Issue: 19330401

Saturday, April 1, 1933
APRIL, 1933
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Monday, January 5, 2015

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0001.xml
advertisement
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Ethyl Gasoline Corporation
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Ethyl Gasoline Corporation
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0002.xml
advertisement
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1
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F. O. B. FACTORY
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F. O. B. FACTORY
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0003.xml
masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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TABLE of CONTENTS for APRIL, 1933
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0005.xml
advertisement
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4
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Advertisement: SIMONIZ KLEENER
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SIMONIZ KLEENER
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0006.xml
article
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4,5,6
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RELIEF PROMISED BY NEW Bankruptcy Bill
TO HELP YOU GET AHEAD
STRENGTH OF INSURANCE COMPANIES REVEALED BY 1932 STATEMENTS
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LEON MEADOW
A NEW Bankruptcy Bill is now up before Congress, and, should it become a law, its provisions should interest almost every one. Not only does this bill provide for revised action in the case of bankruptcy but it will also bring a change in foreclosure proceedings on home mortgages.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0007.xml
advertisement
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General Electric Co.
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General Electric Co.
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0008.xml
advertisement
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6
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Lambert Pharmacal Co.
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Lambert Pharmacal Co.
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0009.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement: Popular Science Homecraft Guild
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Popular Science Homecraft Guild
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0010.xml
advertisement
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THE RONALD PRESS COMPANY: Accountants’ Handbook
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THE RONALD PRESS COMPANY
Accountants’ Handbook
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0011.xml
advertisement
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7
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MULLINS MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
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MULLINS MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0012.xml
advertisement
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7
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Independence Fund of North America, Inc.
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Independence Fund of North America, Inc.
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0013.xml
article
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Our Readers Say
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Our Readers Say
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WHEN I became a subscriber of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, I was interested in wood turning. I had never seen a lathe in operation but I had a half-horsepower motor and a saw table, which I had built, so I decided to get a lathe. A secondhand man told me all the good things about a lathe he had.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0014.xml
article
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10
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How General Motors Engineers made the PONTIAC economy straight 8 SO Easy Riding
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0015.xml
article
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11,12,13,110
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800 feet on a Fireproof Rope Inside a Flaming Volcano
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ARPAD KIRNER
A SLENDER white thread, a rope of asbestos, rose straight above my head to the edge of the cliff. Below me were boiling lava and billowing fumes. Dangling at the end of the rope, 1 was being lowered 800 feet into the mouth of an active volcano!
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0016.xml
article
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STRANGE CLUES tell Secrets of Man's Life 20,000 YEARS AGO
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IN THE gathering dusk of a late afternoon last November, a group of distinguished scientists sat in an auditorium at the University of Michigan, and listened to the story of the earliest murder known to have been committed within the territory that is now the United States.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0017.xml
article
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15,112
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Latest Instruments and Methods Are Used by Scientists in Unraveling Ancient Mysteries
Electricity Finds Treasure
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MICHEL MOK
she wore in her hair and around her neck and waist. Together with Dr. Frank Leverett, president of the American Geological Society and one of the world's foremost authorities on glacial geology, he subjected the clay and sand layers in which the bones were found to a searching examination, showing beyond doubt that the tragedy occurred about 20,000 years ago.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0018.xml
article
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AVIATION
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VALVE IN PLANE'S FUEL LINE ENDS FIRE DANGER
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FIRE following an airplane crash is prevented by a new magnetic valve devised by a Westinghouse engineer. The valve, inserted in the gasoline line, is held open as long as the plane's ignition is turned on. When a pilot, sensing danger, cuts off the ignition switch, the valve automatically closes under the pressure of a spring.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0019.xml
article
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PROPELLER RING RAISES PLANE'S SPEED
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THAT the speed of an airplane may be increased from thirty-nine to 140 percent by putting a ring around the propeller is the discovery announced by two Compton. Calif., inventors. The circular cowling is said to straighten out the air blast of the propeller and increase its effectiveness.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0020.xml
article
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ENGINEERING
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MODEL SKYSCRAPERS GET QUAKE TEST
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How to make buildings earthquake-proof is the object of an unusual series of tests in progress in the engineering laboratory of Stanford University, at Palo Alto. Calif. Model skyscrapers are subjected to artificial earthquakes on the vibrating table illustrated below, to determine their relative ability to withstand shocks.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0021.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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GLUE IN THIN SHEETS USED WITHOUT WATER
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IT LOOKS and feels like paper—but the dark sheet in the picture above is actually glue, in a new ready-to-use form. The thin yellow-brown sheet comes in rolls and is cut and applied as needed to plywood or veneer. Requiring no moistening, it is said to give a strong, water-proof bond between sheets of plywood subjected to heat and pressure in a hot plate press.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0022.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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PAPER TUBES NOW FORM HOMES FOR OYSTERS
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PAPER tubes, coated with cement, form new incubators for baby oysters. The tubes, to which the microscopic oyster larvae cling until they develop into seed oysters, have been developed by the United States Bureau of Fisheries, at its Beaufort, N. C., station.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0023.xml
article
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ENGINEERING
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Model Mine Under Berlin Is Miners’ Classroom
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MINING as it should be conducted is taught right in the city of Berlin, Germany—or rather, it is taught just below Berlin. A model mine has been constructed ten feet below the city’s streets and is now a part of the German Museum for Workers’ Protection.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0024.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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CROOKS’ BOMBS STUDIED FOR CLUES
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BOMBS, common weapons of thugs and gangsters, are receiving scientific investigation. Chemists in Berlin, Germany, make painstaking examination of bomb fragments, find clues, and often are able to trace the bomb to the manufacturer.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0025.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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FASTEST TRAIN'S SPEED SHOWN ON SPEEDOMETER
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SPEED of the world’s fastest train, making the run from Berlin to Hamburg, Germany, is constantly registered on the dial shown below, for the benefit of the passengers. The speedometer, of course, registers in kilometers. The 180-mile run is covered in two hours and twenty minutes.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0026.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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LOUDSPEAKER, INSTALLED IN TOWN, SERVES AS BELL CHIMES
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LOUDSPEAKER chimes, recently developed for use in the clock towers of buildings, make the installation of an expensive system of bells unnecessary. Small tubes serve as miniature chimes and are struck at every quarter hour by automatic mechanism under the control of an electric clock.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0027.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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LIGHT PRINTS TIME ON CLOUDS
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ONCE engaged in the development of a death ray for possible military use. H. Grindell-Matthews, British inventor, has developed a new gun for projecting light rays. A motor carriage supports the cannon-like projector, which is designed to throw signs upon clouds miles away, and is an improved model of one he demonstrated in New York City not long ago.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0028.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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NINE THERMOMETERS COMBINED IN ONE
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BY TURNING a knob at the bottom of a new household thermometer, the user may learn the temperature in any room of his home. The device works by electricity, and extension wires lead from it to nine indicators suitably distributed. A sufficient number is provided, according to engineers who developed the instrument, so that the temperature within the home refrigerator and the hot-water heater may be observed as well as that of any room in the house.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0029.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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New Power Boat for Polo on Water
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SKIMMING over the water at twenty-five miles an hour, wheeling in their own length, fast little water polo boats may soon engage in a thrilling new sport. A New Jersey boat builder has designed a special craft, a water-tight pontoon driven by an outboard motor and carrying on its back a bicycle-like framework, for the use of water polo players.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0030.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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READING GLASS HELD BY STAND
