankakee, Ill., skims along the water at almost ten miles an hour. Powered by an old automobile engine, the curious craft has twin propellers and is balanced by five steel drums below the water level.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0131.xml
article
116
116
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Handy Ammeter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTERNATING current flowing through large electrical conductors in power stations can be accurately measured without breaking the circuit by clamping on the magnetic ammeter shown above.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0132.xml
article
117
117
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
"Mail Box" for Telegrams Transmits Messages
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TELEGRAMS are transmitted automatically by a photo-electric facsimile machine housed within a compact wall box, as shown above. Messages are written on special blanks, which are deposited in the telegraphic “mail box” through a slot. Here the blank is automatically wrapped around a transmitting cylinder and the message sent like a wire photograph.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0133.xml
article
117
117
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Fish Are Taught Tricks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FISH have memories, and can be taught to perform tricks, according to Dr. Mieczyslaw Oxner, ichthyologist at Europe’s oldest aquarium, in Monte Carlo. Two months are required to train a fish to eat out of your hand, Dr. Oxner declares. Below, some of his finned pupils are shown “jumping” through a hoop.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0134.xml
article
117
117
The Man with the Net
[no value]
The Man with the Net
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BOOKS in the main New York Public Library fill eighty miles of shelves. MINNESOTA extends farther north than either Maine or Washington. BOMBPROOF paint, resistant to incendiary chemicals, has been developed by English scientists. MOUSE-EATING grasshoppers live in the Belgian Congo.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0135.xml
article
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Radio Studio Uses Moving Walls
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW departures in accustics confront a visitor to a monster broadcasting center just completed near Brussels, Belgium. "Moving walls" in one studio, where singers, orchestras, aid light opera are put on the air, enable sound engineers to alter its acoustical properties completely in thirty-five seconds.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0136.xml
article
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Big Kites Form Barrage for Air Defense
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILL kites, with their trailing cables, prove an effective obstacle to invading planes? The picture above shows German soldiers preparing to test the odd scheme. According to earlier reports, Germany intended to adopt the British plan of a “balloon barrage"—a network of captive balloons with hanging cables to entangle air raiders—for protecting its western frontier and interior industrial plants against approaching hostile aircraft.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0137.xml
article
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Spring in City's Park Spouts "Radium Water"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICA’S third-biggest metropolis may possess a valuable radium mine. Its city fathers recently learned to their surprise that Fairmount Park, Philadelphia, contains the country’s most radioactive spring, when Dr. J. Lloyd Bohn, Temple University physicist, tested the water that gushes from it.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0138.xml
article
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Left-Handed Can Opener
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LEFT-HANDED persons will particularly welcome a can opener just invented. It operates by a crank which turns in either direction with equal can-opening efficiency. In addition, it has a built-in magnet that prevents metal particles sheared from the can from dropping into the contents.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0139.xml
article
120
120
AVIATION
[no value]
Rack Holds Parts of Plane Motor for Overhauling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE intricate job of tearing down an airplane engine for overhauling, and then getting it back together again, is made easier by a novel parts rack devised by John S. Schwarz, chief aviation machinist’s mate in the U. S. Naval Reserve station at Floyd Bennett Field, New York City.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0140.xml
article
121
121
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Device Takes Measure of the Teeth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the aid of the "gnathograph," an instrument as mouth-filling as its name, a dentist's patients may now be assured of a perfect fit for artificial teeth. Fitted to the jaws as shown above, the new device registers the arrangement of the teeth and the direction of the “bite,” to guide the dentist in straightening teeth or fitting inlays, crowns, bridges, and plates.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0141.xml
article
121
121
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
Spare Tire Inflated by Extension Tube
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVEN a spare tucked away in a trunk compartment need not be neglected when a motorist checks the air in his tires. A car maker has introduced the handy extension air line shown above, which permits the spare tire to be tested and inflated without opening the trunk.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0142.xml
article
121
121
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Buns Sliced by Electricity
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS FAST as they are placed in the machine, rolls and buns are sliced by a new electric aid for restaurants and hotels. Adjustable for different sizes and shapes of rolls, the device stops short of cutting them completely in two by any desired fraction of an inch.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0143.xml
article
122
122
RADIO
[no value]
Radio Beacon Is Marker for Dead Whales
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO listeners who hear strange signals may have tuned in on a dead whale. A Scandinavian concern has recently produced an automatic radio transmitter which can be attached to the flagpole marking the floating carcass of a harpooned whale, so that its position can be determined at any time by the direction-finding radio equipment on the whaling ship which will later haul it aboard.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0144.xml
article
122
122
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Pivoted Straightedge Aids Engineers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO AID in drawing engineering graphs, a new type of ruler provided with a tightly stretched wire that serves as the straight-edge is mounted on a pivot so that it can be rotated easily around any desired point. A round weight holds the ruler in place, while a sight simplifies the problem of placing the straight-edge directly over a point on the graph for drawing lines.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0145.xml
article
123
123
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Stop Light on Club Aids Golfers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NOTED British scientist, Prof. A. M. Low, has turned inventor to produce a golf club for beginners to use in putting practice. Clipped to the shaft of the putter, a red light automatically flashes on if the novice deviates from the perfect “pendulum” stroke employed by experts.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0146.xml
article
123
123
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Hens' Nests Get Shock Absorbers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHOCK absorbers for hens’ nests are a strange by-product of vast engineering projects. When residents at the site of the Grand River Dam, near Disney, Okla., discovered that dynamite blasts were keeping eggs from hatching, a local inventor went to work on the problem.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0147.xml
article
123
123
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Motor Runs Power Dustpan
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROPELLED by a gasoline motor at a speed of three miles an hour, a new “motorized dustpan” makes short work of sweeping a factory floor or city street. Equipped with any type of broom from soft fiber to stiff wire, depending on the use intended, the pneumatic-tired machine can turn in its own length, and can pick up dirt from within only an inch and a half from a wall or curb.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0148.xml
article
123
123
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
Wrench Measures Tension for Tightening Nuts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TIGHTENING nuts to exactly the proper point is made easy by a new precision tool for auto mechanics. Employed as a socket-wrench handle, after its pointer has been set to the right tension, it flashes a red light to tell the user when to stop pulling.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0149.xml
article
124
124,125
[no value]
[no value]
New Inventions in the Field of Sports
NOVEL DEVICES PROVIDE THRILLS FOR PLAYERS AND SPECTATORS, AND GIVE AID IN PRACTICE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW thrills for players and spectators, and novel aids for practice, are provided by the latest inventions in the field of sport. Polo becomes an exciting aquatic game when played on mechanical steeds, skimming the water under the power of husky outboard motors.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0150.xml
article
126
126
MODELS
[no value]
Odd Shipyard Builds Vessels in Miniature
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ORDERS from all over the world pour into a novel shipyard in Berlin, Germany, where vessels of all nationalities and of all types, from the smallest sailing sloops to gigantic ocean liners and naval dreadnoughts, are carefully copied from plans and turned out in scale-model form.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0151.xml
