Issue: 19330301

Wednesday, March 1, 1933
MARCH 1933
3
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122
Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0001.xml
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THE TEXAS COMPANY
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THE TEXAS COMPANY
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0002.xml
advertisement
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1
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Advertisement: PLYMOUTH SIX
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PLYMOUTH SIX
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0003.xml
masthead
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2,13
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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TABLE of CONTENTS for MARCH, 1933
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0005.xml
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3
3
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PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
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PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0006.xml
advertisement
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5
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0007.xml
article
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6,7,8,9
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WHERE Amateurs Have No Standing
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LEON MEADOW
GOING home on the train the other night, I couldn’t help overhearing a conversation between two men in the seat ahead of me. One of them looked up from the financial section of the newspaper he had been reading and said to the other, “If I had the money I’d get in on some of that Case Threshing Stock.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0008.xml
advertisement
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6
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Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
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Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0009.xml
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7
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PROVIDENT MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
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PROVIDENT MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0010.xml
advertisement
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8
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D. Van Nostrand Co., Inc.
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D. Van Nostrand Co., Inc.
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0011.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0012.xml
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9
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0013.xml
article
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10,11
Our Readers Say
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Our Readers Say
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HERE’S one that’s been bothering me for a long time. Some of your scientific readers probably know the answer. Suppose we take a compression spring, like the valve spring on an automobile, compress it, and then bind it with wire so as to hold it in compression.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0014.xml
advertisement
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12
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0015.xml
article
13
13,14,15,103,104
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Riding the Night Patrol WITH THE Radio Police
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EDWIN TEALE
RED, blue, green, the reflections of neon signs race across the polished hood of Cruiser Car Number 65. Private cars swerve to the curb. Crowds flash past. Lighted windows blur and streak together. Cross-street traffic stops as the wail of the siren announces that the night radio patrol is making a run.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0016.xml
article
16
16,17,96
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BIRTH CONTROL METHODS Restore Wasted Forests
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Andrew R. Boone
TWO weeks before pollen began to fly, a young tree scientist climbed high into the branches of a vigorous Western Yellow pine. At his waist hung a hundred small bags. Over the topmost pinnacle he slipped the first bag, tying it carefully so he could see the blossom through the oblong celluloid window.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0017.xml
article
18
18
AVIATION
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Grasshopper Plane Jumps into the Air
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AN AIRPLANE that jumps into the air, like a grasshopper, is reported to have performed successfully in trial flights at an Alhambra, Calif., airport. Alonzo Mather, inventor of its boosting gear, sees possibilities for it in enabling airplanes to take off from the restricted space of a ship's deck or a small field bordered by trees or cliffs.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0018.xml
article
18
18
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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NEW SAFETY RAZOR HAS OSCILLATING BLADE
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ESPECIALLY designed for those with tender skins and tough beards, a new safety razor employs an oscillating blade to cut the hairs. While the razor is drawn across the face, a pair of friction rollers revolve and cause the whole blade to move sideward with a reciprocating motion, as indicated by arrows in the photograph at left.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0019.xml
article
18
18
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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TOOL FOR DRAFTSMEN DRAWS MANY CURVES
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ELLIPSES, spirals, and other curves hitherto requiring complicated apparatus to draw correctly may now be inked-in with ease by an ingenious hand tool for draftsmen. The tool, which resembles a compass, is held in place with one finger resting on a center pin as shown in the illustration above.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0020.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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BRAKE STOPS FAST TRAIN IN 100 FEET
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STOPPING a mile-a-minute express train within the space of 100 feet is one of the feats claimed within the power of a new type of emergency brake, invented by a Russian and demonstrated recently before police officials of London, England.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0021.xml
article
19
19
AUTOMOBILES
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Fluid Flywheel Gives Auto Smooth Power
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WITH their adoption as standard equipment by four British motor car makers, fluid flywheels, a modern achievement of inventive genius, are coming into increasing vogue for automobiles as well as for heavier machinery. Replacing the conventional mechanism, the fluid flywheel transmits power with exceptional smoothness.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0022.xml
article
19
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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CHEMICAL HAND WARMER FITS OVERCOAT POCKET
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FIRST aid for cold hands is a new warmer that slips conveniently into an overcoat pocket. Fireless and devoid of electrical connections, it generates its own heat on the same principle as chemical heating pads of larger size. When a teaspoonful of water is poured into an inner bag containing a chemical mixture, and the bag is replaced in its cloth cover, the warmer emits a gentle heat for a considerable period.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0023.xml
article
19
19
AUTOMOBILES
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ODD DESIGN IN NEW STREAMLINED CAR
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A WELL-KNOWN American manufacturer of fine cars, usually of ultra-conservative style, has startled the motor world by producing a streamlined model that ranks with extreme conceptions of “the car of the future.” Its contour, developed after extensive wind-tunnel tests, gives the new model a maximum speed of 115 miles an hour, while at cruising speeds of sixty to eighty miles an hour it slips silently and smoothly through the air.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0024.xml
article
19
19
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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CLOUD-MAKING TOWER MAY SAVE ORCHARDS
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FANTASTIC ideas of capturing electricity from the atmosphere have led to small practical results thus far, but a curious tower just erected atop a canyon ridge near Whittier, Calif., proves that such a dream is hard to down. The Los Angeles inventor and builder of the tower says he will use it in an attempt to release electrical charges from moisture-laden air.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0025.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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Electric Taster Measures Fruit's Acid
