Issue: 19320701

Friday, July 1, 1932
July 1932
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Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Articles
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
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PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0002.xml
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THE NATIONAL PUBLISHERS’ ASSOCIATION
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THE NATIONAL PUBLISHERS’ ASSOCIATION
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masthead
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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tableOfContents
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Table of Contents for July, 1932
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PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0005.xml
article
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Choosing and using TOOLS
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Prof. Collins P. Bliss
IN SELECTING the first hammer, primitive man searched carefully for a smooth, oval stone that would fit comfortably in the palm of his hand. Later, he found that this crude implement could be improved by roughing out shallow depressions for his fingers.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0006.xml
advertisement
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Popular Science Institute
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Popular Science Institute
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PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0007.xml
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Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0008.xml
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LEVER BROTHERS CO.: Lifebuoy
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LEVER BROTHERS CO.
Lifebuoy
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PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0009.xml
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Our Readers Say
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Our Readers Say
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I WAS looking over the January, 1927, issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY last evening and was struck by the many things prophesied for 1927, that came to pass, if not then, at a later date. The editorial is unique in that practically everything suggested in it has been invented and is as common today as shoes. . . . and only five years!
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0010.xml
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Chemist
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Chemist
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PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0011.xml
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9,10,11,105,106
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RADIUM LIFE-GIVING ELEMENT . . . deals DEATH in Hands of Quacks
Startling Facts Disclosed in This Article Will Help You Escape the Dangers You Run When Ignorance Handles Nature’s Strangest Element
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MICHEL MOK
WAR has been declared on all patent medicines containing radium. The Federal Trade Commission, the U. S. Food and Drug Administration, state and municipal health agencies, and medical associations are fighting to drive from the market nostrums whose supposed healing properties are credited to radium.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0012.xml
article
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12,13
LEADING ARTICLES
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FLYING TANKS ...War's Deadliest Weapon
Trench Warfare Doomed by Tanks That Fly
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B. G. SEIELSTAD
A BATTLE is raging. What seems to be a fleet of attacking airplanes is sighted. Suddenly terror descends out of the sky. Swooping low, the machines are revealed to be armored tanks with wings. They land. The wings drop off, and into action roars a squadron of four-ton tanks, spitting death from three-inch guns.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0013.xml
article
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14,15,103,104
LEADING ARTICLES
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Haunted Oil Fields Puzzle Geologists
WELLS Long Believed Dead Are Turning in Their Graves, and Their Ghosts Offer Some Strange Problems to the Experts
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Sterling Gleason
IN THE graveyard of the oil industry, strange sounds are heard. Deep rumblings, dismal groans. Dead oil wells are turning over in their graves. Geologists, holding autopsies, have pronounced some of them not yet officially dead. Many oil fields today are haunted by these restless ghosts that rise from their tombs to create new puzzles for oil men.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0014.xml
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DIAMONDS Made to Order
Heat and Pressure in Laboratory Imitate Nature in Producing Carbon Crystals
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DIAMONDS, one twentieth of a karat in size, have been made in the laboratory. Dr. Ralph H. McKee, Columbia University professor of chemical engineering and his assistant, L. H. Barnett, developed the process that made possible this scientific marvel.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0015.xml
article
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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THIS WHEELBARROW JUST ROLLS ALONG
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AN ADAPTATION of the motor-driven hoop that recently amazed England (P.S.M., May ’32, p. 63) has made its appearance in Germany. It is the “hoop-barrow,” a wheelbarrow propelled within one huge wheel. The barrow proper, remaining stationary, is attached by means of rollers to the large hoop which is easily pushed by hand.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0016.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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BRUSH BOY REPLACED BY VACUUM CLEANER
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BY PUTTING a nickel in the slot you may get your clothes brushed, if an “automatic brush boy,” recently exhibited at the National Inventors’ Congress in San Francisco, Calif., is installed in hotels and stations. The drop of the coin in the box causes an electrical contact to start a motor that operates a small vacuum cleaner brush.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0017.xml
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HEALTH AND HYGIENE
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SEX OF UNBORN CHILD MAY BE REVEALED BY CELL STUDY
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PREDICTING the sex and mental and physical traits of unborn children may follow successful experiments made by Dr. John Belling, expert on heredity of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. Dr. Belling has photographed the “genes,” the hitherto unseen particles that carry hereditary characteristics.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0018.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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NEW METHOD MEASURES AMOUNT OF EROSION
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DAMAGE done on farm lands by water pouring off hillsides is graphically shown by a new device recently placed in operation at the soil-erosion experiment station of the U. S. Department of Agriculture at Bethany, Mo. A concrete trough catches drainage water from near-by fields.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0019.xml
article
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AUTOMOBILES
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BIG TRUCK TIRES ON FREAK CAR
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LOOKING like some queer comic paper freak, a car remodeled by Ted Castle rolls through the streets of Los Angeles. It is fitted with huge truck tires, size 44 by 10, held in place by rows of carriage bolts passed through the gigantic shoes and the regular tires inside them.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0020.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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ELECTRIC PISTOL FIRES SOLDER
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PULLING the trigger on the electric pistol shown at the right releases solder instead of bullets. The carbon tip is cored and wire solder is forced through this hole. The clip on the wire connected to the iron is snapped onto the ungrounded terminal of the starter battery.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0021.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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DIAL ON HUMIDOR GAGES MOISTURE
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A CIGAR humidor with a built-in hygrometer has been introduced in Germany. At the side is the hygrometer which indicates the humidity of the air inside the humidor. The movement of the hand toward the “too dry” end of the dial serves to warn the smoker that water should be added to the moisture pad.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0022.xml
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HEALTH AND HYGIENE
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MONOTONOUS NOISE MAKES GIRL SLEEP
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EVIDENCE that monotonous noises induce sleep has been produced by Professor John B. Morgan of Northwestern University. He placed a young woman student in a chair and attached various recording instruments to keep track of her pulse, respiration, and other body functions that change during slumber.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0023.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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TABLE FOR AUTOMOBILE CLAMPS TO ROOF
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A TABLE for use in automobiles has been invented by C. R. Richardson of England. Utilizing the principle of the lazy tongs, he has designed the table to collapse against the roof of the car when not in use. It can be pulled down to any elevation desired and the backward-forward position also may be adjusted.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0024.xml
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ELECTRICITY KEEPS HOUSE FOR GENERAL
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To MAKE life more comfortable in his little cottage beside the Thames River, near Marlow, England, a British war hero, Brig. Gen. J. B. Wroughton, has fitted his home with a multitude of labor-saving devices of his own invention. By pressing a button or closing a switch, the majority of his household tasks are performed.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0025.xml
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MATHEMATICAL PENCIL TOTALS BRIDGE SCORE
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CALCULATING a contract bridge score is made easy by a pencil recently placed on the market. When its movable barrel is turned, figures appear in three windows. The user sets the barrel to the number in the central window, showing the number of tricks over or under the contract and reads the score under “not vulnerable” or “vulnerable” in side windows.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0026.xml
