Issue: 19320901

Thursday, September 1, 1932
SEPTEMBER 1932
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Thursday, December 25, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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advertisement
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0002.xml
advertisement
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DE SOTO MOTOR CORPORATION
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DE SOTO MOTOR CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0003.xml
masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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TABLE of CONTENTS for SEPTEMBER, 1932
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0005.xml
article
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AIR CONDITIONING The Latest in Home Comforts
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R. M. Bolen
DRIER than the Sahara Desert,” is the way heating engineers describe the quality of the air in ninety-nine out of every hundred heated homes. Most important of all the necessities of life is the air we breathe, yet because of artificial heating methods we live, during the winter months, in a man-made atmosphere far drier than that of Death Valley.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0006.xml
article
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4,5
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Our Readers Say
Something Makes Us Think He Likes His Astronomy
Can You Imagine Anyone "Just Ignoring" Chicago!
Your Pool, D. S. R,, Is Just Twelve Feet in Depth
It's Just Possible You Can Blame Old Man Worry
Here's an Explanation of Full Moon and Frost
Problem of Airplane Flight Is All Settled Again
Only a Cyclone Needed to Give This Car Its Top Speed
Sometimes It's Just as Well to Get Your Terms Right
He Would Like to Know How Bell Announced Spirits
Maybe the Big Fellow Would Simply Loaf Along
Anyway, You Must Admit, It Was a Right Nimble Fly
Who Else Wants Articles on Railroads and Farms?
This Boy Spoke Up and Got Himself Seen
An Echo of Approval Comes Out of Idaho
Do You Know How to Run Molten Iron Through Pipes?
Bridge as a Science and Also a Big Headache
Evidently This Writer Has No Time for Astrology
Kind Words and Cusses Keep the Wheels Turning
Suggests Vacuum Tube for Real Study of the Stars
All You Need to Know About Falling Bodies
Most Likely Someone Sits on the Safety Valve
Many Wise Men Think Both Statements True
His Plea Is for More Mathematical Problems
Our Guess Is Horace, but Probably It's Leopold
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THE title of POPULAR SCIENCE indicates that the main object towards which “our magazine” is attuned is to popularize science or explain it in an easy understandable form. Now what I would like to know is why astronomy, the original and oldest of all the sciences (the grand-daddy of them all!
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0007.xml
article
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6,7,8,92
LEADING ARTICLES
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Take Millions from Sea AR 400-FOOT DEPTH
Diving Bell for Sight-seers
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Michel Mok
A MILLION dollars in gold scooped up from the sea in a day! This was the news flashed by wireless from the Italian salvage ship Artiglio II, whose divers recovered part of the $5,000,000 in gold and silver that went down with the liner Egypt off Brest, France.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0008.xml
article
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9,10,11,12,13
LEADING ARTICLES
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Human Bomb to Plunge Four Miles
Dare-Devil Parachute Jumper to Leave Plane in an Aluminum Shell
Smoke Screen Hides Big Power Station
“ROCKET” CARS TO RUN AT WORLD’S FAIR
BATHER DRESSES IN BAG
Earthquakes Foretold By Use of New Tiltmeter
WINGED SPEEDBOAT ALMOST FLIES
VAPOR LAMP TINY BUT POWERFUL
Sea Gulls Teach Man Secret of Flight on His Own Wings
EVER-MOVING LIGHTS COLOR FOUNTAIN
STEAM FROM DEEP WELL TO RUN BIG DYNAMOS
Factories That Poison Air Are Raided by German Officials
TURRET ON PLANE HOUSES GUNNER
MUSIC SHORTENS WAIT AT PHONE
GOLFER'S RANGE FINDER GIVES DISTANCE TO HOLE
SOAPSUDS COOL MOTOR AND RAISE THE POWER
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THE world's first human bomb will plunge earthward, within the next few days, from an airplane four miles above Salisbury Plain, England. Spectators will see a tiny speck, hurtling downward at a speed that may reach 500 miles an hour, before it is near enough to be recognized as a glinting projectile of aluminum.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0009.xml
article
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14,15
LEADING ARTICLES
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Guard Secrets of New Airship
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WHEN the U. S. S. Macon, now being built at Akron, Ohio, is finished, it will look like its sister ship, the Akron, but it will be different. Many changes, the most important of which are kept secret, will be made in the Macon. The gas cells in the Macon will be of gelatine-latex construction—a cell type that has been found superior to anything previously used.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0010.xml
article
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16,17,94
LEADING ARTICLES
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SONG HUNTERS with SOUND TRUCK Snare Notes of WILD BIRDS
FIRST Real Collection of Forest Music Made with Outdoor Microphone and 17,000 Feet of Film
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George H. Dacy
AFTER hunting three months through the woods, swamps, and mountains of New York State, A. R. Brand, a retired stock broker and amateur naturalist, recently returned to his home in White Plains, N. Y., with 17,000 feet of talkie film. It was the first scientific collection of bird songs ever gathered.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0011.xml
article
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18,19
LEADING ARTICLES
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Giant Receiver gives RADIO to Whole City
Programs, Retransmitted over Telephone Lines, Go to Loudspeakers in Many Hundreds of Residences
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Robert E. Martin
MUSIC that had filled the studio stopped as R. A. Fox, the man who entertains Lorain, Ohio, for eighteen and one-half hours a day, turned a switch. Fox snapped another switch, and began talking into a microphone standing on the desk in front of him:
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0012.xml
article
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LEADING ARTICLES
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GARDENERS WORK MIRACLES with Electric Hotbeds
Heat Controlled Automatically Gives Plants Fast Growth and Unusual Size
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Walter E. Burton
AN OVERLOADED electric power cable in Norway may seem to be far removed from American gardens. Nevertheless, that particular cable was the means of putting thousands of dollars into the pockets of American gardeners. A few years ago a Norwegian engineer named Jacobsen noticed that plants growing above an underground transmission line were larger and better developed than those a short distance away.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0013.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Ten-Million-Volt Thunderbolt Launched in Electric Laboratory
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THUNDERBOLTS of ten million volts of electric fire crashed between two six-foot aluminum spheres in the General Electric Company’s high-voltage laboratory at Pittsfield, Mass., the other day, their noise resounding through the steel-lined room.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0014.xml
article
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CAR’S LIGHTED SIGN WARNS OF TURN
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IMPOSSIBLE to misunderstand is a stop and turn signal for autos, that informs a following motorist in spelled-out words what the driver is going to do. The disappearing sign contains an electric light connected to the car battery, which turns on and off automatically as the signal is operated.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0015.xml
article
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NEW INVENTIONS
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GLASS BLACKBOARD REPLACES SLATE
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GLASS blackboards are the newest style for schoolrooms. Designed to replace slate, they are said to be unscratchable and not subject to fading. By a new process a rich black color all the way through is given to the glass. The panes have approximately the same weight as similar areas of slate, “with none of the defects often found in slate.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0016.xml
article
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UNDERGROUND CHAMBER KEEPS FOOD FRESH
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To KEEP food cool and fresh without ice, an inventor of Garvin, Minn., devised an underground “refrigerator.” The food container is a cylindrical cabinet fifteen inches in diameter and thirty inches high, fitted with three shelves, and closed by a hinged door. It is lowered on a cable nearly to the bottom of a hole seven feet deep, where it is held in position by a counterweight.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0017.xml
article
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SHIPS
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BOY SCOUT SAILORS TO TRAIN ON TINY “OLD IRONSIDES”
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A COUNTERPART in miniature of the famous frigate Constitution and probably the smallest full-rigged ship afloat, the Constitution Junior was recently launched at Washington, D. C. The little vessel, forty-seven feet in length, is to be used as a training ship for the local troop of Sea Scouts—the nautical branch of the Boy Scouts of America.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0018.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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SALESMAN'S CAR EXPANDS AS SHOWROOM
