Issue: 19321101

Tuesday, November 1, 1932
November, 1932
5
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121
Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0001.xml
advertisement
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0002.xml
advertisement
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1
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ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA, INC.
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ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA, INC.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0003.xml
masthead
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2,15
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0004.xml
tableOfContents
2
2,4
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Table of Contents for November, 1932
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0005.xml
advertisement
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3
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G. & C. Merriam Co.
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G. & C. Merriam Co.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0006.xml
advertisement
5
5
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Popular Science Homecraft Guild
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Popular Science Homecraft Guild
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0007.xml
advertisement
5
5
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The EQUITABLE Life Assurance Society
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The EQUITABLE Life Assurance Society
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0008.xml
article
6
6,7,8,9
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Why BUSINESS MEN are beginning to Smile
To Help You Get Ahead
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LEON MEADOW
A FEW days before the November Financial Article was scheduled for the press, we received a letter asking for a summary of present financial and business conditions. The writer also wanted to know exactly what had been accomplished by the various relief measures organized to combat the depression, and what, in our opinion, could be expected for the near future.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0009.xml
advertisement
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6
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0010.xml
advertisement
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7
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PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.
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PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0011.xml
advertisement
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8
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UNITED FRUIT CO.
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UNITED FRUIT CO.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0012.xml
advertisement
8
8
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Three-in-One Oil Co.
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Three-in-One Oil Co.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0013.xml
advertisement
9
9
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PROVIDENT MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.
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PROVIDENT MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE CO.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0014.xml
advertisement
10
10,11
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0015.xml
article
12
12,13
Our Readers Say
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Our Readers Say
Cheap Sunshine Requested for Oklahoma Winter
After All, Tools Are Needed To Build a Good Boat
Are You a Hero—and Why? Don't All Answer at Once
When the Moon Comes Over the Orange Belt, Calif.
If You Don't Know This One You Can Ask Your Cat
Splitting the Atom Holds Future of the World
Here's a Mean Little Question for the Class in Evolution
Little Balls, Big Balls All Keep Rolling Along
Here's a Hiccough Remedy That Will Kill or Cure
Maybe This Reader Has No Real Love for Dogs
Blood Fell Like Rain But— Where Were the Feathers?
Leaning Ladders Give You the Width of This Street
Brother’s Age Is Anything from Three to Eighteen
Our Baby Planet Nothing to Get Haughty About
Airplanes Keep on Flying But They Don’t Tell How
Where Popular Science Leads, The Others Follow Along
Of Course, the Cows Might Give You the Answer
Massachusetts Now Claims America’s Crookedest River
Grandpa’s “Jolly Rocker” Makes Three Sets of Twins Happy
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Now is the time for someone to write an article for your magazine showing how to rig up at home a unit that will enable us “sun starved” people to enjoy the Mazda Sunshine Bulb next winter with no more expense than the cost of the bulb, scrap materials, and a little time.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0016.xml
article
14
14
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Puppet Planes for Tragic Scenes
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0017.xml
article
15
15,16,17,105
LEADING ARTICLES
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Spot Crooks by their EARS
WHAT TIME IS YOUR EAR?
FIRST FULL PRESENTATION OF NEW IDENTIFICATION SYSTEM
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EDWIN TEALE
A TEN-YEAR search for two ears just alike has led to the discovery of a new weapon against crime. The other day, Dr. Theron W. Kilmer, noted New York physician, told police officials at the seventh annual convention of the National Identification Association, meeting in New York City, of discovering a “criminal ear” that appears twice as often among gangsters, thieves, and thugs as among honest citizens.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0018.xml
article
18
18,19,106
LEADING ARTICLES
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Startling Movie Stunts with Toy Planes on Strings
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ANDREW R. BOONE
PUPPET airplanes, looking exactly like full-sized machines ready to fly, now take the place of real planes in filming movie air stunts. On great sound stages, they are always under control, ready to “fly” through fog and storm and snow or to be photographed against mountain and cloud backgrounds for thrilling closeups in the air.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0019.xml
article
20
20
ENGINEERING
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USE MODEL OF BIG LOCOMOTIVE TO SOLVE RAILWAY PROBLEMS
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To SOLVE railroading problems, engineers of the University of Illinois have set up in their laboratory an imitation locomotive. This unusual model is a quarter-size reproduction of the front end of a heavy Mikadotype locomotive, that puffs like a real engine but never goes anywhere.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0020.xml
article
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20
RADIO
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RADIO LIGHT GIVES PROGRAM SOURCE
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A RADIO set that shows at a glance the source of a broadcast program is the invention of a young Milwaukee, Wisc., electrical engineer. On top of the set is mounted an illuminated map of the United States. When the user of the set tunes in a station, a lamp bulb automatically flashes behind the map at the point where the program originates.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0021.xml
article
20
20
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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MACHINE STEAMS PAPER FROM WALLS
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OLD wallpaper is removed in a jiffy by a new portable machine designed especially for the purpose. Its oil burner generates low-pressure steam, which is applied to the paper through a hand applicator. The steam softens the adhesive and the paper peels off.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0022.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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NEW HOLDER ENCLOSES ENTIRE CIGARETTE
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SPARKS and ashes cannot flick from the end of a lighted cigarette when it is enclosed in a new safety cigarette holder, pictured above open and closed. According to the New York inventor, it should prove especially useful to motorists. While being smoked, the cigarette is completely enclosed by a folding shell that admits air through perforations.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0023.xml
article
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20
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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OWL CLOCK'S EYES TELL TIME
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OWL-SHAPED, with revolving eyes that tell the time, is an amusing clock made in Germany. Hours are read at the left, as you face the owl, and minutes at the right. Thus, in the photograph, the eyes indicate that it is three o’clock. No numbers are on the dials, as one mentally associates the numbers with the proper spacings.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0024.xml
article
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21
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New Gyroscopes BALANCE ITALIAN LINER
MIDGET POST OFFICE HAS PHONE BOOTH
PARIS CAFE GIVES DINERS “AIRSHIP” RIDE
Rolling Waves Are Unable to Disturb Big Ship as Rotors Whirl
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SPEEDING across the North Atlantic, near the end of November, the Conti di Savoia, newest and second largest Italian luxury liner, will pay little heed to the rolling of the sea. Three giant gyroscopes, with rotors thirteen feet in diameter and weighing a hundred tons, will counteract the disturbing forces of the waves, holding the 48,000 ton ship to an even keel.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0025.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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NEW FILM WILL PICK UP FINGERPRINTS
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FINGERPRINTS literally are lifted off objects near the scene of a crime, in a new process invented by Alton K. Fisher, assistant in anthropology at the Milwaukee, Wisc., Public Museum. Speedy and accurate, the new method may supplant photographing the tell-tale prints.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0026.xml
article
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22
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SAFE TRAY FOR SMOKERS
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FORGOTTEN cigarettes can do no damage when they are left lying in a new glass ash tray. A close-fitting groove in each rest puts out the cigarette before it burns down far enough to fall off the tray and mar a table top or upholstery.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0027.xml
article
22
22
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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BOTH ENDS OF LIFEBOAT RELEASED AT SAME TIME
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A NEW releasing mechanism for lifeboats was successfully demonstrated in New York the other day. The device was invented by H. J. Ferguson, First Officer of the S. S. Duchess of Atholl, to avert danger of capsizing at the moment that the boat casts loose.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0028.xml