article
127
127
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Young Girl Runs Successful Newspaper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN fifteen-year-old Elaine Stiles took over the editorship of the “Kingston Spy,” Kingston, Wis., weekly newspaper, two years ago at the death of her father, readers shook their heads doubtfully. Elaine, however, refused to be discouraged and since has been reporter and publisher rolled into one.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0152.xml
article
127
127
RADIO
[no value]
Broadcasts Game as He Plays
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PLAY-BY-PLAY account of a basketball game, broadcast by one of the actual players during the contest, recently went on the air at Cleveland, Ohio. For the radio stunt, the player-announcer carried a short-wave transmitter that required no trailing wires, and the central radio studio picked up and rebroadcast his exciting description of his own plays and those of his team mates and opponents.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0153.xml
article
128
128
SIX TIME SAVERS FOR CAMERA FANS
[no value]
Remote Control for Automatic Camera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
QUICKLY attached to the automatic type of candid camera that takes rapid-fire pictures, a remote-control unit just marketed permits the photographer to stand up to fifteen feet from his camera to make a series of pictures. An electromagnet powered by a small dry cell trips the shutter when a button at the end of a light-weight cable is pressed.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0154.xml
article
128
128
SIX TIME SAVERS FOR CAMERA FANS
[no value]
Photoflood Needs No Reflector
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REFLECTOR and photoflood bulb are combined in a new 500-watt lamp that makes it unnecessary to use auxiliary reflectors when taking pictures with artificial illumination. A special aluminum coating inside the bulb, combined with a metallic reflector in the neck, directs light through the inside-frosted circular end.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0155.xml
article
128
128
SIX TIME SAVERS FOR CAMERA FANS
[no value]
Electric Print Drier Cannot Overheat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CONTACT prints and enlargements are safely dried on a compact electric drier especially designed for the amateur photography fan. Any possibility of scorching or burning prints is eliminated by a thermostatic control that prevents the 110-volt device from becoming overheated, even though you should go away and leave it.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0156.xml
article
129
129
SIX TIME SAVERS FOR CAMERA FANS
[no value]
Portable "Flood-Flash" Outfit Is Powered by Batteries
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BULB changing is virtually eliminated with a novel repeating-flash outfit designed for use with miniature cameras. The flash bulb, which can be used over and over again, is turned on for an exposure by the operation of a flash-gun device coupled to the camera shutter.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0157.xml
article
129
129
SIX TIME SAVERS FOR CAMERA FANS
[no value]
Lamp Is Built into Camera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DESIGNED to be ready for instant use both night and day, the new inexpensive camera shown at the left carries its own flash lamp. A reflector taking midget-type flash bulbs is built into the top of the camera, along with a holder for two dry cells.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0158.xml
article
129
129
SIX TIME SAVERS FOR CAMERA FANS
[no value]
Unit Washes and Dries Film
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH a new combination film-processing unit, negatives can be washed and dried without removing them from the reel on which they were developed. Both water to wash them and air to dry them are filtered through a fine screen having 15,000 copper threads to the square inch.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0159.xml
article
130
130
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Pet Dog Makes Living Fur Piece
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIGNS reading "No Dogs Allowed" mean nothing to Miss Jeanne Lorraine, of New York City, since she taught her twelve-year-old pet toy collie, Jiggs, to drape himself around her neck and masquerade as a fur piece. The trick first worked on a clerk at a residential hotel that barred pets, and Miss Lorraine has been using it ever since to take her dog through subways, past customs officers, on railroad coaches, and into other places where canine companions are not welcomed.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0160.xml
article
131
131
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Streamline Yacht Resembles Submarine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STREAMLINE from stem to stern, a powerful motor yacht owned by a British sportsman closely resembles a submarine in external appearance. The rakish craft develops a top speed of about forty-four miles an hour, and is said to have crossed the English Channel between England and France in less than one hour, despite heavy seas.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0161.xml
article
131
131
MODELS
[no value]
Marines Wage Mimic War with Model Arms
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WARFARE on a small scale is practiced with model weapons on miniature battlefields set up at the U. S. Marine Base at San Diego, Calif. Various problems in battle tactics and general strategy are worked out by the leathernecks with the tiny airplanes, hangars, trucks, cannon, and other accessories of modern warfare shown at the right.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0162.xml
article
131
131
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Skin “Maps" Aid Identification
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“MAPPING” pore patterns of the human skin may supplement fingerprinting under a new identification process. A blue dye is applied electrically to the skin and wiped off. A micro-scope then reveals blue dots in the sweat-gland pores in patterns that are different for every individual.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0163.xml
article
132
132
AVIATION
[no value]
Air-Raid Shelters Get Realistic Tests
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW protective measures against air raids, devised by British inventors, recently proved their effectiveness in spectacular tests. Portable, bell-shaped bomb shelters, designed to accommodate three to four persons apiece, were not even dented when experimenters a brick wall fall upon them.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0164.xml
article
132
132
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Hand Pump Propels Silent "Rowboat"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW “rowboat” for sportsmen, introduced abroad, is propelled by pushing and pulling a handle instead of by swinging oars. Silent gears transmit the power to a small screw propeller, eliminating even the creak of rowlocks and enabling an angler or hunter to stalk his quarry without giving warning of his approach.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0165.xml
article
133
133
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
Cape, Stick, Vanity in Beach Umbrella
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BESIDES shielding its user from the sun, a versatile new beach umbrella can be used as a walking stick, a vanity case, or part of a bathing costume. The detachable fabric top may be worn over a bathing suit as a cape, or will serve as a skirt. The rest of the umbrella folds within a lightweight metal tube, forming a staff to aid in walking over the sand.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0166.xml
article
133
133
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
New Trailer Has Porch for Sleeping
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOT-WEATHER comfort is assured travelers in a new type of automobile trailer, designed by an inventor in Birmingham, England. Pivoted joints enable one side of the body to be swung open at night, providing a sleeping porch exposed to cooling breezes and high above the ground.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0167.xml
article
134
134,228
POPULAR SCIENCE Question Bee
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE Question Bee
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
1 To distribute strains on the hull most favorably, a big ship usually is launched (a) frontward (b) backward (c) sideward (d) upside down. 2 Polaris is (a) a legendary sunken continent (b) the site of a proposed military air base (c) a radioactive element (d) the North Star.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0168.xml
article
135
135
Un-Natural History
[no value]
Un-Natural History
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Gus Mager
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0169.xml
article
136
136,137
Handy Helps for Homemakers
[no value]
Handy Helps for Homemakers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CURTAIN CLIPS. Shaped and colored to resemble butterflies, these spring-operated clips are handy for ornamenting tie-backs and for pinning up curtains. To attach a clip, the two wings are pressed together JAR SEALER. Fruit jars are sealed tightly with the aid of a new device.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0170.xml
article
138
138,139,140,232
GUS SPOTS SOME Tail-Light Troubles
[no value]
GUS SPOTS SOME Tail-Light Troubles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
HE WAS a dried-up-looking little fellow who didn't stand over five feet four, but when he hopped out of an almost-new sedan outside the shop door of the Model Garage, one sunny spring morning, Gus Wilson saw that he was nursing a man-size grouch.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0171.xml
article
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
The Home Workshop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0172.xml
article
142
142,143,144
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Can You Spot These Woodworking Mistakes?
