Issue: 19340401

Sunday, April 1, 1934
APRIL
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124
Monday, June 16, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0001.xml
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F. O. B. FACTORY DETROIT
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F. O. B. FACTORY DETROIT
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0002.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0003.xml
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GENERAL MOTORS
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GENERAL MOTORS
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0004.xml
masthead
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Masthead
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0005.xml
tableOfContents
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
TABLE of CONTENTS
FEATURES AND DEPARTMENTS
AUTOMOBILES
AVIATION
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY FOR APRIL, 1934
MODELS
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
RADIO
SHIPS
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
CRAFTWORK
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0006.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0007.xml
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Wm. H. Wise & Co.,
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Wm. H. Wise & Co.,
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0008.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0009.xml
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0010.xml
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Advertisement: SIMONIZ
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SIMONIZ
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0011.xml
article
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WILL WE HOP THE OCEAN ON Floating Islands?
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FLOATING islands of steel! Landing decks, with six acres of space, to make the ocean safe for commercial flying. Hotel quarters, machine shops and tremendous storage tanks for fuel. An understructure built so as to allow giant waves to pass through without breaking against the platform or even rocking it!
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0012.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0013.xml
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PHOENIX MUTUAL
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PHOENIX MUTUAL
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0014.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0015.xml
article
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LIGHTING Your Home Workshop
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R. M. BOLEN
ADEQUATE lighting is the first requisite of a well-equipped home workshop. Almost more important than the tools and benches is the illumination of the work. Poorly lighted quarters are no better fitted for woodworking or model making than they are for reading.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0016.xml
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Westinghouse Lamp Co.
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Westinghouse Lamp Co.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0017.xml
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Our Readers Say
Here's a Red-Hot Argument About Heat that Isn't Heat
If the Whole 5,000,000 Agree, Your Suggestion Is Good
Anchored Airports At Sea Safe Only During a Storm!
Speed of Gravity Waves Is Worrying This Reader
Building His Own Library of Priceless Information
Cry from Oklahoma for More and More on Radio
"He" Bees and "She" Bees Are Now Properly Classified
Matter in Rotation Offers Some Interesting Tests
Steam Power for Planes and Cars Is His.Interest
He Tells You the Secret of Keeping Up-to-Date
New List of Favorite Articles We Published
Mystery of Bouncing Bottle Cleared Up by Photographer
Why Does Soap Make This Nail Brush Float?
Thinks Tungsten Razor Would Last Forever
Oblique Fall of Meteor Explained by This Reader
He Knew a Good Thing When He Saw It, But Conscience—
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THIS is an answer to M. K., Los Angeles, Calif., who appealed to the Einsteins who read POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. We think that if he had consulted some good encyclopedia he would have had no trouble with his problems. The question seems to concern the nature of heat and of course everybody knows that heat is not heat unless it has some material thing to effect.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0018.xml
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Gem Safety Razor Corp.,
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Gem Safety Razor Corp.,
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0019.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0020.xml
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D. VAN NOSTRAND CO.
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D. VAN NOSTRAND CO.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0021.xml
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0022.xml
article
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New Mystery Rays TAP POWER HIDDEN IN ATOM
Ultra-Short Waves Link Airports
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JOHN E. LODGE
MAGNETIC merry-go-round, firing electrified particles at 50,000 miles a second, has just generated the world’s first neutron ray in a research laboratory at the University of California. The new ray represents the culmination of years of study by two California scientists, Dr. E. O. Lawrence and Dr. M. Stanley Livingston.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0023.xml
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How Nighthawk Trucks Move Nation's Goods
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EDWIN TEALE
THREE million trucks roll on the eight million miles of surfaced roads in the United States. In all parts of the country, hundreds of thousands of machines take to the highways when darkness falls, speeding over hills and valleys, heading for the larger cities.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0024.xml
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CHEMIST'S SLIDE RULE SPEEDS CALCULATION
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DESIGNED for the use of commercial chemists and students of chemistry, a sliderule type calculator shows correct formulas and molecular weights for approximately 400 inorganic compounds. The device is said to reduce greatly the time ordinarily used in computing molecular weights and solving equations.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0025.xml
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WORD TALLY ON FOUNTAIN PEN
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WRITERS are able to estimate closely the number of words they have written by referring to a scale engraved on the transparent ink barrel of a new fountain pen. Seven sections are marked on the scale indicating the words written from 1,000 to 7,000.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0026.xml
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TRUCK AND TOURING CAR COMBINED
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DEVELOPED for use by surveyors, and possibly by the Army as well, a combination truck and touring car has just been perfected. Among its unusual features is a four-wheel drive, which is said to increase its ability to travel rough roads such as deep sand, steep hills, and ditches.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0027.xml
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MUSIC TAUGHT WITH WHIRLING DISKS
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CIRCULAR paper disks, revolving as a phonograph record does on its turntable, supply new methods of music instruction in the devices shown below, invented by Dr. W. Otto Miessner, composer and music authority of Chicago. In the “rhythophone,” shown at the left, punch holes are made in the disk to correspond with the notes of a musical passage.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0028.xml
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GIANT RADIO PLANT MEETS FIRST TESTS
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USING twenty 100,000-watt tubes, the biggest radio broadcasting plant in the world is now sending out test programs from Cincinnati between one and six o’clock in the morning. The station has a total power of 500,000 watts. Its giant tubes, water cooled, use a million gallons of water a day.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0029.xml
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MEASURE STRESS CAUSED BY QUAKES
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KNOWN as a stress recorder, a device recently placed in service at Harvard University, will aid engineers in the design of structures that will withstand earthquakes. When miniature building frames are subjected to artificial earthquakes in the laboratory, the device indicates the stresses to whicheach member is subjected, and from these figures the corresponding stresses that would be induced in a full-sized building can readily be computed and guarded against.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0030.xml