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FISHERMAN NO LONGER NEED HOLD THE POLE
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EVEN the task of holding the pole is now spared the fisherman, since the invention of a “lazy man’s holder” recently shown at San Francisco, Calif. It is provided with a clamp for attachment to the side of a boat or a limb of a tree, and may be set at any angle.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0027.xml
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AMERICA'S CROOKEDEST RIVER IS MAPPED
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WHAT is called the crookedest river in America has just been mapped by the U. S. Geological Survey. The map shows that the Nolin River, which crosses Hardin County, Kentucky, travels a twenty-mile course to advance a total distance of six miles.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0028.xml
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LIFE-SIZED ROBOT MAN DANCES AND SINGS
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NOT only does a new mechanical man talk and sing, but he dances to radio music. This man-sized robot, designed by a German engineer, has a loudspeaker mechanism for a brain, and the vibration of the speaker closes relays that operate his arms and legs.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0029.xml
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AVIATION
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Floating Edge on Wings Keeps Plane Out of Tail Spin
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AN AIRPLANE designed by G. W. Cornelius, California aviator and inventor, has wings hinged at the front so that the trailing edges can move up and down in response to variations in wind pressure and “bumps” in the air. He claims that a tail spin is impossible with this construction and that the plane will fly virtually without manual control.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0030.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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TRAY HOLDS SODA GLASS
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CHILDREN may now patronize soda fountains as easily as the grown-ups. A tray brings the glass down to a convenient level. Made of aluminum, the tray folds for compact storage. A long bar clamps it to the inner side of the counter as shown.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0031.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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GIGANTIC HAND LIFTS 150 TONS
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A HUGE steel hand that will lift and at the same time weigh a full sized locomotive is the latest thing on a gigantic floating crane in England. The scale that registers the weight picked up is set into a crosspiece between the five-sheave block and the tackle.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0032.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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CHECKS CUT ROAD PERIL
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THE PRACTICE of painting dangerous road obstructions with a black and white checkerboard pattern makes the motorist careful when he sees the familiar design. The newest idea to protect the street worker against the hazards of auto traffic is to clothe him in a jumper patterned with white and black squares.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0033.xml
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PHOTOGRAPHY
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Lifelike Depth Given to Movies
New Process Adds Long-Sought Third Dimension to Pictures on Screen
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ONE of the long-standing dreams of photographers—to be able to produce a picture with lifelike, three-dimensional depth—now seems on the verge of realization. How it has been accomplished on an experimental scale was demonstrated recently by Dr. Herbert E. Ives, of the Bell Telephone Laboratories, noted for his pioneer researches in electrical picture transmission and in television.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0034.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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New Tests Suggest that PLANTS Can Think
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NEW evidence that growing plants may have "brains" and display reasoning power has been announced by the Smithsonian Institution at Washington, D. C. The discovery was made by Dr. Earl S. Johnston, who, it is reported, has found in plants a striking similarity to the intelligence of human beings.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0035.xml
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LEADING ARTICLES
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It Never Rains Cats and Dogs BUT. . . It Does Rain FISH!
LIVING Creatures Actually Fall with Rain from the Clouds, and This Article Tells When and Why Such Strange Things Can Happen
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ROBERT E. MARTIN
UNTIL three o'clock in the afternoon, the eighteenth of May had been like any other spring day on the farm of W. L. Doughtie, Edgecombe County, N. C. Then strange things began to happen. Dark clouds swiftly gathered overhead. Suddenly, there was a heavy downpour.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0036.xml
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LEADING ARTICLES
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Thrilling Air Battles Fought for MOVIES
How the Illusion of a Crash in an Airplane Is Created in a Movie Thriller
Do You Need Some CASH?
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ANDREW R. BOONE
FIFTY-FOUR trim young men in military uniforms gathered around the blackboard. “We will fly across the sun this morning,” the leader told them. “The black ships will fly in from the south, the whites from the north. I don't care where you meet, but stay above the clouds.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0037.xml
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AVIATION
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Save Air-Tight Globe for Second Flight into Stratosphere
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ONE of the strangest of vehicles—the air-tight aluminum ball in which Prof. Auguste Piccard and a companion sealed themselves and, swung from an enormous balloon, soared from Augsberg, Germany, to a new height record of ten miles above the earth—has been removed from its resting place on a glacier at Ober-Gurgl, Austria.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0038.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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USE X-RAYS TO FIND HIDDEN BOMBS
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CRIMINALS and cranks who send bombs through the mails, as described in an article on another page of this issue, may be frustrated one of these days by a new application of the X-ray. A Boston inventor has perfected an apparatus that could be installed in a post office and that reveals whether a package contains a bomb without opening it.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0039.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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NEW TUBE HAS GIANT ELECTRIC RESISTANCE
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ENGINEERS solved an unusual problem recently when resistance devices of exceptional magnitude were required for studies of photo-electric cells. Dr. Harvey C. Rentschler, director of research of the Westinghouse Lamp Company, has produced reliable resistors of 235,000,000,000 ohms by sputtering a thin film of carbon on a glass helix in a bulb.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0040.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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APPLES IN CRATES WELL JOLTED IN PACKING TESTS
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IMPROVEMENTS in methods of packing apples have been discovered at the Arlington, Va., experimental farm of the United States Department of Agriculture. An imitation truck driven backward and forward by machinery simulated the shaking the fruit would receive on a long truck or car journey.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0041.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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NEW RAY OUTFIT FINDS ART FAKES
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ULTRA-VIOLET rays in recent years have proved their value to detect forgeries in paintings, and a new portable apparatus developed in England makes their application to a suspected work of art an easy matter. This instrument, resembling a camera in appearance, is the invention of Prof. A. P. Laurie of the Royal Academy of Arts.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0042.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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CIGAR-SHAPED MOTORBOAT CAN’T SINK
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WITHOUT the aid of previous experience to guide him, a Morganton, N. C., blacksmith has fulfilled a lifetime dream by designing and building himself a seagoing motorboat. Startlingly unconventional in appearance, the cigar-shaped craft is especially suited for rough water, and its builder, John Fox, contends that it could even roll over like a barrel without sinking.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0043.xml
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UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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TALKS AT CONFERENCES RECORDED IN STEEL
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ALL that happens at business conferences may now be permanently recorded by a recently developed electrical system. Upon the table in front of each one present is placed a microphone. The chairman, pressing the proper buttons, switches on the “mike” before the speaker, whose voice is recorded by a dictating machine upon a length of steel wire which may be played back at any time.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0044.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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STAMP INKS ITSELF
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A DATE stamp devised by a California inventor requires no ink pad, because it reinks itself. The ink is carried in a narrow pad on a hinged arm, which protects the characters and swings out of way when in use.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0045.xml
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31
CASH PRIZE WINNERS
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APRIL Heroes of Science CONTEST
Twenty-nine Who Proved Successful Showed Surprising Skill in Presenting Their Entries in Our
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CHECKS to a total of $1,000 have been sent by POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY to the twenty-nine winners in our April Heroes of Science Picture CutOut Contest, whose names appear on this page. The winners in the March contest were announced last month (P.S.M., June `32, p. 31).