A NEW CASH PRIZE CONTEST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW good are you at detecting the mistakes commonly made by inexperienced woodworkers? Here's a chance to find out and perhaps win a cash prize. All you have to do is to study the accompanying nine photographs and list all the errors you notice.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0173.xml
article
145
145
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Woodpecker MOUNTED ON DOOR TO ACT AS A KNOCKER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE A. SMITH
THIS red-headed woodpecker, perched on a cabin or back-yard door, serves as a door knocker when some one pulls the string. The bird is sawed from a piece of ¼" wood. The piece of wood to which the bird is attached, after being cut to dimensions, is given a half-round shape, or a section from a tree limb with the bark left on may be used, if preferred, to make this part of the knocker.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0174.xml
article
145
145
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Old Thickness Gauge Provides Blades for Palette Knives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S. J. GANCHER
FLEXIBLE palette knives or spatulas are invaluable not only for artists’ use, but also for mixing small quantities of tinting colors and for applying composition wood and other soft fillers or cements to small cracks and holes. Excellent ones can be made without cost from discarded leaves removed from an old, well-tempered thickness or feeler gauge.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0175.xml
article
146
146
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Tie-Backs and Window Wedges Jig-Sawed from Thin Wood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHITE dogwood blossoms on a brown branch provide the color scheme for this little set of curtain tie-backs and window wedges. Two tie-backs and one or two wedges are needed for each window of the room in which they are to be used. Cut the front and the back of each tie-back from ⅛" thick hardwood and the small connecting piece from ½" material.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0176.xml
article
146
146
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Grinding-Wheel Guard Made from Old Brake Drum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. C.
AN UNGUARDED grinding wheel can be provided with an effective guard by making use of an automobile brake drum as shown. A sheet-iron cover is added to close in the open side of the drum. Professional mechanics realize the importance of keeping a grinding wheel trued up, but this is not always true of amateurs.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0177.xml
article
147
147
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Chart on Band Saw Shows Which Blade to Choose
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. H.
IN THE operation of the band saw, it is best to use the greatest width blade that the work will permit. To enable the worker to determine this quickly, the chart shown may be fastened with cellulose mending tape to the upper wheel guard. On the chart are the different sizes of blades and the working radius of each.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0178.xml
article
147
147
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Small Brushes Kept Soft in Tubes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMALL paintbrushes can be kept soft and in good condition by using a rack like that illustrated. The backpiece is ¾" by 2" by 32". Spring-clip clothespins are glued or fastened with small brads to this piece so that the brushes will be held about 3½" apart.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0179.xml
article
147
147
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
A Pilot-Wheel Mirror Frame
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. S.
FRAMED in a replica of a sailing-ship pilot wheel, this 24" mirror is unusually decorative. The piece can be duplicated by anyone accustomed to simple scroll-saw and lathe work. The outer frame is made up of eight separate segments with a handle in each.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0180.xml
article
148
148,149,150
MODELS
[no value]
New U.S. Destroyers and Submarines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THEODORE GOMMI
IN PRECEDING articles of this series we have described models of the new capital ships that are being completed for the U. S. Navy. A well-balanced fleet, however, also includes what are generally classified as "torpedo craft,” and we are therefore adding to our miniature scale-model squadron a new flotilla leader, two recent types of destroyers, and a submarine of the latest design.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0181.xml
article
150
150
WOODWORKING
[no value]
Small, Decorative Moldings Made from Pencils
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ERNEST F. HOGAN
HALF-ROUND moldings are frequently used to ornament furniture and craftwork articles designed in the modern style. When the projects are small or medium in size, such as, for example, book ends, table radios, clock cases, magazine racks, trinket boxes, and smoking cabinets and stands, it is frequently possible to use pencils from which to make suitable half-round moldings.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0182.xml
article
150
150
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Rubber Bands Muffle Noise of Lawn-Mower Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JACK HAZZARD
BOYS and men who pick up an odd job of lawn mowing here and there can push their lawn mowers along the pavement from one place to another with much less noise if the wheels are covered with rubber. Simply spread a little tire cement on the rims and stretch over each a band cut from an old inner tube.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0183.xml
article
151
151
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
Ventilated Rubber Disk Makes Sandpaper Last Longer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SANDING disks will last longer and do a better job if a soft backing and some means of keeping the sandpaper cool are provided. Since the disk illustrated was to be used on a ¼" drill, the adapter was made with a ¼" shank. The stiff disk may be either pressed composition wood or sheet metal.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0184.xml
article
151
151
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Bottom of Garbage Cans Painted to Check Rust
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARTHUR S. CLARK
THE life of an ordinary garbage can may be lengthened considerably by applying a coat of good paint to the bottom and a few inches up the sides, both inside and out, since moisture from the garbage and from the ground soon rusts out the bottom of the can.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0185.xml
article
151
151
BOATING
[no value]
Sensitive Wind Vane for Racing Craft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. H.
SO SENSITIVE is this wind vane for small racing craft that the slightest breath of air actuates it, and in a real blow it points true and steady into the eye of the wind. Make a paper pattern of the design desired, glue it lightly to the feather, and use a very sharp knife or razor blade to cut away the unneeded parts.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0186.xml
article
152
152
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Modern Two-Toned Photo Stand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DICK HUTCHINSON
NICKEL silver, copper, and glass are used for making this modern, two-toned photo stand. If any difficulty is experienced in obtaining the necessary nickel silver, ask the assistance of the industrial-arts teacher at some near-by high school.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0187.xml
article
152
152
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Toothed Scraper Roughens Joints for Gluing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W.N.C.
FOR roughening the surface of wood joints when necessary before applying glue, a hook scraper may be made by brazing a short piece of hack-saw blade (a heavy power-saw blade is best) to a suitable shank and fastening the shank in a file handle.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0188.xml
article
153
153
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Combination Ax and Knife Sheath
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES HORTON
MANY accidents in camp and on the trail can be avoided if a combination sheath with an ax, knife, compass, and book of matches is carried. A pattern is given for a sheath to hold the particular type of ax and 4½" woodcraft knife carried by the writer, but it can be changed to suit other styles.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0189.xml
article
154
154
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Dutch Milk House Shelters Bottles from the Sun
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAZEL F. SHOWALTER
IF YOUR milk bottles are left in an exposed or sunny spot, a little shelter like that illustrated above will protect them. It takes the form of a tiny milk house with a Dutch milkmaid. Cut the sides and roof from ½" wood, and the back and floor from somewhat thicker material.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0190.xml
article
154
154
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Carrier for Garden Tools Cut from Old Nail Keg
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. W. WHEATLY
MADE from a small nail keg, this garden basket will be found convenient for small tools, gloves, raffia and string, seed packets, and other small items of garden equipment. An empty keg may be obtained from a hardware store, lumber yard, or carpenter shop.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0191.xml
article
154
154
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Chain Links Form Neat Finger Latches
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. B.