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WHILE R. C. Hitchcock, Westinghouse engineer, was enjoying a luncheon in his laboratory not long ago, it occurred to him that the apple that constituted his dessert contained a certain amount of electrical energy. He inserted a pair of wires from a sensitive electric meter—and it began to register.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0026.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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WALKER CAN TUNE IN WITH RADIO IN CANE
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So THAT a pedestrian may enjoy broadcast programs wherever he goes, a German inventor, Alfred Mintus, has devised what he calls a “radio walking stick.” Outwardly it resembles an ordinary cane, but the interior contains a miniature receiver and batteries.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0027.xml
article
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AVIATION
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LIGHT RAYS TO FIGHT AIR RAIDERS
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A SECRET system of searchlights to put air raiders out of commission has just been demonstrated before British Air Ministry officials by L. G. Toplis, English electrical engineer. His special lamps are said to be designed to bewilder enemy pilots, causing them to lose control and crash.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0028.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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WATER IN PIPE LINE COOLS MOTOR
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A NEW departure in auto cooling systems, just introduced in a car of familiar make, brings water directly from the radiator to vital parts of the engine through a pipe line. The water circulates first in special cooling jackets around the exhaust valves, hottest spots on the whole motor; then it passes on to cool the intake valves, and the cylinder head and barrels, before being returned to the radiator.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0029.xml
article
21
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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CAMERA SPEEDS LAND SURVEY
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SURVEYING methods may be made over by an instrument called a “photo-recording transit,” developed by Government foresters at Portland, Ore. In this device, a special panoramic camera replaces the surveyor's eye and photographs a sector of the country, while a scale of reference angles is automatically recorded on the picture.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0030.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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MODEL SHOWS LATEST IDEA OF EARTH’S CORE
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WITH the aid of the sectional diagram illustrated above, Professor R. A. Daly, Harvard University geologist, recently gave the Geological Society of America the latest scientific conception of the interior of the earth. The fortymile-thick crust on which we stand constitutes its real strength, he says.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0031.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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AIR PHOTOS SUGGEST BIG COMET HIT EARTH
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DID a giant comet once collide head-on with the earth? Prof. F. A. Melton, University of Oklahoma geologist, recently completed a field study of mysterious elliptical pits averaging half a mile long, found in numbers in North and South Carolina by aerial photos like the one reproduced above.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0032.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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TEST TRAIN AT 100-MILE CLIP
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SNAPPED just as it was leaving the Berlin station in the striking view at left, Germany's new streamlined train, the “Flying Hamburger,” hit a speed of nearly 100 miles an hour on its first passenger run to Hamburg. To minimize wind resistance, even the door knobs are sunk within the body.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0033.xml
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22,23
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Midget Sub to Seek Riches on Sea’s Floor
Simon Lake’s Underwater Craft Makes Trip to Bottom of Long Island Sound
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WHEN Simon Lake, famous submarine inventor, once asked a farmer what crop gave him the greatest profit per acre, the farmer replied, “Beans. I make sixty dollars for every acre I plant.” “Would you believe,” Lake asked him, “that I know where you can get a return of $3,000 to $4,000 an acre?
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0034.xml
article
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AVIATION
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Whirling Vanes Lift and Drive New Plane
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FOUR square vanes on revolving frames serve as wings and propeller for an airplane soon to have its first flying trials. The vanes rotate on pivots, presenting a nearly flat surface as they descend. This feathering action, the new York inventor, William Rahn, believes will enable the craft to hover in the air or to speed forward at a rate of 135 miles an hour.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0035.xml
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PLUNGER IN HUMIDOR FILLS YOUR PIPE
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SMOKERS now are offered a humidor that not only keeps tobacco moist and fresh, but even fills their pipes for them. Raising and lowering a plunger on top of the bowl stirs the contents, deposits a measured charge in a pipe placed beneath an opening, and tamps it down, as shown in the photo at left.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0036.xml
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TWO VACUUM CUPS HOLD NEW OUTLET TO WALL
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VACUUM cups fitted to a new convenience outlet enable it to be attached instantly to a wall, wherever it is needed, and moved from place to place if the occasion should arise. The handy accessory provides connections for three appliances.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0037.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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MASKS TESTED WITH REAL POISON GAS
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TEMPTING death daily is the let of a few daring men in a London laboratory, where a steel-walled chamber containing an appreciable quantity of real poison gas is reported in use to test the air-purifying canisters of military gas masks. Masked experimenters sit outside the deadly chamber, and breathe through hoses that terminate in the canisters within.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0038.xml
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AVIATION
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RADIO CONTROLS PLANE MODEL
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To DEMONSTRATE the airworthy qualities of a safety plane he has designed, a Japanese inventor is building the remarkable model, illustrated at the right, to fly under its own power. It will be powered with a four-cylinder gasoline motor, and the inventor, R. Okahara, proposes to steer and land it by radio control.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0039.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Giant Voltage May Blast Atom
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MAN-MADE lightning will soon flash in a blimp hangar at South Dartmouth, Mass., where a fantastic machine to harness the power of 10,000,000 volts is nearing completion. Sitting inside one of its two hollow spheres of aluminum, nearly fifteen feet in diameter, an operator will apply the huge voltage to a vacuum tube.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0040.xml
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GLOBE STORES LIGHT FROM ELECTRIC BULB
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STORING light in a globe was a feat recently demonstrated by Ethan I. Dodds, America’s most prolific inventor, whose collection of more than 2,000 patents was exceeded only by those of the late Thomas A. Edison. The evacuated interior of Dodds’ magic globe, which is covered by twelve of his U. S. patents, is coated with a mixture of phosphorescent chemicals.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0041.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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NEW POLICE SIGNAL BOX FOR HOMES