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0046.xml
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$10,000 in CASH PRIZES
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$10,000 in CASH PRIZES
Here Are Two More Heroes of Science
FOR SOLVING NEW AND EASY PICTURE PUZZLES
Rides of the Contest—Reach Carefully
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ARE you dreaming about a trip to Europe, a new car, or an important renovation or addition to your house? The sum of $500 could make any of these or many another dream come true. You may earn that amount in one evening, and at the same time thoroughly enjoy your-self, by participating in our fascinating Heroes of Science Contest.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0047.xml
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NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
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Vegetables Now Quick-Frozen on Farm as Soon as Picked
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SO THAT garden vegetables may reach the consumer as fresh as the moment they were picked, a new application has been made of “quick freezing.” In this process, perishable food is harmlessly frozen and packaged for refrigerated shipment.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0048.xml
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AVIATION
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FIGHTS FIRE FROM AUTOGIRO
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AN AUTOGIRO airplane proved its effectiveness as a fire-fighting aid during a forest fire in southern New Jersey not long ago. State Fire Warden Col. Leonidas Coyle rode in the plane, holding a two-way conversation by short wave radio with other wardens in a moving automobile below him.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0049.xml
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AUTOMOBILES
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NEW CAR AFTER SPEED RECORD
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AMERICA will soon try to win back from England the world’s speed crown for automobiles. Barney Oldfield, famous racing driver, recently exhibited a model of the three-and-a-half-ton car to be built for this attempt. The twenty-six-foot racer will be driven by a 300-horsepower motor equipped with six magnetos, and Oldfield hopes with it to exceed the 253-mile-an-hour record of Sir Malcolm Campbell, British sportsman, who made that unparalleled speed a few months ago when he drove his car over Florida’s sands.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0050.xml
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SCIENTIFICKS
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SCIENTIFICKS
...OUR ARTIST VIEWS THE STRANGE AND UNUSUAL FACTS DISCLOSED BY LEADING AUTHORITIES IN THE LAST MONTH
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PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0051.xml
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36,37,110,111
LEADING ARTICLES
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How Bomb Sleuths Trap "Pineapple" Murderers
HUNTING Clues in Dynamite Attacks Is Extra-Hazardous Business and This Article Tells of Tragedies with Deadly Machines
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EDWIN W. TEALE
IT WAS rush hour at the post office. Clerks in shirt sleeves worked at top speed. Loaded hand trucks clattered over the cement floor. Rubber stamps thumped on parcels. Coins clicked. Feet scuffed along the floor as lines of customers fed a steady stream of letters and parcels in at the windows.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0052.xml
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AVIATION
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PILOT CAN AIM PLANE AT TARGET
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AIMING an airplane at a gunnery target is made easier by new equipment designed by Major Gerald E. Brower, U. S. Army Air Corps. A hinged flap immediately behind the pilot’s head is raised when the guns are about to be fired and holds the pilot’s head central with the ship.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0053.xml
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AVIATION
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FLYER WEARS LIGHTS IN JUMP
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ABLAZE with light from a ring of lamps strapped around his waist, a parachute jumper recently dropped at a Burbank, Calif., airport. The human firefly was Royce Stetson, veteran transport pilot, who sought to test his idea that objects fall faster at night than in the day-time.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0054.xml
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AVIATION
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ARMY PLANE A “BUTTERFLY”
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A HIGH-FLYING speedster is the U. S. Army's newest type of observation airplane, whose wings suggest those of a butterfly. Its 650-horsepower motor drives it at a speed of 190 miles an hour at an elevation of 5,000 feet.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0055.xml
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AVIATION
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MUFFLER QUIETS PLANE’S MOTOR
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A CLUSTER of pipes resembling the branching spikes of a flowering shrub occupies the interior of a novel muffler for airplanes, designed by a Ware, Mass., inventor. So effectively does it operate that all but seven percent of the original engine noise is said to be removed.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0056.xml
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PHOTOGRAPHY
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AIR CAMERA CAN TAKE CLOSE OR FAR VIEW
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CLOSE-UPS or far shots of the land beneath an airplane can now be made with the same camera, regardless of the plane's altitude, by use of a new device called a “zoom lens.” An interconnected series of lens elements permits changing the magnifying power of the lens while in flight without making the pictures fuzzy.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0057.xml
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MODELS
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BIG MODEL PLANE MAKES LONG FLIGHT
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ONE of the biggest model airplanes ever built made a successful test flight recently at Pasadena, Calif. Powered by a two-cylinder gasoline motor, the plane took off with preset controls and flew for several hundred yards. Its wing spread measures ten feet, and the model carries a one-pint tank for gasoline.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0058.xml
article
39
39
AVIATION
[no value]
GLIDER PILOTS ATTEMPT TO BURST BALLOONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SKIMMING above a mile-long hillside, near Los Angeles, Calif., glider pilots recently jockeyed their motorless planes in a spectacular balloon-bursting contest. Armed with pin-pointed lances, they were shot into the air at the top of the slope, while balloons were held high in the air at the bottom of the hill.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0059.xml
article
39
39
AVIATION
[no value]
BRITISH PLANE DROPS BOMBS AND TORPEDOES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIKE a mosquito ready to use its sting, Britain’s newest war plane prepares to launch a death-dealing weapon in the striking picture at the right, snapped from below by an alert cameraman. The new machine is the first adopted by the Royal Air Corps in which are combined the functions of dropping bombs and torpedoes.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0060.xml
article
39
39
AVIATION
[no value]
PILOT DRAGGED FROM MACHINE BY ’CHUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A WESTERN pilot recently became the first to make a parachute leap from an aviation training machine —but the stunt was not done intentionally. Wearing regulation flying equipment, Louis Babbs stepped into the cockpit to be whirled around and pitched up and down in the usual realistic tests for balance provided by the device.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0061.xml
article
40
40
ENGINEERING
[no value]
PLACER DREDGES DIG GOLD FROM WORKED-OUT BEDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SCENES of the gold rush of the Forty-niners are being revived near Camanche, Calif., where historic old river beds are once again yielding pay dirt. The new gold rush occurred when modern machinery for extracting the glittering metal made it profitable to rework the beds.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0062.xml
article
40
40
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW SURF BOARD RUN BY MOTOR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STRANGEST of aquatic vehicles is a motorized surf board, invented by a Sydney, Australia, mechanic and built during his spare hours. He proposes its use for life-saving, since the speedy device would quickly reach a swimmer not too far from shore.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0063.xml
article
40
40
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
MOVIE TARGET HELPS POLICE SHOOT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
POLICE officers of St. Louis, Mo., now get realistic target practice by shooting at moving figures on a motion picture screen. A projector runs off a reel depicting gunmen and burglars in action, while the marksmen try their aim. The impact of a bullet automatically stops the projector, and a hole in the replaceable screen shows whether the bullet hit its mark.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0064.xml
article
41
41
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
USE AUTO TO START MOTORBIKE RACERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SO THAT motorcycle racers will get off to an even start, a new releasing apparatus is being tried out in England. The cycles are attached by ropes to a bar on the front of a motor car, and start down the track in leash at a signal from the starter.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0065.xml