article
22
22
PHOTOGRAPHY
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ELECTRIC EYE GIVES CORRECT PHOTO EXPOSURE TIME
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GUESSWORK is removed from picture-taking by a new meter that automatically reveals the correct exposure to use. A pair of photoelectric cells in this device measures the intensity of the light, which is indicated in units of light value by an electric needle on a dial.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0029.xml
article
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23
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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AMERICAN BUS CAN RIDE ON RAILROAD OR HIGHWAY
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A MOTOR bus that rides on roads or rails with equal ease was demonstrated in Chicago the other day. Small flanged guide wheels, let down before and behind the main ones by a control beside the driver’s seat, keep the odd vehicle on a railroad track as it rolls along on its rubber tires.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0030.xml
article
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23
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NEW AUTO STOP LIGHT WAVES ITS WARNING
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A NEW rear stop light for automobiles attracts attention by swinging back and forth like the red warning signal at a railroad crossing. A small electric or vacuum windshield wiper motor operates the arm to which the light is attached. The switch or operating valve is connected to the foot brake so the light flashes on and begins swinging automatically when the brake pedal is pressed.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0031.xml
article
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23
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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BOUNCING BALL TESTS POWER OF VOICE
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A SINGER’S lungs need furnish only a trifling amount of air to fill a concert hall with sound, recent experiments indicate. To test the power behind the human voice, subjects at the phonetic laboratory of Hamburg University, in Germany, were asked to sing into a bouncing-ball device resembling a familiar child’s toy.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0032.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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ATOMS IN MODEL OF MOLECULE BEHAVE LIKE REAL ONES
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MODEL molecules behaved like real ones before a recent scientific meeting at Denver, Colo. They were built by Prof. Donald H. Andrews, of Johns Hopkins University, to test the theory that molecules are made of atoms leashed together by forces like springs.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0033.xml
article
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LEADING ARTICLES
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Quicksands Frozen to Dig Tunnels
Engineers Startle World with Casings of Artificial Ice Around Ninety-Foot Shafts
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JOHN E. LODGE
UNDERGROUND shells of ice as tall as seven-story buildings are helping to construct a pair of tunnels beneath the Scheldt River at Antwerp, Belgium. When engineers were faced with the problem of sinking ventilating and elevator shafts through fluid quicksand, they decided to freeze it! Their success in forming artificial-ice barriers to keep water out is attracting worldwide interest, since the unusual engineering scheme may be applied to good effect elsewhere.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0034.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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Talkie Gets Horseless Carriage
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A HUNDRED-YEAR-OLD horseless carriage, driven by steam, has been constructed in Hollywood, Calif., for use in a talkie. The studio mechanics constructed the machine from old drawings of an English “boiler wagon” that is said to have puffed along a road near London long before the first gasoline engine made its appearance.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0035.xml
article
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Balloon Radio Seeks Polar Weather Secrets
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TWINKLING lights and radio signals will bring automatic weather reports from the upper air when the “International Polar Year” expeditions penetrate the Arctic in 1933. Two balloon-carried instruments to aid in gathering data have just been perfected.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0036.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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COOKING KIT USES NEW FUEL
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FUEL in paste form, made of solidified alcohol and packed in convenient tubes like shaving cream, operates a new miniature cooking kit. The oufit includes a folding stand to hold a pot and a small burner. Pressure on a spring lever opens the burner for filling the fuel reservoir.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0037.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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ACCIDENT FINDS “LOST" PLANT
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BY A lucky flick of his flashlight, Dr. Edward T. Wherry, of the University of Pennsylvania, recently re-discovered a plant that had been “lost” for 125 years. This rare variety of “alum root,” a name that is applied to a number of species, was originally discovered by the German botanist Pursh in 1817.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0038.xml
article
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27
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Guns and Bars Guard U. S. Crop Reports
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GUNS and barred windows will henceforth guard the U. S. Department of Agriculture's seasonal crop reports from prying eyes, until they are ready for the public. The extraordinary precautions follow disclosures calling to mind war-time activities.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0039.xml
article
27
27
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SNAKE TIES ITSELF IN KNOT TO CURE INJURY
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A SNAKE became its own surgeon in a remarkable feat observed not long ago by R. S. Walker, Chattanooga, Tenn., naturalist. When this snake was captured its back was found to have been broken. The body drooped limp below the injury. The snake was placed in a hibernating box and left for several days.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0040.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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USES TRUCK ENGINE TO LOAD BARRELS
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A HOMEMADE hoist, operated from the motor of his truck, helps Frank McDonald, of Portland, Me., to load 500-pound barrels of cod liver oil aboard. The barrels are left for him on the wharves by fishing vessels. To ease the task of loading them, McDonald mounted a special fitting at the front of the car, taking power from the motor’s crankshaft at the point where the crank handle is usually inserted.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0041.xml
article
28
28,29,109
LEADING ARTICLES
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NEW TOOL, like Paint Gun, Sprays Mist of Molten Metal
Remarkable Process Gives Metal Coating to Any Material from Steel and Sculpture to Fine Lace and Paper
FIND MANY METALS IN THE HUMAN BODY
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Kenneth M. Swezey
HISSING determinedly and spurting a tiny flame, a tool, looking not unlike a paint sprayer, moved slowly back and forth over openings in stencils fastened to long panels of silvery metal. Not paint, however, was being applied to decorate these sections of aluminum doors and door frames that soon would be part of an ultra-modern New York skyscraper.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0042.xml
article
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New Ways to Fight POISON FOG
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POISON fog claimed the lives of sixty Belgians, two years ago. Now it may be banished forever, by two outstanding inventions reported to the American Chemical Society. One is a super-sensitive detector that warns when sulphur dioxide gas—the deadly element in poison fog—reaches a dangerous concentration in the air.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0043.xml
article
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AVIATION
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New British Plane Has Hinged Wings
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AIRPLANES with folding wings have been built for years, but a radically new style of folding craft recently made its appearance at the Croyden airdrome near London, England. Known as the “mono spar plane,” it is expected to solve the problem of reducing weight, and increasing cargo and passenger capacity.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0044.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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NAILS, WITH ROUGH SURFACE, HAVE GREAT HOLDING POWER
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A NEW nail with nearly three times the holding power of an ordinary one has been developed at the U. S. Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, Wise. The secret of its increased efficiency is a roughened surface, barely noticeable to the eye, which enables wood fibers, into which it is driven, to cling to it more tenaciously.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0045.xml
article
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AVIATION
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PLANE TAKES OFF FROM CAR'S ROOF
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CATAPULTING an airplane into the air from the top of a speeding automobile was a feat carried out successfully, the other day, at Los Angeles, Calif. A special platform was built on the roof of a standard sedan. When the airplane was in place and the pilot ready at the controls, the car started down the Metropolitan Airport field at forty-five miles an hour.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0046.xml
article
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AVIATION
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PLANE, WITH EXPANDING WINGS, FLIES IN TEST
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A NEW type of airplane with expanding wings was recently flown in Germany. Supplementary wing surfaces or fins, one on each side of the fuselage, fold into slots in the main wing or slide outward between guiding rollers to increase the area of wing surface.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0047.xml
article
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AVIATION
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FLYER MISSES TRUCK BY INCHES
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No WONDER the driver of the truck, in the picture above, put out his hand and slammed on the brakes. A fast plane roared down out of the sky and missed him by inches. The close shave occurred near a Washington airport when a contestant in a transcontinental race was practicing landings.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0048.xml