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FOR the convenience of those who require a magnifying glass for reading or in their work, a New York manufacturer has produced a compact outfit in which the enlarging lens is held by adjustable arms attached to a broad base that rests upon a table or desk.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0031.xml
article
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ENGINEERING
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BRIDGE FLOOR IS MADE OF STEEL MESH
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WHEN engineers in Seattle, Wash., recently decided to widen a bridge in the city, they found the machinery that elevates the center section would be unable to handle the additional weight if the span were floored with concrete. So they fitted the enlarged bridge with a floor of steel mesh.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0032.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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USE SEESAW TO START STOPPED HEART
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A LIFE-SAVING seesaw has been invented by a University of California scientist to revive those whose hearts have stopped, as the result of certain kinds of accidents. While oxygen is forced into the lungs and heat is applied to the body, the patient will be rocked steadily up and down on the pivoted plank, to which he will be strapped lying on his back.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0033.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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TWO NAIL SETS IN ONE
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Two nail sets are combined in one tool recently invented to save time in driving home nails of different sizes. One point drives small nails and brads, while a second, at right angles to the first, is for use with larger nails. The odd shape of the tool makes it convenient to use.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0034.xml
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20,21,106
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Prehistoric Monsters Roar and Hiss for Sound Film
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ANDREW R. BOONE
FROM the slime of tropical mud flats, the ghost voices of prehistoric monsters have reached the screen. Hisses and grunts of the pterodactyl and brontosaurus; roars from a tyrranosaurus, largest of the dinosaur family; groans and roars of an imaginary giant ape are reproduced by mechanical contrivances.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0035.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Homemade Instruments Guide Sailor Across Ocean
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WHEN Fred Rebell ended a lone 8,000mile voyage from Australia, the other day, by sailing his eighteen-foot skiff Elaine into Los Angeles harbor, Calif., he owed the success of his perilous adventure to homemade instruments and the knack of using them.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0036.xml
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ENGINEERING
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BIG ELECTRIC VIBRATOR HELPS BUILD BRIDGE
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To AID in building the great San Francisco-Oakland bridge and other large structures, research engineers of the University of California have perfected the oversize electric vibrator pictured above. It will be used in tamping down concrete, and will cause the material to settle to a more compact mass than is obtained by usual methods.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0037.xml
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MODELS
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BUILD MODEL RAILWAY FOR CHILDREN
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STREET car employees of Stuttgart, Germany, have built a model trolley line through woods near the city for the entertainment of the youngsters. The track is carried over rough ground and boulders on concrete piers, and measures 660 feet from end to end.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0038.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Insects Are Actors in Remarkable Movie
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INSECTS are actors in an unusual series of motion pictures filmed by Stacy Woodard, of Hollywood, Calif. Armed with a long-range lens and aided by infinite patience, he succeeded in recording vivid scenes of deadly scorpions in battle, of hunting wasps stalking their prey, and of other rarely-viewed wonders of the insect world.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0039.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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INK NOW COMES IN BAR FORM
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INK in bars has recently been placed on the market. Each bar is supplied in a special paper tube, and finger pressure drops it out without handling. For use, one of the bars is dissolved in a quart of water. The bar can be broken in half or even into smaller pieces if the full quantity is not required
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0040.xml
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ENGINEERING
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HOW OUR SKYSCRAPERS EVOLVED
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EVOLUTION of the skyscraper from its squat ancestor of heavy masonry is strikingly shown in a series of models just placed on display at the Museum of Modern Art, in New York City. The first shows a building of sixty years ago, its weight supported by walls of reinforced concrete.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0041.xml
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ENGINEERING
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TAKING HUM OUT OF MOTORS
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EVEN the diminutive electric motors that run fans and vacuum cleaners have come in for attention in the war against noise. To aid in eliminating objectionable hum, the miniature broadcasting station pictured at the left, has been set up in an East Pittsburgh, Pa., research laboratory.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0042.xml
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MODELS
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Gears In Young Tree Model Make It Grow as Though Alive
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A MECHANICAL twig, seven and a half feet in diameter, will show visitors at the Chicago World’s Fair next summer how a tree grows. Sliding plates and moving canvases will add an eighteen-inch ring to the model and reproduce a year’s growth in a minute and a quarter.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0043.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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MOVING GANGWAY SPEEDS TRAVELERS
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PASSENGERS leaving transatlantic liners at Cherbourg, France, will soon use motorized gangways designed to speed their disembarking and the handling of their luggage. The gangways, operating like escalators, or moving stairways, can be elevated or lowered to any level to meet the requirements of different-sized vessels.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0044.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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GOLFERS' NEW PUTTER HAS GUIDE ON BLADE
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A NEW putter for golfers has a metal flange, three-quarters of an inch wide and nearly three inches long, extending backward from the blade. With a correct stroke, this flange is parallel to the ground at the bottom of the swing. If the flange digs into the earth, the swing is wrong.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0045.xml
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MODELS
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Life in a Hospital Seen in Scale Model
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To STIMULATE contributions to a British hospital fund, sponsors of the drive are exhibiting at London, England, a large-scale working model that is probably without a counterpart in the world. It depicts a modern hospital building, and sections of the walls are cut away to give the public a clear idea of the activities that go on in such an institution.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0046.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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NEW TYPE OF AIR BATTERY
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AN IMPROVED model of the air-breathing A battery introduced to radio fans two years ago requires only a single filling of tap water to put it in service. Reservoirs hold extra water to maintain the level as the electrolyte-forming chemicals dissolve.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0047.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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PLUG MENDS PUNCTURE
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PUNCTURES in auto tire casings are speedily repaired with a new mushroom-shaped plug of rubber. Smeared with rubber cement, the plug is pushed through the hole from inside as shown above. Its projecting stem is seized from the outside with pliers, drawn tight, and cut off.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0048.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Beautiful Pictures Built with Tiny Bits of Enamel
Photos on These Pages Tell How Mosaics here Designed by an Artist and Skillfully Copied
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MASTER craftsmen in a New York studio, at this writing, are fitting together tiny blocks of colored enamel to form a giant panel of mosaic work seventy-six feet long and fourteen feet high. Destined for installation at Radio City, it is considered one of the finest examples of present-day mosaic—an ancient art now being used in the decoration of buildings.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0049.xml
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ENGINEERING
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Bury Telephone Poles To Make Them Live Longer
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SHORT sections of telephone poles, coated with creosote and buried in three widely-separated laboratories, are expected to show how poles can be made to last longer. Every year foresters employed by the Bell Telephone Co., bury sections of poles at Limon, Colo., Gulf-port, Miss., and Chester, N. J. After a year or more, they remove the logs, cut out their hearts with augurs, and study them.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0050.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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How JIG-SAW PUZZLES Are Made by the Million
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PUTTING jig-saw puzzles together is the latest craze to sweep over America. It has replaced the cross-word puzzle, the Tom Thumb golf course, and in many places has ousted contract bridge. On this page are photos showing the steps in the manufacture of the millions of jig-saw puzzles sold each week.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0051.xml
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30,31,108
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Swift Motor Trucks Put CIRCUS Back on Roads
Our Machine Age Brings devolution in Method of Moving Tent Shows in America
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EARL CHAPIN MAY
MORE than thirty circuses this spring will tour the country, moving from town to town in motor trucks. The American circus began its career on country roads in horse-drawn wagons. Later it took to the railroads. Now it is back to first principles and is taking advantage of the modern truck and the modern highway.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0052.xml
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VITAL ORGANS cut from body to work Life Saving Miracles
Recent Operations of a Sensational Nature Are Described for You in This Article, Fifth in Our Series Dealing with Modern Surgery
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FREDERIC DAMRAU
LIFE-SAVING by surgery, the most dramatic phase of modern medicine, now includes the removal of whole organs from the human body. This is one of the most recent daring advances in the technique of the operating room. Miracles of this kind, performed again and again, have proved you can live without a stomach, with one of your lungs entirely removed, with a kidney gone, and even with part of your brain taken away by the surgeon’s knife!
