Issue: 19330701

Saturday, July 1, 1933
JULY,1933
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Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0001.xml
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THE TEXAS COMPANY
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THE TEXAS COMPANY
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0002.xml
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Ethyl Gasoline Corporation
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Ethyl Gasoline Corporation
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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TABLE of CONTENTS for JULY, 1933
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0004.xml
masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0005.xml
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0006.xml
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HOTEL Book-Cadillar
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HOTEL Book-Cadillar
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0007.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0008.xml
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SIMONIZ
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SIMONIZ
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0009.xml
article
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Our Readers Say
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Our Readers Say
He Gets a Real Kick Out of His Photomicrography
Glue Maker Has Some Real Inside Information
He Learned About English From the Talking Pictures
Nifty Little Experiment With a Rusty Old Nail
Coldwater Reader Seeks Information on Freezing
Maybe This Reader Has Made a Discovery
Shoot the Chutes for Life From a Burning Building
Your Ferris Wheel Bug Must Be Getting Dizzy
But Who Can Tell Us Where Niagara Started?
Earthquake as War Weapon Is a Brand-New Idea
Will Anything Dissolve Hot Water Sediment?
Raising Tropical Fish Described in June Issue
Not a Pipe Dream But There's Smoke in It
This Fresh-Water Diver Made His Own Helmet
What! More Aviation.?
Is this Merely a Slam at The Heroic Babe Ruth?
Here's a Gigantic “If"
What Next? This Man Wants Us To Start An Art School
We Have Printed “A, B, C" Articles on Both Subjects
Hind-Leg-First Mosquitos Prove Unwelcome Guests
Knockers Have Their Place In the Scheme of Things
His Scientific Interest Invades Electric Chair
Water Freezes, Ice Floats, And They Weigh the Same
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YOUR article on making photomicrographs guided me in taking several such pictures in my cellar laboratory. Simple Cramer 4 by 5-inch contrast plates were used, giving a one half second exposure with the microscope condenser in place. The enlargement, when figured for eye observation, was 160 times linear.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0010.xml
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Pontiac
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Pontiac
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0011.xml
article
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WORLD’S FIRST Steam-Driven Airplane
Successful Flights with Long-Sought Craft Crown Many Similar Attempts by Early Aviation Engineers
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H.J. Fitz Gerald
OVER the Oakland, Calif., Airport, a few days ago, a silent plane slanted across the sky trailing a thin ribbon of white vapor. Spectators heard the pilot shout a greeting from the air. They saw him flash past, skimming the ground at a hundred miles an hour.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0012.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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BOY RIDES TOY SEAPLANE POWERED BY GASOLINE MOTOR
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DOING everything but fly, a model seaplane provides aquatic sport for the young son of a British craftsman, who made the machine in his own workshop. The craft skims across the water on its pontoons at a speed of about twelve miles an hour, under the power of a midget gasoline motor and an air propeller.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0013.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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FIFTH WHEEL MAKES TIRE TESTS SAFE
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SEEKING a blowout-proof racing tire, a manufacturer recently staged high-speed road trials on the Indianapolis Speedway. Samples of tires to be tested were placed, one after another, on the right rear wheel of a racing car — usually the first to show wear on this course because of its counter-clockwise turns.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0014.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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WALLBOARD INSULATED WITH ALUMINUM SHEATH
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ALUMINUM, covering one side of a new wallboard, is expected to improve its heat-insulating quality. The polished metal stops summer heat by reflecting it back as a mirror does light, while in winter it diminishes heat loss by radiation. The metal sheath has been partially detached, in the photograph above, to show core of gypsum board.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0015.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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WIRES SLICE OFF PLASTER CAST WITHOUT HURTING PATIENT
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WHEN his wife had to be put in a plaster cast following an automobile injury, W. K. Kearsley, research engineer of Schenectady, N. Y., received permission from a doctor to try out a new way of removing such a cast. He had been informed that this was a necessarily trying task, requiring the cast to be softened with vinegar and then chipped or cut away with heavy cutting pliers or saws.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0016.xml
article
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AVIATION
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MAIL IN PLANE’S FALSE NOSE
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THOUGH it looks as if it carried a balloon at its nose, the airplane pictured above actually owes its odd appearance to an innovation in the arrangement of cargo space. To give the ten passengers more room in the cabin, the mail compartment is placed at the forward end of the fuselage, ahead of the pilot and propellers.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0017.xml
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AVIATION
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TAKE PICTURES OF VOLCANO AS LAVA SCORCHES PLANE
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SKIMMING SO close that molten lava spattered the wings of their plane, a daring pilot and photographer risked their lives, not long ago, to make close-up pictures of the East Indian island volcano Krakatoa in full eruption. While other cameramen were content to remain at a safe distance in a boat, these two flyers, repeatedly banking their craft in the nick of time to escape the fiery column, obtained fine views of the outburst, which continued with unabated fury for forty-eight hours.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0018.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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FLASHLIGHT IS A TELESCOPE
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MANY useful implements for campers and hikers are combined in a new convertible flashlight. By rearranging its parts, it is readily transformed into a telescope, a candle lamp, a magnifying glass, or a burning glass. The case contains a waterproof first-aid kit in addition to two standard dry cells.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0019.xml
article
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ENGINEERING
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BRIDGE FOUNDATION DUG WITH COMPRESSED AIR
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HUGE “sausages” of clay, weighing as much as three tons apiece, are hurled to the surface from subterranean depths by compressed air, in a new method of excavating for bridge foundations. A steel cylinder, four feet in diameter, with a cutting edge on the bottom, is first sunk in the ground.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0020.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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ROCKING-HORSE TRAINS BRITISH RIDERS
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MOUNTED on rocking-horses, recruits of the British cavalry are now receiving preliminary training in horsemanship. At the Army Equestrian School, at Weedon, England, the wooden horses were recently installed to give rookies the feel of the saddle and practice in mounting and dismounting before they tackle the spirited animals stabled at the school.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0021.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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NEW AUTO LIGHT WARNS OF IGNITION TROUBLE