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AN EXPANDING automobile has been introduced to meet the needs of traveling salesmen. When the driver reaches a place where he wishes to demonstrate his merchandise, he stops the car, inserts a crank-shaped lever in a floor socket beside the gear-shift handle, and gives it a few turns.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0019.xml
article
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NEW INVENTIONS
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SLEEPER NOT DISTURBED BY LAMP UNDER BED
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To MAKE it possible for a person to move about a room where another is sleeping, without disturbing the sleeper or bumping into furniture, an ingenious under-thebed night lamp has been placed on the market. When the lamp is clamped to the bed frame, its direct rays are shielded from the occupant but cast a soft glow over the entire floor space.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0020.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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Electrically Operated Machine Parks Cars in Air to Relieve Congestion in Streets
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VERTICAL parking, newest way to keep cars off busy city streets, has come into its own. After six months’ successful trial of the first commercial installation of the system in the loop district of Chicago, others are now contemplated for other large cities.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0021.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Climate 25,000 Years Ago Traced in Ancient Tree Pollen
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FROM a study of the pollen of ancient trees, a “prehistoric weather man,” John Voss, high school instructor of Peoria, 111., has traced successfully the climate of his locality for the past 25,000 years. Illinois and Wisconsin peat bogs, he discovered, contain quantities of perfectly preserved pollen from trees that long since disappeared.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0022.xml
article
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NEW INVENTIONS
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BANK ALARM CAN ELECTROCUTE BANDIT
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BOLD indeed would be the bandit who attempted to climb over a new protective barrier for the grating of a bank .cashier’s cage. To succeed, he must pass a dozen parallel strands of fine steel wire strung on quadrant-shaped standards. Touching any one of ten of them will set off a loud alarm outside the building.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0023.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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SCARECROW COP MAKES DRIVERS OBEY RULES
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DUMMY traffic cops are a new warning to motorists. Though a driver might fail to see or heed an ordinary “no parking” sign, the admonishing finger of the stern-faced dummy serves as a forceful reminder that the sign means what it says. A trial of the figure showed that few drivers chose to risk a summons by ignoring it, with the result that the regular police force is largely freed from the task of rounding up offenders.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0024.xml
article
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USE BLACK LIGHT TO GET UNUSUAL COLORS
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HITHERTO unforeseen artistic effects with materials that glow in characteristic colors when illuminated with ultra-violet light are predicted by American dye experts. Window displays, arranged of fabrics treated with fluorescent dyes and show cards lettered with fluorescent ink, will give a striking effect when illuminated with ultra-violet rays.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0025.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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GERMANY QUARANTINES ALL IMPORTED ART OBJECTS
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To PROTECT its museum treasures against destructive insect pests and mold, Germany has established the world’s only quarantine for art objects. Imported pieces from America, Africa, Australia, and Asia must be fumigated before they are admitted into the country.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0026.xml
article
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NEW INVENTIONS
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TWO-FACED INSTRUMENT IS VIOLIN OR VIOLA
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TWO-FACED is a novel instrument devised by a St. Louis, Mo., musician. One side is a violin, the other a viola. By reversing the instrument from time to time, a skillful performer can execute an exceptional range of chords of high and low pitch.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0027.xml
article
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NEW INVENTIONS
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UMBRELLA ON BICYCLE SHELTERS RIDER
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SHOULD he get caught in a shower, a Bavarian inventor, Heinrich Rothbauer, has no concern. A sturdy umbrella is mounted on his bicycle, attached by a clamp in such a way that it may be adjusted to the most effective angle. The umbrella can also be used to shade the rider from a hot sun.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0028.xml
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NEW INVENTIONS
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UPPER BERTH TRAVELERS GET DRESSING PLATFORM
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AN INNOVATION in railroad travel called a “dressing platform” has been put into service for upper-berth passengers by the Michigan Central Railroad. This folding platform provides comfortably roomy space to dress, replacing the usual cramped quarters.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0029.xml
article
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NEW INVENTIONS
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Split Film Cuts Home Movie Cost
Remarkable Narrow Gage System Squeezes Four Images into the Space Which Formerly Was Needed for One
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FOUR pictures are squeezed into the usual film space of one, through the use of a camera of radical design in a remarkable “narrow gage” movie system just introduced. So economical of film is the process, according to its sponsors, that thousands who have thought home movie-making beyond their means may now enjoy this fascinating hobby.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0030.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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DIVING BELL NOW OPEN TO SIGHT-SEERS
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HOW does it feel to plunge 100 feet beneath the waves? Sight-seers may now experience that sensation, with the placing in service of the first diving bell ever open to the public. Operated from a pleasure ship off Long Beach, Calif., it is lowered over the side with an operator and three passengers inside.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0031.xml
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RADIO
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LOUDSPEAKERS ANNOUNCE THE OLYMPIC WINNERS
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To ANNOUNCE the winners of events at the Olympic Stadium, Los Angeles, Calif., a loudspeaker system was designed. A circle of huge horns, installed atop a tall mast, is connected through an amplifying system to the announcer’s microphone.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0032.xml
article
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NEW INVENTIONS
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SWIVELING VISE LOCKS ITSELF IN POSITION
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A NEW swiveling bench vise, turning both horizontally and vertically and automatically locking itself in position when the jaws are tightened, has been perfected by a California inventor. The moment that work is clamped in the vise, it becomes absolutely rigid, but to change its position it is necessary only to loosen the screw slightly.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0033.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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Wind Tunnel Used to Perfect Streamline Design for Autos
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USING an experimental wind tunnel at the University of Oklahoma, two graduate students have worked out what they believe to be a perfect streamline design for cars of the future. Tests of models showed that a sedan of the new type would go half again as far on a gallon of gasoline as one of conventional design, and could attain correspondingly higher speeds, because of reduced wind resistance.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0034.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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SUSPENSION BRIDGE CARRIES PIPE LINE
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NEITHER pedestrians, automobiles, nor trains will cross a bridge just completed over the Missouri River near Ponca, Neb., yet it represents an engineering feat of the first magnitude. Longest of its kind in the world, it was erected to carry a fourteeninch pipe line for natural gas over the waterway.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0035.xml
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NEW INVENTIONS
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RUBBER APRON KEEPS WADER FROM SINKING