NEATER than the usual small wood or metal turn buttons used as catches for various purposes are finger latches made from safety-chain links as shown at the right. A link is opened up so it will lie perfectly flat and then fastened with two small roundhead screws to the fixed side of the opening, whether it be on some homemade photographic equipment, a cabinet, or anything else.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0192.xml
article
155
155
WOODWORKING
[no value]
Red Cedar Chest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWIN M. LOVE
FEW pieces of furniture make more acceptable gifts than a good cedar chest. Here is one that is of modern, streamline design and paneled in a way that makes the construction very simple. Select aromatic red cedar having as little white sapwood as possible.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0193.xml
article
156
156,157
BOATING
[no value]
Boat Rolls Up on Cradle Lashed to Car Roof
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK BAYER
AFTER building the POPULAR SCIENCE camper's utility boat, which proved to be a "corker," I devised the cradle illustrated for carrying it on top of a car. A track runs through the center of the cradle, and there is what is called a "⅜" deck block” fastened to the bow of the boat.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0194.xml
article
158
158
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
High-Speed Reel BUILT FROM OLD BICYCLE PARTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOWARD R. HEYDORF
FOR either trolling or kite flying, this coaster-brake reel is very fast in action. The reel may be made in various sizes. The reel shown is a large one and makes use of 9" aluminum pie plates. When smaller plates are used, the sprocket that drives the reel should be from one of the smaller bicycles.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0195.xml
article
159
159,160,161
Philanthropic Craftsman
[no value]
Philanthropic Craftsman
GIVES AWAY 3,000 TOYS A YEAR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A VISIT to the homeworkshop of W. D. Robinson, of West Helena, Ark., would lead you to believe that you had stepped into a small toy factory. Doll cradles are piled high along one wall, hundreds of wagons line the shelves that reach from floor to ceiling, and boxes of partially completed projects fill almost every available space.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0196.xml
article
162
162
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Small Clamp-on Lamp Illuminates Circular Saw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. A. BOWER
CIRCULAR saws, although the most frequently used machines in the home workshop, usually lack the special lamp attachments provided with many other types of power tools. This drawback may be overcome by using a clamp-on style of lamp, which may be attached to the saw guard or even to the edge of the table when required.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0197.xml
article
162
162
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Starting Difficult Screws
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMALL screws that must be started in awkward places may be held on the end of a screw driver in the manner shown. The screw driver is set in the slot of the screw, and the two are taped together with cellulose mending tape. The greater width of tape is placed on the screw driver so that the tape will come off the screw easily after the screw has been driven into position.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0198.xml
article
162
162
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Pliers Wound with Rubber
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN it is necessary to work with heavy wire or hard materials, it pays to pad the pliers handles with ¾" by 9" strips of vulcanizing tire-patch material. The ends are pinched together and held with a clothespin while being vulcanized for fifteen minutes in an ordinary oven at very low temperature.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0199.xml
article
162
162
SHOP DATA FILE
[no value]
LEATHER BOOKBINDINGS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Genuine leather bookbindings may be preserved from deterioration and kept in first-class condition by applying the following dressing: Adeps lanae, anhydrous (lanolin) 1 part Neat’s-foot oil 1 part Mix the two thoroughly until the composition is of uniform consistency.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0200.xml
article
163
163
WOODWORKING
[no value]
Spice Rack Fastened Inside Kitchen-Cupboard Door
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDMUND C. HANLEY
IF A RACK like the one illustrated is made for a kitchen-cupboard door, it will save time in selecting spices, flavorings, and other cooking essentials. Since the rack protrudes within the cupboard, the regular shelving will have to be reduced in depth.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0201.xml
article
163
163
SHOP DATA FILE
[no value]
DIMENSIONS OF TYPICAL TABLES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0202.xml
article
164
164,165
BOATING
[no value]
More Pep FROM YOUR Outboard Motor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. C. CHENEY
ALTHOUGH the average outboard motor is very well made and requires little attention other than proper lubrication, it is a high-speed machine and in time will require taking down and reconditioning. The most difficult task is likely to be the removal of the flywheel because of the danger of springing the crankshaft.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0203.xml
article
166
166
MODELS
[no value]
Billboards DRESS UP A MODEL RAILWAY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. ELMER BLACK
SCALED from actual structures, these billboards lend realism to a model railway, yet are easily constructed. Several of each type, placed at vantage points about the system, help to create an effective layout. The dimensions indicated on the drawings are for an O-gauge railway.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0204.xml
article
167
167
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Bent-Wire Catcher Locks Instantly on Leg of Chicken
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BENJAMIN NIELSEN
WITH a single quick lunging motion, a chicken can be caught and securely held by means of this self-locking, bent-wire catcher. It is an improvement over a plain wire hook because it automatically grips the leg of the fowl when pushed in place.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0205.xml
article
167
167
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Ink Holder for Ruling Pen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN USING a large ruling pen on long, heavy lines, a draftsman is apt to overload his pen and cause a blot. This may be prevented by fitting a thin metal tongue between the pen nibs. The tongue may be cut from thin brass shim stock, obtainable at any auto repair shop.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0206.xml
article
167
167
BOATING
[no value]
Greasing the Stern Bearing of a Small Motor Boat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARNE O. SALONEN
A CONSTANT supply of grease can be fed into the stern bearing and also the stuffing box of a motor boat by using a good-sized grease cup, an elbow, and a pipe nipple. Drill the hole through the side of the shaft log into the shaft hole a trifle small, and screw in the nipple; then add the elbow and the grease cup as illustrated above.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0207.xml
article
168
168,169
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
SPLIT-IMAGE Range Finder INSURES ACCURATE FOCUSING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RALPH L. ASBURY
THOSE much-wanted photos that turn out fuzzy from poor focusing have proved to most amateurs that they are none too good at guessing distance. This trouble may be remedied by the use of an easily made range finder of the split-image type, the optical principle of which may be seen in the accompanying drawing.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0208.xml
article
169
169
SHOP DATA FILE
[no value]
BACK LIGHTING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Back lighting is obtained when the lens faces the light source. The effect is possible with any camera. 1. Exposure. For the regular backlighting effect, give sufficient exposure so that the shadow side of the subject will register detail on the negative.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0209.xml
article
170
170
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
JUNKED Phonograph Motor AGITATES Film Tank
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LOUIS HOCHMAN
THE value of keeping films in constant agitation during development has long been recognized, but how many have the patience to sit and twirl the film-tank agitator knob. However, an efficient agitator can be made from an old phonograph motor, which can be obtained at most junk dealers for less than a dollar.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0210.xml
article
170
170
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
Paper Disks Mark Kind of Film in Holder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Now that amateur photographers are so conscious of the various types of photographic films available and like to have a choice of them to suit all conditions, it is necessary to mark each film holder in some way to show at a glance what particular kind of film has been loaded into it.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0211.xml
article
171
171
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
Auto Steering-Column Housing Supports an Enlarger
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALVIN C. PORTER
BY USING an old auto steering-column housing as the upright for a homemade vertical enlarger, it is possible to solve the problem of the standard much more neatly than the usual pipe and pipe fittings or makeshift wooden arrangement. This particular housing was purchased from a wrecking yard for less than a dollar.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0212.xml
article
171
171
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
Miniature Films Developed in an Ordinary Tank
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. O. W.
IN THE absence of regular minature film equipment, an occasional roll of 35-mm. film may be developed in an ordinary cut-film tank. Two No. 4 developing hangers are held apart by means of 8-32 screws passing through the hooks in the ends of the handles and screwed into the ends of a pair of ⅜" by 3" round iron rods, which have previously been drilled and tapped for the screws.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0213.xml
article
172
172
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
Flash Bulbs Changed Quickly by Altering the Socket
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W.C.W.
IN TAKING action pictures with photoflash bulbs, success often depends upon the speed with which a used bulb can be removed and a new one inserted in the holder. The standard socket with which most amateur flash lamps are equipped has so many threads that time is lost, and there is also always some danger of burning one’s fingers while unscrewing the used bulbs.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0214.xml
article
172
172
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
Holder with Exposed Film Marked by Rubber Band
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G.S.G.