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To CURB the activities of burglars in Berlin, Germany, civilians are availing themselves of a new service offered by the city’s police department. An emergency police box is installed in a home or apartment. Should the householder hear a suspicious noise or see a robbery from his window, he has only to pull the handle of the box.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0042.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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SHIP'S PASSENGERS ARE LANDED WITH DERRICK
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SCENES like that in the photograph below, suggesting a thrilling sea rescue, take place when visitors land on the jagged coast of Hamakua, Hawaii. There small boats bring passengers within range of a derrick-like landing gear that has been erected on a cliff.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0043.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Where Telescopes Look Like Big Cannon
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STRIKING scenes, resembling those in a gun factory, confront a visitor to the famous Zeiss works at Jena, Germany, where telescopes for many of the world’s largest observatories are built. A number of these Big Berthas of the sky, ready for shipment, presented an unusual sight recently when a photographer snapped the view at the left.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0044.xml
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COVERING FOR ELECTRIC CORD ENDS KINKING
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TROUBLESOME kinks in cords for the telephone, the electric iron, and other household fixtures are prevented by a new elastic covering. Simple to attach, it is merely wound around the cord as shown in the photograph, without need of disconnecting any of the wires.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0045.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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DETACHABLE CAR TRUNK FITS OVER SPARE TIRE
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FITTING over the spare tire, a new detachable trunk for automobiles is held in place by a single wing nut and bolt. Only a few seconds are required to attach or remove it. The tire serves as a shock absorber for the contents. Especially useful for picnics, the trunk may be packed with food and removed later to the scene of the meal without unpacking it.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0046.xml
article
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NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
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PAINTER'S SLIDE RULE HELPS MATCH COLORS
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A COLOR slide rule, to aid in matching any tint, has been devised by a large paint manufacturer. One of the cardboard devices is supplied for each color. When the painter has to match a brown auto enamel, for example, he selects the brown card and pulls down the slide, attempting to match the color on the auto as seen through an aperture in the card.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0047.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Toys Used by Scientist in Study of Vibration
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CHILDREN'S toys aided a recent scientific study of self-induced vibration, the phenomenon that causes wing flutter in airplanes and shimmy in auto wheels. To find its underlying laws, J. G. Baker, research engineer of the Westinghouse Electric and Manufacturing Company, investigated hundreds of examples of self-induced vibration.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0048.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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NEW PLEASURE CAR IS ALSO A LIGHT TRUCK
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COMBINING a pleasure and a business car in one is the achievement of Peter Linn, Los Angeles, Calif., inventor. The rear end of the car is provided with a sliding deck, collapsible rumble seats and a folding trunk. To transform the car into a light delivery truck, deck and seats are pushed out of the way and the trunk unfolds to form a package carrier.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0049.xml
article
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HEALTH AND HYGIENE
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MODEL OF HUMAN HEAD AIDS RADIUM RESEARCH
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A LIFE-SIZE wax model of a human head is being used by a British hospital to test radium rays. Since the wax has about the same density as human tissue, the effect of radium upon any internal part may be measured by inserting a photographic film in the model.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0050.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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WALKING IN TREADMILL DRAWS WATER
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A BRITISH country dweller walks a quarter of a mile to get a drink of water, without leaving his own cellar! To raise the large bucket in his 300-foot well, Fred Hoare, of Beauworth, Hants, installed a twelve-foot treadmill beside the shaft.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0051.xml
article
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28,29,101,102
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Amateur Movie Makers USE PROFESSIONAL TRICKS
FILM Thrillers, Made in Attic or Garage, with Tiny Sets, Rival the Work Turned Out in Big Studios with Costly Equipment
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STERLING GLEASON
IN LITTLE HOLLYWOOD, the amateur cinematographers are shooting. Home-made floodlights blaze. Embryo Garbos appear. Miniature cameras click, as amateur directors wield megaphone and script to produce thrilling celluloid drama.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0052.xml
article
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30,31,32,97,98
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Shattered Men Rebuilt by Master Surgeons
Thrilling Experiences Are Described in This Article, Fourth in Our Series Dealing with Modern Surgery
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FREDERIC DAMRAU
A DISTINGUISHED looking man stopped me on the street. "Remember me, Doctor?" he asked. I looked at him closely. On each cheek there was visible the short line of a scar. Eventually he identified himself as a soldier I had treated in 1918 after he had undergone what was probably the most amazing human repair job I have seen performed.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0053.xml
article
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33,34,98
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Making Our MONEY Last Longer
Constant Tests by Our Government Seek More Durable Paper Currency
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ARTHUR GRAHAME
HOW I wish I could make my money last longer!” We’ve all expressed that universal desire. The United States Government is wishing the same thing—that it could make its money last longer. Even now, it does a lot better than most of us for it makes a dollar bill last nine months!
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0054.xml
article
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MODELS
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Gold Mining taught with Models
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TINY cradle rockers and nozzles no longer than a man’s arm aid in teaching amateur miners how to recover gold from the claims now being worked in the West. The oldest method known to mining and the newest are combined in this school at Los Angeles, Calif.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0055.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Odd Designs on Film Turn to Music
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SYNTHETIC music is being produced in a German film studio by reversing a familiar process. When artists sing and orchestras play before the talkie microphone, their music is recorded, in one standard method, as a wavy black line upon the sound track of the film.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0056.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Final Tests Now Being Made of America's Fastest Railway Car
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SOON to be seen in many states is the eighty-five-mile-an-hour streamlined railway car of aluminum that recently had its first demonstration at Detroit, Mich. (P. S.M., Feb., ’33, p. 21). It has just begun a series of trial runs that will take it over tracks of the Michigan Central and New York Central lines.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0057.xml
article
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AVIATION
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Corkscrew Plane for Vertical Flight
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CAN an airplane be built that will fly straight up? Many odd crafts have been built in vain attempts to solve this problem, but J. P. Sellmer, of Stinson Beach, Calif., is pinning his hopes to one of even stranger design than most. His corkscrew airplane, according to him will lift itself by means of a whirling, continuous wing of spiral design.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0058.xml
article
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HEALTH AND HYGIENE
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TELESCOPE EYEGLASSES MAKE THE BLIND SEE