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A NEW pilot lamp, attached to a car’s dashboard by a screw bracket, warns a motorist instantly of any trouble in the ignition system. So long as the coil and spark plugs are working properly, the window of the indicator, illustrated in circle, is illuminated by a red neon light.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0022.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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ROBOT GUIDES SUBWAY RIDER IN LONDON
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TWIRLING a dial helps subway riders find their way, at a self-service information booth just opened in London, England. To inquire how to reach any point in the city, the traveler sets the dial according to a printed list of instructions.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0023.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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EAR TUBES FOR PHONE MAKE WORDS DISTINCT
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PERSONS hard of hearing, who have difficulty in carrying on a telephone conversation, are said to be aided by the new set illustrated above. When answering a call, the user places a receiver of conventional design (at right of photo) upon the base of an instrument resembling a physicians’s stethoscope.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0024.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Paris Plans 2,300-Foot Tower
Tallest Structure Ever Built by Man Has Been Designed for World Exhibition in 1937—Motor Cars to Climb It to 1,600-Foot Level—Its Beacon Visible 120 Miles
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SET the Eiffel Tower on top of the Empire State Building, and you will have a structure approaching the dimensions of a skyscraper that is planned in France. This mighty shaft of reinforced concrete, to be known as the "World Tower," will be 2,300 feet high.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0025.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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Drives Midget Car Right Through Doorway
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WHEN he reaches the scene of an indoor spraying job, one British contractor does not leave his car parked outside, but drives right in through the doorway! His midget auto was fashioned from the chassis of a standard make of small car, which was remodeled to even more diminutive size so that it would pass through an aperture only twenty-eight inches wide.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0026.xml
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AVIATION
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RUSSIAN BALLOON TO INVADE STRATOSPHERE
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A NEW challenge to the ten-mile altitude record of Prof. Auguste Piccard, made last summer in a globe hermetically sealed and carried aloft by a huge balloon, is offered by Russian scientists, who plan a similar ascent next month. Their balloon is being rushed to completion for the attempt, and an air-tight cabin is being built that will protect the flyers from lack of oxygen and reduced air pressure.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0027.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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PENCIL TRACES GARDEN LABELS ON COPPER
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LETTERING traced with a sharp-pointed pencil upon a new plant label for the garden will withstand indefinite exposure to the elements, according to the maker. The label is faced with a thin sheet of copper, backed with cardboard. Writing indented in the soft metal by the pencil point, in the manner shown above, is preserved long after the lead marks themselves are effaced.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0028.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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BOTTLES HOLDING SHIPS ARE LOCKED TOGETHER
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PUTTING a ship model in a bottle is not sufficiently difficult to suit Charles V. Nielsen, expert model maker of Hasbrouck Heights, N. J., so he has devised the remarkable ornament pictured at left. Twin ships in bottles are joined by a stick that bears two pegs at each end, preventing its withdrawal from either bottle neck.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0029.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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BULL'S-EYE FENCE POSTS GUARD BRITISH ROADS
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BULL’S-EYE fence posts safeguard night drivers against running off the road at dangerous curves of a highway near London, England. Red reflectors, resembling the individual danger markers used in this country, are sunk in the white posts and are brilliantly illuminated by the headlamps of an oncoming car.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0030.xml
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Model Railway Looks Like Real Thing
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PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0031.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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HOTEL GUEST SELECTS ROOM FROM PHOTOS
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THROUGH a system just introduced in a Pittsburgh, Pa., hotel, a prospective guest sees just what his room will look like before he is taken to it by the bell boy. On each side of the registering desk, photographs of the available rooms are displayed on a vertical board.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0032.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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BIGGEST DIAL THERMOMETER IS ON ROOF
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MOUNTED on the roof of a high building at Rochester, N. Y., the world's largest dial thermometer tells the temperature to observers blocks away. The face of the giant instrument is taller than a man, and a revolving indicator, painted white, points to figures a foot high.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0033.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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MICROPHONES CONTROLLED BY WIRES
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MICROPHONES controlled by wires, like the characters of a marionette show, simplify broadcasting from a radio station at Cleveland, Ohio. The operator in the control room manipulates switches to move the microphones toward any part of the studio, in order to pick up sounds from individual actors or musicians.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0034.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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EXPERTS WATCH FLAME IN MOTOR'S CYLINDER
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To STUDY the manner in which flame spreads through a cylinder of a car’s motor when the spark plug ignites the fuel mixture, experts of the U. S. Bureau of Standards have constructed a special cylinder equipped with windows, as shown above. Thirty-one symmetrically-spaced apertures in the top of the head permit the time of arrival of the flame at each point to be observed.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0035.xml
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Find Fortunes in American Gems
Latest Devices Aid Jewel Hunters in Their Search
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ACCUSTOMED to exotic jewels— South African diamonds, Burmese rubies, Siamese sapphires—few people realize that fortunes await the gem hunter in the deserts and mountains of the western United States. Here modern prospectors, aided by the latest in labor-saving tools, are satisfying the current vogue for stones that owe their popularity more to their beauty than to excessive cost due to scarcity.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0036.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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NEW MICROSCOPE FOR AMATEURS
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ESPECIALLY designed for the amateur who cannot afford an expensive instrument, a new microscope, introduced by a well-known optical firm, fulfills all needs at low cost. The instrument magnifies 100 diameters, and is provided with rack-and-pinion focusing and removable mirror.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0037.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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ENDLESS COIL SPRING USED TO PUMP WATER
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PICKING up a coil-spring curtain rod that had fallen into his bathtub. C. P. Frederick, of Seattle, Wash., was surprised at the amount of water that clung to the coils. The observation led him to design a new form of pump to raise water—an endless coil spring, running over a pair of pulleys, that dips in water at its lower end and throws it off into a collector at the top.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0038.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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PISTON RING FILE HELD TO CYLINDER HEAD