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UNIVERSAL WRENCH FITS MANY DIFFERENT NUTS
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FITTING any nut, from a quarter of an inch to more than two inches in size, a universal wrench of European invention combines in one tool the functions of a large variety of wrenches and pliers. When the new wrench has been adjusted, pressure on a hand lever causes the jaws to seize the nut with a vise-like grip.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0031.xml
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PLANE SPREADS INSECT-KILLING SPRAY
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AIRPLANE spraying of orchards to control insect pests that ravage the trees has now been extended to the use of liquid insecticides, giving it new effectiveness. Hitherto dusts have been used because the load of water required to dilute an oil spray in order to avoid burning trees would be too heavy to carry in an airplane.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0032.xml
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NEW ELECTRIC BULB HAS NO FILAMENT
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DEVOID of any filament, an electric lamp demonstrated recently in New York City provides economical light by a new application of the glow of mercury vapor. Two bulbs are used, one within the other, and the space between the two is exhausted of air by a vacuum pump.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0033.xml
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ODORLESS ANTISEPTIC
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ODORLESS and tasteless, a new antiseptic compound, whose discovery is reported to the Society of American Bacteriologists, is described as a more effective germicide than iodine. The drug, a chlorine compound, has a bright yellow color, which persists as long as it is active.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0034.xml
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SURGICAL DRESSINGS WOUND ON A SPOOL
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SIXTY dressings for minor wounds are supplied in spool form in a first-aid package recently placed on the market. Readily detached for instant use, each dressing combines a strip of adhesive tape and pad of gauze, making it unnecessary to lose time in searching for the separate materials.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0035.xml
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Sub’s Rescue Mask Tested on Land
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TO TEST a new breathing mask for submarine rescue use, a German manufacturer has erected a complete model of a submarine behind his factory. Men wearing the masks and special jackets enter the dry-land submarine, which is fitted with machinery and bunks to simulate a real craft, and carry out the drama of sailors escaping from a disabled submarine.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0036.xml
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NEW FREE-WING PLANE CAN’T STALL
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STALLING and tail spins are said to be prevented in a new type of airplane demonstrated the other day at a Los Angeles, Calif., airport. The wings are pivoted to the fuselage at a point onethird of their width from the leading edge, and the pilot may release them in flight so that they will tilt to counteract a dangerous spin.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0037.xml
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HAND LAMP PROTECTS BLIND PEDESTRIANS
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To GUARD the lives of blind pedestrians at night, a hand signal lamp has been devised by a Belgian inventor. When the user crosses a street after dark, he holds up the pocket lamp and presses the button, lighting a luminous white disk on which three black dots appear.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0038.xml
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TWENTY-FOOT MODEL REPRODUCES INVOLVED SUBWAY CONSTRUCTION
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Two New Jersey men are completing a twenty-foot model of the most complicated underground construction project ever attempted by man, selected by the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia for reproduction in miniature. The spot chosen is the New York City block bounded by Broadway, Sixth Avenue, Thirty-Third and Thirty-Fourth Streets, where existing and projected subways will create a subterranean labyrinth.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0039.xml
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CHICKS RUN THEIR ELECTRIC HEATER
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BABY chicks may keep themselves warm with the aid of an automatic heater recently placed on the market. Shown below, it provides a platform to which the chicks are attracted by a pilot light burning continually at the rear, in center. The weight of several chicks on the platform closes a mercury switch and turns on two heater bulbs at the sides of the pilot.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0040.xml
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NEW RIVER BOAT HAS UNUSUAL DESIGN
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A DUTCH engineer, C. J. Stoel, has embodied his ideas of the streamlined speedboat of the future in the ambitious model illustrated above. Designed for swift travel on lakes and rivers, its rolling lines afford an interesting comparison with the streamlined ocean liner described on another page of this magazine.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0041.xml
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GASOLINE FROM SAWDUST
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SWEDEN has just granted a subsidy of $50,000 for the erection of an experimental factory for the production of gasoline from peat and sawdust. A Finnish chemist invented the new process.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0042.xml
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OIL-CAN OPENER ALSO A SPOUT
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MOTOR oils may be poured into the crank case of a car directly from their cans through a combination can opener and spout invented by a Los Angeles man. The spout contains a sharp point that cuts a hole in the can. Oil flows out the hole and down the trough provided by the device.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0043.xml
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Whole Radio Station in Auto
Broadcasting from Scene of News Event Is Now Possible
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SPEEDING after the news at a mile-a-minute pace, a streamlined car about to be placed in service by the National Broadcasting Company will represent an innovation in radio technique. It contains a complete broadcasting station that can operate fifty to 100 miles from the nearest land line, bringing special programs of news and sporting events to radio listeners from virtually any point to which the car can be driven.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0044.xml
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City of Treelike Buildings Planned
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SHAPED like trees with slender trunks, homes and office buildings of the future may rise into pure air on pedestals of steel. Our artist presents here his conception of this startling proposal, made recently by R. H. Wilenski, noted British architect.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0045.xml
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FASTER, SAFER PLANES DEVELOPED IN Biggest Wind Tunnel
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Arthur Grahame
SPEED with safety in the air. Speed with economy of operation. Speed with comfort for air travelers. For the past few years these speed demands have been insistently made by the users of airplanes and especially by the airline companies whose existence depends on the swift, safe,dependable, and economical transportation of passengers, mail, and express.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0046.xml
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New War Plane Has Movable Gun Turret
Camera Makes Lifelike Statue
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OFFICIALLY known as an express bomber, England’s latest 150-milean-hour war plane has been nicknamed the “flying ash can.” It takes its name from the cylindrical turret that can be dropped below the fuselage during flight.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0047.xml
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New Energy Tests REVEAL OUR LOSS AT WORK OR PLAY
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ROBERT E.MARTIN
ALL the hearts beating in the United States develop about 70,000 horsepower ! Half a peanut furnishes sufficient energy for an hour of intense mental effort! Eighteen holes of golf consume as much energy as climbing five times to the top of the Empire State Building, the world’s highest skyscraper!