UNLESS a photographer follows a set routine and is very systematic in every move he makes, he is likely to find himself occasionally in doubt as to whether or not the film in a certain cut-film holder has been exposed. A simple way to avoid this and prevent double exposures is to slip a rubber band over each holder as soon as the slide has been replaced after an exposure has been made.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0215.xml
article
172
172
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
PRINT DEFECTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Spots. Black spots may be due to undissolved particles of chemicals, such as metol, in the developer or to iron (rust) in the wash water. Dark brown spots are often caused by air bells, which adhere to the prints in the hypo bath and prevent fixation, or to amidol, metol, and other chemicals in dust form on the paper before or even after development.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0216.xml
article
173
173
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Wooden Sack Holder Saves Time in Bagging Root Crops
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
N. W.
WITH a substantial wooden sack holder of the kind illustrated at the right, a potato crop or other root crop may be bagged by one person working alone without the annoyance of a single spill. Scrap lumber can be used to make the platform, upright, crossbar, and arms.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0217.xml
article
173
173
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Handling Porch-Awning Lines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN awnings are hung outside of screened porches, the operation of the lines often becomes quite a problem. Going outside to raise or lower the awnings can be avoided if plain brass grommets are put in the screens to admit the awning lines.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0218.xml
article
173
173
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
Camera Fastened to Belt
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ERNEST ROBSON
A SMALL camera carried by a neck strap will bounce and swing as you walk. To prevent this, anchor it to your belt as shown by using a piece of heavy leather and an extra tripod screw. Cut two parallel slits in one end of the leather so your belt will slip through it.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0219.xml
article
173
173
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
New Vacuum-Cleaner Switch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. N.
TO REPLACE a worn-out switch on our vacuum cleaner, I used an ordinary lamp socket equipped with a push-button switch. After connecting it, I pushed it into the handle and taped it securely. A glass household fuse was then screwed into the socket.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0220.xml
article
173
173
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
Tape Marks Miniature Films
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAY KERSHNER
IN THE process of examining a strip of miniature film to pick out certain negatives for enlarging, you can save time and find the desired negatives more quickly later on if you attach a small piece of adhesive tape along the edge of the film opposite each one selected.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0221.xml
article
174
174,175,176
WOODWORKING
[no value]
IMPROVED Hollow Surfboard FOR ALL-AROUND SPORT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TOM BLAKE
DESIGNED for all-around use, this streamline hollow surfboard is of the latest life-guard type. It carries two persons easily. Use white cedar, mahogany, spruce, redwood, or white pine as follows: 2 pc. ¾" by 3¾" by 14' for rails; 2 pc. ¾" by 1⅝" by 14' for battens; 2 pc. ¾" by 5" by 8' for ribs; 1 pc. 1¾" by 16⅛" by 17" for bow block; 1 pc. 2 5/16" by 2⅞" by 8" for stern block; 4 pc. ¼" or ⅜" by 12" by 13' 9" for planking, or if wood a full 12" wide is not available, ¼" or ⅜" waterproof plywood or ⅛" pressed composition wood of tempered quality may be used instead.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0222.xml
article
177
177
WOODWORKING
[no value]
Four-Place Swing DESIGNED FOR SAFETY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HI SIBLEY
ALTHOUGH the unique swing shown in the accompanying illustrations can accommodate four children as passengers, one child can swing it alone without undue effort. It is so designed that side sway is eliminated, and there is no place where wandering fingers are likely to be pinched—always an important consideration where children are concerned.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0223.xml
article
178
178,179
[no value]
[no value]
BOAT PAINTING As It Should Be Done
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RALPH G. WARING
WHILE the general methods of painting small boats are the same for all classes, there are certam variations according to the type of boat. The following specifications are for new boats, but a study of them will also make it clear what is required for repainting from time to time.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0224.xml
article
179
179
[no value]
[no value]
SPREADING RATES FOR MARINE FINISHES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
1. Paste filler, if 10 lb. of paste is used per gallon of thinner (1 part pure turpentine plus 2 parts gasoline) will cover 500 sq. ft. per gal. 2. Yacht gloss white, 700 sq. ft. per gal. 3. Yacht gloss black, 800 sq. ft. per gal. 4. Marine deck paint, 600 sq. ft. per gal.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0225.xml
article
180
180
[no value]
[no value]
Cutting Duplicate Pieces on a Circular Saw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. H.
FOR cutting duplicate pieces of wood to length on a circular saw without danger of a kick back, the jig below will be found convenient. The drawings are for a saw fence 1" thick and 2" high. Note that there is ⅛" clearance between bottom of jig and saw table.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0226.xml
article
180
180
[no value]
[no value]
Old Fence Posts Lifted with Lever and Chain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NORVAL WRIGHT
MANY devices are used for lifting fence posts, but for ordinary use the homemade one illustrated above will serve surprisingly well. Heavy, hard-to-pull posts can be raised with it. Obtain a stout piece of hardwood and a heavy iron bar. In one end of the block of wood cut a slot for the bar.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0227.xml
article
180
180
[no value]
[no value]
PLANE IRONS AND CHISELS—GRINDING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Plane irons and chisels are ground on the beveled side only. Either an ordinary tool grinder or a sandstone wheel may be used. The grinding wheel must revolve toward the tool, which should be held firmly and moved from side to side across the stone with moderate pressure.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0228.xml
article
181
181
[no value]
[no value]
Graceful Bird Pattern Decorates Various Small Novelties
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. F. S.
SEVERAL decorative wooden articles may be made from the bird pattern illustrated. If cut from ½" wood and assembled with two end brackets and a shelf, it will serve as a useful wall shelf. The lines and spots on the birds might be carved out, if desired, and given a dark stain; then apply a medium-dark stain over the birds alone, and give one or two coats of clear varnish to the entire piece.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0229.xml
article
181
181
[no value]
[no value]
PLANE IRONS AND CHISELS—WHETTING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The wire edge formed by grinding is removed by rubbing the plane iron or chisel on an oilstone (whetting). A mixture of half kerosene and half machine oil may be used on the stone. Hold the plane iron or chisel firmly so that the heel of the bevel is raised slightly above the stone.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0230.xml
article
182
182
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Door Stop Scroll-Sawed in Shape of Sailboat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK McCARTY
THIS nautical door stop is scroll-sawed from ⅜" plywood, and the mast, boom, and gaft are ¼" dowel rods, planed flat on one side and tapered toward the ends. Paint the sails flat white, the hull bright red, and the water green. Leave the spars the natural wood color or varnish them.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0231.xml
article
182
182
HOME LABORATORY
[no value]
Strain Detector Shows Flaws in Spectacle Mountings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S. JANES
KNOWN as a "strain detector," the homemade device shown in the accompanying illustrations is for determining whether spectacles are mounted correctly. It indicates at a glance if the lenses are under such a strain that they may break later on.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0232.xml
article
183
183
new SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
Well-Designed Spring Guide
INCREASES SAFETY OF CIRCULAR SAW
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SPRING guides for the circular saw are, of course, indispensable in the woodworking shop, and the one illustrated is especially well designed for its purpose. It holds the work tightly against the fence of the machine even if the wood is badly warped, and it prevents fly-backs because the work can only move forward once it enters into the fingers of the fixture.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0233.xml
article
184
184
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
Gauge on Tinner's Snips Limits Length of Cut
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY times in working with sheet metal it is desired to make a series of cuts of equal length, as, for example, when cutting a number of fan blades from a single blank. For this purpose the adjustable gauge shown below will be found useful. When it is attached to the shears, any number of uniform cuts may be made.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0234.xml
article
184
184
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
Split-Tube Collet Chucks Serve Many Purposes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M. T.