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COUNTLESS steps between the bench and the job are saved by a new piston ring file, that clamps directly to stud or cap screw in the cylinder head. The ring is held against a V-shaped plate and moved back and forth along a guide, while fingers press the ends against the file, as shown above.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0039.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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WALKING CANE IS ALSO A FISH POLE
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A CANE that turns into a fish pole, as demonstrated above, permits a fisherman to try his luck whenever he encounters a promising stream. Telescopic fiber sections join to form a hollow shaft, through which the line is threaded from a detachable reel.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0040.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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HEAT RUNS THIS TINY ENGINE
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BY HARNESSING the kick of a diminutive metal disk that snaps into convex shape when heated and back into concave shape when cooled, Westinghouse engineers claim to have created the world’s first engine that turns heat energy directly into mechanical energy.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0041.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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Timing Camera takes 2,000 Photos a Second
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SPLITTING a second into 1,000 parts, the world’s fastest timing camera was demonstrated recently by engineers of the Electrical Research Products laboratories in New York City. It resembles in principle the cameras used to time runners at the Olympic games last summer, but it is 125 times faster.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0042.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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CROOK DEALERS FOILED BY PACKAGED MOTOR OIL
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MOTOR oil, packaged and sold in round cans, with the aid of a new-dispenser, now foils the vendor of bootleg lubricant. Sharp-pointed prongs drain the original can in the motorist’s presence. Thus he gets the brand he asked for as the can, once empty, cannot be refilled.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0043.xml
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MODELS
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MODELS AID FIGHT ON INSECT PESTS
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TO ILLUSTRATE his lectures on methods of combating insect pests, George E. Sanders, entomologist for a large New York chemical concern, has constructed enlarged models of familiar parasites. Faithfully copied from the insects as seen under a microscope, but enlarged as much as 100,000 times, they give a startling impression of realism.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0044.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Grade Cotton by Guarded Samples
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ARMED guards keep watch over a lead-lined casket in the U. S. Treasury at Washington, D. C. It holds only twenty cardboard boxes stuffed with samples of cotton—but these samples, with duplicate sets in other countries, constitute the final court of appeals for grading 25,000.000 bales of cotton that enter the world's trade every year.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0045.xml
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ENGINEERING
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ELECTRIC CABLES PUT IN “SUBWAY”
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A VERITABLE subway for electric cables, just installed in a San Francisco channel by Pacific Gas and Electric Company engineers, is expected to care for the needs of the community for a century to come. Engineers constructed two concrete sections, pierced with conduits, each 120 feet long and weighing eighty-five tons.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0046.xml
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History's Biggest Show
REVIEWS WORLD'S GREATEST CENTURY
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EDWIN TEALE
AFTER a forty-year journey through space, a reddish ray of starlight has just struck a photo-electric cell and flashed on the lights of a $25,000,000 extravaganza of science, the Century of Progress Exposition at Chicago. Islands to accommodate the show, were built in the waters of Lake Michigan.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0047.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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Tanklike Tractor Carries Welder to Repair lob
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MANEUVERABLE as a war tank, an endless-tread tractor, just developed by Westinghouse engineers, carries a built-in welding outfit right to the point where it is needed for railway repairs. The fifteen-foot machine easily ambles across rails, runs along side slopes as steep as forty-five degrees without overturning, and climbs a ramp onto a flat car when its work of repairing battered rail ends and worn crossings is done.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0048.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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EXTRA EYEGLASS LENS CLIPS TO ANY FRAME
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DESIGNED to be clipped to the frame of a pair of spectacles, a new type of lens enlarges reading matter so the use of a hand reading glass becomes unnecessary. It is roughly the size of a quarter and is held about an inch in front of the regular spectacle lens.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0049.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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COLOR OF FLAME REVEALS GAS LEAK
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GASES that leak from refrigerating plants, and other fumes difficult to detect by ordinary means, are quickly revealed by an ingenuious burner patterned after a blowtorch. The device, burning alcohol, normally has a clear blue flame. When a rubber tube on the torch is held near a gas leak, however, as shown in the photograph at the left, some of the gas is sucked through the tube to the burner and the flame changes color.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0050.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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ICE-TONG LIFTER FOR RESCUE WORK
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WORKING like ice tongs, an ingenious rescue device enables an invalid to be carried safely from a burning building. Metal loops grasp the human burden; the greater the weight, the more firmly they grip. A leather strap encircles the, rescuer's neck, leaving his hands free.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0051.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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WONDERS OF ANT LIFE SEEN IN GLASS HOME
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BETWEEN two photographic plates, held in a wooden frame, a New Hampshire naturalist placed dirt and thus constructed an anthouse with transparent walls. By this means the activity of an insect city is easily studied. The tunnels and subterranean chambers made by the ants are clearly visible and their work can be seen from each side of the glass home.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0052.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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DIME PUT IN SLOT RINGS DOORBELL
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To SAVE a busy housewife from frequent annoyance by unwelcome callers, a doorbell that works only upon the insertion of a dime is soon to be marketed. The coin slides into an inside receptacle, where it closes an electric contact that permits the bell to be rung.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0053.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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TURTLELIKE CAR BUILT OF OLD PARTS
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FROM spare auto and motorcycle parts, a Chicago mechanic has built a freak vehicle which he calls a “turtle on wheels.” The total cost, he says, was about twenty-five dollars. Made of corrugated metal, the turtle-shell body extends beyond the wheels on each side, reducing wind resistance.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0054.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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TINY MICROPHONES HELP SINGER MAKE RECORD
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MINIATURE microphones, placed on a singer’s chest and forehead, as shown above, supplement standard equipment in making electrical transcriptions at a Los Angeles, Calif., studio. By this method, the originator says, it is possible to make a record that sounds even better than the voice of the performer in person, since the small microphones pick up tones undistorted by faulty nose or mouth technique.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0055.xml
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30,31,95
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Lost Oil Fields FOUND BY MODERN MARVELS
Microscopes, airplanes, and electrical devices now used in mapping the treasure-holding domes beneath earth's surface