article
41
41
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
BUG POISON SPRAY HOOKS TO HOSE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ATTACHED to the garden hose, a new device makes an easy task of spraying the home garden with insecticide. Its tank and nozzle are attached to the hose, and the water turned on full force. With the hose turned so tank is down only water is sprayed.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0066.xml
article
41
41
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
BLINKING ELECTRIC SIGN HAS NO MOVING PARTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BECAUSE it contains no moving parts, a radically new type of flasher for animated electric signs is declared to reduce current consumption, as well as costly wear and maintenance. Through a circuit of rectifiers and transformers, part of the alternating current supply is transformed into direct current and intermittently opposes the regular electric supply so that each light blinks.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0067.xml
article
41
41
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW LIGHT BULB REVEALS HEAT OF FURNACE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NOVEL type of lamp bulb has been devised by General Electric engineers to reveal the temperature within a furnace by sighting through the door. The pear-shaped bulb is coated black except for two transparent patches. The user looks through these at the fire, comparing its brightness with that of the bulb’s filament.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0068.xml
article
41
41
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
LINDBERGH INVENTION IS AID TO SCIENTISTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VERSATILE enough to delve into medical as well as aeronautical science, Col. Charles A. Lindbergh, famous flyer, recently attained new distinction as inventor of an improved type of centrifuge for preparing blood corpuscles in research tests.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0069.xml
article
42
42
ENGINEERING
[no value]
QUICK DROP IN PRESSURE SHATTERS ORE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SUDDENLY-released steam hissed as John Gross, metallurgist of the U. S. Bureau of Mines, struck with a hammer the trip of a strange-looking valve. Finely-shattered ore rattled like a discharge of buckshot against the sides of a sheet-iron hood placed in front of the valve.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0070.xml
article
42
42
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
MOWING MACHINE CUTS HEDGE TO ANY SHAPE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN Israel Evans of San Bernardino, Calif., became weary of cutting the hedge about his home, he invented a mowing machine to do the work. Operated by a gasoline motor, it will cut one hundred feet of hedge in thirty minutes. Its cutter may be raised or lowered to heights from one to four feet.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0071.xml
article
42
42
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
PUT ROCHELLE SALTS IN LOUDSPEAKER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROCHELLE salt crystals have just been put to work at an entirely new job. A long series of experiments have led to the discovery that they can be used with excellent results in a radio loud-speaker. As the crystals change shape with the passage of an electric current the tone is reproduced with great fidelity.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0072.xml
article
42
42
MODELS
[no value]
ELECTRIC RAILWAY COST ONLY $40
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ELECTRICAL railway has been built by students of John Muir Technical High School, Pasadena, Calif., for $40, under the supervision of George Henck, director of industrial arts for the Pasadena public schools. The items for the road, which can be duplicated by any mechanically inclined boy, were: quarter-horsepower electric motor, $7; wheels, axles, and trucks, $8; track, $9; ties, $3; body, $4; wires and movable boom, $9.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0073.xml
article
43
43
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
WATER CARTRIDGE SHATTERS CONCRETE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY TWISTING a small handle, one man can now shatter ponderous blocks of concrete. The feat is made possible by a new tool that works upon the principle of the hydraulic jack. The screw handle forces home a piston, driving water into a “hydraulic cartridge” placed in a drill hole.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0074.xml
article
43
43
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
WORKS NEW GREASE GUN LIKE RIVETING HAMMER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BUILT like a pneumatic riveting hammer, a new grease gun shoots lubricant successfully into joints that are tightly clogged with hardened grease. Compressed air is used to drive its piston, which delivers a series of hammer blows upon a stream of grease and forces it into the joint under a pressure of as much as 10,000 pounds, if necessary.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0075.xml
article
43
43
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
CASE THAT FITS POCKET HOLDS HOME MOVIE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN AMATEUR photographer may now carry in his pocket and exhibit with little inconvenience a brief selection from one of his own home movies. This is made possible by an ingenious application of an old principle in a new pocket movie outfit.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0076.xml
article
43
43
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
PLANE’S PROPELLER ROUTS MOSQUITOES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN mosquitoes plagued a crew drilling oil wells in a Louisiana swamp, the men mounted an automobile engine on an iron frame and attached an airplane propeller. The “skeeter chaser” worked, and its strong air current now keeps the insects away, while the men work in peace while also cooled by the blast.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0077.xml
article
43
43
ENGINEERING
[no value]
TIME BOMBS NOW USED TO SHOOT OIL WELLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MODERN methods of “shooting” oil wells demand ample time for the shooters to finish their tamping and retire to a safe place. To meet this need, ingenious time bombs are now in use. Loaded with dynamite and accurately set to explode after a predetermined interval of from one to eleven hours, they are carefully lowered into the drill shaft.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0078.xml
article
44
44,45,109,110
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
BUG eats BUG TO SAVE American Farms
CROP DESTROYING PESTS Are Killed by Parasites Captured in Remote Lands and Released in This Country
[no value]
[no value]
CLAYTON R. SLAWTER
AN INTERCONTINENTAL airline plane. settled to earth the other day at the Miami, Fla., airport after a long flight from South America. Part of its cargo consisted of infinitesimally small winged creatures, thousands of wasps that were being rushed here to aid in the war against the sugar-cane borer that was ravaging cane crops in Louisiana.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0079.xml
article
46
46
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Erupting Volcanoes Change Weather
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILL South America's recent volcanic eruption change our weather? Experts anticipate that possibility since a 400-mile string of volcanoes along the Andes roared into action like a salvo of big guns a few weeks ago, shaking Chile and Argentina for two days and nights with their cannonading.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0080.xml
article
47
47
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Half-Blind Tricked into Seeing
University of California, with New Method, Restores Normal Sight When One Eye Fails
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HUNDREDS of residents of Los Angeles, blind in one eye, have recently had perfect vision restored. The success is a tribute to a remarkable new method of treating partial blindness developed at the University of California using two new instruments—the “manuductor” and “telebinocular.”
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0081.xml
article
48
48
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
REMARKABLE PHOTOS SHOW ELEPHANT AS LUMBERJACK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELEPHANTS have long served as lumber-jacks in India, where the brute power of a single beast replaces the efforts of a crew of men. The striking photographs reproduced here, just received from Ceylon, give an unusually clear idea of the spectacular operation.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0082.xml
article
48
48
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
FLOWERPOT ORCHARD BEARS FULL SIZE FRUIT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
APPLES, pears, and peaches as fine as the market offers may now be grown on three-foot shrubs in flowerpots. The entertaining hobby of raising an “indoor orchard” is made possible, for anyone with the time and patience to try it, by the discovery in France of a way to stunt fruit trees of many kinds, without impairing the quality of their fruit.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0083.xml
article
48
48
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
STREET SWEEPERS WEAR RED LIGHT ON ANKLE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STREET sweepers who work until late hours in Leipzig, Germany, no longer fear being run down by motorists as dusk approaches. They now wear “ankle lights.” These miniature red reflectors are attached to the ankles by encircling straps.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0084.xml
article
49
49
AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