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TELESCOPE eyeglasses, just perfected by a New York optometrist, will enable forty percent of persons incapacitated by blindness to return to normal work, the American Academy of Optometry was told recently. The powerful lenses enable a patient with only two per cent of normal vision, ordinarily classed as total blindness, to see clearly.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0059.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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AIRPLANE TESTS AUTO'S VENTILATOR
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A GALE from an airplane propeller was used in a recent striking test to show the efficiency of a new ventilating system for automobiles. By utilizing air currents set up by the car’s motion, the system provides individual ventilation to suit the comfort of each passenger.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0060.xml
article
37
37
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
NEW MACHINE GAGES MAN-MADE QUAKES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To STUDY the transmission of earthquake waves through the earth’s crust, German meteorologists are setting off artificial explosions. An apparatus called an “undograph,” illustrated above, is used to detect the tremor. In one test a ton of high explosive was fired on an Arctic island and over three hours later the shock was detected at Potsdam, Germany.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0061.xml
article
38
38,39
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Home Utensils Guarded by Third Degree Tests
Electrical Equipment Subjected to Severe Grueling in Laboratory That Searches for Defects in Materials
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOUR electric iron short-circuits or the bottom of your cookpot burns through, you may have just cause for complaint. To guard against such occurrences, some of the country’s largest makers of electrical equipment cooperate in maintaining, in New York City, a unique research organization known as the Electrical Testing Laboratories.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0062.xml
article
40
40,41
[no value]
[no value]
How Navigators Escape Hurricanes
INCH-LONG SHIP MODELS WITH YARN FOR SMOKE show
[no value]
[no value]
GAYLORD JOHNSON
BEFORE Columbus sailed boldly westward, confident of reaching China in a few days, and bumped unexpectedly into a new continent, the particular perils of the western Atlantic were unknown. It was called "The Sea of Darkness," because no one had met its dangers.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0063.xml
article
42
42
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
How Sculptors Put Life in Granite
Secret Tricks of the Art Taught in Unusual School that Uses the Outdoors as for Students
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0064.xml
article
43
43
AVIATION
[no value]
Bird-Like Plane, with Zigzag Wings, Meets First Tests
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIRST trials of a curious bird-like airplane, recently held at a Berlin airport, were reported a success. The unconventional machine was designed by Hans Richter, noted German aviator, to test the aerodynamic qualities of wings of zigzag contour in comparison with the usual straight design.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0065.xml
article
43
43
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
WATER SUPPLY CARRIED BY CITY FIRE TRUCK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CARRYING its own water and chemical supply a fire truck extinguishes brush fires and blazes caused by short-circuits on electric poles for the city of Los Angeles, Calif. Power from the truck’s own engine raises a telescoping tower to a height of thirty feet, to give the firemen an elevated point of vantage.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0066.xml
article
43
43
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
DESK FOR CHILD HAS BUILT-IN BLACKBOARD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CHILD’S desk with a built-in blackboard provides entertainment and instruction. The blackboard hangs behind the desk when not in use, but is readily swung into position at the front. If desired, it may be detached and used separately.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0067.xml
article
43
43
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
PENCIL IS ALL “LEAD”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL “lead” and devoid of a wooden casing is a new pencil that has appeared on the market. The stick of solid graphite may be given any desired type of point, or may be brought to a fine tip in a sharpener.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0068.xml
article
43
43
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
TIED DOWN HOUSE IS HURRICANE PROOF
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVEN the force of a hurricane will not unroof the house of one Florida home owner, or sweep it from its foundations, for the house is tied down. After witnessing the disastrous experiences of some of his neighbors in wind storms, this man passed steel cables over his roof and anchored their ends securely in the ground.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0069.xml
article
44
44
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Russian Ship Fights Way Through Ice of Northeast Passage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARCTIC history was made the other day when the Russian icebreaker, Sibiriakov III, came into port at Yokohama, Japan, after a 3,000-mile dash from Archangel, Russia, through north polar regions and around the eastern tip of Siberia. It was the first time a ship had navigated the frigid Northeast Passage without spending the winter locked in the ice.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0070.xml
article
44
44
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
VANES ON WINDMILL REGULATE ITS SPEED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A WINDMILL that is said to run at constant speed, regardless of the velocity of the wind, has been patented by an Auburn, Ind., inventor. A pair of side vanes, spreading or closing under the variable force of the wind, automatically controls the speed of the windmill much as a governor regulates a steam engine.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0071.xml
article
44
44
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
LIGHT LURES FISH INTO TRAP
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LURING fish with colored lights is the speciality of Herbert W. Spear, of Portland, Maine, who, before interested U. S. Bureau of Fisheries officials, recently demonstrated some of the luminous fish-catching devices he has invented. A small model of a folding fish trap, containing batteries and an underwater light, was let down into the water and was soon filled with fish.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0072.xml
article
45
45
[no value]
[no value]
Air Well Waters Parched Farms
Beehive Structure on Hill Draws Moisture from Atmosphere and Holds It in Reservoir
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXTRACTING water from the air to irrigate fields and vineyards is an accomplished feat in southern France, where first tests of an amazing invention called an aerial well have just met with complete success. Towering forty feet above a hilltop overlooking the little town of Trans-enProvence, this remarkable structure resembles nothing more than a monster beehive.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0073.xml
article
46
46,47,84
Trailing Rare Crystals WITH A MICROSCOPE
[no value]
Trailing Rare Crystals WITH A MICROSCOPE
Myriad Forms of Startling Beauty, Originating in the Laboratory of Nature, Are Revealed with Your Lens
[no value]
[no value]
BORDEN HALL
BEAUTY of form and color reigns supreme in the strange world of crystals. Into this exciting laboratory of nature, where mathematical exactitude is the law, we are now ready to enter. Here we shall find geometry blended with art—a combination making a powerful appeal to the scientific and the esthetic.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0074.xml
article
48
48
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
120 Miles an Hour with Seven Horsepower
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MORE like a war tank than a racing car appears the seven-horsepower machine just completed for George Eyston, noted British racer. Its design is expected to permit speeds in excess of two miles a minute. The driver sits enclosed within a streamlined, cabin-like frame of steel fitted with windows of mica.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0075.xml
article
48
48
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
HIDE CAMERA IN COW’S SKIN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STRETCHED over wires and padding, a cow’s skin is now part of the photographic equipment of the California State Fish and Game Commission. The lens of a camera is poked through a hole in the skin, and pictures of wild animals, otherwise unobtainable, are taken.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0076.xml
article
48
48
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