WIRE NETTING GUARDS TELEPHONE LINES
RARE BEETLE IS FOUND IN TENNESSEE CAVE
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STERLING GLEASON
FABULOUS treasure in the world's lost oil fields is today the goal of a new search. It is being sought by a new school of scientific detectives—men who read clues from microscopic bugs dead millions of years, or from photographs snapped from an airplane at a 10.000-foot altitude; who sound the earth with miniature electric vibrators, release migrating electric currents to explore hidden depths, measure changes of one-millionth part in the earth’s gravitational field, or follow a trail of radium to subterranean levels never before probed by man.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0056.xml
article
32
32
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Loudspeakers Page Hospital Doctors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NO TIME is lost in calling any particular physician in one of New York's big hospitals, where a new paging system has just been installed. When a telephone call for a doctor is received at the central switchboard, it is referred to an operator who, finding the doctor is in the hospital, repeats his name before a microphone.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0057.xml
article
32
32
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
SPECIMENS WHIRLED ON DISK IN MICROSCOPE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TINY cells are whirled to destruction, while powerful lenses magnify the miniature cataclysm, in a new microscope centrifuge perfected by Dr. Gustav Fassin, University of Rochester optical expert, and shown below. Specimens placed on a whirling disk within the instrument are spun at a speed of four miles a minute.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0058.xml
article
32
32
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
TINY FUSES TO GUARD DELICATE INSTRUMENTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOUSEHOLD fuses are giants compared with a series of miniature fuses recently placed on the market. The smallest of these is made of platinum wire one thirtieth the diameter of a human hair. It is so delicate it cannot be seen by the naked eye.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0059.xml
article
32
32
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
MAP COAST WITH LONG-RANGE CAMERA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ODD instrument aboard the British survey ship Challenger, which bears a party of explorers on a nine-month trip to chart the Labrador coast, looks like a foreshortened cannon. The device, shown in action at left, is known as a hydrographic camera and will aid in mapping rocks dangerous to navigation.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0060.xml
article
32
32
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW SCRAPBOOK CAN'T BULGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CLIPPINGS pasted in a scrapbook, recently put upon the market by an eastern manufacturer, do not make it bulge. Every other page is perforated so that it may be torn out as the preceding page is pasted up, as shown in the photograph at right.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0061.xml
article
33
33
AVIATION
[no value]
Blimp Carries Vertical Antenna for Radio Broadcast
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRAILING from the bottom of a baby blimp 1,500 feet in the air, a 500-foot antenna recently sent out experimental broadcasts near Pittsburgh, Pa. Engineers of Station KDKA, the pioneer radio station that first broadcast popular programs in America, recently conducted the tests to determine the effect of a long-sending aerial operating vertically to the earth instead of parallel to it, as is the case with conventional broadcasting equipment.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0062.xml
article
33
33
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
STUDY FISH WITH SUBMARINE SLEDGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO AID in surveying the plant and animal life of Lake Constance, on the German-Swiss border, scientists have devised a contrivance known as a submarine sledge. Trailed on a wire beneath a launch, the sledge scrapes along the bottom on ski-like runners and collects specimens in a net.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0063.xml
article
33
33
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
VEST POCKET THICKNESS GAGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
So COMPACT it may be tucked away readily in a vest pocket, a new gage makes the measurement of small thicknesses as easy as telling time by a watch. The jaws are opened by a wheel beneath the index finger, and close automatically over the object to be measured when the wheel is released, as shown in photo at right.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0064.xml
article
33
33
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
UNKNOWN MAYAN ARTIST CARVED BIG MONUMENT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOUR centuries or more ago, a Mayan sculptor in Guatemala laid down his tools and surveyed a stone monument he had just completed. Twice as tall as a man, it depicted a Buddha-like figure seated in a niche. Illustrated above, this monument, and other rare treasures of early Mayan culture, have just been unearthed and forwarded to the University of Pennsylvania Museum at Philadelphia, Pa.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0065.xml
article
34
34,35,96
[no value]
[no value]
PLANT GROWTH SPEEDED IN Midget Gardens
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Walter E. Burton
PLANT wizards and inventors have succeeded in reducing the size of gardens to a point where products formerly requiring an acre or two of space, can be raised in the back yard, or even indoors. Several paths have been followed in reducing garden size without lowering the yield.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0066.xml
article
36
36,37,84
Hunting Water Life YOUR Microscope
[no value]
Hunting Water Life YOUR Microscope
MAKING A NET TO SNARE ANIMALS AND PLANTS FROM PONDS OR SEA WATER—HOW TO STUDY THEM IN TINY WATER CELL
[no value]
[no value]
Borden Hall
ONE is never even dimly conscious of the teeming life in the world that is crushed under one’s feet or that swims and swirls through the depths of a pond until one views it through the lens of a microscope capable of multiplying images 300 times or less.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0067.xml
article
38
38,39,96
[no value]
[no value]
Tricks of Firebugs EXPOSED BY POLICE EXPERTS
Concerted Fight Made on Arson as Criminal Fires in United States Cost Over "5,000,000 Each Year
[no value]
[no value]
Robert E. Martin
ITS engine throttled down, a black touring car swung noiselessly into the driveway of an unoccupied house on Long Island, thirty miles from New York City. Two men hastily entered the building carrying bundles and cans. It was three o’clock in the morning.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0068.xml
article
40
40,41,94
[no value]
[no value]
What You Can See In Starland With an OPERA GLASS
Exciting Races in the Heavens—Faint Dots that Turn into Great Clusters of Stars— Learn How to Study Moon's Features
ROBOTS THAT ANSWER PHONE RENTED OUT
SAWDUST CLEANS FURS
[no value]
[no value]
GAYLORD JOHNSON
THRILLING contests of speed, in which the planets, the moon, and the sun are spirited rivals, are constantly being run along a narrow sky track that goes completely around the heavens. Once you have learned to trace the course of these mighty racers, and how to know them at a glance, you will have endless delight in watching their sprints from month to month and year to year.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0069.xml
article
42
42
[no value]
[no value]
Ship’s Magic Eye Pierces Fog
Invisible RayS ThroWn Off by Every Object, are Caught by Photo-Electric Cell and Warning Sounded to Prevent Collision in Fog,Smoke,or Darkness
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SUCCESSFULLY tried out in its first sea tests aboard the liner Queen of Bermuda,a new marine instrument called a fog eye reveals the presence of objects hidden by darkness, fog, smoke or artificial smoke screens. Shipping and naval officials see revolutionary possibilities for the remarkable instrument in peace and war.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0070.xml
article
43
43
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Orchard Sprinkler Gets Unusual Test
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To AID in the design of new types of orchard sprinklers, an unusual proving ground has been established by a California engineer. A high shield, equipped with a window, permits an observer to watch the performance of a spray nozzle at close range, without getting drenched.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0071.xml
article
43
43
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
POCKET STEREOSCOPE SHOWS VIEWS ON FILM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GONE is the old-fashioned parlor stereoscope of a generation ago, but its counterpart, in modern guise, has just made its appearance. The new pocket-sized form of the instrument, illustrated above, is as small as a pair of opera glasses and uses thirty-five-millimeter motion picture film instead of paper photographs.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0072.xml