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So WADERS may keep dry and venture safely into deep water, an odd rubberized costume has been introduced. Its floating apron, with a pneumatic rim, encircles the head of the wearer and supports his weight when he steps out of his depth. The “safety wader” was originally designed for a wading duck blind, but has been widely adopted by fishermen who wade in a stream as they fish.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0036.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Mushroom Buildings of Concrete Grow Twelve Feet a Day
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BUILDINGS that grow a dozen feet a day until they have reached full height may mark the next period of general construction. The method has been applied successfully to erecting one-piece grain elevators. After ground has been excavated, wooden forms for concrete are built.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0037.xml
article
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AVIATION
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UNUSUAL PLANE HAS REAR PROPELLER
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AT LAWRENCE, Kans., a plane with two wings on each side on the same level has just been designed. The pilot occupies a seat in the nose of the fuselage. Back of him, in the center of the ship, is the motor which is coupled to a rear propeller, with a drive shaft and two universal joints.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0038.xml
article
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NEW INVENTIONS
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TINTED FINGER NAILS FOR EVENING WEAR
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DETACHABLE party finger nails have been patented by a Los Angeles, Calif., inventor as an addition to the wardrobe of the society woman. The thin, tinted shells fit snugly on top of the natural nails, held in place by adhesive cement. As the cement is readily soluble, the nails can be removed at will.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0039.xml
article
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AVIATION
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New and Unusual Features of Activity in the Air
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0040.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Waste Water in Oil Fields Yields Rich By-Products
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How a troublesome waste product was unexpectedly made to yield riches in byproducts is one of the newest romances of the California oil fields. Water that comes with the oil from wells was considered a nuisance until state regulations recently prohibited oil companies from turning the waste water loose.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0041.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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MELTED GRANITE FORMS TINY VOLCANOS
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MINIATURE volcanos were made to order, the other day, at the California Institute of Technology. Granite, melted and boiled at a temperature of about 3,600 degrees F. in a laboratory furnace, furnished the volcanos. Feldspar, one of the constituents of granite, melts first, and as the temperature rises, the whole mass fuses and forms realistic craters.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0042.xml
article
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NEW INVENTIONS
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LIGHTS ON BACK FLASH UMPIRE'S DECISION
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FLASHING lights announce the decision of a baseball umpire in a signaling system invented by a Tampa, Fla., clergyman. The umpire operates a switch box on his chest, while lamps on his back make the ruling known according to a code.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0043.xml
article
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AVIATION
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Ocean Airports of Artificial Ice
Daring Project Would Dot Sea with Islands Kept Solidly Frozen
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ISLANDS of ice for ocean flyers, resting on the sea bottom and kept firm by refrigerating plants, are visioned by a German engineer. Such man-made ice cakes, he declares, could be produced for transocean airlines at a fraction of the cost and time involved in other proposals for “seadromes” or midway stations.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0044.xml
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NEW INVENTIONS
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First Two-Way Rail Bus Now Running in Germany
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A GERMAN railroad has recently put into operation what is believed to be the first two-way rail bus in the world. At each end of the body, which is of conventional bus construction with flanged wheels, is a driver’s compartment and a complete power plant.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0045.xml
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LEADING ARTICLES
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World’s Strictest School Trains Our War Birds
Physical Perfection Demanded of Randolph Field Cadets
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CLAYTON R. SLAWTER
FLY northeast fifteen miles over the flat Texas table-land surrounding San Antonio and you pass above the only “air city” in the world, a community housing 3,500 inhabitants and laid out with the one aim of meeting the needs of flying men. It is Randolph Field, the Army’s new $10,000,000 college of the air.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0046.xml
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NEW INVENTIONS
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New Remote Control System Fights Skyscraper Fires
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FIRST installations have just been made in and about New York City of a “remote control” system of fighting skyscraper fires. By this new method, one man in a fireproof booth can combat flames sweeping an entire building. Fire officials are watching the pioneer installations in a paper factory, oil plant, and other buildings with interest, for they may be the long-sought means of controlling fires in tall buildings.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0047.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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Fascinating Experiments ANY AMATEUR CAN PERFORM with Simple apparatus
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SHOULD you imagine that an especially equipped laboratory is needed to perform interesting and instructive experiments in science, try the ones suggested on this page. Here are eight simple, fascinating tests that any home experimenter can perform with no more apparatus than is to be found in the average household.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0048.xml
article
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SHIPS
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BIG ROTOR GOES DOWN SHIPS FUNNEL
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MODERN liners, especially oil burners, may carry more funnels than they actually need for the sake of appearance. Not entirely useless are the “dummy” stacks, for the lower part frequently is used for ventilation. Recently another ingenious use was demonstrated when an eight-ton turbine rotor had to be placed in the hold of the S. S.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0049.xml
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MODEL ROCKET PLANE FLIES FIVE MILES
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DRIVEN by miniature rockets, a model airplane recently made a five-mile flight over an island in the North Sea off the German coast. The craft, constructed by Reinhold Tiling, German experimenter, is reported to be of an entirely new design.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0050.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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AMMONIA GAS STAINS WOODWORK BROWN
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BY TREATING lumber with ammonia gas, the mellowed brown shades of old woodwork have been produced at the U. S. Forest Products Laboratories, Madison, Wis. Ways have been found to apply the process on a commercial scale, dispensing with expensive liquid stains, to nearly all kinds of wood.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0051.xml
article
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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BAD LIGHT MAKES YOU TIGHTEN YOUR MUSCLES
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IF YOU grip the steering wheel of your car more tightly when you drive at night down a dimly-lit street than you do in the daytime, blame poor illumination. Even though you imagine you can see adequately, you are undergoing a nervous strain that drains your energy, declares Dr. Matthew Luckiesh of General Electric Lighting Research Laboratory. To measure this hidden strain, a number of persons read a book for half-hour intervals under various lighting conditions, their fingers resting lightly on an electric push button registering the tensity of the muscles. The tests showed average human being needs 100 times as much light as he thinks he does.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0052.xml
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NEW INVENTIONS
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NEW PUNCH CATCHES DISKS IT CUTS OUT
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A NEW punch catches its own punchedout disks. The paper guide has a Ushaped spring, the lower arm of which closes a hollow reservoir where the disks accumulate. For emptying, pull back the spring with the fingernail as shown above; the disks fall into the waste basket.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0053.xml
article
39
39
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