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0053.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Emergency Coal Mines
Use Old Automobiles to Furnish Power
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PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0054.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Food for Cattle Grown in Metal Cabinet
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A SYNTHETIC pasture contained in a sheet-metal cabinet seven feet high, and reported capable of supplying sufficient green herbage for a herd of twenty cattle has been devised by a German agricultural expert. The cabinet contains ten drawers in which tender maize plants sprout, their growth being accelerated by doses of a special solution of stimulating chemicals administered three times daily.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0055.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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TEETH ON COTTER PIN HOLD IT IN PLACE
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To OVERCOME the necessity of expanding the ends of a cotter pin in order to make it stay in the hole, an inventor has designed one providing with ratchet teeth. The pin is inserted in the nut in the usual way. In tapping the head with a hammer, one part of the pin is caused to slide on the other.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0056.xml
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BLAME DAM FOR QUAKES
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DRAINING the Zuyder Zee has produced earthquakes in Holland, according to Prof. Otto Braschin, of the University of Berlin, Germany. He says recent tremors are due to the dam that cuts the North Sea from the Zuyder Zee.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0057.xml
article
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ENGINEERING
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NEW TOOL SPLICES LIVE WIRE
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MECHANICAL hands now enable linemen to repair high tension wires carrying as much as 600,000 volts, without the necessity of shutting off the current while they are working. A veteran California lineman, Chester Coons, is the inventor of the new hot wire tools.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0058.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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CLOSED CAR WINDOW IS OPENED BY A LEVER
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A NEW window control has been designed by two Eureka, Calif., inventors, to aid the driver of a closed car in making hand signals. A flip of a convenient lever allows the window to drop open of its own accord. Only three-quarters of a turn on a crank handle is required to raise the window again and shut it tightly.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0059.xml
article
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CORN LEADS AS MOST VALUABLE U. S. CROP
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WHAT are the ten most valuable crops raised on American farms? The United States Department of Agriculture recently answered this question from statistics compiled during the latest census. They are, in order of their value, corn, hay, cotton, wheat, oats, potatoes, tobacco, oranges, barley and apples.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0060.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Beam of Light Carries
Powerful Ray Speeds Radio Program Across Half-Mile of City Buildings
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RADIO fans witnessed a twentieth-century marvel, the other night, when they listened to a radio program transmitted over a ray of light. High in the tower of the Chrysler Building, in New York City, an orchestra played before a microphone.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0061.xml
article
38
38,39,110
[no value]
[no value]
Learn to Know the Stars with an Umbrella
. . This Is the First Article of an Unusual Series That Will Reveal the Secrets of the Sky
STORM CARRIES GOLD
[no value]
[no value]
GAYLORD JOHNSON
THOUSANDS of people find astronomy the most fascinating of hobbies, and thousands more would join the fun if they were not held back by the belief that nothing worth while can be seen or done without first securing an expensive telescope.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0062.xml
article
40
40,41,107
[no value]
[no value]
Glow Lamps for Home Lighting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
FROM a fixture on the wall of his laboratory, a New York chemist recently removed the electric bulb that had been burning there. In its place he screwed a midget, candle-shaped device resembling a radio tube of odd design and snapped the switch.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0063.xml
article
42
42,43
[no value]
[no value]
Living GERMS from other worlds... ... brought to Earth by METEORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Robert E. Martin
SPELLBOUND at a microscope, Prof. Charles B. Lipman, University of California biologist, recently gazed at what he believed to be the first living creatures from another world ever observed. Tiny germs—some round, some rod-shaped—swarmed beneath the lens.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0064.xml
article
44
44
MODELS
[no value]
MODEL OF DIVER IS FULLY EQUIPPED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FEW months ago, Chief Gunner’s Mate G. F. Boone, U. S. N., became a master diver. Enthusiastic over his n newly-acquired work, he devoted his spare hours to constructing the working model shown at the left, which he has just placed on exhibition in Washington, D. C.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0065.xml
article
44
44
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
SAND BLAST CARVES WOOD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WOOD carving of unusual beauty is produced by a new process in which sand, propelled by an air blast of 150 pounds’ pressure, serves as the tool. A rubber stencil is used to cover the parts not to be carved. The sand blast, as shown at right, speedily eats away the surface against which it is directed.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0066.xml
article
44
44
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
PLANE'S WHEEL HOOKS TRAILER TO AUTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SEEKING a coupling for a big automobile trailer, engineers of a Detroit, Mich., concern found the answer to their problem in an airplane landing wheel, complete with its pneumatic tire. The wheel was mounted in a frame attached to the tow car by means of aluminum channel blocks, and a king pin, passing through its hub, was anchored to the steel nose of the trailer.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0067.xml
article
44
44
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
USE PENDULUM TO TEST HARDNESS OF METAL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TESTING the hardness of a metal with a pendulum is the feat performed by the new instrument pictured above. A spherical ball of steel, one twenty-fifth of an inch in diameter, supports the pendulum upon the test specimen. The ball sinks farther into a soft metal than a hard one.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0068.xml
article
45
45
AVIATION
[no value]
Paddle Wheel Plane for Vertical Flight
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILL paddle wheel airplanes be the next great step forward in aviation? No less an authority than Dr. Adolf Rohrbach, head of the great German airplane firm that bears his name, is sponsor for. the idea of replacing the wings and propeller of the conventional aircraft with immense rotating vanes.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0069.xml
article
45
45
AVIATION
[no value]
GARAGE USES PLANE TO RUSH HELP TO WRECKED AUTOS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BILLBOARDS near Los Angeles, Calif., announce a new aerial garage service. A phone call brings the repair man by airplane. The quick assistance recently saved a $3,600 cargo of butter, threatened by 115-degree heat when the truck at right broke down in a Nevada desert.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0070.xml
article
46
46
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
CAMERAMAN IN DIVING BELL TAKES MOVIE OF OCTOPUS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a live octopus was added recently to Hollywood’s screen stars complications for the cameramen resulted. A scenario called for views of the octopus under water, but attempts to get realistic views in a swimming pool were failures. Technicians solved the problem by putting the cameraman inside a steel diving bell with walls half an inch thick, completely equipped with air lines and flasks of oxygen.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0071.xml