article
43
43
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
New Pick-Up Transfers Railway Passengers at Full Speed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BOARDING or leaving a speeding express train as it whizzes through a station may be made possible by a pick-up system recently demonstrated with models before French railroad officials. The plan calls for the erection of inclined ramps of wide-gage track at each station.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0073.xml
article
44
44
ENGINEERING
[no value]
Big Dam to Water Sahara
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TURNING the Sahara Desert into blossoming farm land, with water drained from the Mediterranean Sea, is the ambitious project for which Hermann Sorgel, German engineer, seeks international support. He proposes to dam the Strait of Gi braltar, and then cut a canal to flood portions of the Sahara below sea level.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0074.xml
article
44
44
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
CALIFORNIA FISHERMEN WEAR DIVING HELMET
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FISHING in a diving suit is the latest sport innovation at Catalina Island, Calif. Equipped with a diving helmet, and weighted down with a lead belt and shoes of the same heavy metal, the submarine fisherman walks out from shore as shown below.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0075.xml
article
44
44
ENGINEERING
[no value]
WEIGHTS TEST NEW BUILDING SITE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SETTLING foundations, that cause unsightly cracks in the walls and ceiling of a building, are forestalled by an unusual testing device. Invented by R. V. LaBarre, an engineer, Los Angeles, Calif., it determines how much load a plot can safely support before the building is erected.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0076.xml
article
45
45
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
New Rotor Ship Sails in Lightest Wind
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LOOKING like whirling surfboards, strange new rotors will furnish the power on a boat now nearing completion at Chicago. Laurence J. Lesh, pioneer aeronautical engineer, is designer of the craft. Unlike the Flettner rotor ship, which attracted wide attention a few years ago, his boat will depend entirely upon the wind for propulsion.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0077.xml
article
45
45
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
RACK HELPS IN PAPERING CEILING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PAPERING ceilings can now be done easily by the layman, it is claimed, with the aid of a hanger recently introduced. It consists of an adjustable rack that aligns and holds the paper, gives or takes up the slack as needed, and leaves the operator’s hands free.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0078.xml
article
45
45
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
FIVE-BLADED RAZOR CUTS SHAVING TIME
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIVE blades, instead of one, are used in a new type of safety razor introduced by a French inventor. One stroke of the razor across the face is said to remove every trace of hair in its path. The speed of the resulting shave is enhanced by the fact that the razor need not be taken apart after shaving.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0079.xml
article
46
46
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
New Submarine Model Swims Like a Fish.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OBSERVING the motions of swimming fish, Franz Heudorf, German inventor, resolved to test their method of locomotion as a means of propelling water craft. Recently he demonstrated, with working models, a new fin drive, dispensing entirely with propellers, which the inventor maintains is especially adaptable to submarines.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0080.xml
article
46
46
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
TIRE VALVE TESTER FITS VEST POCKET
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LEAKS in tire valves are quickly detected with the aid of a new pocket tester, illustrated at right. The flexible rubber socket fits over a valve stem, making an air-tight seal. If any air is escaping from the valve, bubbles appear at once in a glass cylinder containing water.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0081.xml
article
46
46
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
PAINT FORMS DESIGNS WHILE DRYING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW paint, that forms its own designs, is easily applied by an inexperienced person to lamp shades, vases, electric push-button plates, and other household objects. Decorative lines and patterns appear as if by magic during the drying, by a process similar to crystallization of certain salts from an evaporated solution.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0082.xml
article
46
46
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW BOWLING ALLEY HAS NO PIN BOYS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRICITY does all the work of pin boys in a new type of bowling alley that eliminates delays in play. Duck pins are used, suspended on chains and held in place by steel seats with triggers. When a ball knocks a pin off its base, it is automatically lifted out of the way.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0083.xml
article
47
47
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
BIG CROSSBOW HURLS MAN FIFTY FEET
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOMERSAULTING fifty feet through the air from a giant crossbow, a California daredevil recently introduced a new circus thrill. Billed as a human arrow, he takes his place in a small metal cradle and braces himself for the shock of starting.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0084.xml
article
47
47
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
ALUMINUM FOIL SUPPORTS SWING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO DEMONSTRATE the strength of aluminum foil, engineers recently arranged the unusual test pictured above. Three of the thin metal sheets, each about six ten-thousandths of an inch thick, formed a support for a swing in which a young woman sat.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0085.xml
article
47
47
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
COMPLETE RADIO SET PUT IN HEADPHONES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INVENTIVE ingenuity has succeeded recently in building a complete radio set into a pair of headphones. No batteries are required, since the set uses a crystal detector, which is adjusted by manipulating a small knob on one of the receivers, as shown above.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0086.xml
article
47
47
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
COMPRESSED AIR NOW STEERS AUTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COMPRESSED air replaces muscle power in a new steering system for automobiles. Even a heavy truck, equipped with the airpower installation, is steered by a finger’s touch. Turning the steering wheel, automatically admits compressed air to a double-acting piston that moves the front wheels of the vehicle.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0087.xml
article
48
48,49
FEATURES AND DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Giant Explosions REPRODUCED IN MINIATURE by Home Chemists
How Blasts of Grain Dust or of Gasoline Vapor Are Caused in Your Laboratory—Tests With Which to Prove a Burning Candle Is a Gas Plant
[no value]
[no value]
RAYMOND B. WAILES
HARMLESS, miniature explosions make experimenting with combustibles a thrilling, yet safe, amusement for the amateur chemist. With inexpensive homemade apparatus, he can duplicate the explosions in a gasoline motor and amuse his friends by burning air.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0088.xml
article
50
50
[no value]
[no value]
NEW ELECTRICALCAL SYSTEM GIVES VAST TONE TO Full Orchestra on Empty Stage
Conductor, 150 Miles from Musicians, Controls Expression with Master Key
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ORCHESTRAL music publicly such as never before had been publicly heard, poured from the apparently empty stage of Constitution Hall, Washington, D. C., a few nights ago when Dr. Leopold Stokowski, conductor of the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra, demonstrated before the National Academy of Sciences, a new electrical system of musical reproduction and transmission developed by engineers of the Bell Telephone Laboratories.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0089.xml
article
51
51
FEATURES AND DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
HOW YOU CAN PUT Tone Control on your RADIO RECEIVER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF equipped YOUR with broadcast a tone receiver control, is you not can provide one for less than a dollar. By following the simple connections indicated, any one can hook up this efficient tone control without altering one connection in the receiver.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0090.xml
article
51
51
[no value]
[no value]
Receiver Sunk in Table Top
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. W. P.