WAR ANIMALS TRAINED TO ESCAPE FUMES OF POISON GAS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GAS attacks in future wars are possibilities for which Germany is seriously preparing. Not only her citizens but also the animals used in military operations are being trained to wear gas masks. Equipment for horses, pigeons, and dogs designed some years ago has been perfected and, as the photograph at the left shows, rehearsals with the apparatus are being carried on so that, in an emergency, escape by the animals from the deadly fumes could be effected.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0054.xml
article
39
39
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
TIN SOLDIERS TEACH WAR TO CADETS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HELMETED tin soldiers, moved about like chessmen on a board, are used by German cadets to solve offensive and defensive problems of war. Tanks and artillery field pieces also are provided for the use of the young warriors. Arranging them on a relief map of some section of Europe, the cadets are required to advance or retreat with the smallest possible loss of men or the greatest territorial advantage.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0055.xml
article
39
39
RADIO
[no value]
FIRST RADIO FIRE ALARM INSTALLED IN GERMANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A RADIO fire alarm system, said to be the first of its kind in the world, has just been put into operation at Wannsee, near Berlin, Germany. When a report of fire is received at police headquarters, the officer on duty presses a button that starts the automatic transmitter.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0056.xml
article
39
39
AVIATION
[no value]
YOUNG INVENTOR BUILDS ROCKET-DRIVEN PLANE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AIRCRAFT propelled by rockets is the dream of Lester D. Woodford, sophomore at the Ohio State University, Columbus. For more than a year, he has been working on the model of a ship that would be driven by gasoline and liquid oxygen. At present he is on an island in a Canadian lake where the first tests with his model are being made.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0057.xml
article
40
40
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
OLD MOTOR TURNS WAGON INTO A CAR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“ONE gallon of gasoline, please!” says young Stanley McCrary, of Seattle, Wash., when he stops his diminutive car at the filling station operated by his father. Parts of a discarded washing machine and a coaster wagon may be identified by a keen-eyed observer in the homemade vehicle.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0058.xml
article
40
40
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
HOLDER FOR SANDPAPER PROTECTS THE FINGERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SANDPAPER or emery cloth may be used without lacerating the fingers, with the aid of a new rubber holder. Its spring grip securely holds the abrasive and permits a steady, even pressure to be applied. Bits of steel wool may also be grasped with the holder to remove rust from household utensils.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0059.xml
article
40
40
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
CIGARETTE HUMIDOR FOR CAR FITS ON DASHBOARD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW dispenser that holds twenty cigarettes is designed to be attached to the dashboard of a car, and so conveniently placed that the driver can help himself to a smoke with one hand without running any danger of losing control of the steering wheel.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0060.xml
article
40
40
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
BLACK WRAPPING PAPER KEEPS FOOD FRESH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GREEN or black wrappings may soon grace many of the products on your grocer’s shelves, as a result of tests just concluded at the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Seeking a way to prevent the spoilage of oil-bearing foods, which are turned rancid by the action of light, experimenters tried the effect of protective wrappers of every color of the rainbow.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0061.xml
article
40
40
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
DINOSAUR BONES FORM MONUMENT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW United States National Monument is being established at Jensen, Utah, following the discovery of rich deposits of the bones of ancient dinosaurs. Many of the skeletons, some weighing fifteen tons, are practically complete. Instead of being dug out and carried away to museums, the skeletons will be left standing in relief upon the cliffs for visitors to gaze at.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0062.xml
article
41
41
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Can You Invent It?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS diagram illustrates the action of an ordinary typewriter. Downward pressure on the key A is transmitted through the bell crank B and the link C to the type bar D, which is shown in the act of striking the platen roll E a sharp blow. Let us suppose that you are tired of being annoyed by the incessant typewriter clatter that results from this construction, and have decided to invent a “noiseless” model.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0063.xml
article
41
41
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
MOVIE STORM MACHINE FIGHTS FIRE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOLLOWING the suggestion of a Wyoming sheep rancher, officials of the Los Angeles County Department of Forestry recently borrowed a movie wind machine and found it a powerful aid in fighting forest fires. Hitherto used only to create imitation storms, the big fan turned such a blast upon a gasoline-soaked area of brush that the fire was blown out in three out of six tests, and brought under control in the others.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0064.xml
article
41
41
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
AUTO TOWS AQUAPLANE IN NEW THRILLING STUNT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A RIDE on an aquaplane takes on new thrills behind an automobile, according to John W. Greenwood, of Oakland, Calif. This stunt may be performed on either a straight or a curved beach. The secret of the trick for the rider lies in keeping most of the weight on the offshore foot, thus tilting the plane as shown in the photograph and keeping it out from shore.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0065.xml
article
41
41
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
WORMS OF RUBBER FOOL FISH AND FISHERMEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVEN a squeamish novice need have no hesitation in baiting a hook with a new kind of worm—for it is made of rubber. The synthetic worms are the invention of a high state official of Colorado, and many fishermen who have tried them say that they fool fish as readily as they fool the human eye.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0066.xml
article
42
42
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
CABINET ON ROLLERS HIDES STUDIO’S KITCHENETTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
How to install a kitchenette in a one-room studio of luxurious appointments without revealing its presence was the problem facing a New York couple. They solved it by means of a combination range and refrigerator, a sink in the corner, and a cabinet on rollers that serves as a pantry and successfully hides the kitchenette when not in use.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0067.xml
article
42
42
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
HANDLE TURNS OLD CANS INTO GOOD CONTAINERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EMPTY tin cans need not be thrown away, thanks to modern openers that remove the top completely and leave no jagged edges. A detachable handle, just introduced, transforms them into handy containers for domestic use. The device fits cans of any size and shape, and is quickly attached with set screw and clamp.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0068.xml
article
42
42
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
DRAIN FOR WINDOW SILL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN window screens swell tight in damp weather, rain water collecting on the window sill may seep in and stain interior wall paper. To prevent this, a diminutive rain drain has been invented. The thimble-shaped tube of copper is inserted in a three-quarterinch hole at the bottom of the screen, and water readily drains through it.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0069.xml
article
42
42
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
HOMEMADE DIVING SUIT HAS PHONE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A HOMEMADE diving suit with a telephone so the wearer can talk with his assistant at the air pump was completed recently by G. C. Wilber, of Oakland, Calif. He cut the helmet from a steel water tank and welded on a handle and an ordinary garden hose coupling for the air connection. A sheet of heavy celluloid provided a window.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0070.xml
article
43
43
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Strange, Prehistoric Forest Found in South America
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SCIENTISTS of the Carnegie Institution recently traveled thousands of miles in search of living forests such as grew in western North America several million years ago. They found the object of their quest, veritable “forests primeval,” in the mountains of Venezuela and Central America. Trees with buttressed trunks, and leaves unlike any now found in the United States, gave them a picture of the way America looked before man saw it.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0071.xml
article
43
43
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
USE COLD AIR BLAST TO COOL SLEEPING CAR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THROUGH a new system known as “precooling,” sleeping cars of the Pennsylvania Railroad are now made comfortable for travelers on warm summer nights. Before the train leaves, a blast of chill air is blown through the car for an hour and a half.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0072.xml