article
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AVIATION
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TEST MODEL PLANES IN HUNDRED-MILE GALE
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HUNDRED-mile-an-hour gales rush through a 400-foot steel and reenforced-concrete wind tunnel recently completed at the Farnborough testing field, in England, and illustrated at the left. A 2,000-horsepower engine creates the artificial hurricane within the tube where models are tested.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0049.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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Anti-Aircraft Searchlight Casts Nine Beams
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MILITARY officials at Fort Totten, N. Y., recently witnessed a demonstration of a radically new type of anti-aircraft searchlight. Hostile aircraft could hardly escape from its rays, since the main shaft of light is split into nine or more separate, high-intensity beams.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0050.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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TO TEST HIGH-FLYING ROCKET
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STREAMLINED like an airplane bomb, a new type of rocket will soon be shot at the stratosphere by Johannes Winkler, German experimenter. Recording instruments on an automatically-released parachute will bring back data for study. A lonely section of the Baltic coast has been chosen for the test.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0051.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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VOICE FROM PLANE HEARD FOR MILES
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LOUDSPEAKERS often have been fitted to airplanes, so that a flyer may address a message to a crowd on the ground. So huge are the resonators in a new German plane designed for “skyspeaking,” that they had to be built into the wings and aerodynamically shaped.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0052.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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SACRED POINTER GUIDES SHIP
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A MODEL of a “sacred pointer,” ancient South Sea navigating instrument, was used recently to take star bearings during a Pacific voyage of the S. S. Asama Maru. Officers who made the odd test found the pointer surprisingly accurate, even though it necessarily could not compare with modern precision instruments.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0053.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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AUTO ROADS OF GLASS
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MOST motorists will swerve to avoid a bit of glass lying in the road—but whole roads of glass are proposed by George J. Ricketts of London, England. According to his plan, interlocking “bricks” of glass would provide a smooth surface easily kept in good repair.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0054.xml
article
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34
ENGINEERING
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PLASTER MODEL HELPS DESIGN BUILDING
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WHEN the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia recently contracted for a new building to serve as its home, officials of the Institute and the city’s Art Jury wanted to see in advance what the exterior would look like. So the contractor erected a wooden scaffold on the building site and displayed models in plaster of the building sections, at the height they would appear in the finished structure.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0055.xml
article
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AVIATION
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MOTOR DRIVEN PLANE FLIES AROUND POST
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TO AMUSE his small son, Fred E. Engler, of Pukwana, S. D., built a toy airplane that actually flies—or so it seems to its youthful rider. The model plane has a propeller that really runs, under the power of a small gasoline motor. It is hung like a swing, on cables, from a homemade standard.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0056.xml
article
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EACH KEY HANDY IN THIS CASE
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PULLING down a metal tab on a new key case brings all the keys out at the bottom, ready for use. An opposite motion withdraws them until further need. Held compactly and conveniently, they occupy little space in the pocket and cannot damage the lining of clothing while each key is in such a position that it easily can be used.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0057.xml
article
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AVIATION
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Tunnel Pierces New Airship
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A THIRTY-THREE-FOOT model of a new style of dirigible was demonstrated at Van Nuys, Calif., the other day. An open tunnel pierces the entire length of the gas bag from bow to stern. The inventor, Thad Rose, believes that this will reduce wind resistance and increase the speed of the ship in flight.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0058.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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TALL CHIMNEY FALLS IN PERFECT BOW
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WHEN a chimney of an abandoned German gas works was razed, not long ago, it made an unusual picture as it fell. Instead of breaking into two or three pieces as might have been expected, the stack bent and dropped to earth as a unit. A photograph snapped at the moment of toppling showed it as a perfect bow.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0059.xml
article
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35
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
TYPICAL AMERICAN IS NO ADONIS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT does the “average American” look like? To find out, a statue was recently modeled from the composite measurements of 100,000 U. S. war veterans, and exhibited in New York to an international meeting of experts in eugenics. It bears little resemblance to the Adonis of classical mythology, as portrayed by sculptors.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0060.xml
article
35
35
RADIO
[no value]
TINY RADIO SET WILL FIT IN POCKET
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Now a pedestrian may tune in on his favorite radio program while he strolls down the street. A midget receiving set, exhibited at a recent English radio show, is so small that receiver and batteries may be carried in the pocket. The loudspeaker is contained in a hat.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0061.xml
article
35
35
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NO BARB ON FISH HOOK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BARBLESS fish hook just patented by a Johnstown, Pa., cabinetmaker, allows undersize fish to be removed and returned to the water without injury. Its spring grip resembles that of a safety pin. Caught in clothing, it is readily removed, and it is said not to snag easily in weeds or overhanging branches.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0062.xml
article
36
36,37
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
New Art Fits Foreign Speech to Any Film
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LANGUAGES are being fitted like garments to actors in the talkies, these days, so that motion picture producers may send their films to foreign countries. An American movie goer may enter a Paris or a Berlin theater and find his favorite actor proposing to the leading lady in French, or discussing a business deal in German.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0063.xml
article
38
38,39
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
TRICKS YOU CAN Teach Your DOG
Veteran Trainer Describes Stunts Your Pet Can Easily Acquire—if You Use Enough Patience and Time
[no value]
[no value]
WALTER E. BURTON
You can easily teach your pet dog tricks, according to the veteran showman, Henry B. Gentry, who has developed some of the most famous trained dogs in the country. The first thing to do is to let the dog you intend to train live his own life for a year.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0064.xml
article
40
40,41,42,112
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
RADIO and DYNAMITE find Earth's Secret Riches
New Miracle-Working Machines Enable Experts to “See” Deeply Buried Wealth
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. FLYNN
FORTUNES in zinc ore today are shipped to Europe from enormous deposits in Newfoundland where, five years ago, not an ounce of ore was being mined. For miles around, the territory, including the now famous Buchans Mine, belonged to the late Lord Northcliffe, British newspaper publisher, who had bought the land for the sake of its paper pulp forests.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0065.xml
article
42
42
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
Disk Replaces Movie Film in New Projector
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CIRCULAR film disks replace standard film in a new motion picture projector, designed for educational and advertising use. According to the inventor, the disks are far less fragile than ordinary film and can be projected 10.000 times without breakage or other damage.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0066.xml
article
43
43
ENGINEERING
[no value]
Giant Railway for Ocean Liners
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAN an express railway be built to carry the world's largest ocean liners bodily across France, between the Atlantic Ocean and the Mediterranean Sea? An engineer named Mahl puts forward this proposal to solve one of France’s outstanding maritime problems.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0067.xml
article
44
44
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Here's the World's First Porcelain House
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IMAGINE a home that costs little to build, never needs painting, and requires only soap and water to keep its exterior clean—and you will have a good idea of the world’s first “porcelain house,” which has just been completed at Cleveland, Ohio.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0068.xml
article
45
45
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Football Rooters in Living Pictures
Spectacular Stunts at College Games Are All Carefully Worked Out with Crayon and Paper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW do rooters in the grandstand, at a college football game, form living pictures, names, and designs in spectacular between-the-halves stunts? At the University of Southern California, Trojan rooters have brought this picturesque art to a high state of perfection, and pictures on this page show how it is done.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0069.xml
article
46
46,47,110
[no value]
[no value]
Will TINY MOTORS fill Air with Flivver Planes?