MATEUR radio operators who spend long hours on the air can obtain better tuning and greater comfort by countersinking their short-wave receivers below the surface of the table. As shown in the illustrations below, a rectangular hole is cut in the table top and the receiver cabinet is set in so the front panel rests at an angle.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0091.xml
article
51
51
[no value]
[no value]
Tiny Lightning Arrester
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW type of lightning arrester is now available to the set builder and radio fan. It is no larger than an ordinary grid leak and can be attached by means of its pigtails directly to the ground and antenna terminals at the rear of the receiver or mounted in a spring clip as shown above.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0092.xml
article
52
52,53
[no value]
[no value]
Using the New Tubes in Your Old Set
Adapters Make It Possible to Modernize Old Receivers without Clanging Sockets
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE H. WALTZ
SPECIAL adapters now make it possible to use the new tubes in old radio receivers. Without changing a socket or touching a connection, you can modernize your set by installing tubes of the latest design. Hitherto, with each new tube development, set owners have been discouraged by the fact that the improved types could not be used to replace their old tubes.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0093.xml
article
53
53
[no value]
[no value]
Building a Crystal Set for the Children
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH considered obsolete, the crystal receiver still has many uses. This is particularly true in sections close to large broadcasting stations. By building a crystal set, you can provide the children of the family with a cheap, satisfactory receiver of their own.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0094.xml
article
54
54,55
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
New Devices FOR THE BUSY HOMEMAKER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0095.xml
article
56
56,92
Auto Glass that's Crash-Proof
[no value]
Auto Glass that's Crash-Proof
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
BRAKES as a blue screeched sedan and whizzed horns past sounded the Model Garage tow car, cut in sharply to avoid a truck, and crashed through the white fence bordering the well-paved highway. For a moment, Gus Wilson and his partner, Joe Clark, were speechless.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0096.xml
article
57
57,58,59,93
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
HERE IS THE LAST WORD IN Racing Catboats
An authoritative article by the designer of the best one-man yacht yet developed
MATERIALS REQUIRED FOR BUILDING OLYMPIC
[no value]
[no value]
E. B. SCHOCK
AMERICA’S most recent contribution to international racing, the Olympic monotype catboat, may be built from the accompanying plans for $75 or less, including a serviceable sail. This should help erase once and for all the popular fallacy that yachting is a game only for the rich.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0097.xml
article
60
60
MODELS
[no value]
Flashlight Cells in Motorboat Model Look Like Racing Engine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. W. WAGNER
HERE is a make-believe gasoline engine for toy motorboats that is, in reality, an unusually convenient means of holding the flashlight cells so often used to drive small boat motors. Heretofore the problem of holding and connecting cells without shorting them has been a difficult one.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0098.xml
article
60
60
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Inexpensive Four-in-One Unit Helps Beginners Do Better Microscope Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Now that the microscope has become so popular, some readers may wish to construct this compact combination outfit consisting of (1) an adjustable understage light, (2) an adjustable reading glass, (3) an adjustable dissecting turntable, and (4) an adjustable above-stage light.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0099.xml
article
61
61
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
LAWN SHOWER KEEPS CHILDREN COOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EARL D
A LAWN shower bath for children can be made at small expense as shown in the accompanying illustrations. This fixture may also be placed beside an ordinary bathtub and connected to the mixing faucet by a short hose, or it can even be used near a floor drain in the basement by connecting it to the hot and cold lines through a Y and a hose connection.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0100.xml
article
61
61
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
LYE ETCHES DESIGNS ON ALUMINUM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
You can improve the appearance of aluminum articles by etching decorative designs in the metal with a strong alkali solution. Wherever the fluid touches the metal, it produces a beautiful matte surface that contrasts strikingly with the usual polished finish of aluminum pitchers, syrup dispensers, aquarium frames, and the like.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0101.xml
article
61
61
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
CAMP WASHTUB MADE FROM CRACKER BOX
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CLIFFORD PARK BALDWIN
CLEANLINESS in camp is made easy with this combination washboard and tub, which also serves as a compartment to carry canned goods, cooking utensils, or other equipment while traveling. Obtain a large tin cracker box from your grocer and have a tinsmith make a corrugated zinc washboard with a metal edging to prevent cuts and tears in the clothing.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0102.xml
article
62
62,63
[no value]
[no value]
Unique BIRD HOUSES Jig-Sawed from Scraps
A new and easy way to utilize odds and ends of lumber in making a large variety of strong, graceful nest boxes
A NEW SERVICE FULL-SIZE PATTERNS for Three Bird Houses
[no value]
[no value]
ERNEST V. BAKER
IF A BIRD house made on a jig or scroll saw was merely just as good as a bird house constructed in the conventional board-saw-hammer-and-nail method, then it would be worthy of little note. However, try one of these houses on your jig saw and I'll wager the sale of nails for bird-house purposes in your neighborhood will take a slump.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0103.xml
article
63
63
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Prize Winners IN OUR Novelty Jig-Sawing CONTEST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“WHAT novelties besides picture puzzles can be made with a jig saw?” was the question we recently asked our readers in announcing a jig-sawing contest (P.S.M., Mar. ’33, p. 63). Many excellent suggestions were received. These were rated by the judges on the basis of 50 points for novelty, 25 for craftsmanship, 15 for simplicity, and 10 for presentation.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0104.xml
article
64
64
WOODWORKING
[no value]
CHILD'S CHAIR NEEDS ONLY THREE PIECES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REAL usefulness is combined with economy in these ingenious stools. They were designed for children, but from the way in which they are appropriated by grown-ups at every opportunity— well, possession counts nine points in the law! The materials required are few: For each stool allow one piece 16 in. wide by 17 in. long for the back, and one piece 12 in. wide by 16 in. long for the seat; these should be 1⅛ in. thick.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0105.xml
article
64
64
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
CHEAP AGITATOR FOR CHEMISTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. C.
IN CHEMICAL work it is often necessary to agitate various chemicals. This constant agitation may be required either to bring about a reaction or to insure a perfectly homogeneous mixture of whatever ingredients are being used. The instruments sold for this purpose, although convenient and well designed, are expensive, and for that reason the writer devised a little machine that employs an old electric bell.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0106.xml
article
64
64
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
FENCING IN THE STAKE FOR HORSESHOES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY CUTTING the side walls of old auto tires at intervals of about 6 in. and straightening them out, it is possible to place them as a protection over the wooden retaining walls that are commonly set around the stake used in the game of horseshoes or quoits.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0107.xml
article
65
65
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Bath-Robe Cord KNOTTED IN SPIRAL DESIGN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kenneth Murray
THIS new bath-robe cord is knotted in a way different from that commonly used. It is easy to make, yet distinctive and novel in appearance, and it has durability beyond all ordinary requirements. Silk cable cord and ordinary slipknots like those used in making the wampum belt described in a previous article (P. S. M., May `33, p. 63) are employed.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0108.xml
article
66
66,85,86
MODELS
[no value]
RIGGING Our New Galleon Model “REVENGE"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Capt. E. Armitage McCann
THOSE ship model builders who are constructing the Elizabethan galleon Revenge and have kept abreast of the work outlined in the three preceding articles (P.S.M., Apr. ’33, p. 65, May p. 67, and June p. 66) are now ready to begin the rigging in earnest.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0109.xml
article
67
67
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
COMFORTABLE SLANT-TOP OTTOMAN MADE FROM OLD AUTO CUSHION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
D. A. BUTLER
THE ottoman illustrated was made in about an hour’s time from a discarded front-seat cushion from a coach type auto. The slant makes it unusually comfortable. A local grocery supplied a wood box of approximately the dimensions of the bottom of the cushion, and the two were nailed together as shown below, with the box set bottom up.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0110.xml
article
67
67
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
INCENSE BURNER TURNED FROM WOOD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. M. L.