article
43
43
[no value]
[no value]
ENGLISH ROAD TO TEST WORLD'S LONGEST RAILS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY USING the longest railroad rails in the world an English railway company hopes to reduce to a minimum the noise and vibration in its passenger coaches. Ordinary steel rails are made in thirty, forty-five, and sixty foot lengths. The experimental rails will measure ninety feet.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0073.xml
article
44
44
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
BRITISH GUNNERS STAGE SEA FIGHT IN CLASSROOM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REALISTIC battle practice is provided for British artillerymen at their Shoeburyness, England, training school. “Aerial observers” spot a model ship and transmit its position to “battery commanders.” These compute the range and transmit firing orders to “markers,” who thrust a peg through one of a number of holes in a board representing the ocean where calculations show the shell would have landed.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0074.xml
article
44
44
[no value]
[no value]
USE OLD AUTO TIRES AS TUGBOAT FENDERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DISCARDED auto tires are replacing rope for bow fenders on Navy tugboats. The fender is made up of three tiers of rubber, each tier consisting of segments of the tread and side-wall of the tire. The pieces of rubber are strung onto heavy steel rods, bent to the shape of the bow on which they will be used, and hung over the bow with a short length of chain.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0075.xml
article
44
44
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
GROWTH OF GRASS ROOTS WATCHED IN SHOW CASE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To LEARN the secrets of the growth of grass roots, Dr. W. A. Leukel, of the University of Florida, devised a “show case" compartment that reveals what happens underground. This fifty-foot case, filled with sand, has a glass front so that the behavior of the roots may be observed.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0076.xml
article
44
44
[no value]
[no value]
NEW MEMO PAD CLAMPS TO STEERING WHEEL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HANDY for shopping lists and memoranda of errands to be done is a new auto pad that clamps upon the post of the steering wheel. Though plainly visible, it does not interfere with driving. A pencil holder and match scratcher are built into the frame of the pad.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0077.xml
article
44
44
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRIC LIGHTED BAIT LURES FISH AT NIGHT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IRRESISTIBLE to fish, according to the maker, is an ingenious underwater lure that shines in the dark. The luminous device carries its own electric light, current being supplied by a replaceable battery to a standard flashlight bulb. A casing of transparent composition allows the light to shine through. One battery is said to supply continuous light for an hour.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0078.xml
article
45
45
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
New Two-Hinged Street Car Can Wriggle Around Corners
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HINGED at two places, a new German street car literally wriggles around corners. It was constructed especially to fill the need for a vehicle of large seating capacity that could negotiate the sharp turns of Berlin’s car tracks. A total of 105 passengers may be accommodated in the three hinged sections.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0079.xml
article
45
45
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
FRENCH DANCERS WEAR CARICATURE MASKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MASKS that caricature the wearer have become a fad at Parisian costume balls and receptions. The idea was introduced by Paul Poiret, famous French designer of women’s dresses, and the photograph below shows him with a comic imitation of his own features.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0080.xml
article
45
45
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
PAVE VEGETABLE GARDEN TO KEEP WEEDS OUT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMALL fruits and vegetables are flourishing in a remarkable “paved garden” of the United States Department of Agriculture’s experimental farm, at Arlington, Va. Instead of bare soil between the rows, concrete slabs or cinder blocks a few inches thick and nine to twelve inches wide are laid.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0081.xml
article
45
45
SHIPS
[no value]
SEARCHLIGHT ON SHIP WRITES AD ON CLOUDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To ADVERTISE his products, a German manufacturer recently fitted a ninetyfoot vessel with a searchlight projector capable of throwing words on the clouds in letters of light. Then he sent the ship on a tour of the fashionable watering places along the Baltic seacoast, where it flashes its message nightly.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0082.xml
article
46
46
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
SKYSCRAPER’S PLUMBING STUDIED WITH MODEL IN TOWER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TOWER just erected at Washington, D. C., houses a full-sized working model of a ten-story building’s plumbing system. Here engineers of the U. S. Bureau of Standards are obtaining the first scientific data on the plumbing needs of a skyscraper.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0083.xml
article
46
46
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
MACHINE PUTS LETTERING ON MAPS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
No LONGER need draftsmen place lettering upon maps and engineering drawings by hand. The laborious task of neatly inscribing names, descriptions, and dimensions with pen and ink is ended by the use of a new machine resembling a typewriter.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0084.xml
article
46
46
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
SWIMMING TAUGHT WITH MIRROR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SWIMMERS at the Ohio State University watch their performances in a mirror. The looking-glass, which can be placed anywhere alongside the pool, is used by the swimming coach to help point out faults in technique. His charges, he says, have improved notably since they have been enabled to watch their own arm action.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0085.xml
article
47
47
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
NEW THROTTLE PERMITS KNEE DRIVING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Now you can step on the gas with your knee, if that seems most restful. A new style of accelerator for any standard make of car is mounted just below the instrument board, to the left of the driver. Its long lever is operated by a slight pressure of the left ankle or knee. This arrangement leaves the right foot free to operate the brake; and also, according to the maker, permits a more comfortable driving position.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0086.xml
article
47
47
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
LIFE-SAVER SLIDES DOWN WIRE TO SWIMMER'S AID
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A LIFE-SAVER may quickly reach a swimmer in need of help through a system patented by a Charleston, S. C., inventor. Instead of plunging into the water, he seizes one of several pairs of swinging handles attached to wires that radiate from his tower perch.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0087.xml
article
47
47
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
GLASS RACK HOLDS BOOK SO INVALID CAN READ
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOME invalids and hospital patients may now read in comfort, while lying on their backs, through the use of a new type of bookrack attached to the bed. The. book rests face down upon a sheet of plate glass, above the reader’s head, while a built-in lamp provides just the proper illumination.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0088.xml
article
47
47
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
STRANGE ENGINE TOWS HULL MODELS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the world’s oddest locomotives recently went into service in Hamburg, Germany. Its duty is to tow models of , seaplanes and pontoons up and down the 1,000-foot tank of the Shipbuilding Institute of Hamburg, while engineers study the relative ease with which the models pass through the water.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0089.xml
article
47
47
NEW INVENTIONS
[no value]
LAWN MOWER SHARPENER BUILT FOR HOME USE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LAWN mowers are sharpened in a few minutes with a handy tool just placed on the market. When it is slid back and forth across the mower, its filing surface puts a keen edge on the cutter blade. Guides automatically maintain the removable file at the proper angle so no experience is required for the tool’s use.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0090.xml
article
47
47
RADIO
[no value]
CLOCK CONTROLS PLANE'S RADIO TALK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To AVOID confusion in maintaining communication with twenty-four mail and passenger planes daily, while simultaneously talking with ground points, an airway radio station at the Chicago Municipal Airport has installed a novel clock.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0091.xml
article
48
48,49
Latest Helps for the Homemaker
[no value]
Latest Helps for the Homemaker
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0092.xml
article
50
50,51
Experiments with Sulphur for Your Home Laboratory
[no value]
Experiments with Sulphur for Your Home Laboratory
Only Simple Apparatus Is Needed in Making These Valuable and Striking Demonstrations
[no value]
[no value]
RAYMOND B. WAILES