Veteran Pilot Tells How Glider with Sixty-Foot Wings Could Fly with a TinyTen-Pound Engine
[no value]
[no value]
CAPTAIN FRANK T. COURTNEY
A SIXTY-FOOT plane with a three-horsepower motor could be built and flown for sport. Recent advances in engine construction and lessons learned from soaring ships have made possible this remarkable feat. A few days ago, I had lunch with several designers and the conversation turned to the possibility of flying with midget motors especially designed to power featherweight soaring planes.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0070.xml
article
48
48
[no value]
[no value]
Home Tests of Nature’s Secrets
You Can Demonstrate for Yourself the Action of Mysterious Laws in the Realm of Science by Using the Things That Are Always at Hand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRIFIED NEWSPAPER. That a newspaper contains static electricity can be proved with the apparatus shown above. Suspend a ball of cotton covered with tin foil on a wire as shown. Rub a newspaper and drop it on the tin. The ball will swing between pie tin and metal rod HOW TO GET GREAT HEAT.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0071.xml
article
49
49
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Pilgrim Fathers’ Homes Seen in Exhibit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO SHOW Americans how the Pilgrim Fathers lived, a unique exhibit has been erected at Salem, Mass. It consists of a group of structures exactly duplicating the dwellings of the first colonists upon the same spot. Successive models show the evolution from the rude, bark-covered houses of 1620 to the more substantial lumber dwellings that followed the operation of sawmills.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0072.xml
article
49
49
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
GIANT CLAM CAN TRAP HUMAN VICTIMS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GIANT clam, found in Australian and Philippine reefs can trap human victims, a recent report to the American Museum of Natural History states. When its open shells lie flush with a reef or hidden below water, an inadvertent wader may step in.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0073.xml
article
49
49
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
ELECTRIC ERASER DOES THE RUBBING FOR YOU
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ERASER that does the rubbing for you, in removing pen and pencil marks, is now on the market. The machine receives electric current through a sixfoot cord that can be plugged into any convenience outlet.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0074.xml
article
50
50
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Our Tung Oil Industry Started in Cemetery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To FIVE seedling trees, neglected for years in a Florida cemetery, has just been traced the birth of an American industry valued in millions of dollars. Thirty-one thousand acres of the southern United States are now devoted to the cultivation of the tung tree, according to a recent Government survey.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0075.xml
article
50
50
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
ROLLERS HELP LAUNCH NEW LIFEBOAT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REVOLVING wheels help a new style of lifeboat down the side of a sinking ship, and propel it after it is in the water. Thus the lifesaving craft may be launched on an even keel despite the listing of the doomed ship, according to the New York inventor.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0076.xml
article
50
50
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
GOLF SCORE ON METAL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
An all-metal scorecard for golfers, that may be used over and over again, is the product of a Hoopeston, Ill., inventor. It consists of two hinged leaves stamped out of aluminum, with twenty-four marker strips. Each strip is numbered up to nine.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0077.xml
article
50
50
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
FREAK LEMON IS PINK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PINK lemonade might be made without resort to artificial coloring from the fruit of an odd lemon tree, discovered in a Burbank, Calif., orchard not long ago by an expert of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. The lemons from this tree have pink flesh and juice.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0078.xml
article
51
51
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
SUN FURNACE TO GIVE GREAT HEAT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HARNESSING the sun’s rays to fuse pottery materials is the aim of Paul Morrison and George Aderhold, of Saxonburg, Pa. They are constructing a giant solar furnace that, when completed, will be 100 feet in diameter. Concentric rings of polished, chromium-plated metal will reflect the sun’s rays and bring them to a focus seven feet from the furnace’s center.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0079.xml
article
51
51
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
PRISON GUARDS GET NEW WARLIKE VEST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WARLIKE in mien is a new vest designed for prison guards, allowing free use of both arms. Eight tear gas grenades and eight riot gun shells may be carried in the garment, each in an individual elastic pocket so that they are instantly accessible.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0080.xml
article
51
51
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
CLEAN STAINED GLASS WINDOWS WITH DISCARDED RAZOR BLADES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW use for old safety razor blades was found recently when the stained glass windows of famous Trinity Church in New York City received their first cleaning in eighty-six years. In expert hands, the blades successfully removed all of the dirt.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0081.xml
article
51
51
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
BIG PEAT BED MOVES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIKE a glacier of black ice, ten million cubic feet of peat moved more than two miles down a valley in County Mayo, Ireland, a few months ago, in one of the few known bog flows of history. The semiliquid mass, advancing like a wall, carried along stones and boulders.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0082.xml
article
51
51
Can You Invent It?
[no value]
Can You Invent It?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAN you make the changes needed in this mechanism to enable the clothes-mangle to operate in the following way: It is desired to have the two rolls, A and B, turn slowly inward, in the direction of the arrows, and then reverse their directions of motion.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0083.xml
article
52
52,53,107,108
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Fighting the Sea for WRECKED SHIPS
How Strange Machines Help the Men Who Go Down to the Sea to Salvage Lost Treasure
TO RECEIVE ATTENTION
[no value]
[no value]
Robert E. Martin
BRINGING dead ships to life, saving the sinking and disabled, rescuing cargoes, raising treasure from the deep! These are the romantic and hazardous everyday duties of the little known race of men and the odd fleet that carry on the strange business of the Black Horse of the Sea.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0084.xml
article
54
54
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Ruins of Turkish Bath, Built by Romans, Found in England
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TURKISH baths were popular among ancient Romans as early as 200 A.D., new discoveries show. Recent excavations at St. Albans, England, revealed the ruins of a palatial Roman establishment for steam bathing. An adjoining banqueting room indicated that a visit to the baths might have been attended with ceremony and festivity in those days.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0085.xml
article
54
54
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW TRAP CAN'T CATCH BIRDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO PROTECT birds and small animals from big-game traps, a safety attachment for standard steel traps has been devised by Albert M. Day, biologist of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. This invention, a thin detachable spring of steel, is slipped under the pan post of the trap as shown in the photograph at the left.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0086.xml
article
54
54
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
RESCUE MASK PROTECTS FROM GAS AND WATER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RESEMBLING the portable “lung” carried by a submarine crew to escape from a hatch beneath the water, a new type of rescue mask was tested recently by the emergency squad of New York City’s police. Wearing this device, one can brave smoke, water, and poisonous gas with impunity.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0087.xml
article
54
54
ENGINEERING
[no value]
PLAN TOWER 2,000 FEET HIGH FOR WORLD'S FAIR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DWARFING any structure ever built by man, a tower of steel and aluminum more than 2,000 feet tall has been proposed for the 1933 World’s Fair at Chicago. Frank A. Randall, Chicago consulting engineer and originator of the project, says such a tower is practicable from an engineering standpoint, and could be erected within seven months to serve as an attraction for sightseers.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0088.xml
article
55
55
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
WATER BAG AND PUMP FOR FOREST RANGERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FOREST ranger becomes a one-man fire department with the aid of a new portable water bag. Carried on the back like a knapsack, it is made of processed cloth and holds more than five gallons of water for quenching a small blaze. A hand pump forces a strong stream of water from the small nozzle.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0089.xml
article
55
55
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
TINY RAILWAY HAS TURNTABLE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COMPLETE even to a turntable is a miniature railway system just completed at Southsea, England, and said to be the smallest passenger-carrying railroad of its kind in the country. Its rails are of nine and a half inch gage. Trains are towed by model locomotives patterned after those that draw the crack expresses of British lines. Enthusiastic youngsters need no urging to lend a hand in operating the diminutive turntable, shown in the photograph above.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0090.xml
article
55
55
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