article
46
46
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
HORSE OF STEEL RUNS ACROSS FIELDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MECHANICAL horse that trots and gallops on steel-pipe legs, under the impulse of a gasoline engine, is the recent product of an Italian inventor. With this horse, he declares, children may be trained to ride. The iron Dobbin is said to canter along a road or across a rough field with equal ease.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0072.xml
article
46
46
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
STEEL CANOPY GUARDS STONE AGE BUILDING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GOVERNMENT engineers have just erected the odd steel umbrella pictured above to shelter from the elements a twelfth-century pueblo watch-tower in Arizona. Archeologists consider the mud-walled structure the most important of its kind.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0073.xml
article
46
46
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
ENTIRE RAILWAY SYSTEM OPERATED BY ONE MAN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNTROUBLED by such modern problems as labor disputes and overhead, a queer little one-man railway in England has successfully resisted the march of modernization. The two-mile line, which connects the towns of Essex and Coryton, possesses one engine, a single passenger coach, and a few freight cars.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0074.xml
article
47
47
AVIATION
[no value]
Test Flyers' Oxygen Tank in Air-Tight Vault
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN AIR-TIGHT chamber, reproducing atmospheric conditions 40,000 feet above the earth, is being used by British engineers in London to test oxygen apparatus designed for a flight over Mt. Everest, world's highest peak. Bundled up like Arctic explorers and breathing oxygen through rubber tubes, experimenters locked inside the metal vault proved the equipment would keep a pilot comfortable in terrifically cold and rarefied air.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0075.xml
article
47
47
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
LIGHT IN BUILDINGS TESTED WITH TWO ELECTRIC EYES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Is POOR light straining your eyes? To that question, an exact answer is now being given by a compact light meter that shows whether an office, a factory, or a schoolroom is properly illuminated. Twin photoelectric cells are set in a paddle-shaped instrument that is held in the hand and moved over the area being investigated.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0076.xml
article
47
47
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
COIL SPRINGS IN SHOE GIVE IT RESILIENCY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY BUILDING tiny coil springs into the sole and heel of a shoe, a Missouri shoemaker reports he has combined the springiness of a rubber sole with the wearing quality of leather. Soldered to a metal plate, the cone-shaped steel springs are inserted between layers of the sole during manufacture.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0077.xml
article
47
47
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
AUTOMATIC SECRETARY RUNS EMPTY OFFICE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN tenants of a new office building in St. Paul, Minn., are called out, they can flip a switch and leave an automatic secretary on duty. A microphone and loudspeaker are installed in each office. When the door is opened, a signal flashes before the girl at the switchboard in the lobby.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0078.xml
article
47
47
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
SECRET SWITCH OPENS LOCK ON CAR’S HOOD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CONTROLLED by a secret switch, a new lock, designed by a Chicago, 111., inventor prevents an auto thief from lifting the car’s hood to circumvent a locked ignition system. Electric latches are attached to the hood and the frame of the car and the wires hooked to the car’s battery.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0079.xml
article
48
48,49,98
HOW TO TAKE PICTURES with your Microscope
[no value]
HOW TO TAKE PICTURES with your Microscope
Pictorial Records of Things the Unaided Human Eye Can Never See Are Easily Made With the Apparatus Described Here
[no value]
[no value]
BORDEN HALL
IN THE world of the microscope, just as in our ordinary world, we can take pictures as we travel. It matters little what kind of a microscope we use so long as it has powers beyond those of ordinary magnifying glasses. Of course, if we are going to push on into the more inaccessible regions of this tiny world we must have an instrument with a power of at least one hundred diameters; that is, a microscope, that will magnify 100 times.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0080.xml
article
50
50
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
German Truck Is Easily Changed Into a Farm Tractor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRUCK and tractor in one is an unusual vehicle designed by a German inventor. When it has been driven to the edge of a field, the rear end is jacked up and a demountable endless tread is substituted for the rear wheels. The converted tractor is now ready to pull a plow through the field.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0081.xml
article
50
50
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
GUARD OIL FIELD WITH CIGARETTE LIGHTER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ELECTRIC cigarette lighter, shielded from the weather by a small roof, is an odd sight at a corner of a Beaumont, Texas, oil field. So dreaded a hazard is fire here that workmen are forbidden to carry matches. Violation of this rule is considered almost as serious an offense as it would be in a powder plant.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0082.xml
article
50
50
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
OCEAN ISLAND FLOATS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DERELICT island of floating vegetation is reported by the U. S. Hydro-graphic office at San Diego, Calif. The wandering isle, sighted 1,300 miles from San Diego in the Pacific, is said to be half an acre in extent and to have trees twenty feet high growing on it.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0083.xml
article
50
50
MODELS
[no value]
MODELS FIX BLAME FOR SEA WRECKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIMINUTIVE models of river steamships and ocean liners now aid German courts in fixing responsibility for marine accidents, and in passing on claims for insurance. At the start of a trial, held in a special seamen’s court, a large-scale map of the waters involved is spread out.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0084.xml
article
50
50
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
USE NEW PERISCOPE TO PROTECT BANK VAULT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To MAKE it impossible for thieves to plunder a bank vault while a watchman is making his rounds, a German optical firm has devised a new form of periscope to be inserted in the wall. Through its eyepiece, as shown at left, the watchman may scan all four walls, the floor and ceiling as thoroughly as if he were looking in a window.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0085.xml
article
51
51
AVIATION
[no value]
Flyers Get Gun Practice with Model Planes on Ground
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SINCE the Versailles peace treaty forbids military aviation in Germany, potential war flyers get their gunnery training on the ground through ingenious expedients. Kites and balloons serve as distant targets, while practice at closer range is made possible by firing at toy airplanes scooting along inclined wires.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0086.xml
article
51
51
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW MOTOR FOR FARM IS ROLLED TO WORK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ELECTRIC motor that rolls to its work is the product of a German electrical firm. One man can move the heavy machine, as shown above. Heavy rims protect the motor from damage. It is intended for use on farms, where a portable power plant is necessary.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0087.xml
article
51
51
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
ROBOTS STAGE REALISTIC PRIZE FIGHT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MECHANICAL men stage an exciting boxing contest in a new game invented for amusement resorts. Two contestants play the game, each controlling one of the boxers with a hand wheel. Animated by a system of electro-magnets, the figures swing their gloves up, down, or sideways and duck with surprising realism.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0088.xml