New Compressed Air Auto Powered with Vertical Engine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROY J. MEYERS, California inventor who a few months ago exhibited a car driven by compressed air instead of gasoline (P.S.M., Jan. ’32, p. 60), has now perfected an improved model of his unusual vehicle using a vertical instead of a rotary engine.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0085.xml
article
49
49
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
BANDAGE IS WATERPROOF
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMALL wounds may now be dressed with a new kind of bandage that does not become loose when wet. A pad of gauze is held in the center of a strip of adhesive tape that has a moisture-proof backing. Strips of crinoline cover the sticky surface and the gauze, and are removed before the bandage is applied.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0086.xml
article
49
49
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
MOTOR-DRIVEN CHAIN SAW CUTS FAST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHORT work is made of the thickest timber by a speedy new motor-driven chain saw. In a recent demonstration it cut through the twenty-eight-inch water-soaked log shown in the photograph in fourteen seconds. Either fallen logs or standing trees may be cut with the new tool.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0087.xml
article
49
49
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
BLOW FAILS TO CRACK ELASTIC PORCELAIN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FREE from chipping or peeling is a new “elastic porcelain” of smooth surface and lustrous snow-white appearance. Striking it with a hammer or mallet will not crack the material, but will produce a slight dent. Because of its flexible properties, the material’s metal base may contract or expand with changes in temperature without damaging it.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0088.xml
article
50
50
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
“OUTBOARD MOTOR” FOR BICYCLE NOW
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN “OUTBOARD motor” for bicycles, suggesting those used on water craft in its design and mounted on the rear, has recently been placed on the market. Power is transmitted by a friction drive to the tire of the rear wheel. A handlebar thumb button controls the speed of the one-cylinder motor, while a hand lever just ahead of the saddle raises the whole motor to disengage it from the wheel when desired.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0089.xml
article
50
50
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
WOOL FROM JUTE FIBERS LOOKS LIKE REAL THING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARTIFICIAL wool that defies detection as a substitute for Nature’s produce may be made from ordinary jute fibers, now used for gunny sacks, through a new chemical process. Coloring matter in the jute is removed by treatment with a weak alkali.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0090.xml
article
50
50
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
CLASP ON BILLFOLD HOLDS IT IN POCKET
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR those who guard their money carefully, an “unlosable” bill-fold has been invented. When a sliding clasp is locked to the edge of the hip pocket, the wallet cannot slide out accidentally. The clasp’s bulldog grip also discourages the fingers of pickpockets.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0091.xml
article
50
50
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
FLOATING VALVE MAKES WATER FAUCET TIGHT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DRIPPING faucets are banished, according to the maker of a new “floating valve” that replaces the ordinary washer. This diminutive device, a brass button with a face of tough, elastic material, pivots freely upon a metal pin when the faucet is closed.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0092.xml
article
50
50
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
MACHINE KEEPS TAB ON AMERICAN POPULATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON A big panel in the Census Bureau at Washington, D.C., colored lamps and flashing figures keep tabs on the ever-changing population of the United States. When this picture was taken, the “population clock” recorded a total of 124,765,651 men, women, and children.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0093.xml
article
51
51
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
WIND GAGE CHECKS RACING FEAT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SINCE a strong wind may alter an athlete’s running speed by a fraction of a second, Stanford University officials have set up a wind recorder to verify the record-breaking performances of Ben Eastman, middle-distance ace. A four-mile-an-hour breeze is the maximum allowed during the setting of a record.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0094.xml
article
51
51
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
TAN-SEEKERS WEAR TRANSPARENT SUITS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SUN baths in transparent envelopes designed especially for the purpose are a new fad among California beach-goers. The novel wrappers, made of cellophane, are said to keep the sun’s heat from warming the skin uncomfortably and protect the wearer from cold winds, as well.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0095.xml
article
51
51
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
MONSTER FUSE BREAKS 13,200-VOLT CURRENT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BIG brother of the diminutive fuses that guard your household wiring is a foot-long monster recently designed by Westinghouse engineers. With little flame or noise, it interrupted a current of 20,000 amperes at 13,200 volts—a hitherto impossible feat—in a test made at the Westinghouse laboratories.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0096.xml
article
51
51
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
RACK SERVES AS BRIDGE PARTNER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CONTRACT bridge partners that never criticize the bid or the play are the invention of a Los Angeles man. The “partner” consists of a wired rack in which thirteen cards can be placed. This support is set at an angle so that only the player sitting directly across from dummy can see the cards.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0097.xml
article
52
52
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Big Floating Hotels to Be Moored off American Shores
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLOATING hotels or “oceandromes,” 1,000 feet long and anchored forty miles or more at sea, may soon appear off the Atlantic coast. Plans to construct two such super-vessels have been announced by a Cuban syndicate, and their design has been completed by B. Poyntz Young, naval architect and marine surveyor of Brooklyn, N. Y. Each vessel will be managed as a clubhouse, open only to members, with tennis courts, shooting galleries, putting greens, and gymnasiums.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0098.xml
article
52
52
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
USE LEAD-FILLED STRIP AS WINDOW PANE PUTTY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANY home owner may easily replace a broken window pane with the aid of a new lead-filled strip that takes the place of putty. Secured with brads around the edge of the new pane, it makes an airtight and permanent joint. The nails pierce the lead inside the strip to hold it securely in place.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0099.xml
article
52
52
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
RHYTHM INDICATOR HELPS MUSICIAN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MUSIC composer may study the effect of blending different rhythms by using a remarkable electrical instrument that operates like a multiple metronome. When one of the pianolike keys is pressed and released, a low-pitched tone is heard in a loudspeaker at regular intervals.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0100.xml
article
52
52
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW CLOCK SHOWS TIME BUT HAS NO DIAL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TELLING the time is easy with a new clock that has no dial. Devised by a Pittsburgh, Pa., inventor, it shows the hour and minute by means of large figures like those of an automobile speedometer. Electricity drives the timepiece, turning drums on which the numbers are exposed one by one in the clock’s window.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0101.xml
article
53
53
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
New Pump Beats Natural Laws in Raising Water
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOLLOWING the example of the United States Patent Office, eighteen countries have issued patents to an Argentinian inventor upon an amazing pump that seems to violate natural laws. By creating waves in a pipeful of water, it makes-the liquid run uphill.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0102.xml
article
53
53
MODELS
[no value]
FARM MODEL HAS 7,000 PARTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Two BIG trailers are required to transport one of the most ambitious models ever built. The exhibit, thirty-two feet long, depicts an American farm scene, a blacksmith shop, and an oil field, electrically illuminated and with animated figures driven by electricity.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0103.xml
article
54
54
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
Cheap Process Yields Plants’ Magic Substance
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the world's most mysterious substances, chlorophyll, the life-giving green pigment in the leaves of plants, is now available to sci ence and industry. Dr. Frank M. Schertz of the United States Department of Agriculture has found a way to extract it at low cost from blue grass, spinach, and other plants, and has obtained the largest batch of the pure compound ever isolated.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0104.xml
article
55
55
Can YOU Invent It?