METAL WINDOW SHADES EXCLUDE STREET NOISES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALUMINUM window shades, setting a modern note in interior decoration, have recently been perfected. According to the maker, they banish the nuisance of balky curtain rollers and soiled shades. The metal panels open or close at the touch of a cord, as illustrated at the left.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0091.xml
article
55
55
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
SLUG OPENS NEW LOCK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COIN-SHAPED tokens, as well as a key are needed to open a new lock for warehouses, garages, and office buildings. Each employe’s tokens are individually marked. Dropped in the slot, as shown above, they reveal who used the door last.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0092.xml
article
55
55
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
DOUBLE STREET CAR HAS HINGE IN THE CENTER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ODDITY in rapid transit is a two-in-one interurban car recently placed in service on a northern California line. The two hinged sections look like separate cars, but actually share a common truck at the center. Passengers enter and leave at the front end, where the conductor collects the fares.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0093.xml
article
56
56
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
New Coal Barge Corrugated to Give It Unusual Strength
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN DESIGNING a 130-foot, all-steel coal barge, recently launched by a New York shipbuilder, the principle that gives strength to a corrugated paper box was employed. The new method, called “reverse channel” construction and combining unusual strength with minimum weight, was worked out by Johannes Kjekstad, welding engineer.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0094.xml
article
56
56
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
EXPOSURE METER GIVES TIME FOR ENLARGEMENT OF PHOTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMATEUR photographers know the difficulty of judging the density of a film or plate negative and timing the exposure correctly for an enlargement. An electrical “enlargement exposure meter” has recently been placed on the market. The user holds it against the easel and presses a button, illuminating a small window.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0095.xml
article
56
56
[no value]
[no value]
AUTOMATIC SPEED SIGNAL FOR AUTO AND PLANE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A “SIGNALLING speedometer” has been invented by a Pasadena, Calif., architect automatically to warn motorists and aviators when they reach a predetermined speed, by giving an audible signal or lighting a lamp. The automobile model would be connected to the transmission, and would assist a driver to keep within legal speed limits.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0096.xml
article
56
56
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
CAP ON TUBE SPREADS SHAVING PASTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR the convenience of those who use shaving creams of the non-lathering type, a special applicator has been invented to replace the standard cap on the tube. This new spreader cap applies the paste directly to the face; it is unnecessary to get the fingers greasy.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0097.xml
article
57
57
[no value]
[no value]
Plane in Test Climbs at Forty-five Degree Angle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
How steeply can an airplane climb? To find out, experimenters at a Berlin airport recently set up an inclined metal wire at a predetermined angle. Skimming near the ground in his high-powered monoplane, P. de Angeli, noted Italian pilot, zoomed directly behind the standard.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0098.xml
article
57
57
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
ONE-HAND CASE OFFERS AND LIGHTS CIGARETTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A ONE-HAND pocket case that delivers lighted cigarettes is the latest aid for smokers. Invented by a San Francisco man, the new case holds nine cigarettes. The mechanism is operated entirely with one hand. A slight pull on the top of the case snaps on the lighter, concealed at one side, and partially extends a cigarette.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0099.xml
article
57
57
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
STREET CAR LETTER BOX SPEEDS MAIL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MAIL boxes on street cars have made their appearance in Strausberg, a little town near Berlin, Germany. Now residents may post their letters at any car stop if no other receptacle is near at hand. But it is not recorded whether any person has had the temerity to hail and stop a car for the sole purpose of getting his letter started for its destination.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0100.xml
article
57
57
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW WINDOW GIVES ONE-WAY VISION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a pane of new material is mounted in a window frame, a person on the inside can see through it, but one outside cannot see in. From the exterior, the one-way pane resembles an ordinary mirror. Chicago police are reported to employ such a pane to enable witness to identify criminal suspects without-meeting them face to face.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0101.xml
article
57
57
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
FILM CAN NOW BE USED WITH A PLATE CAMERA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EQUIPPED with, a new adapter, a plate camera can use roll film. The device that accomplishes this fits upon the back of the camera in place of the plate holder and accommodates a spool of standard roll film. Since the film is arranged to lie exactly in the position formerly occupied by a plate, the regular focusing scale of the camera can be used.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0102.xml
article
58
58,59
Latest INVENTIONS for the Household
[no value]
Latest INVENTIONS for the Household
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BLIND, BUT RIGHT. This coffee container not only automatically seals itself tightly when closed, but it also releases exactly the right amount of coffee for one cup so that it can be operated without mistake by a blindfolded woman STOPS SHIVERY CHILLS.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0103.xml
article
60
60,61,93
[no value]
[no value]
Experiments with CARBON for the Home Chemistis Laboratory
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAYMOND B. WAILES
IF YOU had your choice between burnt toast and a diamond, you undoubtedly would choose the diamond. Chemically speaking, however, you would be getting carbon in either case. The burned, black portion of toast is carbon, while the diamond is carbon in a crystalline form.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0104.xml
article
62
62
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Electric Eye sounds Fire Alarm and Locates Blaze on Ship
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DISASTERS such as the recent burning at sea of the French passenger steamship Georges-Philippar, with the loss of dozens of lives, may be averted in future by an automatic fire alarm system perfected especially for marine use. Not only does this apparatus sound an alarm when the first wisp of smoke anywhere in the ship indicates a fire, but it reveals the exact location of the fire in time to prevent it from gaining headway.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0105.xml
article
62
62
Cash Prize WINNERS in our August Heroes of Science Contest
[no value]
Cash Prize WINNERS in our August Heroes of Science Contest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Here Are the Names of Twenty-Nine Whose Skill and Application Brought Them Cash Rewards in Our Big Picture Cutting Contest in August Issue FIRST PRIZE $500 Charles Lind, Hicksville, N. Y. SECOND PRIZE $100 H. J. Brockman Baltimore, Md. THIRD PRIZE $50 M. J. Langley Chicago, III.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0106.xml
article
63
63
New Radio Tube Has Three Uses
[no value]
New Radio Tube Has Three Uses
Changing the Grid Hook-up in Amplifier Type 89 Changes Work It Does in Set
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THREE complete grids, each with its own separate connection, give a remarkable radio tube, the new type 89, the ability to change its characteristics as a chameleon changes its colors. When a tube of low amplification factor is required, type 89, with its grids connected a certain way, becomes such a tube.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0107.xml
article
64
64
Trailing Trouble in Your Loudspeaker
[no value]
Trailing Trouble in Your Loudspeaker
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WOBBLING back and forth some eighteen million times for every hour of use, your radio loudspeaker gets a pretty tough deal. No other part of the radio receiving equipment has to stand such terrific mechanical punishment. It is no wonder, therefore, that a radio loudspeaker occasionally breaks down under the strain of so much vibration.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0108.xml
article
65
65
How to get Good Code "FIST"
[no value]
How to get Good Code "FIST"
Efforts at Speed Spoil Amateur's Work in Spite of Type of Key Used
Ousting Harmonics
[no value]
[no value]
John Carr
ABILITY to send clean-cut, readable code, a good "fist," is the goal of every amateur radio operator. As you listen in, however, on the amateur wave bands, you will hear the Internation Morse Code distorted, mutilated, and garbled in every conceivable way.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0109.xml
article
66
66,93
GUS tells How to Inspect a Stalled Motor
[no value]
GUS tells How to Inspect a Stalled Motor
GUS says:
HEAT EXPANDS REAMERS THAT CUT UNDERSIZE
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
GUS WILSON slid into the driver's seat of the wrecking car, touched the starter button, and was about to drive out of the Model Garage when Joe Clark, his partner, arrived for the day's work. “Ride over to the freight station with me,” Gus called in answer to Joe’s greeting.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0110.xml
article
67
67,68,69
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
A Matchless New Model for You to Build The Battleship TEXAS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a model of one of the finest and most powerful battleships afloat—the U. S. S. Texas, flagship of the Atlantic fleet. It has been simplified to such a degree that anyone interested in model making can build it without difficulty and at relatively low cost for materials; and no special tools are needed.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0111.xml
article
70
70
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