SHORT pieces of tubing, cut open down one side, form handy collet chucks for many uses. They can be used to hold the ends of broken drills or to reënforce very small drills. They will prevent damage to polished or threaded rods that have to be clamped in a vise and keep thin-walled tubes or wooden rods from being flattened by the vise jaws.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0235.xml
article
184
184
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
Handy Switch Control for Drill Press
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CONVENIENT switch-control knob and safety lock may be added with very little work to a drill press of the type illustrated. A piece of 3/16" brass rod about 2' long is bent as required by the design of the machine so as to run from the motor switch to the front of the drill press.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0236.xml
article
185
185
WOODWORKING
[no value]
Old-Fashioned Phonograph Converted into a Tool Cabinet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OLD phonograph cabinets can be remodeled into excellent tool cases. The one illustrated was bought for thirty-five cents secondhand and fitted up for use in connection with the drill press. A cabinet that has the upper part of the legs square, as shown, is the simplest to make over.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0237.xml
article
185
185
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
Scales Scribed on Tinned Copper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. O. L.
CALIBRATED scales and dials for machines, models, and various instruments, especially those of an experimental nature, are easily made from tinned copper plate. If this is not available, ordinary sheet copper can be tinned with solder by using a common soldering iron.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0238.xml
article
186
186,187,188
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
PART TWO Lathe Accuracy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER a lathe has been checked up from the point of view of alignment, it is necessary to test the cross-feed mechanism. Work already done will avail nothing unless this part of the lathe is also in good order. The major test, which is quite simple, relates to the faceplate.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0239.xml
article
189
189
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
Heavy-Duty Screw Driver Gives Great Leverage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
K.F.K.
A HEAVY-DUTY "persuader" for stubborn screws can be fashioned from a large screw driver. An inch or so from the tip, apply a narrow blowtorch flame and heat the shank for a few moments. Do not permit it to get so hot that the temper of the whole tool will be drawn.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0240.xml
article
189
189
[no value]
[no value]
Inserted-Tooth Milling Cutters Made at Low Cost
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. W. CLEM
INSERTED-TOOTH milling cutters of various sizes for home workshop use may be made economically by the following method, especially if discarded high-speed steel teeth can be obtained from a machine shop. Teeth that have been ground down too small for their usual-size cutters will serve the purpose.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0241.xml
article
190
190,191,192
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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WIRING CONVENIENCE OUTLETS
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[no value]
[no value]
HAROLD P. STRAND
LACK of a sufficient number of permanent base or wall outlets for electric lamps and appliances is the cause of the hazardous misuse of cords many homes, yet it is not at difficult to install plug outlets, especially on the first floor. Every main room should have at least two, and the living room requires from four to six, depending upon its size.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0242.xml
article
192
192
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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How to Resharpen Hair Clippers on an Oilstone
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE PARKE
HAIR clippers, both hand and machine, must be sharpened correctly or they will be irretrievably ruined. The first requisite is a large oilstone with two grades of grit— medium and fine. If an old one is to be used, bring both surfaces to a perfect level by grinding on a discarded piece of auto wind-shield, using sand and water for an abrasive.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0243.xml
article
192
192
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
Penetrating Oil for Shop Use
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. C. T.
FOR loosening rusted connections on plumbing jobs and similar work, a cheap penetrating oil can be mixed from one part used motor oil and three parts kerosene.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0244.xml
article
193
193
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
“Gems" for Celluloid Rings Cut from Old Toothbrush
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. E. YOUNGKIN
RINGS made from old toothbrush handles or scraps of celluloid may be ornamented with “gems” of the same material. Either transparent or solid colors may be used, the gem being formed as shown on the end of a fairly large piece. The top edges are beveled with a fine finger-nail or ignition file, and the sides then trimmed off.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0245.xml
article
193
193
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Protector Shaped from Tin to Guard Injured Finger
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. R. JOHNSTON
WHEN the tip of a finger is badly injured, it remains sensitive for a long time and hurts when accidentally bumped. To protect it, cut a piece of fairly heavy tin to the shape shown and bend it to fit over the initial dressing. Bind the metal jacket on with surgical tape.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0246.xml
article
193
193
NEW SHOP IDEAS
[no value]
Sandpaper Cutting Gauge
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SANDPAPER can be divided into half and then quarter sheets quickly and neatly by making the cutting gauge illustrated below. A 10" twenty-four tooth hack-saw blade is fastened to the outward-beveled front edge of the board, with the teeth leaning in the same direction you will face while cutting the paper.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0247.xml
article
193
193
HINTS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Rustic Outdoor Trash Can
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELMER CROOK
FOR picnic grounds, camps, or parks, this rustic trash holder is much less unsightly than the ordinary types of painted cans. It is made of twelve wooden staves held together by two hammered iron bands. Short, square-headed lag screws pass through holes in the bands and into each stave.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0248.xml
article
194
194,195,196,197,234
Hints for Beginners in Amateur Chemistry
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Hints for Beginners in Amateur Chemistry
Join in the Fun of Experimenting at Home! This Article Tells How Easy It Is to Start
You Can Make This Handy Automatic Evaporator
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[no value]
RAYMOND B. WAILES
IF YOU have been following this series of articles for some time, you probably have already set up a more or less complete chemical workshop in which to carry on your experiments. However, there is always a new crop of beginners coming along—newcomers who would like to join the fun and who need some simple advice on equipment and working methods.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0249.xml
article
198
198
Easy Tests Prove Scientific Laws
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Spinning Can Gauges Viscosity of Liquid
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[no value]
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PLACE equal weights of water and of sand in two similar cans, suspended from thin wires. Twist the cans the same number of times and release both. The sand-filled can, turning as a unit, oscillates back and forth for several minutes. The other soon comes to rest because its energy is absorbed by internal friction or viscosity.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0250.xml
article
198
198
Easy Tests Prove Scientific Laws
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Swinging Weight Illustrates How Light Is Polarized
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SUPPORT a pencil, as shown, so that it cannot move vertically. Leave enough slack in the side strings, however, for the pencil to pivot about an inch to either side. Hang a small weight from its end. Release the weight over A, in the picture, and it will swing freely between A and B.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0251.xml
article
198
198
Easy Tests Prove Scientific Laws
[no value]
A Vacuum in a Can of Paint
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEXT time you remove the cover from a can of paint, listen carefully and you will notice a sucking noise. The oil in the paint has chemically combined with the oxygen from the air within the container, leaving a partial vacuum inside the can. The sound of outside air rushing in to take the place of this partial vacuum is what you hear when you open the can.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0252.xml
article
199
199
Easy Tests Prove Scientific Laws
[no value]
Test Shows What Makes Soil Dark and Rich
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PUT a little rich, dark soil in each of two can covers, and balance them exactly upon a pair of scales, by adding to or withdrawing from the contents of either. Remove one cover from the scales and heat the soil just enough to drive off all the moisture that it contains.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0253.xml
article
199
199
Easy Tests Prove Scientific Laws
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Seeing "Kick" from Watch's Tick