article
52
52
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
LOCOMOTIVE CAN HIT 145 MILE SPEED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAUGHT by the photographer at so unusual an angle that it has the appearance of an eagle poised for flight, a new German locomotive is designed for a normal speed of two miles a minute. Its builders, however, declare it is capable of attaining 145 miles an hour with wide-open throttle.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0089.xml
article
52
52
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
USE RUBBER FUNNEL TO PUT WATER IN BATTERY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FILLING the cells of a storage battery with distilled water is simplified by an attachment for standard glass fruit jars designed by a Placerville, Calif., woman inventor. The device is a funnel-shaped rubber cap with a short tube at the end.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0090.xml
article
52
52
AVIATION
[no value]
AUTOMATIC DIAL CALLS FLYING PILOT ON PHONE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO dispatchers along the transcontinental airway of the United Air Lines now speak at will to the pilot of any particular airplane in flight, by dialing his number as shown above. The device used resembles a conventional dial telephone, but automatically selects the radio wave-length to which the desired craft's receiver is tuned.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0091.xml
article
52
52
AVIATION
[no value]
CARGO ’CHUTE LANDS EGGS UNBROKEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EIGIITY-SIX pounds of food supplies were dropped from an airplane to a party of girl campers at Big Bear Lake, Calif., the other day, in a demonstration of a new cargo parachute. A dozen eggs within the pack were unbroken when recovered. The ’chute, devised by a Los Angeles, Calif., inventor, is provided with an electric timer that automatically opens it at a predetermined height above the earth. This minimizes drifting and would enable food to be dropped to castaways.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0092.xml
article
52
52
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
MERCURY IN TUBE GAGES TRAIN'S GAIN IN SPEED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
How fast a train can pick up speed is measured by an "accelerometer” devised by a General Electric engineer. Its glass tube, mounted on a flat base and set on a window sill, contains mercury. When the train is standing still, the mercury stands at zero, but surges backward as the train gains speed.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0093.xml
article
53
53
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
New Instruments Help Architects
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
How much sunlight will you get from an eight-foot French window facing southwest, at four o'clock on an April afternoon? Odd instruments answer this and hundreds of other questions in a Government research laboratory at Galston. England, where architects are offered an advanced course in their profession.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0094.xml
article
53
53
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
SCHOOL USES MACHINE TO MARK ALL EXAMINATION PAPERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SCHOOL children of Ironwood, Mich., now have their examination papers marked and graded by robot scorers. In a test, a student is handed a list of questions with a choice of several possible answers, together with a supplementary card bearing numbers corresponding to the answers.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0095.xml
article
53
53
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
RUBBER SLAPPER OUSTS THE POLICEMAN’S CLUB
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RUBBER slappers have taken the place of wooden clubs familiarly known as billies, in the hands of Indianapolis police. Invented by Chief of Police Michael Morrisey, of that city, the new weapon is a flat, heavy block of rubber with a slot for the fingers.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0096.xml
article
54
54
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
Steel Shield for Policemen is Bullet-Proof
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BULLETS crashed and ricocheted recently in an exciting test of a new shield for policemen at Chicago, 111. Mounted on casters, the four-foot shield of specially hardened metal affords protection for one police officer in storming barricades or entering besieged houses in the face of gangster fire.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0097.xml
article
54
54
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
METALS THAT VAPORIZE SECURED IN NEW WAY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DUST of rare metals, with particles so fine they burn if exposed for long to the air, is being obtained by a new process of electrolysis developed in the Westinghouse laboratories at East Pittsburgh, Pa. By inserting an electric terminal in special chemical baths, the engineers have obtained, in a powdered state, uranium, thorium and tantalum.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0098.xml
article
54
54
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
THREE FACES ON ONE PORTRAIT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DEPENDING upon the position from which it is viewed, an ingenious slotted sign recently erected in Moscow, Russia, shows the portraits of Karl Marx, the father of socialism, Nikolai Lenin, leader of the Bolshevik revolution, and Joseph Stalin, present head of Soviet Russia.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0099.xml
article
55
55
AVIATION
[no value]
Air Maps for Army Made on Short Notice
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN an army on the march wants an air map of a strategic position, it wants it in a hurry. So that they will be able to give the U. S. Army twenty-four-hour-a-day service at any point on the globe, enlisted students receive strenuous training afield at the new Army Air Corps technical school, Chanute Field, 111.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0100.xml
article
55
55
MODELS
[no value]
MODELS AID CRYSTAL STUDY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHITE objects resembling the eggs of some fabulous creature, shown in the accompanying photograph, help to make clear to engineers a complex but useful phenomena of physics. The models were constructed by Dr. Francis Bitter, Westinghouse engineer, to illustrate the properties of a crystal of iron in a magnetic field.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0101.xml
article
55
55
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW PUTTY KNIFE IS MANY TOOLS IN ONE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PUTTY knife with an offset blade has been introduced. The offset edge, drawn toward the user, becomes a hook for the removal of old putty as shown in the lower photograph. When the tool is drawn sideward as a scraper on a keg or metal container (upper photo), the offset design guards the worker’s knuckles. The versatile tool is also recommended for removing paint and wallpaper—all of this is in addition to its use as a putty knife.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0102.xml
article
56
56,57,109
experiments with Colloids for the HOME CHEMIST
[no value]
experiments with Colloids for the HOME CHEMIST
Gold Solutions and Novel Gels Are Easily Made in Your Laboratory with the Apparatus Described Here
[no value]
[no value]
Raymond B. Wailes
WITH a beam of light and a test tube, the amateur can study the chemistry of sunsets, fogs, and river deltas. Like crystals of sand and sugar, most substances fall into two classifications—those that form true solutions with a solvent and those that unquestionably do not.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0103.xml
article
58
58,59
HOME Conveniences THAT SAVE TIME
[no value]
HOME Conveniences THAT SAVE TIME
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SELF-OPENING TABLE Pressing a button, set in the side of this bridge table, automatically opens all four of the legs at once ALL-METAL LAUNDRY CHUTE. A door in wall or floor of the bathroom opens to this laundry chute down which soiled clothes slide to a container in the basement.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0104.xml
article
60
60
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
When Natural Laws Look Wrong
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
You can’t always trust your eye. What you think you see may be wholly different from the facts. The truth of this statement is proven by the strange experiments illustrated on this page. For instance, does it not surprise you that pulling the string, in the upper picture, will make the spool roll uphill and wind up the cord?