SMALL MACHINE ROLLS ON TWO CASTERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMALL home workshop machines with individual motor drives may be made more readily portable by the method illustrated. This requires only two casters for each stand and, indeed, is better than using four casters because there is less tendency for the machine to roll or shift while it is being used.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0112.xml
article
70
70
[no value]
[no value]
POCKETKNIFE DOES DUTY AS MARKING GAGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ORDINARY saw-and-hammer repair jobs often require more tools than we take along, and one of these is likely to be a marking gage. In a pinch, a pocketknife makes an excellent substitute. The point of the pencil—or of a nail used as an emergency scriber—rests snugly in one of the blade hinge grooves, while the body of the knife is held as shown.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0113.xml
article
70
70
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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WOODEN TOOL STRETCHES WEBBING AND WIRE
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H. CALDWELL
FOR most upholstery work it is necessary to use a webbing stretcher. The one illustrated below, which is a copy of a tool more than 75 years old, is easy to use and gives such great leverage that the webbing can be drawn as tight as a drum. It is made from a piece of 1-in. hardwood 15 in. long.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0114.xml
article
70
70
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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A CHESS SET FOR INTERRUPTED GAMES
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A. M. SMYTH
IN THE manufacturing plant where I am employed there are chess players all over the building, but the actual time they can devote to a game is fifteen minutes each day. To provide an inexpensive type of board so that a game can be continued from day to day without the pieces becoming disarranged, I designed the outfit illustrated.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0115.xml
article
70
70
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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TEMPORARY ADHESIVE LEAVES NO TRACE
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DOUGLAS LEECHMAN
A USEFUL adhesive wax for temporary purposes can be prepared by adding a teaspoonful of Canada balsam to one ounce of melted beeswax. Stir together, pour into a shallow flat tray, and, just before the wax hardens, cut it into inch square blocks.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0116.xml
article
71
71
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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Modern Mirror Made from an Old Golden Oak Cast-Off
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CHARLES H. ALDER
THERE is no end to what can be done in modernizing old furniture. Every attic will yield pieces that can be magically transformed. The mirror from a discarded golden oak dresser, for example, can be converted easily into a piece that is as up-to-date and smart looking as anything you can buy in a furniture store.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0117.xml
article
71
71
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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NOVEL JIG-SAWED WINDOW SHADE PULLS
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HAZEL F. SHOWALTER
THIS ornamental little pull for a window shade is made in the form of an owl sitting on a curved branch. To prepare the pattern, divide a 4-in. square into 1-in. squares; then draw the lines of the pattern from point to point across the squares as shown in the small diagram appearing below.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0118.xml
article
71
71
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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LONG HOOKS FORM NEAT SHELF BRACKETS
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DANIEL REYNOLDS
LARGE square screw hooks of the type shown make neat brackets for narrow shelves and may be moved easily should occasion demand. The hooks are placed about 3 in. from either end of the shelf and extend out from the wall about 2 in. for a shelf 3 in. wide.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0119.xml
article
71
71
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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IMITATION PLATING FOR BRASS AND COPPER
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WALLACE H. MCCLAY
MANY an amateur radio operator wishes his coils were a shiny silver instead of dull copper. Here is a process that can be applied right on the spot: Place 2 oz. of nitric acid in a 4-oz. bottle and add about ½ OZ. of mercury. When the mercury has gone into solution, add enough water to fill the bottle.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0120.xml
article
71
71
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OUR BLUEPRINTS—A Gold Mine of Ideas
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WHEN you are about to start a new undertaking in your home workshop—it doesn’t matter whether it is something mentioned in the current issue or not—see if the subject is on our list of blueprints (page 90). If it is, send for the blueprints, because they will save your time and insure your success.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0121.xml
article
72
72
MODELS
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MODEL TRAINS Pass Doorway on Bridge
Five exceptionally useful kinks for those who operate miniature railways
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IT OFTEN happens that the room in which a model railway system is to be located has a door that opens inward. This makes a continuous track circuit an impossibility if the installation is to be mounted permanently on a shelf around the wall, because the door interrupts the circuit.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0122.xml
article
72
72
MODELS
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Bumper Gives When Hit
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A WOODEN bumper for model railway sidings is illustrated in the photograph above. It is easily made of the lumber from an old crate. The size should, of course, be in proportion to the scale of the track. In cases where the end of the siding is so located that a train running off the end will come to grief by falling off the table, the wood parts of the bumper should be solidly screwed and glued together.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0123.xml
article
72
72
MODELS
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Adding Weight to Cars
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TO ADD weight to some of the units of your model railway is often desirable. A locomotive, for example, will pull a much heavier load and run with more realism if it is loaded to give the wheels better traction. Again, you may want to equalize the speed of two different trains.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0124.xml
article
72
72
MODELS
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Cables for Locomotives
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ORDINARY stranded wire is not suitable for the electrical connections between the two motors of a double motor driven model railway locomotive. An exceptionally flexible wire for this purpose is the so-called “litz” wire used for winding high-frequency radio coils.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0125.xml
article
72
72
MODELS
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A Simply Made Flood Light
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FROM an empty round talcum powder can, an automobile type single-contact socket, and some radio bus wire can be made the little flood light shown at the .left. The lower portion of the talcum powder can is cut off and the cap removed so that the socket can be soldered into place.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0126.xml
article
73
73
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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An ARMCHAIR OF MAHOGANY AND COWHIDE
HOW TO WHITTLE A PEACH-PIT MONKEY
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Hi Sibley
REAL comfort is combined with simplicity of construction in this fine example of an old Spanish armchair. It is a design handed down by the old padres of California who were obliged to do the best they could with the simple tools and materials at hand and who succeeded in creating a distinctive style that has been popular for many generations.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0127.xml
article
74
74
FOR THE HOME OWNER
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Paneling Walls with Paint
AND OTHER SHIPSHAPE HOME HINTS
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INTERIOR walls that are decorated with a flat paint in a solid color often can be improved greatly by the addition of striping lines, in a darker shade. These are arranged to give the effect of panels. Although many painters use an ordinary beveled straightedge to guide the striping brush, amateurs will obtain equally good results, with less chance of smearing the stripe, if they guide the brush with the fingers in the manner illustrated.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0128.xml
article
74
74
FOR THE HOME OWNER
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How to Stop Small Boiler Leaks
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SMALL leaks in a steam boiler should be repaired at once, but this does not necessarily require the service of a plumber. It frequently can be done by adding a mixture of bran and corn meal to the boiler water. To make the repair, the water in the boiler should be warm.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0129.xml
article
74
74
FOR THE HOME OWNER
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Quick Way to Defrost Refrigerator Coils
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WILLIAM C. REICHARD
APARTMENT house dwellers having mechanical refrigerators served by a central compressor unit in the basement need not wait for the general monthly defrosting of the entire system to remove the frost from the refrigerating coils in their own cabinet.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0130.xml
article
74
74
FOR THE HOME OWNER
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Acid Cleans Water Gage
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BEFORE starting up the heating plant for the winter, the home owner will do well to inspect the insulating covering. If the asbestos has become cracked or loosened, it can be repaired with asbestos cement, which is obtainable at most hardware and plumbing supply shops.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0131.xml
article
74
74
FOR THE HOME OWNER
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Damp Resisting Kalsomine
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B. D.