TOOL PICKS UP DROPPED PARTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW screw placer aids workers on automobiles and radios. It retrieves screws that have dropped into inaccessible places, and it also can be used to start a screw in a hard-to-reach hole so that a screwdriver may be used to finish the job. By turning one end of the slender tool, jaws of spring steel are opened and clamped upon the screw, as shown in the photograph.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0077.xml
article
48
48
[no value]
[no value]
CASTINGS QUICKLY MADE IN MECHANICAL FOUNDRY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIE castings of zinc alloy and brass are turned out in fifteen seconds, by a new mechanical foundry. Die cast parts require little finishing work, but the small manufacturer usually has no facilities for making them and is forced to carry an unwieldly assortment.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0078.xml
article
49
49
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
Sea Gull Boat Skims Water at Seventy Miles an Hour
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SKIMMING the surface like a gull, a speed boat that rises clear of the water has just completed its first trial runs successfully at Marshfield, Ore. It resembles a hybrid between an airplane and a water craft. Plywood-covered fins, shaped like airplane wings, extend from the sides in three successively smaller steps.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0079.xml
article
49
49
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
NEW TUBE CONTROLS VOICE IN PHONE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
No LONGER need you ask a phone caller to speak a little louder, when a new adjustable amplifier is attached to your receiver. By adjusting a simple control that operates much like the volume knob of a radio set, the voice, in the receiver, may be made loud or soft at will.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0080.xml
article
49
49
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
CAR'S STEERING WHEEL IS INSTRUMENT PANEL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL the instruments needed for ordinary driving are mounted directly on a new automobile steering wheel. In this position they are plainly visible. Connections to the instruments are led through the hollow post of the wheel.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0081.xml
article
50
50
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
Specially Designed Trucks Speed Door-to-Door Deliveries
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AUTOMOBILES are about to threaten the last stand of the horse and wagon. New trucks designed especially for door-to-door deliveries have been introduced almost simultaneously by several makers, to speed the milkman, the baker, and others on their daily rounds. Their controls are ingeniously simplified so that the driver may step aboard and drive standing up. One model has a removable power plant that may be quickly replaced with a spare.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0082.xml
article
50
50
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
NO WIRES ON RADIO KNIFE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SURGEONS hail a new radio knife, devoid of wires, as an outstanding advance. Previous types have long employed high-frequency currents like those of radio, led through a dangling cord, to make clean, bloodless cuts in tissue. The latest apparatus dispenses with any electric connection and leaves the surgeon’s hands unencumbered in a delicate operation.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0083.xml
article
50
50
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
WINDPROOF SUIT TO AID MT. EVEREST CLIMBERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WINDPROOF suits will be used by mountain climbers next summer, in a new attempt to reach the 29,141-foot summit of Mount Everest in Asia. The costume is scientificially designed to give protection from icy blasts. Members of the expedition will carry oxygen tanks.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0084.xml
article
50
50
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
FROZEN FISH ALIVE WHEN THAWED OUT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FREEZING live Volga River sturgeon in Russia, and thawing them out again to be sold alive in inland cities of America, is a possibility forecast by recent experiments of Dr. N. A. Borodin, eminent Russian biologist, at Harvard University.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0085.xml
article
51
51
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Powerful Locomotives Are Now Equipped With Disk Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DISK wheels have appeared as an innovation upon locomotives of the New York Central lines. The new drivers are reported to be cheaper than those with spokes and their reduced weight lessens the wear on rails. Each wheel is formed of a pair of disks, encircled by a standard tire of metal.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0086.xml
article
51
51
MODELS
[no value]
STEAM ENGINE, BUILT OF GLASS, ACTUALLY RUNS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CALIFORNIA glass blower, John T. Backman, has just completed an intricate glass model of a steam engine. He began work on the unusual engine two years ago as a spare-time hobby. All the mechanism, including pistons, cylinders, and bearings, is made of glass.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0087.xml
article
51
51
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
THIS PORTABLE LOCKING DEVICE FITS ANY DRAWER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DRAWERS may now be guarded with a portable locking device. A flat steel bar, with a hook-shaped end, is slipped above the partly-opened drawer and engages the partition above it. The drawer is then closed and the lock, slipped over the notched end of the bar, is pushed home.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0088.xml
article
51
51
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
NEW RATCHET WRENCH FOR TIGHT PLACES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ESPECIALLY suited for work in cramped quarters, a new fine-toothed ratchet handle for a socket wrench will take a bite as small as one-seventieth of a complete turn. This compares with a bite of one-tenth to one-twentieth of a turn previously available in such a tool, according to the maker.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0089.xml
article
51
51
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
BIG SHIP’S RADIO HUNG ON SPRINGS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A RADIO outfit hung on springs enables passengers of the S. S. Rex, speedy Italian superliner, to converse by radio with friends 4,000 miles away. The cradle of coil springs guards the sensitive set from the vibration of the propellers and the shock of the waves dashing against the ship as it speeds through the water.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0090.xml
article
52
52
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
SALT, GROWN ON STICKS, HARVESTED FROM SEA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SALT is being “grown” on sticks, in a new process of harvesting it from sea water that has been successfully applied at Alexandria, Egypt. Water from the Mediterranean Sea is admitted to large tracts along the coast, which have been planted with rows of poles.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0091.xml
article
52
52
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
TINY CHECK PROTECTOR FITS IN THE POCKET
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CHECK protector, that may be carried in the pocket, guards against fraudulent erasure or raising of the amount. After writing a check, the user slips it into a groove in the device. Drawing the check protector to the right, across the handwriting, perforates the paper with a pair of cog-wheel rollers and makes any alteration instantly visible.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0092.xml
article
52
52
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
MIDGET PROJECTOR FITS PALM OF THE HAND
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
So SMALL that it can be held in the palm of the hand, a new midget projector serves to display views snipped from movie film. The lens tube and other exterior parts are of telescopic construction, and fit flush with the case when the apparatus is not in use.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0093.xml
article
52
52
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
LOCK WORKED BY FLEXIBLE KEY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To FOIL the lock-picker, an ingenious German inventor has devised what he terms a “dragon key.” The odd key is flexible, and is composed of a number of jointed sections. It is pushed without difficulty into the crooked keyhole of the special lock with which it is used.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0094.xml
article
52
52
MODELS
[no value]
GROOVE GUIDES WOOD CUTTER BLADE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ESPECIALLY designed for the model maker, a new tool makes it easy to cut strips of light material, such as balsa wood, accurately to size. The blade slides along a straight edge, guided in a groove; it is provided with a guard to preclude the possibility of injuring the fingers.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0095.xml