[no value]
Can YOU Invent It?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a situation in which the man in the boat must become an inventor in order to save his life! He was rowing across a river only a couple of miles above a high waterfall when one of his oars slipped out of his hand and went overboard. In the boat he has an anchor and over two hundred feet of rope, but the river is too wide for him to throw the anchor to the bank.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0105.xml
article
55
55
New Uses for Old Utensils
[no value]
New Uses for Old Utensils
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MATERIALS at hand in almost every home, though not to be found in the average tool kit, will simplify many a household task. The photographs on this page suggest eight handy kinks that may save time or labor in everyday life. They illustrate how familiar utensils often may be well adapted to uses that the manufacturer, or the householder who has used them for years, never thought of, and that wait for some ingenious tinkerer to discover.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0106.xml
article
56
56
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
COTTON PICKER DOES WORK OF 60 MEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILL the cotton pickers of the South give way to more efficient, if less romantic, harvesting machinery? An improved cotton harvester, exhibited recently in Chicago, supplies the most recent threat to the continued use of hand pickers.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0107.xml
article
56
56
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
BIGGEST BEETLE KNOWN IS FOUR INCHES LONG
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWENTY fine specimens of the brown Goliath beetle of equatorial Africa, largest of the 100,000 known species of beetles in the world, have just been received by the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago. The body of this insect is nearly four inches long.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0108.xml
article
56
56
HEALTH AND HYGIENE
[no value]
GET HEAT AND MASSAGE FROM ONE MACHINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HEAT, massage, and vapor treatment are combined in a new electric instrument designed for external use in treating local congestion and irritation due to colds and other ailments. When it is plugged into a wall socket, a circular heating element vaporizes any preparation with which its gauze applicator is saturated.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0109.xml
article
56
56
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
NEW BAND SAW HANDLES BIG PIECES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNUSUALLY large work is handled by a new type of band saw for school use, light manufacturing and for advanced home workshop enthusiasts. Three wheels, used instead of the usual two, carry the flexible blade around a triangular circuit and permit clearances of twenty-four and thirty inches respectively in the two models manufactured.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0110.xml
article
56
56
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
THIS FRICTION HINGE HOLDS DOOR OPEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SO OPEN trunk lids will not fall down, and doors will remain open without swinging, a friction hinge has been devised. Its bearing is a double cone, held closely by springs in contact with the two leaves. A door or other object fitted with the hinge will stay open until sufficient pressure is applied to overcome the friction of the bearing.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0111.xml
article
57
57
NEW PROCESSES AND INVENTIONS
[no value]
HOW MOVIE CARTOONS WORK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A REVOLVING-DRUM device now being installed in department stores and elsewhere as a mechanical novelty displays a brief animated movie that constantly repeats itself. It is designed to explain to the layman how the intriguing animals and human figures of cartoon strips in the motion pictures are given the illusion of motion, by superimposing in quick succession a number of drawings differing slightly in detail.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0112.xml
article
57
57
MODELS
[no value]
TOWER OF BABEL MODEL MADE FOR CHICAGO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MODEL of one of the world’s first skyscrapers, the Tower of Babel, famed in Biblical story, has just been completed by a German sculptor for the Oriental Institute at Chicago, Ill. It depicts in faithful detail the tower at Babylon on which the legend is believed to have been founded.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0113.xml
article
57
57
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
PLAN BLIMP FOR MAGNETIC AIR LINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL-METAL “blimps” sustained by hydrogen or helium and propelled by giant magnets along a predetermined route are suggested by a group of German inventors, who are studying the feasibility of such a plan for a line across the European Alps.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0114.xml
article
58
58,59
NEW DEVICES FOR THE HOME
[no value]
INVENTIONS for the Household
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VACUUM DRY CLEANER. A miniature dry cleaning outfit for the home that removes grease spots from clothes. Its applicator pad draws cleaning fluid from small reservoir, returning it by valve system that uses suction UMBRELLA OR CLOTHES DRYER.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0115.xml
article
60
60,61
Industrial Stunts for Home Chemists
[no value]
Industrial Stunts for Home Chemists
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Raymond B. Wailes
INDUSTRY today, in virtually all of its most important and profitable branches, leans heavily upon chemistry. So numerous are the chemical processes now used by manufacturers that only a few of them can be touched upon in this department.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0116.xml
article
62
62
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
You Eat Giant’s Meal in 56 Years
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOU were served at a single meal all the average person eats in a lifetime, you would sit down to a beefsteak weighing as much as six dressed steers, confront a giant potato too big for a two-ton truck to haul, cut slices from a loaf of bread higher than your head, and pour milk from a bottle as tall as a bungalow!
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0117.xml
article
63
63
HELPFUL HINTS FOR RADIO FANS
[no value]
You Can Run Radio in Car without B BATTERIES
Testing Voltages
Auto Sets at Home
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIX-VOLT, heater type radio tubes, types 236, 237, and 238, solved the problem of a current supply for automobile radio sets. These durable, vibration-proof tubes can be connected directly to the regular six-volt lighting circuit of the car.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0118.xml
article
64
64,65,104
HOW TO BUILD Your Amateur Transmitter
[no value]
HOW TO BUILD Your Amateur Transmitter
HERE is a transmitter that will appeal to the beginner or expert. It is simple and inexpensive to construct and easy to operate efficiently
BLUEPRINTS READY!
Coil Specifications
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN CARR
HERE is an amateur continuous wave radio transmitter that is simple to build, easy to adjust, and efficient in operation. It Will appeal both to the beginner and the more advanced amateur. When properly installed and adjusted, it will meet the Government requirements for purity and sharpness of wave in the amateur bands, a point often overlooked in the designing of low power amateur transmitters.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0119.xml
article
66
66,107
Gus explains Mystery of Vibration in Car
[no value]
Gus explains Mystery of Vibration in Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
"STOP the car, Clem," Mrs. Ferrers commanded. "I can't stand that awful drumming sound another moment. My head aches like fury. It’s driving me crazy. Can’t you do something about it?” Clem Ferrers smiled placatingly. “Sure, Aggie, we’ll stop and I’ll see what I can do. It didn’t seem so bad to me.”
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0120.xml
article
67
67,68,69,101,102
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
How to Build Our New Sportboat
. . . A Trim, Smart Looking Runabout with the Conveniences of a Cruiser
Complete List of Materials
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM JACKSON
FINE performance, smart appearance, and general utility are combined in the new POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY "sportboat." It has the style speed, and convenience of a runabout together with the comforts and roominess of a small, light cruiser. The overall length of the hull is 15 ft. 6 in.; the extreme beam, 5 ft. 3½ in.; and the weight without the motor, 600 lb.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0121.xml
article
70
70
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
DECORATIVE COPY OF EGYPTIAN URN TURNED FROM WOOD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. C. PELTIER
ANYONE possessing a small lathe can turn from wood an authentic copy of an ancient Egyptian urn. When used either as an ornament or as a holder for flowers, it harmonizes with any decorative scheme. Mahogany, walnut, and cherry all work up well, but any wood with an attractive figure can be used.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0122.xml
article
70
70
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
LADDERLIKE TOOL RACK FITS ON BACK OF BENCH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWIN M. LOVE
BY FAR the handiest tool rack the writer has ever used is that pictured in the accompanying photograph. Supported by the bench top, it affords 6 lineal feet of inclined shelves within convenient reach of the workman at the vise—sufficient to hold all the small tools anyone ordinarily uses in the general round of work.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0123.xml
article
71
71
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Unusual Child's Dresser Built to Look Like a Doll House
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KATHLEEN EAMES LITTLE
THIS unique and colorful piece of nursery furniture resembles a doll house but is actually a dresser. It even has a mirror to reflect a clean little face and well-brushed hair. Smooth ¾ in. thick white pine or other soft wood is used for practically all the construction except the doors, which are of 5-ply veneer, and the back, which may be any thin material—wood, wall board, pressed wood composition, or plywood.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0124.xml
article
71
71
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
HOMEMADE TOOL FOR TURNING TENONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANY amateur wood turner who has calipered tenons to size on a lathe knows how easy it is to get a tenon a little too small or too large, with the result that the joints are difficult to assemble properly. The accompanying illustrations show a tool that will not only insure correctly sized tenons but will do it in a fraction of the time needed to caliper them.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0125.xml
article
71
71
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
[no value]
RUBBER TACK IMPROVES PUTTY KNIFE HANDLE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK BENTLEY
THE handle of a putty knife is often used to tap panes of glass which are being fitted into a sash or which have to be removed for some reason, but there is always considerable danger that the glass will be cracked or broken, especially if it is a tight fit in the rabbet.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0126.xml
article
72
72,73
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Jockeying the Waves on Easily Made Water Skis
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MORTON C. WALLING
UNTIL you've returned spray-drenched from a speedy ride on a pair of easily constructed water skis, you've missed one of the most thrilling of water sports. Water skiing offers all the speed, excitement, and white water of aquaplaning with plenty of thrills and spills to spare.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0127.xml
article
73
73
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
HOLDER KEEPS ELECTRIC SOLDERING IRON TINNED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. S. CULVER
WHEN an electric soldering iron is continually heated and used for long periods, the copper tip requires frequent dressing with a file. To remedy this, a holder may be made that allows the copper point to be kept immersed in a small pool of molten solder.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0128.xml
article
74
74,75
MODELS
[no value]
Cutting-Out Gear and Whaleboats COMPLETE OUR MODEL OF THE Wanderer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Capt. E. Armitage McCann
EXCEPT for some additional rigging and the making of the whale-boats and cutting-out gear, little work remains to be done on our model of the famous old American whaling bark Wanderer. For the benefit of those who have not read the previous articles in this series (P. S. M., Apr. ’32, p. 75; May p. 83; June p. 83), it should be pointed out at once that complete full size drawings of the model can be obtained by sending one dollar for POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY Blueprints Nos. 151, 152, 153, and 154 (see page 100).