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0048.xml
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.First Fully Electrified House Runs Itself
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CALLED the world's most completely electrified dwelling, a six-room house just completed at Mansfield, Ohio, will serve Westinghouse engineers as a laboratory in planning the home of tomorrow. Three and a quarter miles of wire operate its 320 electric light bulbs, eighty-seven convenience outlets, and twenty-one built-in appliances, many of which are types never before installed in a residence.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0049.xml
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Live Adventures with Dead Animals
TAXIDERMISTS HAVE THRILLING TIME PRODUCING MOUNTED SPECIMENS
LIVE ADVENTURES OF TAXIDERMISTS WITH THEIR DEAD ANIMALS
LIVE ADVENTURES WITH DEAD ANIMALS
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THOMAS M. JOHNSON
NOAH WEBSTER said in his dictionary, that taxidermy is “the art of stuffing animals.” It is much more than that now, and “stuffy” it never was. At any moment in the taxidermist’s life, in may rush adventure or bizarre experience. Nor is this surprising, since taxidermy deals with all manner of creatures, frequently wild, which are sometimes alive when they seem to be dead, and sometimes dead when they seem to be alive.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0050.xml
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CYCLIST USES WIND TUNNEL IN TRAINING
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IN ORDER to study the wind resistance experienced in various postures, a French racing cyclist has availed himself of an aeronautical wind tunnel for tests. Mounting his machine, which is suspended at the mouth of the wind tunnel, the rider attempts to counteract its force by changing his position.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0051.xml
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NINE GOLF CLUBS ARE COMBINED IN ONE
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INVENTED by a Chicago jeweler, a new adjustable golf club combines nine different types of irons in one, reducing the assortment needed for a golfer’s bag and consequently the weight that must be carried by the caddy. Numbers on the swivel head of the club and its mounting indicate the angle of setting for each type of stroke.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0052.xml
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FLOWERS FROZEN IN ICE
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FROZEN solid in blocks of ice, fresh blooms of the Australian wattle and bottle brush were recently shipped successfully to London, England, to be displayed at a flower show. The conical blocks were polished as shown above to give visitors a clear view of the contents.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0053.xml
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VIKINGS' OLD WAR HORN UNEARTHED IN DENMARK
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NEARLY ten feet long, a snake-like horn unearthed in Denmark and shipped to America might well puzzle a modern musician. The rare relic, shown below, was used for signaling by ancient Vikings of the eighth century, when they wished to call their adventurous bands together for council or war.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0054.xml
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FURNITURE MAKING, HUSTON'S HOBBY
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FAMILIAR to many for his impersonations on the movie screen and stage, Walter Huston becomes a home workshop enthusiast in his spare hours away from the studio lot. His cabin in the San Bernardino Mountains of California, where he makes his home, is furnished almost en tirely by his own hands.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0055.xml
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New Streamlining for Big Ships
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ARE liners of the sea destined to take on new forms in the race for speed? With streamlined trains and automobiles no longer a dream but a fact, as told in recent issues of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, designers are wondering where the newborn art of streamlining may work additional transformations.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0056.xml
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Midget Torpedo Boat Has Forty-Knot Speed
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CAPABLE of attacking anything from a submarine to a battleship, one of the world’s smallest warships has been developed in England. This “pocket torpedo boat,” shown undergoing a test at left, measures fifty-five feet in length and skims the water at forty knots.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0057.xml
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SMALLEST MOTOR RUNS POCKET ELECTRIC FAN
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PAUL WELFONDER, German engineer, claims the distinction of having built the world’s smallest practical electric motor. Operated by a flashlight battery, its armature spins at 900 revolutions a minute. Mounting a blade on the rotor, the builder has a pocket electric fan.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0058.xml
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USE ARROWHEADS TO MAKE PICTURES
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AN UNUSUALLY effectively way to display Indian arrowheads has been devised by Dr. A. R. Wittman, of Merrill, Wise., whose collection is the largest in his state. The stone weapons serve as the materials for pictorial panels of Indian chiefs, bears, mountain goats, and other scenes and animals associated with Indian life.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0059.xml
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ICE BOAT IS STREAMLINED
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STYLED the “ice Zepplin,” a speedy new type of ice boat has made its appearance at recent German regattas. The pilot sits within a cockpit at the rear of a long torpedo-shaped hull, which has a flat bottom and a top that is rounded to a smooth, streamlined finish.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0060.xml
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ROBOT, ON LAND, TEACHES SWIMMING
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LEARNING a difficult swimming stroke is made an easy task by a new mechanical instructor, devised by an Oakland, Calif., inventor. When the novice lies upon the device and turns a crank handle, jointed guides simulate the motions of the crawl stroke.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0061.xml
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WORKER GOES HOME ON HIS COASTER
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AT THE end of their day’s work, laborers in a slate quarry of north Wales start their trip home in picturesque fashion. Each is provided with an odd device known as a “car gwyllt,” literally, the car that goes, which is, in effect, a one-man roller coaster.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0062.xml
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[no value]
RAISE 146-FOOT TOWER IN THREE HOURS
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ERECTED by six men in only three hours, and dismantled even more rapidly to be taken to another site, a new type of steel observation tower is speeding the work of the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey. The 146-foot towers are used in long-distance surveying over tall trees and hills in order to establish permanent location markers throughout the country.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0063.xml
article
39
39
[no value]
[no value]
PORT FOR GUNS IN POLICE WINDSHIELD
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[no value]
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A WINDSHIELD, containing a gun port, has been invented by a former Dearborn, Mich., fireman, to guard the lives of police officers during a bandit chase. Thrusting his weapon through the opening in the bullet-proof windshield, an occupant of a police car can fire at escaping criminals without exposing himself.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0064.xml
article
39
39
[no value]
[no value]
SHOE-SHINING MITTEN CARRIES ITS POLISH
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ALL the essentials for ' polishing shoes are combined in a mitten recently placed on the market for household use. Small buttons of a special polishing wax are attached to one side of the mitten, as shown in the illustration above, while the other side of heavy flannel serves as a polishing cloth.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0065.xml
article
39
39
[no value]
[no value]
STOP LIGHT COMBINES COLORS AND MOTION
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A STOP light for cars that is plainly visible in sunlight, fog, rain, or darkness, combines action and dazzling colors to secure the attention of other drivers. Celluloid insets, colored red, blue, green, and yellow, are mounted on a revolving disk that spins whenever the motorist steps on the brake which actuates the signal.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0066.xml
article
40
40
[no value]
[no value]
LARGEST SHIP OVERHAULED IN WORLD’S BIGGEST DRY DOCK
GAS MOTOR IN WHEEL TOWS ROLLER SKATER
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Two giants met, the other day, when the S. S. Majestic, largest liner in the world, entered the biggest dry dock ever built. The ship was the first to be overhauled in the new dock at Liverpool, England, which was recently completed at a cost of more than $6,000,000.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0067.xml
article
40
40
[no value]
[no value]
4,000 PIECES OF WOOD IN MOSAIC TABLE TOP
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BY GLUING together 4,000 pieces of fir, mahogany, Tennessee red cedar, walnut, and Alaska cedar, Everett Smith, of Hoquiam, Wash., has produced an attractive card table with a mosaic top. It contains a colorful pattern in five brilliant hues, built up by the small blocks.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0068.xml
article
40
40
[no value]
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CAP FOR SHAVING CREAM TUBE IS ALSO A BRUSH
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SERVING the purpose of a brush as well as a cap, a new attachment for a tube of shaving cream simplifies the morning toilet. When the cap is attached, pressure squeezes cream upon the applicator, which is then used like a brush.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0069.xml
article
40
40
[no value]
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NEW TRANSMISSION HAS NO GEARS