WITH glass tubes, corks, bottles, and other simple apparatus, you can demonstrate some of the most interesting qualities of sulphur, the “brimstone” of the ancients, and a substance of vast industrial importance. Only a few cents worth will be required.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0093.xml
article
52
52
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
HUGE FLYWHEELS IN UNUSUAL PHOTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOUR mammoth flywheels lined up ready for shipment made an unusual sight the other day in a German steel company’s factory, and a photographer happened along in time to record the striking picture reproduced here. The wheels measure fourteen feet in diameter and weigh about thirty-one tons.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0094.xml
article
52
52
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
CAR'S PARKING TIME RECORDED BY METER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR use in city streets where a parking time limit is enforced, a California inventor has devised a “parking meter” for installation on a car’s instrument board. When the owner leaves the car he trips a lever that starts the meter operating.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0095.xml
article
52
52
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
PHOTOGRAPHER WEARS A DARKROOM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A WELL-DRESSED news photographer would wear his camera, his darkroom, and a complete finishing outfit to work, if the latest British development should set the style. All these were included in the bizarre costume of a camera man who put in an appearance during a recent sports meet at Birmingham, England.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0096.xml
article
52
52
Cash Prize WINNERS in our June Heroes of Science Contest
[no value]
Cash Prize WINNERS in our June Heroes of Science Contest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Here Are the Names of Twenty-Nine Whose Skill and Application Brought Them Cash Rewards in Our Big Picture Cutting Contest in June Issue FIRST PRIZE $500 George Carnevale, S. Ozone Park, N. Y. SECOND PRIZE $100 Edmund D. Myers, Wilmington, Del.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0097.xml
article
53
53,94
New Radio Sets Hit High Mark
[no value]
New Radio Sets Hit High Mark
New Tone Fidelity
[no value]
[no value]
ALFRED P. LANE
FROM antenna binding post to loudspeaker, the latest models of radio receivers have reached an amazing degree of perfection. Radio engineers, a few years ago, never dreamed such performance was possible. Formerly two of the most debated qualities of any radio set were sensitivity and selectivity.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0098.xml
article
54
54,55
[no value]
[no value]
Tune Transmitter Right to Avoid Trouble
Simple Wavemeter Circuit
AMATEURS Need Wavemeter Described in This Sure They Keep Their Transmitters within Bands Designated by Government for Their Use
Gages Transmitter Waves
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN CARR
WHEN you press the key of your amateur radio transmitter, the waves it produces travel outward from the antenna in every direction with the speed of light itself. With over 25,000 licensed amateur stations in this country and thousands more in other parts of the world, you never know who is hearing your signals.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0099.xml
article
56
56,93
How to Keep Your Car Looking New Sunlight, Not Rain, Makes It Shabby, says Gus
[no value]
How to Keep Your Car Looking New Sunlight, Not Rain, Makes It Shabby, says Gus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
WHAT in blazes is the matter with it now?” grumbled Joe Clark from his perch in the bow of the boat the two garagemen had hired to get down the lake for a few days’ fishing at Whitey’s camp. “Ask me what isn’t the matter with it!” his partner Gus Wilson panted as he grabbed the handle and gave the flywheel another vicious twirl.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0100.xml
article
57
57,58,58a,58b,59
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
How to Build a Fast, Light Canvas Canoe OF THE KAYAK TYPE
Kayak Blueprints and Patterns
Bill of Materials
[no value]
[no value]
Jack Hazzard
DECKED canoes of the kayak or Eskimo type are becoming increasingly popular. They are especially well adapted for cruising on open water and for use at points to which it is necessary to carry the canoe by automobile. That is because their strength and seaworthiness is out of all proportion to their extremely light construction.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0101.xml
article
60
60
[no value]
[no value]
Miniature Cape Cod Cottage Holds Sewing Outfit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. E. A.
A NOVEL little container for sewing and mending materials can be made in the form of a Cape Cod cottage from a few scraps of in. thick pine. Cut the pieces approximately to the dimensions given in the sketch at the right and assemble with glue and countersunk brads.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0102.xml
article
60
60
[no value]
[no value]
CHILD’S BICYCLE MADE FROM TRICYCLE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK FISCHER
WHEN a child gets tired of his tricycle and wants to learn to ride a bicycle, it is not difficult to change the three-wheeler into a two-wheeler. This saves the expense of buying a small size bicycle, which is nearly as expensive as a large one and is almost certain to be outgrown long before it is worn out.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0103.xml
article
60
60
[no value]
[no value]
THUMB TACK PERSUADER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROY ELTON
THUMB tacks are often quite stubborn to remove without a regular lifter, especially when they have been pressed into fairly hard wood. This difficulty can be prevented, however, by first pushing the tack through a rectangle of leather measuring about ¼. by ¾ in.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0104.xml
article
60
60
[no value]
[no value]
MAGIC STICKS RATTLE AT WILL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
K.M.
“MORE fun than you can shake a stick at” aptly describes the magic sticks shown at the right. There are three—two solid and one that rattles when shaken. Asking a spectator to keep his eye on the rattlestick, the performer slowly moves them into different positions on a table.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0105.xml
article
61
61
[no value]
[no value]
Portable Woodworking Bench Saves Carpenter’s Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS portable woodworking bench, especially designed for use in new buildings and for jobbing work, takes the place of a pair of sawhorses, holds cabinetmaker’s bar clamps stationary across the top for gluing up screen frames, doors and other flat work, and also serves as a quick-acting vise for doors which have to be fitted.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0106.xml
article
61
61
[no value]
[no value]
PLANING EXTRA THIN PIECES OF WOOD ON A JOINTER
Wanted...
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VERY thin pieces of wood such as are often required in model making can be dressed easily and safely on a small motor driven jointer with the aid of a heavy hold-down block like that shown in the accompanying photograph and the sketch which appears at the bottom of the right-hand column.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0107.xml
article
62
62,63
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Removing Wall Paper with Steam .....AND FIVE OTHER SHIPSHAPE HOME KINKS
Shipshape Home SUGGESTIONS for September
How to Damp-Proof Basement Walls
Long Strainer Covers Entire Gutter
Foot Lever Helps Apply Wall Board Unaided
How to Mix and Spray on Creosote Shingle Stains
New Washing Method Makes House Look Repainted
Dollars for IDEAS
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HENRY CASPAR BLOM
J.S.
H.J.M.
WITH the homemade device illustrated above, I can remove four layers of wall paper from an ordinary size room in one day. The idea is to play live steam on the paper by holding a funnel tightly against the wall, while the other hand is busy tearing off the thoroughly soaked paper with a putty knife.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0108.xml
article
64
64,65,66
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Capt. E. Armitage McCann explains the fine points of Making Fore-and-Aft SAILS FOR ANY SHIP MODEL
TOY SAILBOAT LANDED WITH ROD AND REEL
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ON THE earlier and more picturesque types of ship models, it is an added advantage to set some or all of the sails. In fact, many model makers wish to have sails even on their scale models of latter-day vessels. For this reason we gave suggestions last month (P.S.M., Aug. ’32, p. 72) on the making of square sails, and in the present article will describe the fore-and-aft sails.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0109.xml
article
66
66
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THIS SPARKLING Garden Cascade RUNS AT LOW COST FOR WATER
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ANY flower garden can be made more attractive by providing a little pool in it, preferably with a pile of stones or rocks so arranged in the center of the pool that a small stream of water can cascade down them in a sparkling stream for perhaps 3 or 4 ft.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0110.xml
article
67
67
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LENS ON AQUARIUM MAGNIFIES FISH
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ERVIN WALTERS
A MAGNIFYING glass attached to the outside surface of your aquarium will make it easier and more interesting to inspect the fish, particularly if they are of the miniature tropical variety. Obtain a planoconvex lens; that is, one having a flat surface on one side and a curved surface on the other.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0111.xml
article
67
67
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DEEP CAKE TIN SERVES AS CLEAT FOR CORD
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F. B.