article
53
53
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
NEW ZEALAND BOYS COAST ON MUD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN boys wait for a good snowfall to get out their sleds, but any day is a good day for coasting, in New Zealand. Snow is a rarity in the even, bracing climate of the islands, so the youngsters do the next best thing and coast on mud! Wooden sleds are used, and a bare slope is flooded with water for the sport.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0096.xml
article
53
53
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
EXTENSION LADDER AIDS IN UNCOVERING RUINS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TWENTY-EIGHT-FOOT extension ladder was recently pressed into service by P. L. O. Guy, University of Chicago archaeologist, to aid him in directing the work of excavating 2,300-year-old ruins at Megiddo, Palestine. Observations and photographs from the high point of vantage enable him to distinguish one layer from the next as the digging progresses.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0097.xml
article
53
53
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
TRACTOR MOVES AN ENTIRE HAYSTACK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TIME-HONORED ways of making hay are brought up to date, according to a Scotch farmer and inventor, in a method that he has just devised. The hay is first stacked on special metal tripods, allowing free ventilation but guarding the contents of the stack against the weather.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0098.xml
article
54
54,55
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
New Mechanical Devices Make Housekeeping Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0099.xml
article
56
56,57
Home Laboratory Stunts You Can Easily Do with METALS
[no value]
Home Laboratory Stunts You Can Easily Do with METALS
Burning Lead or Iron is Easy After You Have Made Correct Preparations Which Require Simple Apparatus
[no value]
[no value]
RAYMOND B. WAILES
NO ONE would think of using a lead pipe for kindling. Yet, with test tube and burner, the amateur chemist can prepare lead particles that mysteriously will burst into flame when they are exposed to the air. This is only one of the many fascinating experiments with metals that can be performed with inexpensive apparatus in the home laboratory.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0100.xml
article
58
58
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Amazing New Uses Found for Wood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE, as suggested by our artist, are unexpected new uses to which the by-products of American timber are now being put. The waste from logging camp and sawmill—in some regions more than half of the wood actually cut—is reclaimed by the magic of chemistry and goes into the manufacture of hundreds of useful articles
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0101.xml
article
59
59
All-Wave Set has FOUR TUNING SCALES
[no value]
All-Wave Set has FOUR TUNING SCALES
How to Solder Taps on Coils and Other Useful Hints for Radio Fans
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY TURNING a convenient switch on the front panel of the all-wave receiver pictured above, the set can be changed over quickly for operation on any wave band from 15 to 550 meters. The same twist of the knob also shifts a movable tuning dial so that the proper scale appears in the dial window of the receiver.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0102.xml
article
60
60,61,99
Keeping Your RADIO Free of Noises
[no value]
Keeping Your RADIO Free of Noises
Man-Made Static Can Be Shut Out of Your Set by the Use of a Condenser Across Sparking Contacts and Choke Coils on Motor
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE H. WALTZ
NOISELESS reception, free from the garbling crashes and crackles of static, has long been the goal of radio engineers. Unfortunately, natural static is a weird product of the atmosphere and aside from increasing the strength of broadcasting no way has been found to eliminate it.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0103.xml
article
62
62,100
Don't Starve Your Car's Battery
[no value]
Don't Starve Your Car's Battery
Gus Wilson Describes Easy Way to Test Ignition System and Keep It in Good Shape
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
RABBIT-LIKE, the Cummings’ car bounded over the bumpy railroad crossing. Then— blump! A hollow thud resounded above the rattles. Harry Cummings jammed on his brakes. His wife shrieked. “What have you done now?” she demanded. “Aw, say!” protested Harry.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0104.xml
article
63
63
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
Novelty Jig-Sawing
WHAT CAN YOU MAKE WITH Picture Puzzle Tools?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOW that picture puzzles have made the jig saw almost as familiar a tool as a hammer or a wrench, thousands of adept amateur jig sawers are asking themselves, "What else can I make besides puzzles?" That is a good question. The jig saw is really a most versatile little tool and it can perform wonders when skill-fully used.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0105.xml
article
64
64,65,88,89
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
There's No Mystery About Metal Spinning
If you have a lathe, you can learn the art easily and make many decorative objects from sheet copper, aluminum, and other metals
[no value]
[no value]
HERBERT WOOLSEY
TO THE amateur mechanic and to a great many professionals as well, the spinning of metal is a mysterious process in which the spinner converts flat pieces of sheet metal into all kinds of intricate shapes. There need be no mystery about spinning, for it is a field which lies within the reach of any mechanic if he has access to a suitable lathe.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0106.xml
article
66
66
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
WHIRLING DISK MARBLE GAME
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DONALD W. CLARK
BECAUSE of the present popularity of marble games, many home workers are looking for new and simple variations of standard designs that can be constructed easily and inexpensively. A design of this type—a little game called “disk-o-luck”— is suggested in the accompanying drawings, which give all the necessary information as to its construction.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0107.xml
article
66
66
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
MAKING AN ALARM CLOCK SHUT ITSELF OFF
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTON BIRMEM
IF AN alarm clock is placed within reach, it startles us and gives us a more or less severe psychological shock when it goes off, yet if it is too far away from the bed, we have to get up to turn it off. Here is a simple method of overcoming this problem, provided one is in the habit of awaking at the first ring and will not merely turn over and go to sleep again.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0108.xml
article
66
66
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
RUBBER GRIPS IMPROVE DRAFTING TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F.B.
THE handles or finger grips of many small drafting instruments are tiresome to use, especially on long, tedious jobs. An improvement is to slip short lengths of pneumatic windshield wiper tubing over the finger grips. The inside of the tubing is the right size for most small instruments, and the outside, being soft and finely ribbed, gives an ideal grip.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0109.xml
article
66
66
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
HOW TO FLOOD-LIGHT YOUR AQUARIUM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. GERALD BULLARD
TROPICAL toy fish are even more beautiful under artificial light than in daylight. The flood light shown is small enough not to interfere with the vision, simple and inexpensive to make, and, most important of all, may be attached wherever necessary.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0110.xml
article
67
67
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Working Toy Derrick Built for Few Cents from Odds and Ends
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. J. SIEFKE
BECAUSE it really works, the derrick illustrated is a completely satisfying toy for any small boy. It is large and substantial, yet the construction is simple and the materials, for the most part, are odds and ends of wood, wire, and tin that can be picked up in any home workshop.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0111.xml
article
67
67
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
WINDING SMALL COILS ON A LATHE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. W.
IN WINDING coils, magnet bobbins, or small armatures on the lathe, the spool of wire can be conveniently held by mounting it on an L-shaped rod set in the tool post as illustrated at the right. The bobbin then can be gripped in the lathe drill chuck and rotated either by hand or with the motor drive, whichever is the more convenient and practical for the special work in hand.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0112.xml