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PLACE a watch, with a small mirror propped against it, on a cardboard carton top hung by threads. Concentrate a beam of lamplight, with a reading glass and a small hole in paper, so that the mirror will reflect it to a distant wall. Every action has its reaction, and even the motion of the watch’s tiny balance wheel produces an observable “kick” or recoil, as shown by the oscillation of the reflected spot of light as it dances on the distant wall.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0254.xml
article
199
199
Easy Tests Prove Scientific Laws
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Surface Tension Lifts Soap Film
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIP a glass funnel in soap-suds and lift it out, as above, while your finger closes the stem. A soap film clings across the mouth. Remove your finger and the film will crawl upward into the stem, drawn by surface tension to the smallest possible area.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0255.xml
article
200
200,201,202,203,236
[no value]
[no value]
Everyday Jobs for Your Microscope
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[no value]
[no value]
MORTON C. WALLING
THE other day, a friend dropped in to see whether I could help him settle a little argument. He fished around in his pocket until he found a small envelope, and then asked me for a sheet of white paper. Opening the envelope, he inverted it carefully over the paper, and something that looked like a tiny, crooked piece of wire fell out.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0256.xml
article
204
204,205,206
RADIO
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"Wireless" Radio Phonograph
REQUIRES NO CONNECTION TO SET
Plugged into an outlet anywhere in the room with your radio, the unit “broadcasts” records through the loudspeaker
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK TOBIN
INEXPENSIVE and easy to build, this "wireless" record player may be used with any alternating-current radio receiver without making any actual connections to the receiver circuit. In addition, when you plug in a microphone and flip a switch, the record player becomes a public-address system that will allow you to do your own program announcing through the radio’s loudspeaker.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0257.xml
article
207
207
RADIO
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“Push-Button” Receiver FOR BEGINNERS
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TUNED by a push-button system that beginners can build with ease, the compact, two-tube battery set described here quickly selects any one of four stations. The simple tuning mechanism consists of four toggle switches and four trimmer condensers of varying capacities, mounted in parallel across the secondary winding of a six-prong coil.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0258.xml
article
208
208
NEW HELPS FOR RADIO BUILDERS
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Portable Two-Way Radio Sends Signals 500 Miles
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAPABLE of two-way communication over a distance of 500 miles, a portable radio that straps comfortably on a man’s back has just been completed by Thomas S. McCaleb, Harvard University radio instructor, for use on geographical exploration expeditions.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0259.xml
article
208
208
NEW HELPS FOR RADIO BUILDERS
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New Crystal Is Housed in Glass Tube
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[no value]
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[no value]
QUARTZ crystals for transmitter frequency control are now being inclosed in glass containers resembling radio tubes. As shown in the illustration at the right, the crystal is fixed to a mica strip placed between two metal supports. Contacts are brought out to metal prongs at the base of the tube, permitting speedy plugging in and changing of the units as required.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0260.xml
article
208
208
NEW HELPS FOR RADIO BUILDERS
[no value]
Adapter Fits New Tubes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR experimenters using the new, all-glass, midget, self-locking tubes, a handy adapter unit has just been designed that allows the tubes to be plugged into the standard “octal” sockets. The top section of the adapter, shown in the upper of the illustrations at the right, has contacts to fit the tiny pins of the new tubes.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0261.xml
article
209
209
NEW HELPS FOR RADIO BUILDERS
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Rubber Suction Feet Hold Speaker on Car Roof
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SPECIAL mounting fitted with rubber suction feet has just been introduced to permit a loudspeaker to be fastened to the roof of an automobile for police-emergency and other public-address uses. The suction-cup feet are attached to a metal tripod having a revolving head.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0262.xml
article
209
209
NEW HELPS FOR RADIO BUILDERS
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Tap Switch Improves Transformer
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHANGING voltage connections on power transformers or matching speakers to the output of amplifiers is simplified with a new, eight-position switch that may be mounted on the top of a transformer’s shield. The exact voltage tapped is shown by an indicator dial on the unit which is itself fully shielded.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0263.xml
article
209
209
NEW HELPS FOR RADIO BUILDERS
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Resistor-Choke Prevents Transmitter Troubles
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[no value]
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[no value]
COMBINING a noninductive, vitreous-enameled resistor with a choke in one compact unit, the new suppressor shown below is designed to prevent the generation of the ultrahigh-frequency oscillations that often cause troublesome noises in push-pull transmitter circuits.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0264.xml
article
209
209
NEW HELPS FOR RADIO BUILDERS
[no value]
Tube Tester Gives Audible Comparison
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE operating quality of tubes in your radio may be tested by comparison with new tubes, with the apparatus illustrated at the left. Consisting of a chassis with two tube sockets and a pair of switches, the device is wired to a multi-prong plug which is inserted in the socket that ordinarily holds the tube to be tested.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0265.xml
article
210
210
New Ideas FOR Motorists
[no value]
Boards Clamped to Fenders Form Lumber Carrier
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M. L. E.
TO AVOID having to run ropes all over my car when I go to the lumber yard for supplies, I fasten narrow boards to the front and rear fenders on one side with C clamps, as shown. An old army blanket folded and placed on the top of the fenders protects the finish from being scratched by the boards during the hauling operations.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0266.xml
article
210
210
New Ideas FOR Motorists
[no value]
Handy Gasket Duplicator Made from Inner Tube
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. L. B.
WHEN you have to make a number of duplicate gaskets, you can save time by using the “rubber-stamp” method. Cut a pattern out of inner-tube rubber and cement it to a block of wood. Then by using an ink pad you can stamp as many impressions as you want on a sheet of gasket material.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0267.xml
article
210
210
New Ideas FOR Motorists
[no value]
Temporary Spring Repair Gets Car to Garage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. M.
SOME time ago, I was driving in the country, miles from any garage, when a front spring broke clean through. Bad roads made it impossible to drive far without repairs of some kind. I got to a farm where I obtained a two-by-four and some wire. First I put the jack under the frame of the car on the side of the broken spring, and raised the side to its normal position.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0268.xml
advertisement
211
211
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
Kodak Junior Six-20
Eastman Kodak Company
Kodak Junior Six-16
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0269.xml
article
212
212
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
Steel Wool Cleans Spots from White-Wall Tires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. F. R.
THOSE white-wall tires have a way of defying your best efforts to get them perfectly clean, particularly after they have been on your car for a year or more. Small surface cracks that weather into the rubber become clogged with tar and grease from the pavement, and soap and water, while they clean the bulk of the grit from the walls, cannot do the job thoroughly.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0270.xml
article
212
212
AUTOMOBILES
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Straps "Lock" Car Doors To Keep Children Safe
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[no value]
[no value]
C. W.
CHILDREN riding alone in the back seat of a four-door sedan cannot open the rear doors while the car is in motion if the simple expedient illustrated above is used. Lower the door windows slightly and fasten a one-inch leather strap around the door frames and center post.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0271.xml
article
212
212
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
Dust Serves as Polish for Chromium Plating
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. D. S.
IN CLEANING my car, I’ve found that the fine dust that accumulates on the hood makes a fine polish for chromium plating. I simply brush the dust up into a pile with a soft cloth, pick it up with a damp cloth, and rub it over the headlights and other metal trim.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0272.xml
article
212
212
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
Wire Extension on Spout Improves Oil Cans
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. S.