IT FREQUENTLY happens that the ordinary small line cleat with two horns does not hold a sufficient quantity of light rope or heavy cord, especially in connection with large or very high curtains, drops, ventilators, and similar movable building attachments.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0112.xml
article
67
67
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HEAVY GATE ROLLS OPEN ON OLD AUTO WHEEL
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E. S. WILLIAMS
HEAVY gates are often difficult to open and close because they drag and catch as they scrape over the ground This can be remedied by using the front wheel and the rear axle of an old Ford. Pass the axle through the wheel and fit them as shown above into an opening cut in the lower front corner of the gate.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0113.xml
article
67
67
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CAMP FOODS KEPT IN FOLDING COOLER
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CLIFFORD P. BALDWIN
To KEEP perishable foods from spoiling and to allow the camper many more delicacies other than the usual camp fare, it is not necessary to have ice. The folding “desert cooler” illustrated at the right will help solve the problem, yet it takes up very little room in the car—only 4 by 7½ by 11 in.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0114.xml
article
68
68,69,91
Shut One Eye before you take a PHOTOGRAPH
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Shut One Eye before you take a PHOTOGRAPH
Then you will see just what your camera sees and be able to improve your pictures greatly... Other hints on lighting, backgrounds, and clouds
HOW TO TAKE Arresting Pictures
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Frederick D. Ryder
HAVE you ever closed one eye while you studied the subject you expected to photograph? Try it next time; it will help you to avoid uninteresting pictures. Our two eyes give us a stereoscopic effect. Near-by objects stand out from the background.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0115.xml
article
70
70
HOW TO MAKE AN Emergency Condenser
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HOW TO MAKE AN Emergency Condenser
Timely Hints for Car Owners
Tube for Radiator
To Hold the Gasket
Emergency Condenser Wins a Reward
New Valve Stem
A Cleaning Spray
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LAYERS of tin foil spaced by specially prepared paper constitute the conA denser connected across the breaker points of the automobile ignition system. Assuming that the condenser goes bad when you are far from a service station, it is possible to work out a last resort emergency repair as shown in Fig. 1.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0116.xml
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71
71
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The National Publishers’ Association
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The National Publishers’ Association
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0117.xml
article
72
72
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SPECIAL-FOR Model Makers
NEW 25-CENT GUIDES FOR BUILDING OUR MOST POPULAR SHIPS AND COACHES
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IN RESPONSE to many requests from readers, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY has prepared a series of handy 2 5-cent guides containing instructions for building practically all its ship and coach models. This task was undertaken some time ago and has just been completed.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0118.xml
article
73
73
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Interlocked Hearts Whittled from One Block
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WALTER L. FAUROT
THIS pair of interlocked hearts affords a simple yet interesting exercise in whittling. Almost any wood may be used, although material that splits readily should be avoided. Soft woods are recommended for practice. The beginner will find it easier to work on a moderately large scale.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0119.xml
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73
73
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Champion Spark Plug Company
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Champion Spark Plug Company
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0120.xml
article
74
74,90
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A CURIOUS PEDESTAL SUPPORTS THIS Round-Top Stand
DONALD A. PRICE Tells How to Construct a Copy of a Valuable Early American Antique
OILING OUTBOARD MOTOR
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K. M.
AMONG the ordinary types of Early American tables with turned legs and butterfly wings, this manyfaceted pedestal stand is a pleasing relief. It is modeled after an authentic pine antique of New England origin. Its height of 30 in. and the great stability of its wide-spreading feet make the stand especially suitable for giving the housewife’s favorite plant a place in the sun.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0121.xml
article
75
75
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SCOOP SERVES AS RACK FOR RUBBER TUBING
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HORACE H. SELBY
TO STORE rubber tubing properly in home workshops and laboratories requires racks which will prevent the tubing from becoming kinked or compressed. The tubing rack illustrated does this and is simple, inexpensive, and satisfactory. It is made from a hand scoop like that shown lying on top of the cabinet.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0122.xml
article
75
75
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HOW TO COAX A RIPSAW BACK INTO LINE
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H. O. CARRINGTON
IT IS often difficult to make a ripsaw follow the correct line in wood that is 2 in. or more in thickness. When the saw is departing from the line, however, it may be brought back in the following manner: Starting from the end of the cut or kerf, use a compass saw to widen by gradual degrees one side of the kerf (depending upon which way you wish to draw the ripsaw).
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0123.xml
article
75
75
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STRAIGHTENING A TANGLED ROMANCE.....
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ALBERT DORNE
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0124.xml
article
76
76
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Improved Gooseneck Threading Tool Insures Accuracy
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G. J. MURDOCK
THIS tool was originally developed to cut very accurate threads on large tool steel worms, but has since been found superior to other ordinary bit holders of the gooseneck type for acme, square, and general V-thread cutting where finish, accuracy, and long wearing qualities are essential.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0125.xml
article
76
76
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Old Bill Says..
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PLACING a small mirror on the work next to the starting tap will enable one to detect the slightest error in squareness without the aid of a square. To keep drawings clean, paste them on cardboard and cover with transparent wrapping material of the cellophane type.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0126.xml
article
76
76
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MAKING SPRING COLLETS RUN TRUE
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G. M.
How the special collet holder is machined. The draw-in nut is turned through a slot near the base of the holder SMALL spring collets or chucks, even when new, do not always hold work so that it runs perfectly true, and as they become worn this gets worse.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0127.xml
article
76
76
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REPAIRING PIPE WRENCHES
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L. N. D.
IT DOES not pay to take chances with wornout pipe jaws. The photograph shows the setup for grinding the teeth in the hook jaw, and the heel jaw is removed from the handle and ground in the same way. Both jaws, of course, should first be resurfaced.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0128.xml
article
77
77
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A QUICK WAY TO BEVEL ROUGH WOODEN EDGES WITH SANDPAPER
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D. V. H.
IN THE accompanying illustrations is shown a novel and exceptionally rapid method of beveling the edges of a number of irregularly shaped pieces of wood. It was devised by a workman who had to turn out 1,000 neatly finished paddies for a bazaar concession. These were bandsawed six at a time from inthick plywood.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0129.xml
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77
77
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0130.xml
advertisement
78
78
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0131.xml
article
78
78
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The Secret of Soldering Aluminum
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EDWARD THATCHER
IT IS not difficult to solder aluminum satisfactorily provided one of the special solders made for aluminum is used. No flux is necessary. Aluminum solder as a rule is composed of pure tin and zinc in equal parts, but sometimes 60 percent tin and 40 percent zinc.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0132.xml
article
79
79
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Sliding Extension Table Improves Small Circular Saw
THREE HINTS FOR THE SHIP MODEL MAKER
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A. V. COMINGS
R. W. BURGESS
THE usefulness of almost any small circular saw may be greatly increased by adding an auxiliary sliding table such as the one illustrated. This enables the operator to cut with accuracy stock up to 12 in. or more in width and as long as 10 or 15 ft.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0133.xml
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79
79
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THE IRWIN AUGER BIT CO.
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THE IRWIN AUGER BIT CO.