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POWER is transmitted at variable speeds by means of a hydraulic unit invented by A. E. Hedlund of Everett, Wash. Replacing gears in automobiles, it employs a steel case containing eight cylinders with eight pistons working in pairs from a crank attached to a drive shaft.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0070.xml
article
41
41
[no value]
[no value]
USE WINGLESS ROOSTER IN STUDY OF FLIGHT
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THROUGH a freak of nature, science may soon be able to explain some of the long-standing mysteries of the flight of birds. A rooster, hatched without wings, is now to be studied in the National Zoological Park at Washington, D. C., by experts from the Smithsonian Institution.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0071.xml
article
41
41
[no value]
[no value]
NEWEST SPEED TRAIN LEAVES THE FACTORY
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SHAPED like a projectile, the Union Pacific Railroad’s 110-mile-an-hour streamlined train has just been completed in Chicago. Its first picture, reproduced above, gives a striking impression of what the swift monster of the rails will look like when it is coming down the rails directly toward the observer.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0072.xml
article
41
41
[no value]
[no value]
POUR THREE-TON TELESCOPE MIRROR
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MEASURING nearly seven feet in diameter and weighing almost three tons, the second-largest telescope mirror in the world was successfully cast at Corning, N. Y., the other day. When it has cooled, which will require nearly three months, it will be installed in the new McDonald Observatory of the University of Texas.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0073.xml
article
41
41
[no value]
[no value]
FOG-PIERCING CAMERA TESTED ON SEA CRUISE
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FOLLOWING successful preliminary trials described in a recent issue (P.S.M., Dec. ’33, p. 48), the new Williams’ camera, that guides ships through fog, recently received a more extended trial during a transatlantic cruise of the liner Manhattan.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0074.xml
article
42
42,43,44,104,105
[no value]
[no value]
Be a Detective with Your Own Microscope
EARTH GUARDS DAM FROM QUAKES
SMUGGLERS DETECTED BY X-RAY OUTFIT
SEEK WAY TO SILENCE AIRPLANE PROPELLER
TEST RADIO-OPERATED TELETYPES
GLASS COLORED BY SUNLIGHT
USE ELECTRIC CURRENT TO TEST FRESH FISH
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[no value]
MORTON C. WALLING
ALLTHOUGH your microscope is an instrument of entertainment that admits you to a world of invisible wonders, it is capable of more serious work. As microscopes are used in commercial and government laboratories in examining and testing all kinds of matrials, so you can employ your instrument for analyzing food, cloth, paper, and hundreds of other things found in your home.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0075.xml
article
45
45
[no value]
[no value]
Defy Death in Stratosphere Flight
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BENT on soaring to record heights, two Army airmen are scheduled to take off this spring in a balloon as tall as a thirtystory building. Their goal is a fifteen-mile ascent into the stratosphere, where experts believe transatlantic airplanes of the future will fly at 600 miles or more an hour.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0076.xml
article
46
46
[no value]
[no value]
SAILING LEARNED ON DRY-LAND VESSEL
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YOUNGSTERS may enjoy the fun of sailing and learn its art, without the danger of actually putting to sea, through the invention of the realistic dry-land craft shown above. Any back yard serves this captive boat for a lake, and its trim sails puff out in the wind as gracefully as if it were floating on water.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0077.xml
article
46
46
[no value]
[no value]
SUN BOILS WATER IN 45 MINUTES
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DREAMS of harnessing the sun for the practical development of power are brought nearer realization in experiments now being conducted by Russian scientists. Solar boilers of a new design, installed in a desert station, have heated water to the boiling point in forty-five minutes, and attempts are now under way to apply the plan on a larger scale.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0078.xml
article
46
46
[no value]
[no value]
ALUMINUM MADE BRIGHT AS SILVER
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ALUMINUM is given a brightness that approaches that of silver through a newly discovered process, which is expected to have far-reaching industrial applications. Its first use will be in constructing reflectors for floodlamps.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0079.xml
article
46
46
[no value]
[no value]
THREE-WHEELED CAR HAS SPARE TIRE UNDER HOOD
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THREE-WHEELED cars, popular in Germany because of their economy, present an unusual problem in the placing of the spare tire. One manufacturer has solved it in the ingenious manner pictured below. The spare is slipped out of the way in a special compartment just under the hood.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0080.xml
article
46
46
[no value]
[no value]
ANIMAL PAINTERS HAVE ART SCHOOL
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Cows and horses serve as models at a school for animal painting in Munich, Germany, called the only one of its kind. Students entering this school embark upon a five years’ course designed to teach them the fine points of painting domestic animals.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0081.xml
article
47
47
[no value]
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Road Scout’s Car Is Traveling Home
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ANYWHERE on the road is home to “Outdoor” Franklin, California road scout for the Richfield Oil Company, whose ingenuity in remodeling his car to provide for his comfort on long trips would arouse the admiration of any camper. His meals cook while he drives, his clothes remain neatly pressed in a compact chest of drawers, his drinking water keeps cool in an insulated compartment at the rear, and at night he sleeps on air.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0082.xml
article
48
48
[no value]
[no value]
TRAVELING SHORT-WAVE OUTFIT
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WHEN L. A. Morrow, radio amateur of Springfield, Ohio, goes traveling, he takes his radio station W8DKE with him. To compare the results of short-wave transmission and reception in different parts of the country, this enthusiast transformed his outfit into a station on wheels, housing it in a two-wheel auto trailer that he constructed of pressed wood material on a wooden frame.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0083.xml
article
48
48
[no value]
[no value]
FLYING CONDITIONS OF NATION SHOWN ON MAP
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KEPT up to date by frequent weather reports, an unusual map just installed at the Rome headquarters of the Italian Air Ministry shows nation-wide flying conditions. Symbols inserted upon a map of Italy at the location of each observing station indicate visibility, wind direction, cloud height, and other factors important to aerial navigation.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0084.xml
article
48
48
[no value]
[no value]
TESTS GAGE STRENGTH OF NOTCHED JOISTS
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TESTING the comparative strength of joists after they had been notched in various ways, experts of the U. S. Forest Products Laboratory recently discovered a fact important to home builders. When joists are cut away at the ends in order to lower a floor to a desired level, the usual practice is to make a rectangular notch.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0085.xml
article
48
48
[no value]
[no value]
WOOD MODEL SHOWS BEHAVIOR OF GAS
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AT THE University of California, a student has constructed the curious model-illustrated at the right. It shows graphically the behavior of a substance in its various physical states. Sections of ply wood, of which the models is built up, are stained in four colors to indicate the action of gas, liquid, and other forms in which carbon dioxide exists.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0086.xml
article
48
48
[no value]
[no value]
USE PROFILE SHADOW TO EXAMINE GEARS
[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
To DETERMINE whether small gears, ratchet wheels, and other irregularly shaped objects correspond to the designs used in their manufacture, a desk-type profile projector has been developed. The object is placed on a glass platform as at left and its magnified shadow is thrown, through a system of mirrors, upon a translucent screen.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0087.xml
article
49
49
[no value]
[no value]
STRIKING VIEW OF NEW SUB
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LATEST addition to the British Navy, the powerful submarine Severn slid down the ways at Barrow-in-Furness, England, the other day and was snapped just after the launching, in the striking view reproduced at the right. A towering prow and bulging sides give the vessel a fantastic appearance.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0088.xml
article
49
49
[no value]
[no value]
BOOK FOR TYPEWRITERS
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HELPING children to learn to read, write, and use the typewriter is the threefold purpose of a picture book just published, which is called the first of its kind. Its perforated pages may be detached and placed in a typewriter, so a child can spell out under each picture the names of the characters or animals and the action portrayed.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0089.xml
article
49
49
[no value]
[no value]
SWIMMER'S LIFE LINE IS WORN ON WRIST
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WORN on the wrist or belt, a new. lifesaving appliance aids in the rescue of a swimmer in distress. The device consists of a cork float and handle, a coil of light but tough cord, and an aluminum receptacle. If the bather feels himself sinking, he pulls the float from its cup at the instant of calling for help.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0090.xml
article
49
49
[no value]
[no value]
TIMING CONTROL DIALS RADIO FOR YOU
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INVENTED by a California woman, a new timing control enables a radio fan to select his evening’s entertainment in advance and enjoy it without twisting dials. He has merely to punch a selector web, just as a conductor punches a transfer, selecting the time and the station desired.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0091.xml
article
50
50,51,111
[no value]
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How Moon and Sun Generate the TIDES
RUBBER BANDS, A BALLOON, AND A GOLF BALL SHOW. . .