article
67
67
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
INSULATED PIPE JOINTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
V. ESPER.
TIN cans can be used to repair sections of asbestos pipe covering which are coming apart. Both the tops and the bottoms are removed, and a length-wise cut is made from top to bottom. Thus prepared, the cans are placed over the asbestos covering where the joints have separated, and regular pipe covering bands clamp them on.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0113.xml
article
68
68,69
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Knotted Silk Pulls for Window Shades and Floor Lamps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Kenneth Murray
ORNAMENTAL square-knot pulls for window shades or floor lamps can be made in a variety of designs from medium or heavy silk cable cord. The length, size, color, and quality of cord can be chosen to suit individual preference. This project is similar in character to the knotted belt described in a previous article (P.S.M., Nov. ’32, p. 77) and is presented in response to hundreds of requests from readers for more designs for square-knot work.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0114.xml
article
70
70
MODELS
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“WATER” IN SHIP MODEL CASE LOWERS TO REVEAL HULL
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[no value]
JOHN A. WILLIAMS
IN GENERAL appearance the ship model case illustrated is not unlike others, but by turning a knob “water” rises around the hull until the ship seems to float at anchor. This effect is achieved by raising a light wooden platform, with a hole in it the shape of the model’s water line.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0115.xml
article
70
70
FOR THE HOME OWNER
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BRASS CHAINS MODERNIZE OLD MIRROR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY C. ENGEL
FOR an expenditure of not more than 40 cents it is possible to make a good-looking modern mirror frame from an old one taken from a mantelpiece, buffet, or other piece of furniture that has been discarded entirely or cut down and modernized without using the old mirror, as is now so often done.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0116.xml
article
71
71
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[no value]
GAGE AIDS IN SETTING CIRCULAR SAWS
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[no value]
A. L. JACKSON
THIS gage for testing and adjusting the set of the teeth of small circular saws can be made in five minutes. All that is needed is a block of hardwood about ¾ in. thick, 1¼ in. wide at the center, and 2½ in. long, and also four small flathead screws ½ or ⅜ in. long.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0117.xml
article
71
71
MODELS
[no value]
HOW TO HOLD VERY THIN STRIPS FOR PLANING
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[no value]
[no value]
JOHN TREWEEK
VERY thin strips of wood are often required, especially for building models, but it is difficult to hold them so they can be planed without breaking. Recently I needed some strips less than 1/16 in. thick. I first dressed a block stiff enough so that it would not bend under the plane and then glued about 1 in. of one end of the strip to it with thin paper between, and with the grain running the right way from the glued end.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0118.xml
article
71
71
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
BASEMENT RACK FOR GARDEN HOSE
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[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM T. WELD
THE hose rack illustrated not only provides a safe storage place for the garden hose during cold weather, but also allows it to be used instantly, if necessary, for extinguishing a fire, for washing the basement floor, for filling movable tubs, or for any other purpose.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0119.xml
article
71
71
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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DRAWER SLIDES MADE FROM CURTAIN RODS
Auto Engine Contest
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[no value]
DANIEL REYNOLDS
FLAT curtain rods of the extension type make excellent drawer slides for light drawers. They are easy to install and never bind. Dampness does not affect them, which makes them ideal for use in a basement workshop. Rods of this type consist of two parts.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0120.xml
article
72
72,90,91
MAKING YOUR OWN Enlargements
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MAKING YOUR OWN Enlargements
A fascinating branch of amateur photography
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[no value]
FREDERICK D. RYDER
MAKING enlargements is, perhaps, the most fascinating branch of amateur photography. There always is a bit of uncertainty and the chances for a thrill in it. Delicate shadings of picture quality, which are buried deep in the tiny silver grains of the small negative and pass unnoticed in a little print, show up in striking fashion in the greater area of a large picture.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0121.xml
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73
73
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[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0122.xml
article
74
74
MODELS
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Automatic Mail Bag Pick-Up AND OTHER MODEL RAILWAY HINTS
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[no value]
[no value]
CARL ROHLFS
ROBERT W. HYDE
WILLARD W. CHEGWIDDEN
WILLIAM ATKIN
WILLIAM BROWN
ONE of the most interesting and easily made accessories for any model railroad is an automatic mail bag pick-up. On real railroads it is the practice to pick up the mail bag from small local stations without stopping the train at all. The bag is suspended from the end of a cross arm on a pole beside the track, and the mail or baggage car is fitted with a hooklike arrangement that catches the bag and carries it along with the train as it rushes by.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0123.xml
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75
75
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NICHOLSON FILES
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NICHOLSON FILES
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[no value]
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0124.xml
article
76
76
A Kit of Ideas for MOTORISTS
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A Kit of Ideas for MOTORISTS
Useful Hints for Emergency Car Work Contributed by Our Readers
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[no value]
B. A.
W. R. W.
K. C. M.
C. R. W.
J. G. P.
REAR axles that are to be removed can be loosened with a tool made from a twenty inch length of iron rod, a twelve-inch section of pipe large enough to fit over the rod, and two axle nuts. The rod should be the same diameter as the threaded end of the axle.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0125.xml
article
77
77
MODELS
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HELPFUL HINTS FOR THE MODEL MAKER
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IN BUILDING a copy of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY stagecoach model Diamond Tally-Ho, Carl W. Printz, of Massillon, Ohio, saved time by gluing up the stock in two layers as shown at A, the segments being wide enough to allow both a front wheel rim and a rear wheel rim to be cut out.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0126.xml
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77
77
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[no value]
CHAMPION SPARK PLUGS
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CHAMPION SPARK PLUGS
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0127.xml
article
78
78,79
MODELS
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We Launch Our Battleship Model
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[no value]
Capt. E. Armitage McCann
LITTLE work now remains to complete the model of the battleship Texas, if you have kept up with the instructions published in the preceding four articles in this series. The identifying numbers mentioned in the following description of the few parts still to be made refer to corresponding numbers on the assembly and detail drawings that appeared in the second article (P.S.M., Dec. ’32, pp. 72 and 73).
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0128.xml
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78
78
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0129.xml
article
79
79
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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UTILIZING SHORT STOCK IN A SCREW MACHINE
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[no value]
JOHN E. SERAFIN
A HAND screw-machine job that called for a large quantity of steel rods, uniform in length, was turned out in an economical way by using a lot of waste pieces that were available instead of cutting them from long stock. Because these pieces were short, it was found necessary to chuck them by the “work” ends and insert them from the tool side of the chuck.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0130.xml
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79
79
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0131.xml
article
80
80
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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HOME WORKSHOP BLUEPRINTS
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[no value]
TO ASSIST you in your home workshop, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY offers large blueprints containing working drawings of a number of well-tested projects. The blueprints are 15 by 22 in. and are sold for 25 cents a single sheet (except in a few special cases).
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0132.xml
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80
80
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[no value]
THE IRWIN AUGER BIT COMPANY
[no value]
THE IRWIN AUGER BIT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0133.xml
article
81
81
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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CHEMICALS FORM QUEER UNDERWATER GARDEN
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[no value]
[no value]
L. L. HYLER
AMONG the many attractive things that can be made by the amateur chemist, the chemical garden is one of the most unusual. It can be “grown” in a bottle, vial, glass vase, fish bowl, or other transparent receptacle. When the proper chemical is introduced into the liquid, a small treelet will shoot up.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0134.xml
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81
81
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[no value]
NORTON PIKE Products
[no value]
NORTON PIKE Products
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0135.xml
article
82
82
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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Our CONSTRUCTION KITS Will Save Your Time
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[no value]
BY SENDING $1 to the Popular Science Home-craft Guild, you can obtain a construction kit of raw materials for making a highly simplified 12 in. long model of the new American built liner Manhattan. The kit contains a piece of white pine for the hull, sawed to the approximate shape but otherwise unfinished; wood of the correct thicknesses for making the various deck units, bridge, funnels, lifeboats, and similar parts ; sheet metal for the rudder, anchors, propellers; soft wire for the masts, ventilators, and davits—in fact, everything but the paint.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0136.xml
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82
82
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0137.xml
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82
82
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WOLLENSAK OPTICAL CO.