FOR oiling out-of-the-way places in my car, I wrapped a length of soft copper wire around the spout of an oil can so that it extends several inches beyond the tip. In use, the end of the wire is placed on the point to be lubricated. The oil is forced from the can in the usual manner, but instead of dropping free from the end of the spout, it flows along the wire to the desired place, as depicted at the right.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0273.xml
advertisement
213
213
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[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0274.xml
advertisement
214
214
[no value]
[no value]
Du Pont: No. 7 Polish
[no value]
Du Pont
No. 7 Polish
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0275.xml
article
214
214,216
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[no value]
TESTED BLUEPRINTS Make Boat Building Easy
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[no value]
[no value]
THERE is still time to build and enjoy a I boat this summer if you begin work at once. By using our blueprints, which are drawn to scale, you will simplify your task considerably. Some of our boat designs are listed below. We also have plans for models, furniture, radios, and miscellaneous novelties.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0276.xml
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215
215
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[no value]
General Motors Corporation
[no value]
General Motors Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0277.xml
advertisement
216
216
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[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0278.xml
advertisement
217
217
[no value]
[no value]
Socony-Vacuum Oil Co., Inc.: MOBILOIL
[no value]
Socony-Vacuum Oil Co., Inc.
MOBILOIL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0279.xml
article
218
218,220
[no value]
[no value]
The Fleet's In!
NEW KIT CONTAINS MATERIALS FOR BUILDING NINE MODELS OF LATEST U. S. FIGHTING SHIPS
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[no value]
TO SAFEGUARD this country in the worldwide armament race, the United States is rushing to completion many new fighting craft, and others are already in commission. You can build nine models of these much-discussed ships with our kit No. 7M, which has just been added to the POPULAR SCIENCE “Model-of-the-Month” series.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0280.xml
advertisement
218
218
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[no value]
Nicholson File Company
[no value]
Nicholson File Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0281.xml
advertisement
219
219
[no value]
[no value]
The Texas Company: Marfak
[no value]
The Texas Company
Marfak
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[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0282.xml
advertisement
220
220
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: MOBIL HANDY OIL
[no value]
[no value]
MOBIL HANDY OIL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0283.xml
advertisement
220
220
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
MOBIL UPPERLUBE
[no value]
Mobiloil
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0284.xml
advertisement
220
220
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0285.xml
advertisement
221
221
[no value]
[no value]
Champion Spark Plug Company: V-PLUG
[no value]
Champion Spark Plug Company
V-PLUG
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0286.xml
advertisement
222
222
[no value]
[no value]
CENTRAL CAMERA CO.: “ALTIFLEX” CAMERA
[no value]
CENTRAL CAMERA CO.
“ALTIFLEX” CAMERA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0287.xml
advertisement
222
222
[no value]
[no value]
LAFAYETTE CAMERA CORPORATION
[no value]
LAFAYETTE CAMERA CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0288.xml
article
222
222
[no value]
[no value]
Turning Camera on Tripod to Follow a Subject
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
K. M.
CUT in the shape of a paddle from thin pressed composition wood or similar material, the handle illustrated above enables a camera used on a tripod to be turned easily to follow the subject. A hole must be drilled through the handle, of course, through which the tripod screw can pass.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0289.xml
article
222
222
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[no value]
Blocking Parts of Negatives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ORDINARY liquid stove polish, applied with a brush, is a satisfactory and readily available opaque paint for blocking out sections of negatives. It will not chip off and is waterproof, although a good grade of gasoline or benzine will remove it if necessary.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0290.xml
advertisement
223
223
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[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0291.xml
advertisement
224
224
[no value]
[no value]
International Research Corporation
[no value]
International Research Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0292.xml
article
224
224
[no value]
[no value]
Flash Light Helps Focus Camera in Dim Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. J. MIHOK
COUNTLESS photoflash bulbs are wasted on indoor pictures because amateur photographers find it difficult to focus accurately, especially if they are using cameras of foreign manufacture with metric focusing scales. A definite way to focus, no matter how dim the light, may be provided, however, by using an ordinary pocket flash light.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0293.xml
article
224
224
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[no value]
Dissolving Sodium Carbonate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. L.
SODIUM carbonate, which is a common chemical much used by photographers, has a marked tendency to form lumps, and these will not dissolve quickly. To reduce the lumps to the original granulated form, simply rub them on the inside of an ordinary wire-mesh tea strainer.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0294.xml
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225
225
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Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0295.xml
advertisement
226
226
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Gillette
Gillette Blade
Gillette
Gillette Blue Blade
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0296.xml
advertisement
227
227
[no value]
[no value]
DAISY MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
DAISY MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0297.xml
advertisement
227
227
[no value]
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR COMPANY
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0298.xml
advertisement
228
228
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: PLASTIC WOOD
[no value]
[no value]
PLASTIC WOOD
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0299.xml
advertisement
228
228
[no value]
[no value]
MASTER GLAZE CO.
[no value]
MASTER GLAZE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0300.xml
advertisement
229
229
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[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0301.xml
advertisement
230
230
[no value]
[no value]
KEUFFEL & ESSER CO.: WYTEFACE
[no value]
KEUFFEL & ESSER CO.
WYTEFACE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0302.xml
advertisement
230
230
[no value]
[no value]
Clipper Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
Clipper Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0303.xml
advertisement
230
230
[no value]
[no value]
3-IN-ONE OIL: HEAVY BODY
[no value]
3-IN-ONE OIL
HEAVY BODY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0304.xml
advertisement
231
231
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0305.xml
advertisement
232
232
[no value]
[no value]
Western Cartridge Company: WESTERN XPERT
[no value]
Western Cartridge Company
WESTERN XPERT
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0306.xml
advertisement
232
232
[no value]
[no value]
BENJAMIN AIR RIFLE CO.
[no value]
BENJAMIN AIR RIFLE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0307.xml
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232
232
[no value]
[no value]
Chicago Wheel & Mfg. Co.: De Luxe Model
[no value]
Chicago Wheel & Mfg. Co.
De Luxe Model
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0308.xml
article
232
232
[no value]
[no value]
Improved Optical Glass
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FASTER and better camera lenses are predicted as the result of the discovery of a way to make optical glass out of rare chemical elements instead of common silica. The resulting glass has a very high index of refraction and a low dispersion, it is reported.
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0309.xml
advertisement
233
233
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0310.xml
advertisement
234
234
[no value]
[no value]
LAFAYETTE RADIO CORP.
[no value]
LAFAYETTE RADIO CORP.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0311.xml
advertisement
234
234
[no value]
[no value]
BIOLOGICAL SUPPLY COMPANY: CHEMICALS
[no value]
BIOLOGICAL SUPPLY COMPANY
CHEMICALS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0312.xml
advertisement
234
234
[no value]
[no value]
ATLAS PRESS CO.
[no value]
ATLAS PRESS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0313.xml
advertisement
235
235
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0314.xml
advertisement
236
236
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0315.xml
advertisement
237
237
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0316.xml
advertisement
238
238
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0317.xml
advertisement
239
239
[no value]
[no value]
MEAD GLIDERS
[no value]
MEAD GLIDERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0318.xml
advertisement
240
240
[no value]
[no value]
LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO.: Chesterfields
[no value]
LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO.
Chesterfields
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19390601_0134_006_0319.xml