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0129.xml
article
76
76,77
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW AND BETTER FLYING MODEL OF THE Nieuport XVII
Famous World War Pursuit Ship Flown by Guynemer, Nungesser, Lufberry, Hall, and Other Aces
[no value]
[no value]
J. DANNER BUNCH
A FAST and nimble fighter was the Nieuport. It was the first outstanding pursuit ship used by the Allies during the World War. Guynemer, Nungesser, Lufberry, Fonck, Hall. Chapman, Prince, and others flew it with amazing success. This new model of the Nieuport XVII, which has a wing span of 29 in., is a beautiful little ship in the air and very stable.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0130.xml
article
78
78
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
RANGE FINDER FOR FOCUSING CAMERA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RICHARD SERVIS
A SIMPLE, easily made range finder that will enable the photographer to snap properly focused negatives can be made of the following: one piece ¼ in. thick and 2½ in. square and another ½ in. square and 1 in. long, preferably hardwood; one piece of sheet brass 1/16 by ¼ by 2 in.; three roundhead (or fillister head) wood screws ½ in. long; one flat-head wood screw ½ in. long; and one small brass or iron washer.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0131.xml
article
78
78
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
EASILY ASSEMBLED FURNITURE LEGS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CLINTON F. BLAKE
WHEN furniture legs are made from solid stock and fastened to the other members of the frame-work with doweled or mortised joints, they often prove a source of trouble and vexation to amateur woodworkers. Any lumberyard, however, can provide ¼ by 1¼ by 1¼ in. corner molding, and also suitable square stock, which will just fit inside the molding, and the accompanying sketch and photograph make plain how these are used.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0132.xml
article
78
78
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
CONVENIENT SWINGING RACK FOR OIL CAN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS swinging rack, made of pieces salvaged from packing cases, has simplified the handling and storing of engine oil in one family’s garage. Assuming that the rack is to hold a 5-gal. can of the size and type illustrated, the inside should be 12 in. square and about 9 in. deep.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0133.xml
article
78
78
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
ROUND-CORNERED CARDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KENNETH MURRAY
PHOTOGRAPHS and any other square-cornered cards or papers can quickly be given clean-cut round corners with a wood gouge and the equipment shown. The gage consists of a flat baseboard to which are screwed two pieces of wood at right angles.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0134.xml
article
79
79,98,99
[no value]
[no value]
Mahogany and Silk Enrich This Dainty Sewing Cabinet
DESIGNED IN THE GRACEFUL STYLE OF 1812
[no value]
[no value]
Donald A. Price
THIS sewing cabinet, patterned after one built about the year 1812, is an unusual project for the home craftsman, and when completed it will be a welcome gift because of its beauty and capacious storage space. Women appreciate the daintiness of the pleated silk which covers the lower portion of the sides and ends.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0135.xml
article
80
80
[no value]
[no value]
From a Few Remnants of Leather You Can Make This Distinctive Cigarette Case
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. CLARKE HUGHES
THE decorative leather case illustrated is intended to hold a standard sized package of cigarettes. With only a slight increase in size, the case may be used for a single pack of playing cards. Although a case of the dimensions given will fit any ordinary package of cigarettes, the reader should take the precaution to prepare a paper pattern of his own around an unopened package of his favorite brand.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0136.xml
article
81
81
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
TRANSPARENT CEMENT CONCEALS DENTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G. M.
REFINISHING highly polished furniture by sanding and varnishing is comparatively easy for most home mechanics except for one thing. There often are small dents, especially on table tops, that extend right down into the wood, sometimes as much as 1/16 in. deep.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0137.xml
article
81
81
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
OUTBOARD REST FOR SAWING LONG WORK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. F. B.
MY HOME shop is only 10 by 12 ft., but in it I handle conveniently boards up to 18 ft. long, either for crosscutting or ripping. The illustration above shows how this is done. The circular saw is opposite the door from which the photograph was taken, and through that door long boards may extend while being ripped.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0138.xml
article
81
81
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
APPLYING PASTE WOOD FILLER EXPERTLY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. N. VANDERWALKER
FLOORS and other surfaces made of such open grained woods as oak, walnut, and mahogany are usually filled with paste wood filler after being stained and before the final finish of varnish or wax is applied. The handling of paste wood filler is easy if the right method is used, but the wrong procedure produces a cloudy, unsatisfactory finish.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0139.xml
article
81
81
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
WIRE PAPER CLIP FORMS EMERGENCY COMPASS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. E.
WITH an ordinary bent-wire paper clip of the type shown in the photograph at the right, together with a pin and a pencil, you can draw circles as accurately as with a compass in those emergencies when there is no compass at hand. Drive the pin into the paper far enough to hold firmly, and use it as a center.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0140.xml
article
82
82
USEFUL SUGGESTIONS for Auto Workers
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USEFUL SUGGESTIONS for Auto Workers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MUDDY road would have to be unusually bad to stall a motor car if it had four-wheel drive. You can take advantage of this fact the next time you get stuck. Figure 1 shows a way to obtain traction with all four wheels. Tie a rope to the front side of the rear wheel in line with the bottom of the running board.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0141.xml
article
83
83,84
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
Coaxing OLD Milling Cutters to Do the Work of NEW
HINTS ON HOW HARD-PRESSED MACHINE SHOPS CAN KEEP DOWN THEIR TOOLING COSTS
[no value]
[no value]
Hector J. Chamberland
BECAUSE of the economical methods introduced in the average shop during the last two years, the tool box, to use a common shop expression, is traveling in all directions. The specialist and set-up man in many cases have made a forced exit. Only men familiar with several operations are to be found on the floor; yet the average all-round machinist and toolmaker, clever as he may be in every sense of the word, still lacks the special training his less fortunate buddy has obtained by doing the same kind of work for a number of years.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0142.xml
article
84
84
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
DOUBLING THE LIFE OF SNAP GAGES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. N. D.
THE expense of snap gages is always high in any machine shop making a line of interchangeable parts. Their cost, however, may be cut materially by making them double-ended as illustrated in the drawing at the right. It is obvious that the double-end type will give twice the service before it becomes necessary to re-grind them.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0143.xml
article
85
85
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
Easily Made Brazing Clamp Holds Work of Any Shape
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WARREN CRANE
ONE of the most troublesome details about brazing, or soft soldering for that matter, is holding the parts. When they are wired together, the heat often expands the wires enough to make them loose, or the brass flows over the wires so it is difficult to get a smooth job.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0144.xml
article
85
85
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
Old Bill Says . . .