A DAMPPROOF or water resisting kalsomine or whitewash can easily be made by adding about ½ lb. of waterproof casein glue to every 16-qt. pail of the finish. Mix the glue powder with equal parts of water by volume and, when it is dissolved, stir the resulting liquid into the kalsomine until thoroughly mixed.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0132.xml
article
75
75,99
CRAFTWORK
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New Fan Whittling Stunts
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E. J. Tangerman
WHITTLING ornate fans from a single block of wood is a favorite stunt. It looks difficult but is really a comparative simple matter. Few whittlers realize, however, that the same method can be adapted in ways never before used and that such miraculous looking feats can be accomplished as carving the figure of a woman in a billowing skirt, or making a bird with outspread wings and tail in a cage—all from one piece of wood.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0133.xml
article
76
76
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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Realistic Seaplane Model
REQUIRES ONLY TWENTY-FIVE SIMPLE PARTS
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Donald W. Clark
MODEL builders who are tired of constructing ordinary airplanes and would like to try a flying boat design for a change will enjoy making this realistic Gronland-Wal seaplane (Capt. Wolfgang von Gronau’s ship). White pine or balsa wood serves for most of the construction, and only twenty-five parts in all are required—not counting the hull cradle.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0134.xml
article
77
77
CRAFTWORK
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SQUARE KNOTS form intricate pattern in this Woven Belt
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KENNETH MURRAY
SQUARE-KNOT work, a pastime of sailors the world over, offers to the home craftsman a fascinating type of handiwork. Tiny knots, tied one next to the other, are so arranged as to form woven articles of unique design. To make the durable and attractive square-knot belt illustrated, some No. 9 three-strand white cotton or linen cord and a nickel or mother-of-pearl buckle are the only materials required.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0135.xml
article
78
78,79
[no value]
[no value]
Hints on Twist Drill Economy FOR SMALL SHOP MACHINISTS
Preserving twin lips ... How to thin the web near shank ... Starting big holes accurately
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Hector J. Chamberland
BECAUSE twist drills are among the most frequently used tools, their maintenance has been the subject of more consideration than almost any other machine shop item. Nevertheless, the all-around machinist in the average small shop is not always familiar with the best ways to insure economy in the use of twist drills.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0136.xml
article
80
80
SHORT CUTS for Auto Jobs
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SHORT CUTS for Auto Jobs
Homemade Brush and Blower Clean Motor Quickly ... Sliding Windows Can Be Put in Open Car Curtains
Windows for Open Car
Drive Shaft Tube
Measure the Toe-in
Twin Guide Mirrors
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MADE from scrap parts, the motor-driven brush, with blower, shown above is an inexpensive timesaver for cleaning an automobile engine. The blades from a discarded electric fan of the midget type are mounted on the wire shank of a spoke brush from which the wooden handle has been removed.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0137.xml
advertisement
81
81
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GLYCERINE PRODUCERS’ ASSOCIATION
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GLYCERINE PRODUCERS’ ASSOCIATION
[no value]
[no value]
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0138.xml
article
82
82,84
Take Tour BEST PHOTOS Indoors
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Take Tour BEST PHOTOS Indoors
And perhaps you can win one of our new, greatly increased picture prizes
JULY PHOTO CONTEST AWARDS
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FREDERICK D. RYDER
"PUTTING 'em in a plaster cast, or maybe freezing them solid is the only way, I guess," my seat mate on the bus excursion sighed as he shuffled a dozen photoprints. “I see you take pictures, too,” he added, glancing again at the camera case between my feet.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0139.xml
advertisement
83
83
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GENERAL ELECTRIC CO.
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GENERAL ELECTRIC CO.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0140.xml
advertisement
85
85
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DELTA MFG. CO.
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DELTA MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0141.xml
article
86
86,87,88
WOODWORKING
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Covering Our New KAYAK with Canvas
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JACK HAZZARD
ONCE you have completed the framework of the new POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY 16-ft. kayak, or Eskimo type canoe, as described in two previous articles (P.S.M., Sept. ’32, p. 57, and Oct., p. 70), the application of the canvas covering is a comparatively simple matter.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0142.xml
advertisement
86
86
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NICHOLSON FILE CO.
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE CO.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0143.xml
advertisement
87
87
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LEVER BROTHERS CO.
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LEVER BROTHERS CO.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0144.xml
article
88
88
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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TOY WEIGHING SCALES MAKE IT MORE FUN TO “PLAY STORE”
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CHILDREN find it much more fun to "play store" if they can weigh out the “groceries,” “hardware,” and other commodities on toy scales that work like the real ones on store counters. Balance scales for this purpose can be made with very little work as shown in the drawings below.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0145.xml
advertisement
88
88
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MORSE
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MORSE
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0146.xml
article
89
89
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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THREE WAYS TO CLAMP SLIVERED WOODWORK
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DAVID WEBSTER
NO MATTER how careful either a home worker or a professional cabinetmaker may be, accidents happen and leave blemishes in conspicuous places. A slivered or a spalled corner may mar an otherwise perfect piece, or there may be a check or shake in the wood itself.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0147.xml
article
89
89
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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MAKING SHARPLY BENT METAL GOOSENECKS
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ARCHIE AMOS
IN ELECTRICAL wiring there are times when a short curved bracket or gooseneck is needed that cannot be bent from the regular solid conduit without kinking. Recently, when it was necessary to make a bracket over a sign for holding a light shade, this problem was solved by using a section of flexible (BX) tubing, which was bent to the proper shape and then soldered, along its length.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0148.xml
advertisement
89
89
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0149.xml
article
90
90
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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HOME WORKSHOP BLUEPRINTS
New projects are marked with an asterisk (*)
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TO ASSIST you in your home workshop, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY offers large blueprints containing working drawings of a number of well-tested projects. The blueprints are 15 by 22 in. and are sold for 25 cents a single sheet (except in a few special cases).