[no value]
WOLLENSAK OPTICAL CO.
[no value]
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0138.xml
article
83
83
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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HOLDING FINE DRILLS IN A LARGE CHUCK
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JACK HAZZARD
THE AMATEUR mechanic often finds it necessary to use fine wood and metal drills in chucks too large to grip them firmly. His first thought is to wrap the drill with tape, and he soons finds this to work only indifferently. If a drill chuck such as is used on small lathes is available, he can slip a rod of metal or hardwood into the spindle hole at the rear end of the chuck; then tighten the set screw and grip the rod securely in a larger drill chuck.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0139.xml
article
83
83
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
MAKING ROUND HOLES IN CORK STOPPERS
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[no value]
GEORGE A. SMITH
WHILE a cork borer is not ordinarily a part of the tool equipment in the average home chemistry laboratory or workshop, the amateur can easily make holes in cork stoppers and the like by the following method: Heat the tang of a small rat-tail file and burn the hole through the cork to approximately the right diameter; then carefully round it off with the rat-tail file.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0140.xml
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83
83
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0141.xml
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84
84
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[no value]
DELTA MFG. CO.
[no value]
DELTA MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0142.xml
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84
84
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0143.xml
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84
84
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[no value]
MULLINS MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
[no value]
MULLINS MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0144.xml
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84
84
[no value]
[no value]
BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL CO.
[no value]
BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0145.xml
article
85
85
MODELS
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SPLITTING BALSA WOOD INTO THIN STRIPS
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[no value]
BARRY TELFAIR
BALSA wood strips for building model airplanes can be cut rapidly and accurately by using the adjustable cutting block illustrated. A razor blade A, preferably of the double-edged type, is clamped securely between the wide and narrow parts of the baseboard B.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0146.xml
article
85
85
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
EMERGENCY REPAIR FOR SPLIT SAW HANDLE
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[no value]
[no value]
W. C. WILHITE
H. B.
WHEN a saw handle splits, the usual procedure is to buy a new one, provided there is no rush to use the saw. In an emergency, however, a broken handle often can be repaired by the method illustrated. In fact, this particular repair proved so satisfactory that a new handle has thus far proved unnecessary.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0147.xml
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85
85
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0148.xml
article
86
86,87
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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Harness Repairing for Farmers
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[no value]
L. M. ROEHL
MORE strain is placed on the traces or tugs of a harness than any other part, consequently these most often break. There are three points at which repair work usually is required: The hame clip becomes worn out; the cockeye is worn through or tears out at the end of the trace; the trace wears thin and breaks where it chafes against the leg of the horse.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0149.xml
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86
86
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0150.xml
article
87
87
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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SPECIAL LATHE CENTER FOR USE WITH CHUCK
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[no value]
[no value]
J.H.D.
A SOFT center like that shown in the sketch below will make it unnecessary to remove the universal chuck from a lathe when some small job comes up that must be machined between centers. The frequent removal of a large chuck is often inconvenient.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0151.xml
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87
87
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0152.xml
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88
88
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0153.xml
article
89
89
MODELS
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THIN, TOUGH PAPER FOR MODEL MAKERS' USE
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[no value]
K.M.
A THIN and exceedingly tough “parchment” tissue that is well suited for covering the wings of model airplanes, making sails for miniature ship models, and similar purposes can be prepared easily at home. A good grade of tissue paper is cut into sheets, and each sheet is immersed for ten seconds in a solution of four parts of water to which has been added one part of sulphuric acid.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0154.xml
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89
89
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THE FATE-ROOT-HEATH CO.
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THE FATE-ROOT-HEATH CO.
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0155.xml
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90
90
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0156.xml
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91
91
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0157.xml
article
92
92,93
Secrets of Success
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HE MADE A CAREER OUT OF A HOBBY
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THE first problem Herbert C. McKay faced upon his discharge from the Army at the close of the World War was the question of making a living. And the problem was a mighty serious one, for McKay returned to civilian clothes, handicapped by a physical condition that made it necessary for him to live in a mild climate.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0158.xml
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92
92
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0159.xml
article
93
93,94
Secrets of Success
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OLYMPIC STRONG MAN WAS PUNY BABY
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JOE MILLER first saw the light of day on July 8th, 1909, in Parkesburg, Pa. If the doctor had been right, it would have been his last glimpse, as well. For he certainly didn’t look strong or well enough to live. But, contrary to expectations, this puny, sick baby managed to survive—and, today, at 24, he is one of the world’s foremost weightlifters.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0160.xml
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93
93
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0161.xml
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94
94
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0162.xml
article
95
95
FOR THE HOME OWNER
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LARGE BEVEL HELPS IN FITTING WALL BOARD
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[no value]
C. A. K.
ANY home owner who is about to line his attic, basement, or garage with wall board will find the work easier if he makes a large wooden bevel-square for transferring angles accurately. The bevel is placed in the angle where the sheet of wallboard is to be fastened and is adjusted to fit exactly.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0163.xml
article
95
95
MODELS
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REALISTIC WINDOWS FOR WHITTLED MODELS
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[no value]
JOHN C. ZIMBECK
NEAT looking windows for models whittled from wood, such as the airplanes described in Donald W. Clark’s series of articles, can be easily made from transparent cellophane wrappers. Carve out a space the same size as the window and from 1/32 in. to 1/16 in. deep, according to the size of the model.
PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0164.xml
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95
95
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Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0165.xml
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95
95
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JOWETT INSTITUTE OF PHYSICAL CULTURE
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JOWETT INSTITUTE OF PHYSICAL CULTURE
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0166.xml
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96
96
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0167.xml
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97
97
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0168.xml
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98
98
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0169.xml
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99
99
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Clarence A. O’Brien
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Clarence A. O’Brien
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0170.xml
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100
100
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Popular Science Publishing Co.
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Popular Science Publishing Co.
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0171.xml
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101
101
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VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
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VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0172.xml
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102
102
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0173.xml
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103
103
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0174.xml
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105
105
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A PRODUCT OF LEVER BROTHERS CO.
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A PRODUCT OF LEVER BROTHERS CO.
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0175.xml
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106
106
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R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY: CAMELS
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R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY
CAMELS
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PopularScience_19330301_0122_003_0176.xml