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0105.xml
article
61
61
How to Build an Electric Organ
[no value]
How to Build an Electric Organ
FOR ABOUT FIVE DOLLARS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH its deep, mellow notes, the electric organ is fast gaining the musical limelight. As a rule, these instruments are large and costly. Yet, for the price of a new hat, you can build a duplicate of a small organ that was featured in a recent coast-to-coast radio broadcast.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0106.xml
article
62
62
Adding a Microphone to Your Set
[no value]
Adding a Microphone to Your Set
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Carr
WHEN a good loudspeaker and amplifier system is needed, the radio fan need look no further than the carefully designed circuit of his broadcast receiver. Attachments like miniature microphones and phonographic pick-ups that require an amplifier can be wired directly to a receiver's audio circuit.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0107.xml
article
63
63
New Radio Tube HAS NO FILAMENT
[no value]
New Radio Tube HAS NO FILAMENT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
George H. Waltz
RADIO tubes, that operate without the usual A or filament current supply, were demonstrated recently to a group of radio engineers. Having no filament and requiring but a single direct-current source, the new tubes present an interesting contrast to the detectors and amplifiers of present-day radio.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0108.xml
article
64
64,111
Choose Your SPARK PLUGS to Fit Your Car
[no value]
Choose Your SPARK PLUGS to Fit Your Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Martin Bunn
LATE one Saturday night, a short man bustled into the small salesroom adjoining the Model Garage repair shop. "Got six new spark plugs just like these?" he asked, pushing a soiled newspaper package across the counter to Joe Clark. Gus Wilson, wiping his hands on a piece of waste, poked his gray head through the open repair shop door.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0109.xml
article
65
65,66,67,91,93
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
"REVENGE"
How to Build a Colorful Model of the FAMOUS FIGHTING GALLEON
[no value]
[no value]
CAPTAIN E. ARMITAGE McCANN
OUR new ship model is an Elizabethan galleon, the Revenge— as picturesque and colorful a little fighting ship as ever battled on the high seas. The Revenge lasted only from 1577 to 1591, but she earned undying fame. Under Sir Francis Drake she covered herself with glory in the defeat of the Invincible Spanish Armada.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0110.xml
article
68
68
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
REMARKABLY LIFELIKE LITTLE Dogs made from Pipe Cleaners
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILBUR F. HULL
IN MAKING novelties from fuzzy pipe cleaners, it is perhaps best to start with a familiar animal like the dog. If you have a few cleaners and a pair of pointed nose pliers, you have everything necessary for your initial attempt. When you have completed a natural looking little dog.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0111.xml
article
68
68
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
FUNNEL ACTS AS HOLDER FOR A FLASHLIGHT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F.W.B.
AN ORDINARY flashlight is sometimes the only source of light available for unexpected repair jobs about the home. To keep it spotted right on the work, if you have no one to hold it for you, is not an easy matter, but it can be done by using a funnel as shown at the left.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0112.xml
article
68
68
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
MOUNTING TOY PLANE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
D.A. BUTLER
A DISCARDED set of toy chime wheels and an old airplane toy, if placed at opposite ends of a 3-ft. length of broomstick, will give a small boy many hours of fun playing aviator. It is best to mount the plane at such an angle to the stick that it will be approximately horizontal when the boy gets astride or “rides” the broomstick.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0113.xml
article
69
69
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
How to Keep Paintbrushes so They Never Need Cleaning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. T.
WHEN relatively small amount of various lacquers, paints, enamels, and other finishing materials are used, as in a home workshop, a school shop, or a small repair shop, it saves much time to set a brush through a slot in the lid of each can and solder it in place as shown in the accompanying illustrations.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0114.xml
article
69
69
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
STORAGE BOX PROTECTS CIRCULAR SAWS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DONALD A. PRICE
As THE home craftsman extends his activities, he is likely to accumulate several circular saws and possibly an abrasive metal cutting wheel. He may hang these on nails, where they are subject to deterioration from rust and dust, or stack them on a shelf where they are awkward to get at and are likely to have the sharp points knocked off or otherwise damaged.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0115.xml
article
69
69
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
REPAIRING OLD WRINGER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. W. SNAPP
THE staining and discoloration of clothes by an old, nearly worn-out clothes wringer is usually caused by rust from the iron roller cores, where the rubber has loosened at the ends and allowed water to run in. A quick repair can be made by taking out the rollers, fastening a paper collar about the ends, and pouring in melted paraffin to seal the openings against water and rust.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0116.xml
article
69
69
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
EASTER EGG HOLDER CUT ON JIG SAW
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. HARVEST
THIS egg holder makes a novel Easter gift for any child. Cut two pieces like C from 4-in. three-ply veneer. In one of them cut the slot marked A, in the other the slot indicated by the dotted lines at B. Make the ring D from ⅛-in, stock and cut out the four holes or mortises as shown to match the small tenons of C.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0117.xml
article
70
70,71,89
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
Portable Air Compressor for Shop Use
MADE FROM DISCARDED MOTORCYCLE ENGINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN we asked our readers recently for suggestions on making use of old auto engines and offered a few prizes as an inducement for them to sketch out their ideas, we had no expectation that so large a variety of excellent plans would be offered.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0118.xml
article
72
72,73
MODELS
[no value]
THIS STRIKING LITTLE Autogiro Model Needs only a few simple parts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Donald W. Clark
BECAUSE of its curious appearance and remarkable performance. the autogiro has an especial appeal for the airplane model builder. It would seem an unusually difficult model to make.but this is not the case if the accompanying plans are closely followed.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0119.xml
article
73
73,74
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Wood Carving for BEGINNERS
Two simple methods by which anyone can prepare panels of a decorative character
[no value]
[no value]
CAROL COWARD
FOR decorative work of a bold and self-expressive type, try carving pictures or friezes from wood similar to the panel, illustrated at the bottom of this page and those shown on page 74. A ¼-in. carver’s gouge, a veining tool (small U-shaped gouge), and some common paints are sufficient for making a start.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0120.xml
article
75
75
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
SQUARE-KNOT TIE
Nimble fingers are all you need to make this
[no value]
[no value]
KENNETH MURRAY
TWO balls of light silk cord, such as crochet silk, will make a good-looking square-knot tie. It has a distinctive, handmade appearance, is exceedingly durable, and will not wrinkle. The simple two-color design illustrated is in good taste and not difficult for the beginner in square-knot work to follow.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0121.xml
article
76
76,77