JUPITER'S ATTRACTION SPOILS METEOR SHOW
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GAYLORD JOHNSON
IF YOU ask a school boy what causes the tide in the ocean he will tell you, “The moon, of course! The attraction of the moon pulls the water of the oceans toward it. The attraction of gravity heaps up the water on the side of the earth toward the moon and so the tide rises as the waters pile up.” That is about all that the boy’s knowledge covers.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0092.xml
article
52
52
[no value]
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FLASH LIGHTS PLAY MARIMBA
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HOLDING flash lights instead of hammers in his hands, Dr. Phillips Thomas, Westinghouse research engineer, recently demonstrated a new type of musical instrument that can be played with beams of light. The instrument, a special marimba, has been fitted with sixty-eight electric eyes and amplifying tubes.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0093.xml
article
52
52
[no value]
[no value]
SMELL METER TESTS PURITY OF WATER
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FAR more rapid than any known method of chemical analysis, for detecting impurities in drinking water, is a new “smell meter” developed by Harvard University experts and illustrated above. Consisting of an air pump with a mercury piston, it first is filled with pure air.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0094.xml
article
52
52
[no value]
[no value]
NEW TYPE BARN IS FIREPROOF
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DECLARED the first of its kind, an experimental barn, built by an association of brick manufacturers, is undergoing tests near Burlington, N. J. Because of the new type of brick construction used, no supporting forms were required in its erection.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0095.xml
article
52
52
[no value]
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IMPROVED CLAMPS HOLD HARNESS FOR SEWING
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To AID farmers in repairing their harness, an inexpensive and practical substitute for the old-fashioned stitching horse has been invented by Prof. L. M. Roehl, of the Cornell University Department of Agricultural Engineering.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0096.xml
article
52
52
[no value]
[no value]
VANES ON MAST KEEP GLIDER LEVEL
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SUCCESSFUL in its first test flights, a glider with an unconventional stabilizing device has been introduced by a French inventor. The stabilizer, carried on a mast above the wing, is used to correct any tendency to pitch forward or side-slip in flight.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0097.xml
article
53
53
[no value]
[no value]
NEON LIGHTS ON RADIO MAST WARN FLYERS
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To FORESTALL an aerial accident such as recently cost ten lives in Belgium, when an air liner collided with a tall radio mast, the towers of the broadcasting station at Rugby, England, are being equipped with neon danger signs. The glow of the tubes, shown in the photograph below, will warn airmen to fly high over the station.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0098.xml
article
53
53
[no value]
[no value]
TRUCK AND TRAILER HAVE 24 WHEELS
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VIEW'ED from the front, a new truck introduced by a British manufacturer, appears to be all wheels. Twenty-four, in all, support the truck itself and the two trailer sections with which it is furnished, enabling the remarkable vehicle to maneuver with ease over rough and seldom-traveled routes.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0099.xml
article
53
53
[no value]
[no value]
CHEMICALS NOW REPLACE HOT IRON IN BRANDING CATTLE
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BRANDING cattle with the mark of their owner has been made more humane by the introduction of a chemical compound that takes the place of a hot iron. A cold tool is dipped in the chemical and applied to the animal’s hide. Within a few days the powerful compound painlessly eats away the hair and turns the red skin to white, leaving a permanent and indelible identification mark.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0100.xml
article
53
53
[no value]
[no value]
METAL COLLAR SUPPORTS CAR DRIVER’S HEAD
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LONG-DISTANCE drives are made less arduous for the motorist, according to a Cincinnati, Ohio, inventor, by a shockabsorbing headrest that he has devised. A hinged metal collar lined with soft material snaps about the neck of the driver, supporting his chin and the back of his head upon his shoulders through spring arms.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0101.xml
article
53
53
[no value]
[no value]
METER ON STILTS GAGES RAIN ON MOUNTAIN TOP
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SET high on stilts to clear the accumulation of drifts that might otherwise bury them, pot-shaped contrivances, like the one illustrated above, serve to measure the fall of rain and snow in the Swiss Alps. Every two months an observer makes the rounds on skis to note the precipitation that they record.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0102.xml
article
54
54
[no value]
[no value]
MAN ENTERS WHALE TO TAKE IT TO PIECES
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WHEN a giant whale was recently moved from its accustomed place in a British museum to a new location, an attendant was called upon to play the role of a modern Jonah. Entering the cavernous interior of the monster, as shown above, he aided in disassembling the massive bones of the skeleton from their mounting.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0103.xml
article
54
54
[no value]
[no value]
MAPLE-SEED CHUTES DELIVER AIR MAIL
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WATCHING the seeds of a maple tree spiral gently to earth, Kennet J. Girdwood, of Bethlehem, Pa., saw the possibility of copying these natural parachutes for practical use. In consequence, he has just received a patent upon a revolving parachute for dropping letters and small packages from speeding planes.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0104.xml
article
54
54
[no value]
[no value]
USE AMERICA'S WORST ROAD TO TEST CARS
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To DETROIT, Mich., goes the dubious distinction of possessing what is called the worst road in America. Just completed by a motor car maker for testing new models, it appears innocent enough when viewed from a distance, as in the picture at left; but a ride upon it represents a motorist’s nightmare.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0105.xml
article
54
54
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[no value]
LAKE SHELTERS MILLION DUCKS
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BLOTTING out the sun with their wings, wild ducks fill the air at a private sanctuary maintained by George H. Wilcox, Arkansas bird lover. More than a million, he estimates, visit a lake on his property near Stuttgart during the winter.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0106.xml
article
55
55
[no value]
[no value]
GLASS-SIDED TRUCKS REAL SHOW WINDOWS
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BY MOVING merchandise over the highways in glass-walled trucks, manufacturers and dealers have found a new way to advertise their products. The vehicles serve as show windows on wheels and draw the eyes of passers-by to their contents, which are attractively displayed.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0107.xml
article
55
55
[no value]
[no value]
BUTTERFLY MAP OF WORLD AIDS FLYERS
USE LOOPS OF SPRING METAL IN NEW HAND EXERCISER