MADE of hardwood and finished either with paint or with stain and varnish, this incense burner is an attractive and easily constructed novelty for gift purposes. Prepare seven wedges according to the dimensions given, trace on each the pierced design, drill, and jig-saw.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0111.xml
article
67
67
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
WRINGER CLEANS GLASS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. K. NOVINS
AN OLD laundry wringer can be put to profitable use to clean glass, metal, wood, and other flat materials, as shown in the accompanying photograph. The wringer is mounted solidly on the workbench. Strips of discarded canvas belting are cut up in small disks of uniform size and packed solidly on the two rollers.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0112.xml
article
67
67
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
HEATER FOR TEST TUBES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. H.
REPLACEMENT units for use in electric heaters of the bowl or reflector type are wound on porcelain tubes and therefore make excellent slow heaters for chemical experiments. Most of them have an inside diameter large enough to take in the smaller test tubes.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0113.xml
article
68
68
Handy Hints for Motorists
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Handy Hints for Motorists
Suggestions Valuable to All Car Drivers Are Contributed by Experienced Readers
Reflects Traffic Light
Speed Governor
Wire Netting for Sand
Rivet Pliers
[no value]
[no value]
L. VAN T.
L. C. P.
W. H. A.
ALTHOUGH a flashlight is a convenient accessory when making emergency motor repairs or checking the oil at night, it is generally not in the car when most needed. However, the amateur mechanic can provide a convenient motor light by installing an ordinary dashboard lamp fixture on the front surface of the dash or motor compartment cowl.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0114.xml
article
69
69
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Small Electric Power Plant RUN BY OLD AUTO ENGINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. L. Bird
MANY districts in our country are still without electric power facilities. It is quite easy and inexpensive to construct a dependable power plant by using an automobile engine for the motive power. The chassis of a discarded or wrecked car, stripped of all equipment except the engine and radiator, serves as the mounting for the generating equipment.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0115.xml
article
70
70
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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CALIBRATING A JOINTER
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[no value]
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E. L.
WHEN chamfering, cutting rabbets, or planing the edge of a piece of wood for part of the length, it is a great advantage to have some way of setting the knives of a small jointer to cut a shaving of definite thickness. Set the table at zero by laying a block of wood over the knives and lowering it until the cutting edges, when turned by hand, just graze the wood.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0116.xml
article
70
70
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
QUICKLY CONSTRUCTED BOAT TRAILER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH C. COYLE
A NEAT, serviceable, and inexpensive boat trailer may be made by mounting the chassis of a junked model-T Ford on the front axle and springs of an old Chevrolet and bolting on three bolsters of 2 by 6 in. wood. A T-shaped drawbar of 3-in. pipe is welded into the front and braced with two sections of 2 by ½ in.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0117.xml
article
70
70
[no value]
[no value]
LINOLEUM CUT WITH SAW
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. W. McP.
AFTER blistering my hands and making a botchy job of cutting linoleum with a knife to fit in recesses of the kitchen and around the gas and water pipes, I discovered that a small hand-type scroll saw is ideal for this purpose.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0118.xml
article
70
70
WOODWORKING
[no value]
Compact Breakfast Nook Folds into Cupboard under Window
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. G. BERNHOLZ
ALMOST like magic this entire dining alcove outfit, which includes a table and benches for five persons, can be unfolded out of the wall from a small cupboard under the window. The table, 27 in. wide and 50 in. long, is in two parts, supported by a brace.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0119.xml
article
71
71
MODELS
[no value]
A Racy Little Biplane
DONALD W. CLARK’S latest model
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS neat little Laird Super-Solution plane will appeal to model builders who prefer making small, racy-looking biplane types. The fuselage can be carved from a section of 1⅜in. diameter curtain pole, 6 in. long. If no lathe is at hand, the front end can be shaped with knife, chisel, and sandpaper.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0120.xml
article
72
72
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
EASILY BUILT CABINETS EXCLUDE DUST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN EVERY home workshop, especially if it happens to be located in the basement, there is a real need for a practical way to protect fine tools, partly completed models, and delicate apparatus from dust. The two cabinets shown at the right are designed for this purpose.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0121.xml
article
72
72
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
JIG-SAWED BUTTERFLY WALL BRACKETS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANTHONY T. PUSCIZNA
WELL-DESIGNED wall brackets relieve the bare look of an otherwise empty wall space. A pair of them may be used to special advantage on opposite sides of a fireplace or entrance archway, or on each side of an alcove or other nook. A jig-sawed butterfly design is illustrated.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0122.xml
article
73
73
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
VISE JAWS LINED TO AID IN SOLDERING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELTON STERRETT
WHENEVER it is necessary to hold parts made of light metal in a vise to be soldered, the jaws conduct the heat away so rapidly that the solder tends to “freeze” before penetrating far enough into the joint to make a good job. A simple way of getting around this trouble is to obtain two squares of sheet asbestos packing at least 1/16 in.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0123.xml
article
73
73
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
LIGHTED SCREW DRIVER FOR USE IN DARK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE E. KILPATRICK
A CHEAP fountain pen flash light and two rubber bands are all that are required to make it easy to drive or remove screws in dark corners where the slots in the heads cannot otherwise be seen. Place the barrel of the flash light on the shank of the screw driver and hold it with the rubber bands as shown above.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0124.xml
article
73
73
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
CONVENIENT TOOL RACK CLAMPS ON JIG SAW
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E.L
FROM scraps of wood, a convenient jig-saw tool rack can be made. Build an inverted “U” of a width suitable for straddling the frame of the saw, if it is not of the rocker arm type, or make it of any convenient dimensions for clamping at the side.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0125.xml
article
73
73
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
RECESSED PANELS KEEP TOOLS ORDERLY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. C. C.
PANEL tool boards for the wall of a shop with the outlines of the tools painted on them are well known, but they have one drawback. The wrong tool may be placed in a certain spot, regardless of the outline on the board. This is impossible on the board illustrated because each tool is inset in a closely fitting recess and most of them go in flush with the surface.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0126.xml
article
73
73
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
A QUICK GROWING DEPRESSION GARDEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CARL G. ERICH.
VARIOUS mixtures are used in making so-called “depression” gardens of the type illustrated, but I have found the following more effective than salt and bluing alone or other combinations: 4 tablespoons of salt and 2 tablespoons each of air-slaked lime, cornstarch, and bluing.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0127.xml
article
74
74,79
FEATURES AND DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
What the amateur photographer needs to know about Camera Tripods and Supports
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FREDERICK D. RYDER,
IF YOU were made of cast iron and had a clamp at every joint, you could stick out your arm, with your camera pointing in the right direction, tighten a few thumbscrews, and take fine time exposures. Actually, when we try to stand perfectly still, our bodies sway back and forth, our arms wabble, and our hands tremble.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0128.xml
advertisement
75
75
[no value]
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0129.xml
article
76
76
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Centering Long Bars IN THE LATHE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Thomas W. Arnold
IT HAS been said that accurate centering is half the job in all lathe work. This applies with special force to the turning or threading of long bars. Suppose, for example, the piece you need for the machine you are building must be over 1½ft. long, with 6 in.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0130.xml
article
76
76
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
BATTLESHIP LINOLEUM POLISHES METAL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M. A. C.