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Nontipping ASH TRAYS Spun Like Magic FROM SHEET METAL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Herbert Woolsey
ONCE you have mastered the method of spinning the ash tray described in this article, you will be able to make a variety of useful and decorative objects from sheet metal with great rapidity and at very little expense. To do this you need no other machine but your lathe and a few homemade tools and accessories.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0122.xml
article
77
77
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
TRICK WAY TO DECORATE EASTER EGGS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G. A. SMITH
SOME of you cannot help but recall those good old-fashioned egg hunts that started off Easter morning with a whoop from young and old alike. I remember a trick used by my grandmother to decorate the Easter eggs with bunnies, chicks, and various greetings.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0123.xml
article
78
78,97
A simple dark-room method of making "Charcoal" Portraits WITH YOUR CAMERA
[no value]
A simple dark-room method of making "Charcoal" Portraits WITH YOUR CAMERA
Prizes for Best Photos of Children
[no value]
[no value]
Frederick D. Ryder
HERE is a new idea for making extra money with your camera. Take portraits of your friends or their children, and finish them to look like large charcoal drawings. The “sketch” at the head of this column, for example, was made by a simple dark-room process from an ordinary negative like the one of the baby shown in Fig. 1.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0124.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0125.xml
article
80
80
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
LOW-COST ELECTRIC SPOT-WELDER BUILT WITH OLD TRANSFORMERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BYRON TAYLOR
ALMOST any shop in which sheet metal is fabricated will profit by having an electric spot-welder. A machine like the one illustrated above will handle materials up to No. 16 gage quite readily. The parts are all mounted on a piece of dry, well-seasoned 2 by 12 in. wood about 5 ft. long.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0126.xml
article
80
80
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
RIGGING CLOTHESLINE IN BASEMENT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM T. WELD
ANYONE who has had the.misfortune to run into a clothesline strung up in the basement will appreciate the method of arranging a line shown in the accompanying illustrations. When not in use, the line is raised out of the way. At each end of the line are two hangers and one crossbar made from 1 by 2 in. wooden strips.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0127.xml
article
80
80
MODELS
[no value]
PENCIL ERASER POLISHES TIN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DONALD R. FOSLER
ORDINARY sheet tin, when used for models, can be given a finely finished appearance with the aid of a lead pencil having an eraser that has never been used. Hold the pencil vertically and revolve it once only, using one hand to act as a bearing to keep the eraser in position on the metal.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0128.xml
article
80
80
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
TWO HINTS ON SETTING A SURFACE GAGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. MOORE
THE two surface gage kinks shown in the photograph above may not always be necessary at the same time, but they are shown together to save space. A small magnet is laid on top of a parallel or similar object to hold the scale upright for conveniently setting the surface gage; and a piece of white paper or cardboard is slipped on the scriber to reflect the light on the scale when the electric bulb is fixed overhead or the bench faces a window so that the scale graduations do not show up plainly.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0129.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: INGRAM'S
[no value]
[no value]
INGRAM'S
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0130.xml
advertisement
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
United States Rubber Company: U.S. Giant Chains
[no value]
United States Rubber Company
U.S. Giant Chains
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0131.xml
article
82
82,83,85
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Electroplating with ZINC-CADMIUM
A new, simple process for coating iron with a durable, bright looking, rustproof alloy
[no value]
[no value]
ISADORE KOWARSKY
A NEW method of electroplating iron with zinc-cadmium alloys now makes it possible for anyone to obtain excellent plating results without the use of expensive instruments and equipment. The deposits obtained are not only durable, uniform, and brilliant, but they provide the best possible protection from corrosion.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0132.xml
advertisement
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0133.xml
article
84
84
Ingenious Ideas for Motorists
[no value]
Ingenious Ideas for Motorists
Our Readers Give You Many Suggestions for Adding Conveniences to Your Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN A holder that attaches to the steering column of your car, you can keep your flashlight within easy reach. The inexpensive holder illustrated is made from an 8 in. length of 1⅞ in. radiator connection hose by plugging the lower end with a cork or suitable wood disk.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0134.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
CHAMPION SPARK PLUG COMPANY: CHAMPION
[no value]
CHAMPION SPARK PLUG COMPANY
CHAMPION
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0135.xml
advertisement
86
86
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0136.xml
article
86
86
MODELS
[no value]
Signal Towers for a Model Railway
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. R. SCHROEDER
MODEL railway enthusiasts who have built the full automatic block control system described in this magazine some time ago (P.S.M., Dec. ’30, p. 94, Jan. ’31, p. 86, and Feb. ’31, p. 128) or, in fact, who intend to install almost any type of signal system, : will find this signal house satisfactory.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0137.xml
article
86
86
MODELS
[no value]
OPERATING MODEL TRAINS ON GRADES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EARLE T. ORCHARD
IF YOUR model railway track layout includes grades, you have to move the rheostat every time the train reaches the grade and then move it back to its original setting when the train breasts the top of the ascent. When the grade is not too steep and the locomotive can climb it merely by a change in the rheostat setting, the solution of the problem is to add another rheostat which can be used to control the current for the grade alone (remove third-rail pins to isolate grade section).
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0138.xml
article
86
86
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
GARDEN HOSE SIPHONS WATER FROM CELLAR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. R. BARLOW
RECENTLY I had to siphon water from my cellar, but found it difficult to start the flow through 75 ft. of hose. I finally hit upon the following method, which proved successful: Connect the hose to a faucet and run it down to the bottom of the water that is to be siphoned.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0139.xml
article
87
87
MODELS
[no value]
MARKER LIGHTS IMPROVE OBSERVATION CARS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. I. HUEBSCH
MANY of the model railway observation cars now sold are fitted with red celluloid disks to represent marker lights. In some of the more elaborate models a back platform light is added, and this is supposed to illuminate the red disks. The effect can be much improved, however, by fitting an electric bulb directly behind each marker disk.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0140.xml
article
87
87
MODELS
[no value]
“DOPING” MODELS WITH SHELLAC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LINN G. DUNCAN
A GOOD substitute for model airplane “dope,” I have found, is white shellac thinned with alcohol, provided it is applied after the paper has been shrunk with water. It makes a very strong wing, and I could never detect any difference in weight.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0141.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Quaker State Oil Refining Co.: QUAKER STATE MOTOR OILS
[no value]
Quaker State Oil Refining Co.