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BY BENDING a strip of spring metal into a series of loops, and attaching a pair of leather grips to the ends, a British inventor has produced a simple hand exerciser for golfers, tennis players, and musicians. When the user squeezes and relaxes the fingers of the hand holding the device, as shown at right, the muscles are said to be strengthened.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0108.xml
article
55
55
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SNAILS NOW GROWN ON GERMAN FARM
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A SNAIL farm not far from Berlin, Germany,lays claim to being the only place outside France where these land-going mollusks are raised for food. Bushels of the shell-covered creatures are shipped from this establishment to German and French markets, where they are considered a table delicacy.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0109.xml
article
55
55
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PUBLIC ADDRESS SYSTEM USES WALL SOCKETS
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WHEN the transmitter of a new public address system is plugged into the nearest wall socket, as shown in the upper view, a standard radio receiver and loudspeaker connected to any other socket in the building will reproduce a speaker’s voice.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0110.xml
article
56
56,57,109
[no value]
[no value]
Home Tests REVEAL STARANGE NATURE OF Sulphur
PRINT PAPER MADE OF OLD TELEPHONE BOOKS
NIGHT AIR RICH IN RADIOACTIVE MATTER
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[no value]
Raymond B. Wailes
IT IS surprising what exciting and mystifying experiments can be performed with a few cents worth of sulphur. Like oxygen, sulphur is a particularly active element. In fact, it combines with many substances so eagerly that intense light and heat accompany the reactions.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0111.xml
article
58
58,59
[no value]
[no value]
Useful Inventions For THE Household
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0112.xml
article
60
60
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Myriad Dots of Light Give New Television
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MYRIADS of tiny twinkling electric arcs build up a picture on a screen, in a new type of television receiver now under experimental development for home and theater use. Described for the first time in this magazine, it aims to produce an image brilliant enough to be projected upon a screen of virtually unlimited dimensions, for parlor or public entertainment.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0113.xml
article
61
61
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[no value]
New Battery for Two-Volt Set
REVOLUTIONARY METHOD OF CONSTRUCTION CUTS COST TO ONE CENT AN HOUR
Emergency Repair of Audio Transformer
Pilot Lights Detect Transmitter Trouble
Novel Short-Wave Tuning Eever
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DESIGNED to operate for 400 hours at less than one cent an hour, the battery, shown in the illustrations at right, forms a new type of filament supply for two-volt receivers. Resembling a large size B battery in outward appearance, this fifteen-pound dry unit is rigidly constructed and supplied in a sturdy case.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0114.xml
article
62
62,63,114
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[no value]
Short-Wave Receiver
TO TAKE WITH YOU ON TRIPS
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THERE is no need to give up your short-wave hobby when you are away from home. The midget, eight-pound receiver illustrated operates on direct as well as alternating current and will give you clear, loudspeaker reception wherever 110 volts are available.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0115.xml
article
64
64,115
[no value]
[no value]
Hunting Your Car’s Caster
HUNTING YOUR CAR'S CASTER AND CAMBER
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MARTIN BUNN
GUS WILSON’S annual visit to his upstate relatives had a way of developing into a busman’s holiday. On this particular trip, his hopes for a workless vacation were shattered the second morning of his stay. This time it was Bill, his eldest nephew, who upset his plans for a week of rest.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0116.xml
article
64
64
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT AILED STEFFINS’ GAR?
Announcing the Prize Winner
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IN the January issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, Martin Bunn described the troubles Fred Steffins, one of Gus Wilson’s customers, was having with his car. A prize of twentyfive dollars was offered for the best letter explaining the difficulty and telling how it could be remedied.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0117.xml
article
65
65,66
[no value]
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Artificial Marble Novelties
THE HOME WORKSHOP
TURNED IN LATHE LIKE WOOD
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E.G. Livingston
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0118.xml
article
67
67
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Earth-to-Mars Rocket Plane
A New Stunt for Model Makers... Building a Miniature
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Donald W. Clark
INTERPLANETARY rocket planes, although actually far in the future, are now familiar to everyone because of constant reference to them in radio and comic-strip adventure stories. No one knows what these strange aircraft will look like, but there is no reason why the model maker should not delve into the future a bit on his own account.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0119.xml
article
68
68
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LIGHT FOLDING CAKE STAND EASILY CARRIED AROUND
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RAYMOND S. FORBES
HERE is an extremely useful and attractive piece of furniture that any amateur craftsman can make. The choice of wood will be largely influenced by the other furniture in the room and is, therefore, entirely a personal matter. The parts required (finished sizes) are two uprights 3/4 by 3/4 by 34 in., one top rail or handle 3/4 by 21/2 by 11 in., one bottom rail 3/4 by 3/4 by 11 in., two feet 3/4 by 21/2 by 9 in., one back stay 1/2 by 3/4 by 28 in., and three tiers 5/8 by 91/2 by 91/2 in.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0120.xml
article
68
68
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GREASELESS LUBRICANT USED LIKE PENCIL
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JOHN C. WORKLEY
You will find many uses around the home, shop, and garage for a lubricating pencil made of finely powdered graphite and beeswax. A thin coating of the graphite-carrying wax rubbed on the latches of automobile doors will make them work smoothly, yet will not come off on clothing.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0121.xml
article
68
68
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CONVENIENT HANDLE FOR STEEL SCALE
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F. W. B.
A TEN-CENT holder for old razor blades forms a convenient handle for the light steel scales used by mechanics for laying out and measuring small work. It can be fastened securely to the rule without marring or bending it, and with it the scale is., easily laid against the work for measuring and scribing.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0122.xml
article
68
68
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MODEL ANCHOR CHAINS
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DALE W. BRAHAM
ANCHOR chains for ship models can be made from copper wire of an appropriate size. Bend a number of rings around a match stick or other form, fit them together, and hold the chain over a burning match to COLOR.-DALE W. BRAHAM.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0123.xml
article
69
69,100,101
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THE HOMEWORKSHOP GUILD MOVES FAST
WHAT IS Your Club DOING?