A SCRAP of old battleship linoleum makes a fast cutting and excellent polishing disk. I discovered this when I made a linoleum block cut recently for printing rifle targets. I turned out the rings and the bull's-eye on a lathe and was surprised to find that the linoleum cut high-speed steel nearly as fast as an emery wheel and left a beautiful polish.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0131.xml
article
77
77
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
DURABLE Magazine Rack
MADE FROM AT LOW METAL COST
[no value]
[no value]
Lee M. Klinefelter
THIS and good-looking, magazine rack does is roomy, not spill durable, magazines all over the floor, and, best of all, can be made at little cost with the tools found in the average home shop. The frame requires about 20 ft. of ½by ⅛in. soft steel.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0132.xml
advertisement
77
77
[no value]
[no value]
JOHNS-MANVILLE
[no value]
JOHNS-MANVILLE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0133.xml
advertisement
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
Remington Arms Company, Inc.
[no value]
Remington Arms Company, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0134.xml
advertisement
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
MEAD GLIDERS
[no value]
MEAD GLIDERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0135.xml
advertisement
78
78
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0136.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
THE IRWIN AUGER BIT CO.
[no value]
THE IRWIN AUGER BIT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0137.xml
advertisement
80
80
[no value]
[no value]
DU PONT
[no value]
DU PONT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0138.xml
advertisement
80
80
[no value]
[no value]
Remington Rand Inc.
[no value]
Remington Rand Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0139.xml
advertisement
80
80
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0140.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0141.xml
article
81
81
MODELS
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CIRCUIT BREAKER BUILT FOR MODEL RAILWAY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE simplest way to protect the wiring of your model railway from the effects of a short circuit is to install an ordinary fuse block for taking household type plug fuses. A 5or 10-ampere fuse will handle the load of a small model railway, and 15ampere fuses are large enough for an elaborate installation using two or more locomotives.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0142.xml
article
81
81,83
MODELS
[no value]
KEEPING MODEL RAILWAY FITTINGS IN SCALE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
T.W.A.
IF YOU want to start a hot argument among a group of model railway fans, all you have to do is bring up the subject of scale dimensions. A number will maintain that sticking to scale—in other words, making each part of a model an exact scale reduction of the prototype—is of vital importance.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0143.xml
advertisement
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
Smooth-On Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Smooth-On Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0144.xml
advertisement
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
U.S. School of Music
[no value]
U.S. School of Music
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0145.xml
advertisement
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
DAISY MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
DAISY MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0146.xml
advertisement
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
PATTERSON BROTHERS
[no value]
PATTERSON BROTHERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0147.xml
article
82
82
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Hints on Difficult Metal Spinning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERBERT WOOLSEY
SOME articles spun from sheet metal look as if they had been shaped over sectional forms such as were described in the preceding article in this series (P.S.M., June ’33, p. 76), but in reality they were made by a different method. If you recall the ash-tray job described in a previous article (P.S.M., Apr. ’33, p. 76), you will remember that the bottom flange was turned over while the work was held in a hollow wood chuck.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0148.xml
article
82
82
MODELS
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CHOCKS AND BOLLARDS FOR SHIP MODELS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. H.
CHOCKS and bollards for ship models are easily made by cutting cardboard or thin metal to the proper shape, gluing or cementing it to the deck, and driving pins or nails in as shown. If brass or other metal is used, holes will have to be drilled for the pins, and the pins may be soldered to the plate.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0149.xml
advertisement
83
83
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[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0150.xml
advertisement
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0151.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
BEHR-MANNING CORP.
[no value]
BEHR-MANNING CORP.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0152.xml
advertisement
86
86
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0153.xml
article
87
87
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Replacing Bolsters on Farm Trucks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. M. ROEHL
THE kingbolt of a low farm wagon often wears down into the bolster and weakens it, or the end of a bolster becomes damaged so that a replacement is necessary. New York State College of Agriculture A piece of oak, maple, or other hardwood 4 in.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0154.xml
article
87
87
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
CIRCULAR SPOOL HOLDER SAVES SEWER 'S TIME
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. D. ALLEX
THIS spool holder is admired by every woman who sees it—and rightly so, as a woman suggested the arrangement. The wood I used was alder, but walnut, mahogany, or oak would be equally suitable if stained; and for an enamel finish any soft wood could be used.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0155.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
RCA Victor Company, Inc.
[no value]
RCA Victor Company, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0156.xml
advertisement
88
88
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[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0157.xml
article
88
88,89
Secrets of success
[no value]
HIS TRAVELING STORE MET WITH SUCCESS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H.M.W.
WILLIAM had worked for me as a stenographer for about three years. A year or so ago our business, along with a great many others, all but evaporated, and it was necessary to cut down on all fronts. William had to go; we regretted it, for this twenty-three year old lad was ambitious and intelligent—an unbeatable combination.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0158.xml
advertisement
89
89
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[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0159.xml
article
89
89,90
Secrets of success
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STRANGE PLANT NURSERY A GROWING SUCCESS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L.L.H.
MY FATHER, James Hard, Junior, came to Florida twenty-three years ago. For reasons that have no place here, he had decided to leave the old Tennessee home and seek his fortune elsewhere. Florida, then a new and alluring land, beckoned strongly.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0160.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0161.xml
article
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
Cash Prizes
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS department will give $5.00 for every true success story submitted by readers of Popular Science Monthly, and which is accepted for printing in this magazine. Manuscripts will be judged on the individual merits of the case and circumstances involved.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0162.xml
article
91
91
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[no value]
FINGERPRINTING DONE WITHOUT USING INK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FINGERPRINTS are made without the use of ink in a new method recently demonstrated before the National Identification Association by a former Deputy Commissioner of the New York City force. When a subject touches a pad, similar to an ink pad, his fingers become covered with a colorless, non-poisonous, nonsticky chemical.
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0163.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
JOWETT INSTITUTE OF PHYSICAL CULTURE
[no value]
JOWETT INSTITUTE OF PHYSICAL CULTURE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0164.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0165.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0166.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
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[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0167.xml
advertisement
95
95
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[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0168.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
American Society for the Control of Cancer
[no value]
American Society for the Control of Cancer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0169.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0170.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Lever Bros. Co.
[no value]
Lever Bros. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0171.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330701_0123_001_0172.xml