QUAKER STATE MOTOR OILS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0142.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
W. & J. BOICE
[no value]
W. & J. BOICE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0143.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
Rutland Fire Clay Company: Rutland
[no value]
Rutland Fire Clay Company
Rutland
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0144.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS: Precision Bench Lathe
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
Precision Bench Lathe
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0145.xml
article
88
88
WOODWORKING
[no value]
Our CONSTRUCTION KITS Will Save Your Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CAREFULLY selected, timesaving kit of raw materials for building a picturesque model of the famous Elizabethan galleon Revenge is the latest addition to the construction kits offered by the Popular Science Homecraft Guild. The new kit, marked G in the list below, contains a plywood centerboard sawed to shape and two plain white pine side blocks for making the hull, all the necessary thin plywood, chair caning spline, hardwood for small fittings, celluloid, dowels, wire, rigging cord, sailcloth, silk, beads, brads, pins, escutcheon pins—in fact everything but glue and paints.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0146.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0147.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: PLASTIC WOOD
[no value]
[no value]
PLASTIC WOOD
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0148.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
WISCONSIN ABRASIVE COMPANY
[no value]
WISCONSIN ABRASIVE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0149.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
International Typewriter Exch.
[no value]
International Typewriter Exch.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0150.xml
article
90
90
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Decorative Double-Duty Candlestick
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lee M. Klinefelter
THOUGH the days of candles are long past, an attractive candlestick is still welcome in every home, and in emergencies it may prove useful as well as ornamental. The one described here is adapted from an antique model and differs from the usual styles in that it may be either hung on the wall or set on the table or mantel.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0151.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0152.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
J. D. WALLACE & CO.
WORKACE Scroll Saw
J. D. WALLACE & CO.
WORKACE Radial Drill
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0153.xml
article
92
92
WOODWORKING
[no value]
HOME WORKSHOP BLUEPRINTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO ASSIST you in your home workshop, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY offers large blueprints containing working drawings of a number of well-tested projects. The blueprints are I5 by 22 in. and are sold for 25 cents a single sheet (except in a few special cases).
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0154.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0155.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
2 IN 1-SHINOLA-BIXBY CORP.: BIXBY's SHOE POLISHES
[no value]
2 IN 1-SHINOLA-BIXBY CORP.
BIXBY's SHOE POLISHES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0156.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
PRATT & LAMBERT VARNISH PRODUCTS
[no value]
PRATT & LAMBERT VARNISH PRODUCTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0157.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
J. &. H. Metal Products Co.: WOOD TURNING LATHE
[no value]
J. &. H. Metal Products Co.
WOOD TURNING LATHE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0158.xml
article
94
94,95
WOODWORKING
[no value]
THESE EASILY MADE Little Tables Nest Together TO SAVE SPACE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
K.M
WHEN nested together, the tables illustrated occupy little floor space. They have artistic lines, are simple to make, and will prove decidedly useful in any living room. The patterns are similar for all three, except that the top and aprons are progressively cut down for the smaller tables.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0159.xml
article
95
95
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
NEAT LOOKING SUPPORT FOR BUSHY PLANTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THEODRE LINDQUIST
FREQUENTLY an otherwise attractive garden is ruined by unsightly flower supports. While supports are often necessary, they need not be eyesores. For several years the writer has used the homemade support illustrated, which is especially useful with peonies.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0160.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
E. R. Squibb & Sons
[no value]
E. R. Squibb & Sons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0161.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
DURHAM-DUPLEX RAZOR CO.
[no value]
DURHAM-DUPLEX RAZOR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0162.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Old Town Canoe Co.: "Old Town Boats"
[no value]
Old Town Canoe Co.
"Old Town Boats"
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0163.xml
article
96
96
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
AMUSING NOVELTIES Turned on a Lathe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. Clarke Hughes
MADE almost entirely on the lathe, this little figure of a Chinaman bears a tray that may be turned to a size and shape suitable for holding either a metal ash tray, an incense burner, or a container for cigarettes. The figure also might be used as a novel sewing kit, a small rod or wire being set between the hands to hold one or two spools of thread.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0164.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0165.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0166.xml
article
99
99,100
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
How to Make Waxed Harness Thread
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. M. ROEHL
TO MAKE thread for repairing farm harness or for any similar leather work, the following materials are required: a ball of linen thread, harness wax, beeswax, two harness needles, and a soft leather pad. 1. Draw out a required length of thread as shown at A.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0167.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
DELTA MFG. CO.
[no value]
DELTA MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0168.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0169.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0170.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
SLOAN’S Liniment
[no value]
SLOAN’S Liniment
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0171.xml
article
100
100
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
TWIN POINT SCRIBER FOR TRANSFER WORK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT WELLER
THE transfer scriber illustrated is especially useful for transferring holes from die sections to the die shoe or bolster plate, from jig parts to assembly frames, and from machine parts to housings. It is made from a piece of ¼-in. cold-rolled steel 3½ in. long, tapered and knurled as shown.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0172.xml
article
100
100
MODELS
[no value]
CORDS OPERATE MODEL RAILWAY SWITCHES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
T. R. WATTS
ALTHOUGH the latest types of electrically operated model railway switches are easily controlled at any distance, many model railway operators do not realize that distant control of the hand operated switches also is quite simple. The illustration below shows a hand operated switch arranged for distant control.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0173.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0174.xml
article
101
101
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Marble Game Is Simple to Make
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. G. S.
MARBLE games are sold by the thousands in various designs, but you can easily and quickly make one yourself. Each player shoots ten marbles by pulling out and releasing the knob. Those marbles which come to rest in the inclosures are counted according to the numbers on the board, and the player who runs up the highest score becomes the winner.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0175.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
THE FATE-ROOTHEATH COMPANY
[no value]
THE FATE-ROOTHEATH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0176.xml
article
102
102,103
Secrets of Success
[no value]
EMPTY GARAGE TURNED INTO PAYING LIBRARY
STORIES THAT WILL HELP YOU GET AHEAD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MY FRIEND said, “When twelve million men leave off work, there is bound to be a change in the measured order of living. And whether the new era will be ushered in on the wings of technocracy or established by individual initiative is beside the point.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0177.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0178.xml
article
103
103,104
Secrets of Success
[no value]
HE CASHED IN ON BOYHOOD HOBBY
Cash Prizes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH I didn’t know it then, as far back as the eighth grade in public school I was tinkering with a hobby that was later to become a wage earner for me. I was taking a course in wood-working that required two hours of mechanical drawing each week.
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0179.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
FEDERAL SCHOOLS, INC.
[no value]
FEDERAL SCHOOLS, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0180.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0181.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0182.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
[no value]
G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0183.xml
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106
106
[no value]
[no value]
MILLER & MILLER
[no value]
MILLER & MILLER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0184.xml
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106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Engineering Research and Sales Co.
[no value]
Engineering Research and Sales Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0185.xml
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106
106
[no value]
[no value]
L. F. RANDOLPH
[no value]
L. F. RANDOLPH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0186.xml
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107
107
[no value]
[no value]
CLARENCE A. O'BRIEN
[no value]
CLARENCE A. O'BRIEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0187.xml
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108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0188.xml
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109
109
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0189.xml
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110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0190.xml
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111
111
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0191.xml
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113
113
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, Inc.: EVEREADY BATTERIES
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, Inc.
EVEREADY BATTERIES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0192.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330401_0122_004_0193.xml