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Latest News from National Headq uarters Many More Clubs Formed Hardware Dealers Help Recent Club Activities AS THE new home workshop club movement gains momentum, club after club is reporting its organization to the headquarters of the National Homeworkshop Guild in Rockford, Ill., and applying for a local charter.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0124.xml
article
70
70,71,102,103
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Making Mast and Spars for the HARTFORD Model
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E. Armitage McCann
OUR model of the sloop-of-war Hartford, Admiral Farragut’s famous ship, has now advanced far enough for us to make the spars and begin the rigging. New readers who wish to build this model, which is the finest of all those I have designed for POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, should refer to the three installments previously published (P.S.M., Jan. ’34, p. 57, Feb. p. 66, and Mar. p. 71.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0125.xml
article
72
72,78,79,80,81
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How to Improve Your PHOTOGRAPHS by using a set of Color Filters
COLORING NEW PUTTY
EASILY MADE BOXES FOR MICROSCOPE SLIDES
FIREPLACE LOG CHEST HAS OUTSIDE DOOR
REUPHOLSTERING OLD CAR
BELLOWS SHIELD AIDS IN AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY
ANTIQUE BOTTLE HOLDS GROWING IVY PLANT
SANDPAPER BLOCK FOR RABBETED EDGES
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THE introduction of panchromatic roll film and film packs opens up absorbingly interesting photographic fields to the amateur camera enthusiast. All sorts of effects formerly possible only with professional equipment are now at the command of anyone owning the simplest type of hand camera.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0126.xml
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73
73
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0127.xml
article
74
74
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Ingenious Ideas FOR CAR OWNERS
Our Readers Furnish New Suggestions For Handy Repairs and Improvements
Trouble-Lamp Plug From Old Bulb Base
Repairing Headlights
Spark-Plug Tester
Sponge-Rubber Mat
Tool to Grip End of Broken Axle
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WHEN a car window is shattered, it is sometimes a week or more before a new glass can be obtained and installed. A temporary repair, however, can be made with heavy cardboard and a large piece of sheet celluloid of the type sold in auto supply stores for repairing side curtains. Trim the cardboard to the full width of the window opening, leaving about three inches to spare in the length. Then cut the opening for the window and stitch the celluloid in place with heavy thread. The makeshift window finally can be installed by inserting the bottom edge in the regular opening in the door, (see illustration), lifting it until the top edge fits snugly in the felt groove at the top of the frame, and jamming two wood or rubber wedges between the cardboard and the frame along the bottom edge on the inside to hold it in place.-J.Z.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0128.xml
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75
75
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Goodrich Rubber Co: Silvertow
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Goodrich Rubber Co
Silvertow
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0129.xml
article
76
76,86,87,89
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How to Light Your Miniature Stage
HOW TO LIGHT YOUR MINIATURE STAGE
DRILLING THIN STOCK
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Benjamin W. Hicks
TO achieve the most realistic effect with any miniature stage, you should install lighting equipment similar to that used on a regular stage. Complete control of the light is essential, and each circuit should be provided with separate dimmers or rheostats.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0130.xml
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77
77
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Advertisement: OLDSMOBILE
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OLDSMOBILE
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0131.xml
advertisement
78
78
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FOLMER GRAFLEX CORP.: GRAFLEX
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FOLMER GRAFLEX CORP.
GRAFLEX
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0132.xml
advertisement
79
79
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ROYAL TYPEWRITER COMPANY, INC.
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ROYAL TYPEWRITER COMPANY, INC.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0133.xml
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80
80
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0134.xml
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81
81
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0135.xml
article
82
82
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Wood Submachine Gun Shoots Rubber Bands When Handle Is Turned
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GEORGE PLUNGAS
THIS submachine gun for children shoots rubber bands about 21/2 in. in diameter cut from old inner tubes. The width of the bands depends upon the strength of the child. Those shown are quite wide and fly with surprising force. Thinner bands are easier to load and safer.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0136.xml
article
82
82
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JIG-SAWED LAMP AND SHADE
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ORNAMENTAL lamps of many types may be made by the owner of a motor-driven jig saw. A sample of such a lamp is shown in the accompanying photographs and drawings. It was designed and constructed by Robert Putzer, of Oshkosh, Wis., and won a prize in our last jig-sawing contest.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0137.xml
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82
82
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NICHOLSON FILES
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NICHOLSON FILES
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0138.xml
article
83
83
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HOW TO CUT HEAVY WIRE INTO SHORT PIECES
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H. MOORE
WIRE that is too heavy to be cut by pliers can be handled conveniently in the manner illustrated above. Take a square block of hardened steel with sharp corners, tighten the end of a scale in a small clamp, and grip both together in the vise. Have the end of the scale in line with the corner of the block.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0139.xml
article
83
83
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A QUICK-ACTING CATCH FOR CELLAR WINDOW
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BRADFORD CHENEY
Coat hook used as a cellar window catch THE automatic cellar window catch illustrated, which is made from an ordinary wire coat hook, is an improvement over the usual hook and eye and other homemade wire fasteners used for this purpose.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0140.xml
article
83
83
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MULTIPLE HOLDER KEEPS SMALL BRUSHES CLEAN
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G. D. GIRARDET, JR.
FOR cleaning or keeping soft the type of artist’s brushes used in painting ship models and other small work, I use the glass tubes in which certain toothbrushes are sold. Common test tubes would do as well. The tubes stand upright in holes in a block of wood.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0141.xml
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83
83
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MUTUAL - COOPERATIVE
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MUTUAL - COOPERATIVE
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0142.xml
advertisement
84
84
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Remington Arms Co., Inc.: KLEANBORE
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Remington Arms Co., Inc.
KLEANBORE
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0143.xml
article
84
84
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REMOVING A TIGHT MILLING ARBOR
CENTER FINDER FOR LATHE
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THE ordinary method of removing stuck milling arbors is to drive them out with a heavy rod; but if an arbor has been in a long time and has rusted a little, it is sometimes next to impossible to get it out without battering the tang and otherwise injuring it.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0144.xml
article
85
85
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CARVING SMALL BOATS FOR SHIP MODELS
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SMALL boats for ship models are usually carved from a solid block. Better results can be obtained with less chance of splitting the ends by the method illustrated. I have a 2 1/2 in. whaleboat that was carved from white pine to less than 1/16 in.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0145.xml
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85
85
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P. Lorillard Co., Inc.
[no value]
P. Lorillard Co., Inc.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0146.xml
advertisement
86
86
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SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.: Smooth-On
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SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
Smooth-On
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0147.xml
advertisement
87
87
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N. Y. Canadian Carborundum Co.
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N. Y. Canadian Carborundum Co.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0148.xml
advertisement
88
88
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THE CASEIN MFG.,CO.,OF AMERICA, INC.: CASCO
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THE CASEIN MFG.,CO.,OF AMERICA, INC.
CASCO
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0149.xml
article
88
88
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Our BLUEPRINTS
A good time to BUILD a BOAT
Flying Airplane Models
Boats
Furniture
Will Help You spend time profitably
Radio Sets
Ship and Coach Models
Miscellaneous
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TO ASSIST you in your home workshop, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY offers large blueprints containing working drawings of a number of well-tested projects. The blueprints are 15 by 22 in. and are sold for 25 cents a single sheet (except in a few special cases).