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0150.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
The Wooster Brush Co.
[no value]
The Wooster Brush Co.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0151.xml
article
91
91
FOR THE HOME OWNER
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PULL ON CORD UNLOCKS DOOR DOWNSTAIRS
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IN MANY small houses there are stairs leading from the side entrance up to the kitchen. When someone knocks or rings at the side door, whoever happens to be in the kitchen has to walk down to unlock the door. To save these unnecessary steps, I rigged up a simple device for unlocking the door from the kitchen.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0152.xml
article
91
91
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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TESTING SOLDERED WORK FOR PINHOLE LEAKS
Wanted... from Model Railway Fans
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SMALL soldering jobs on gas tanks, pails, kitchen utensils, and similar smooth surfaced articles can be tested quickly and easily with the aid of a large vacuum cup such as used to support clothes hooks. The vacuum cup is slightly dampened and placed over the patch of solder as illustrated.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0153.xml
advertisement
91
91
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WALKER-TURNER CO., Inc.
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WALKER-TURNER CO., Inc.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0154.xml
advertisement
91
91
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AERO MONORAIL COMPANY
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AERO MONORAIL COMPANY
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0155.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
Smooth-On Mfg. Co.
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Smooth-On Mfg. Co.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0156.xml
article
92
92
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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EASY WAYS TO IDENTIFY MODERN ALLOYS
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SEVERAL of the more modern alloys are difficult for the shopman and metal stockman to classify correctly. Although they may differ greatly in strength, resistance to corrosion, ductility, and other practical properties, they resemble each other in appearance.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0157.xml
advertisement
92
92
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0158.xml
advertisement
93
93
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0159.xml
article
94
94
WOODWORKING
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Our CONSTRUCTION KITS Save Time and Money
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THIS month the Popular Science Homecraft Guild offers an exceptional bargain for ship model makers—a complete construction kit of materials for building a 3 ft. long exhibition model of the U. S. S. Texas, flagship of the Atlantic Fleet.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0160.xml
advertisement
94
94
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John Hancock Inquiry Bureau
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John Hancock Inquiry Bureau
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0161.xml
article
95
95
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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AMUSING WOODEN KITTY NODS CONTINUALLY
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THIS nodding kitty toy may be easily made with the aid of a jig, scroll, or coping saw. Prepare pasteboard patterns of the sides, the back filler piece A, and the combined head and tail piece B by drawing a series of 1-in. squares and reproducing the curves in their correct relation to the squares.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0162.xml
article
95
95
FOR THE HOME OWNER
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ADAPTING LARGE CORKS TO SMALL BOTTLES
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W. L. F.
AN oversize cork may be reduced in size by rolling it under a heavy weight or shaving it down under water, but an easier method is to cut one or two wedges from the smaller end as shown.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0163.xml
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95
95
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0164.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
Lever Brothers Co.
[no value]
Lever Brothers Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0165.xml
article
96
96,97
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Molding Equipment for Making Small Castings at Home
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH C. GILBERT
EQUIPMENT for making small castings from lead, type metal, aluminum, and other nonferrous metals can be prepared so easily and at such low cost that there is no reason why the model maker or experimenter cannot do his own foundry work at home.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0166.xml
advertisement
96
96
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0167.xml
advertisement
96
96
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[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
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SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0168.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
SMMC
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SMMC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0169.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0170.xml
article
98
98
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Desk Ornament Predicts Weather
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THE heart of this little desk or table barometer is a violin string, which, twisting and untwisting according to the dampness of the air, turns an indicating dial. The materials can be obtained for a few cents. To make the base, screw a piece of 1 by 4 by 4 in. hardwood to a faceplate, turn it to diameter, and surface it.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0171.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0172.xml
article
98
98
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
FILLING HOLES IN WOOD
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C.M.B.
WHEN it is desired to force a plastic wood composition or wood putty into a hole and let it dry under pressure, put a piece of waxed paper between the work and the block before clamping. The waxed paper not only will peel without dragging out the plastic material, but also will not absorb the moisture from the surface, causing it to dry too rapidly.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0173.xml
advertisement
99
99
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0174.xml
article
100
100,102
Secrets of Success
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HOW AMERICAN WAR ACE BEAT HIS HANDICAPS
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS A perfect example of a man who set his goal and gained it, read this life story of Eddie Rickenbacker, famous American war ace. It is a tribute to the power of concentration of this man, and of his ability to make worth-while use of every minute of his spare time.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0175.xml
advertisement
100
100
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International Correspondence Schools
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International Correspondence Schools
[no value]
[no value]
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0176.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL RADIO & ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
NATIONAL RADIO & ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0177.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
LEWIS HOTEL TRAINING SCHOOLS
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LEWIS HOTEL TRAINING SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0178.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
COYNE Electrical School
[no value]
COYNE Electrical School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0179.xml
article
102
102,103
Secrets of Success
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WILLIAM RILY COPPAGE USED HIS SPARE TIME
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UNTIL he was eighteen years old, William Rily Coppage had never been further from Lebanon Junction, Kentucky, than Tallapoosa, Georgia. Today Rily is one of the best known names in the construction game. As a youngster, Coppage could read and write and figure a bit, but his main asset was his broad, strong back.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0180.xml
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102
102
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0181.xml
article
103
103
Secrets of Success
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Cash Prizes
Awarded For All True Success Stories Accepted and Printed
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THIS department will give $5.00 for every true success story submitted by readers of Popular Science Monthly, and which is accepted for printing in this magazine. Manuscripts will be judged on the individual merits of the case and circumstances involved.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0182.xml
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103
103
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National Radio Institute
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National Radio Institute
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0183.xml
article
104
104
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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CUT-OUT PUZZLE HAS TRICKY SOLUTION
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ARTHUR L. SMITH
AN UNUSUAL cut-out puzzle with a "catch" in it may be made from cigar-box material as shown in the drawings above. The problem is to form an equilateral triangle in a square box or frame by using five pieces of the shapes indicated. The solution depends upon the fact that the triangle is formed by the space left when the pieces are correctly assembled.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0184.xml
article
104
104
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
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NOVELTIES MADE FROM PHONOGRAPH RECORDS
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OLD phonograph records can be converted easily into novel wall pockets, card trays, paper clip holders, and small receptacles for various purposes. Place the record in a large pan of boiling hot water and let it soak for a few seconds. It will become soft and limber enough to be shaped with the hands.
PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0185.xml
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104
104
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VICTOR J.EVANS & CO.
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VICTOR J.EVANS & CO.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0186.xml
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104
104
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Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0187.xml
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104
104
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0188.xml
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105
105
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0189.xml
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106
106
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0190.xml
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107
107
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0191.xml
advertisement
108
108
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0192.xml
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109
109
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0193.xml
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110
110
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0194.xml
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111
111
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LIONEL
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LIONEL
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0195.xml
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113
113
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MIDWEST RADIO CORP.
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MIDWEST RADIO CORP.
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0196.xml
advertisement
114
114,115,116
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The American Tobacco Co.: Lucky Strike
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The American Tobacco Co.
Lucky Strike
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PopularScience_19321101_0121_005_0197.xml