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0134.xml
advertisement
80
80
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NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
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NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0135.xml
advertisement
80
80
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Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0136.xml
article
81
81
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Simple Homemade Machine Twists Colored Cords for CRAFT WORK
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HUBERT E. MISHLER
ORNAMENTAL cords for many purposes can be made with this simple little machine; for example. a Boy Scout lanyard for knife or whistle, a dog leash, fancy cords for hanging pictures, a watch fob or a cord for attaching penknife and watch, and pull cords for a floor lamp.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0137.xml
article
81
81
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DISCOVERED “SECRET” OF PIPE SATISFACTION TEN YEARS AGO
His “Secret” shared by Thousands today
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TEN years ago Mr. J. Franz Norgren of Madison, South Dakota, was still engaged in the search well known to every pipe smoker—the search for the ideal tobacco. Then one day his seeking was rewarded. He found it at last in Edgeworth! For some time he believed he had stumbled upon a “secret.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0138.xml
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82
82
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0139.xml
article
82
82
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A Rustic PLAY PEN for the Lawn
SOAP PASTE PROTECTS HANDS FROM GRIME
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R. W.
WHEN used outdoors in the garden or at a summer camp, the ordinary type of baby’s play pen, being light colored and conspicuous, is less appropriate than one made of rustic materials like that illustrated. To construct such a play pen, the following are required: 4 posts from 1½ to 2 in. in diameter and 34 in. long; 8 rails of the same diameter and 42 in. long; from 32 to 36 spindles from ¾ to 1 in. in diameter and 28 in. long; 8 hooks 2½ in. long with the necessary eyes or staples; and 8 roundhead bolts 3 by ¼ in. All the wood should be straight and have reasonably smooth bark.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0140.xml
article
83
83
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Four Jig-Sawed Puppies Brace This Child's Costumer
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ANTHONY T. PUSCIZNA
THIS costumer will find a welcome place in every home where there are children. For hard usage, maple or birch are especially suitable, but almost any wood will serve. Prepare the stock for the shaft 1½ by l½ by 50 in. and hand dress or, better still, plane it on a small jointer to the proper taper.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0141.xml
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83
83
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Lever Brothers Co.
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Lever Brothers Co.
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0142.xml
article
84
84
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Laced Joints Give Wooden Boxes a Unique Appearance
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AN ARTISTIC wooden wastebasket and an unusually novel nut box can be made with very little work as shown in the accompanying illustrations. Out of a 1-in. board cut a polygon of any desired number of sides to form the base block of the wastebasket.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0143.xml
article
84
84
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ADHESIVE TAPE FASTENS PHOTO MASK
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L.C.
THERE is no danger that a photographic negative will accidentally be moved out of place when printing pictures if the mask is stuck securely to the glass of the printing frame with strips of adhesive tape as shown in the accompanying illustrations.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0144.xml
article
84
84
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PHOTO PRINTS ROLLED DOWN WITH PENCIL
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PETER P. ROCCAPRIORE
IN AN emergency, a large marking pencil will serve as a substitute for a photographic roller for mounting prints. Place the print accurately in position on the mount as illustrated in the accompanying photograph. Then lay the pencil across it at one end, rest the end of a ruler over the pencil, and roll the pencil over the print by sliding the ruler back and forth with enough pressure to insure perfectly smooth CONTACT.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0145.xml
article
84
84
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GLASS BUBBLES SPARKLE IN GARDEN POOL
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INTEREST is added to a garden pool or indoor aquarium if a few bubbles are floating about on the surface of the water. These bubbles are nothing more than burned-out automobile head lamps and dash lamps from which the bases have been removed.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0146.xml
article
84
84
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HEATER FORMS GLARELESS LIGHT UNIT
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J. K. TULLY
THE ordinary type of electric heater with polished copper reflector can be converted easily into a flood light for lighting a room indirectly by the simple expedient of removing the wire guard and screwing a 100or 200-watt bulb into the socket to replace the heating element.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0147.xml
article
85
85,86
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DOUBLE-DUTY DESK AND DRESSER MADE FROM AN OLD BUREAU
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EVERETT EAMES
BY UTILIZING an old bureau, it is possible to construct a combination desk and dresser with less than a quarter of the work required in building a new desk. When the writing top is closed, the finished piece looks like a three-drawer Colonial lowboy, but with the top open it is a comfortable and commodious desk with generous provisions for writing materials.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0148.xml
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85
85
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0149.xml
advertisement
86
86
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0150.xml
article
86
86
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SIMPLE PURITY TEST FOR TURPENTINE
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THE presence of mineral oil in turpentine can be detected by mixing aniline oil, obtainable at large drug supply houses, with an equal part of the turpentine in question. Shake the two together and then allow the resulting liquid to stand for about five minutes.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0151.xml
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87
87
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Coyne Electrical School
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Coyne Electrical School
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0152.xml
advertisement
87
87
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Advertisements
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KIT NO. 2
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KIT NO. 1
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0153.xml
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88
88
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0154.xml
article
88
88,89
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CHOPPING BOWL forms base of this Ship Model Plaque
NEW WAY OF RETINNING A SOLDERING IRON
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L. N. GOODMAN
HERE is something new in ship model novelties—a miniature of your favorite ship sailing in a realistic setting of sea and sky, and so mounted that it can be placed on the mantel or hung on the wall. Being small, this unique scenic model is easy to build. A. sharp penknife and a hammer are the only tools required.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0155.xml
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89
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0156.xml
advertisement
90
90
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Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0157.xml
advertisement
90
90
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N.W. SCHOOL OF TAXIDERMY
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N.W. SCHOOL OF TAXIDERMY
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0158.xml
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90
90
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THE PELMAN INSTITUTE OF AMERICA
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THE PELMAN INSTITUTE OF AMERICA
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0159.xml
article
91
91
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Photo Contest AWARDS
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The $10 prize for the best photograph entered in our twelfth photographic contest (P. S. M., May ’32, p. 112), which was on the subject of room interiors, has been awarded to A. H. Parsons, Burlingame, Calif. The following won honorable mention in the same contest:
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0160.xml
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91
91
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0161.xml
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92
92
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NATIONAL RADIO & ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
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NATIONAL RADIO & ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0162.xml
advertisement
92
92
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SAVASOLE CO.
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SAVASOLE CO.
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0163.xml
advertisement
92
92
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L.EDWARD FLAHERTY
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L.EDWARD FLAHERTY
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0164.xml
article
93
93
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ROADS BUILT OF GLASS FOR AUTO TRAFFIC
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ROADS of glass are being built for motor traffic in Czechoslovakia. Two experimental stretches of highway, constructed by spreading a mixture of glass powder and cement on a damp concrete base and then saturating it with water glass, have been under test for several months.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0165.xml
article
93
93
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HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS GET AVIATION COURSE
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SCHOOLBOYS now get their aviation training early in Chicago. The honor of being the first junior high school in the United States to offer its students a complete course in aeronautics, including flight theory, construction technique, and motor mechanics, is claimed by the A. R. Sabin Junior High School of Chicago.
PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0166.xml
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93
93
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0167.xml
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94
94
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0168.xml
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95
95
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0169.xml
advertisement
95
95
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AMERICAN SCHOOL OF PHOTOGRAPHY
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AMERICAN SCHOOL OF PHOTOGRAPHY
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0170.xml
advertisement
96
96
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PORTER SARGENT
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PORTER SARGENT
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0171.xml
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97
97
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MIDWEST RADIO CORP.
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MIDWEST RADIO CORP.
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0172.xml
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98
98,99,100
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Advertisements
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R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
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PopularScience_19320901_0121_003_0173.xml