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0150.xml
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89
89
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Ironized Yeast Co.: SKINNY
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Ironized Yeast Co.
SKINNY
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0151.xml
article
90
90
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Graceful Candlestick Forged at Low Cost from Band Iron
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KENDALL FORD
THE use of candles has increased to a great extent during the past few years. While in no way supplanting our modern illuminating systems, they seem to provide just the right atmosphere for intimate, informal gatherings and dinners.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0152.xml
article
90
90
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AFTER-DINNER SERVER FOR CIGARETTES
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DICK HUTCHINSON
A CIGARETTE server of distinctive design with four separate ash trays may be easily made from 18-gage soft sheet copper. All the pieces are hammered on one side before being bent. The trays are hammered flat, and are bent to shape over a wooden block, which is held in the vise as shown.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0153.xml
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91
91
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0154.xml
advertisement
92
92
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PLASTIC WOOD
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PLASTIC WOOD
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0155.xml
article
92
92,93
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LOG-CABIN Bird Houses
Easily Built from Scrap Lumber
HOW TO DESIGN A HOUSE TO SUIT ANY BIRD
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Herman Hjorth
CHILDREN—and grown-ups, too—get much enjoyment and satisfaction from observing birds and listening to their cheerful songs. There is no better way to entice birds to build nests nearby than to provide comfortable boxes or houses for them.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0156.xml
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93
93
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0157.xml
article
94
94
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Miniature IGLOO
CONCEALS PASTE POT
LACQUER BRUSHES KEPT CLEAN WITH ACETONE
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THIS desk ornament—a model of an Eskimo’s snow igloo on an ice cake— houses a paste pot, while the paddle on the kayak serves as a letter opener. The base of the miniature is a piece of 1/2 in. plywood with an elliptical front edge. Bore a shallow depression to fit the paste jar.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0158.xml
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94
94
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Rutland Fire Clay Co.
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Rutland Fire Clay Co.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0159.xml
advertisement
94
94
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Clemson Bros. INC.: CUTS METAL
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Clemson Bros. INC.
CUTS METAL
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0160.xml
article
95
95
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Simple Microscope Lamp Gives Wide Range of Light
METAL DECORATED WITH FUSED GROUND GLASS
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H. J. SEXTON
K. M
AN EFFECTIVE microscope lamp, which has an adjustment for various light intensities and a choice of numerous light apertures and several color filters, can be built from the base of a burned-out radio tube, a metal socket for the tube, an adjustable carbon resistance, a 10-volt bell-ringing transformer, a 6.3-volt radio panel-lighting bulb, a screw base for this lamp, a piece of transparent celluloid, small strips of variously colored cellophane, a piece of 1/16-in.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0161.xml
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95
95
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Buttner Pipe Corporation: BUTTNER
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Buttner Pipe Corporation
BUTTNER
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0162.xml
article
96
96,97
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Construction Kits
No Time Wasted When You Use Our
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"I NOTE that you list a number of blueprints for ship models. Making a ship model is a hobby that would appeal to me, but I do not know which one to try first. What do you recommend?" This is one of innumerable similar questions asked by readers.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0163.xml
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96
96
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Advertisement: DRYBAK
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DRYBAK
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0164.xml
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96
96
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HAMILTON SPECIALTY COMPANY: “AIR SCOUT”
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HAMILTON SPECIALTY COMPANY
“AIR SCOUT”
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0165.xml
advertisement
97
97
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0166.xml
advertisement
97
97
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Advertisement: Glostora
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Glostora
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0167.xml
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98
98
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Advertisement: WILLIAM DIXON INCORPORATED
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WILLIAM DIXON INCORPORATED
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0168.xml
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98
98
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Model Ship Supply Co.
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Model Ship Supply Co.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0169.xml
advertisement
98
98
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Mead CYCLE COMPANY
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Mead CYCLE COMPANY
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0170.xml
article
98
98
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BUILDING TRESTLE FOR MODEL RAILWAY
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J. W. CLEMENT
EVERY miniature railroad needs at least one bridge on the system. As our road is in the pioneer stage of construction, the old-fashioned pile trestle will probably be the best type to start with. True, these structures are obsolete on an up-to-date main line, but they make a model more picturesque and will be entirely appropriate on a branch line or “mountain division.” Dowel sticks are the most popular material for the piling, but a more realistic effect may be obtained if small, straight willow branches are used.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0171.xml
article
98
98
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A SAFE WAY TO WIRE MODEL SWITCHES
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LEONARD BLAND
Ox MY model railway system a number of accidents occurred at one of the switches, and finally a car was ruined. I _ then installed the wiring shown in the = accompanying diagram. This is an ec_ onomical method of preventing accidents and adds realism to the track layout.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0172.xml
article
98
98
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RUBBER BANDS REPLACE SCREEN-DOOR SPRING
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R. R. RUNDELL
A GOOD substitute for a long coiled screendoor spring can be made from several large rubber bands cut from heavy tire inner tube, looped together end to end. The rubber bands should be at least or in. wide. One end, of course, is secured to the screw eye or hook in the door, and the other to the door casing.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0173.xml
article
99
99
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MAGNETIC COUPLER FOR MODEL SWITCH ENGINE
MODEL PULLMAN SEATS MADE IN ONE PIECE
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A MODEL switch engine built by the writer has, as a novel feature, magnetic couplers which operate automatically. Such couplers will not, of course, handle heavy trains, but switching operations may be carried on in a realistic manner with single cars, or with two cars coupled together.
PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0174.xml
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99
99
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0175.xml
advertisement
100
100
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Henry Disston & Sons, Inc.
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Henry Disston & Sons, Inc.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0176.xml
advertisement
100
100
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0177.xml
advertisement
101
101
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0178.xml
advertisement
101
101
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United States Rubber Company
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United States Rubber Company
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0179.xml
advertisement
102
102
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0180.xml
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103
103
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WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.
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WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0181.xml
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103
103
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Craftsman Wood Service Company
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Craftsman Wood Service Company
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0182.xml
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103
103
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HAMMARLUND MFG. CO.
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HAMMARLUND MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0183.xml
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103
103
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0184.xml
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104
104
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BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL CO.
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BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL CO.
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0185.xml
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104
104
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0186.xml
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105
105
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0187.xml
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105
105
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19340401_0124_004_0188.xml
article
106
106,107,108
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Secrets of Success
STORIES THAT WILL HELP YOU GET AHEAD
STREET SIGN INVENTION PAID COLLEGE EXPENSES
RUSTY STOVE PUT HIM BACK ON HIS FEET
Cash Prizes
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WHEN Eugene Swold graduated from high school he lacked capital, was blessed with no influential friends or relatives, and had no omnipotent political pull. Like so many others, he ambitiously set about to find a job, hoping to earn money that he might enter a small college near his home the following Fall.
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