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE efficiency of a grinding wheel is governed by its surface speed; 6,000 surface feet per minute is considered normal. An ordinary bearing or similar surface can be lapped in about one third the time it would take to scrape it. In changing the location of a bored hole, a dial indicator.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0145.xml
article
85
85
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
IMPROVISING THREAD CALIPERS IN AN EMERGENCY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS R. COOVER
WHEN work is at hand which requires the use of thread calipers, a pair of ordinary calipers can be made to serve the purpose, if necessary, by the method shown above. Cut two pieces of steel 1/16 by ⅝ by 2 in., and round one corner of each slightly.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0146.xml
article
86
86,99
PHOTOGRAPHY
[no value]
Homemade Miniature Camera
takes pictures on movie film
[no value]
[no value]
WALTER C. GRIFFIN
THOUGH tiny, this watch-pocket camera designed by Ellsworth Craft, of Los Angeles, Calif., makes clear pictures, holds film for 100 exposures, and can be built at little or no expense. Its construction should appeal particularly to those photographers who enjoy experimenting, and some of them probably can make the camera even more compact.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0147.xml
article
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
How to Lay a WATERPROOF Rubber Tile FLOOR
CASH PAID for Good Shipshape Home Ideas
[no value]
[no value]
Everett Eames
THE most serviceable floor obtainable is none too good for the bathroom. Artificial stone mosaic is the first choice of many home builders, but this is expensive and requires considerable experience to lay. Some may also object to the fact that it is cold.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0148.xml
article
88
88
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
Three Baseball Bats and a Chopping Bowl Make Novel Stand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WALTER E. BURTON
BASEBALL fans will find particular enjoyment in making this novel stand. A wooden chopping bowl forms the top, and each of its three legs is a small base-ball bat. A stand of this kind can be built in an hour or two at a cost not much over $1.25. It is unusually sturdy, making it especially useful in a boy’s room, recreation room, or den.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0149.xml
article
88
88
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
LARGE WORK TURNED ON SMALL LATHE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. V. COMINGS
THE owner of a small combination woodworking outfit, which usually has a 6 or 8 in. swing lathe as one of its units, occasionally wants to turn a lamp base or some similar piece of work with a diameter greater than his lathe will accommodate. If the bed and tailstock are not permanently attached to the headstock, the oversize turning may be accomplished by making a tool rest of 1 by 3 in. stock, preferably oak, as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0150.xml
article
88
88
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
NONTIPPING HOLDER FOR DRAWING INK BOTTLE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT NEUBAUER
A 2¼-IN. GLASS cup or shoe of the type used under furniture legs and a bit of modeling clay or plaster of Paris will form an ink bottle stand heavy enough to prevent the bottle from tipping even when used on an inclined drawing board. Simply place the bottle in the center of the cup and press modeling clay around it, or pour in a mixture of plaster of Paris and water.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0151.xml
article
89
89
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
Homemade Fixtures for HOLDING WORK TO BE MILLED IN A Small Lathe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOLT CONDON
IN A PREVIOUS article in this series (P. S. M., May `32, p. 104) certain homemade milling tools for use on the lathe were described. With these it is necessary to have various attachments for holding the work rigidly and furnishing the means of feeding the work to the cutter.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0152.xml
article
89
89
IDEAS FOR THE HANDY MAN
[no value]
MAKING TIGHT JOINTS IN WOODEN TRAYS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
JOINTS in wooden trays or tanks can be made water-tight through the use of battery sealing compound. When building the tray or tank simply spread the melted compound evenly along the joints and then fasten with screws or nails as desired. After the piece has been completed, a little additional heat will partially remelt the compound and cause it to flow into every crack and opening, making the joints absolutely water-tight.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0153.xml
article
90
90,94,95
WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT Snapping Action Photos
[no value]
WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT Snapping Action Photos
$10 prize for best ACTION PHOTO
[no value]
[no value]
Frederic k D. Ryder
ONE day last summer an acquaintance of mine thrust a fistful of prints in my hand and dangled a camera before my eyes. “Look at ’em!” he said. “Every one so fuzzy you can’t even recognize their faces. What’s the matter with my camera?” This man is the proud father of a boy who is making quite a reputation for himself in school athletic circles.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0154.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0155.xml
article
92
92,93
CRAFTWORK
[no value]
Amusing Designs for Turned Toys and NOVELTIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Harvey C. Frederick
TURNING small toys and novelties on the lathe is an absorbing line of work for home craftsmen. Where the parts are not especially small or fragile and when the finish is to be paint or lacquer, soft and smooth grained woods may be used, such as white pine, gum, or red cedar.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0156.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
CHAMPION SPARK PLUGS
[no value]
CHAMPION SPARK PLUGS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0157.xml
article
95
95
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
A SIMPLE WAY TO MAKE SANDPAPER ROLLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C.F.B.
AFTER long enduring the vexation of having to soak sandpaper off a roll and glue on another piece, I devised the simple roll illustrated below, upon which it is easy to replace worn-out sandpaper or change to a different grade. The roll is turned to a circumference in. shorter than the width of a piece of sandpaper.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0158.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0159.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0160.xml
article
97
97
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
LAWN EDGER THROWS SOD ON WALK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDGING a lawn about sidewalks becomes an easy task with the tool illustrated. This not only cuts the sod accurately at a given distance from the sidewalk. but also keeps a constant angle at the edge, throws the cut sod up on the sidewalk. wears only very slowly, and can be operated at least two or three times as fast as an ordinary edger.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0161.xml
article
97
97
HINTS FOR THE MECHANIC
[no value]
BLOWING CHIPS SAFELY FROM DRILLED HOLES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER seeing a machinist get cast-iron borings in his eyes while blowing out a drilled hole with an ordinary blowpipe. I made the device illustrated in the sketch above. It is connected with an air line near the drill press by means of a rubber hose and pressed down over the hole to be cleaned out.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0162.xml
article
97
97
FOR THE HOME OWNER
[no value]
KEEPING OLD VACUUM CLEANERS OILED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. J. C.
MANY old style vacuum cleaners need comparatively frequent oiling. This is not so likely to be neglected if a ten-cent oil can is kept in a socket attached to the handle as illustrated in the photograph and drawing above.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0163.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
BAUER & BLACK: PAL
[no value]
BAUER & BLACK
PAL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0164.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0165.xml
article
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
AWKWARD GLUED JOINTS BOUND WITH RUBBER
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[no value]
[no value]
A. W. MILLER
TO INSURE strong glued joints it is essential to apply firm pressure during the drying period. It is often impossible, however, to use clamps because of the number or shape of the surfaces requiring pressure. In many such cases, winding with thin strip rubber will often give the desired pressure.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0166.xml
article
99
99
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[no value]
COLORING PHOTOGRAPHS
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[no value]
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WATSON C. COLE
THE amateur photographer finds it is impossible to color glossy finished prints with water colors because of the wax left on the surface by the ferrotype plate. If the print is wiped off with carbon tetrachloride on a cotton swab, it is possible to use water colors and get equally as good results as are obtained on a waxless, smooth finish print.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0167.xml
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99
99
[no value]
[no value]
Larus & Brother Co.: Edgeworth Smoking Tobacco
[no value]
Larus & Brother Co.
Edgeworth Smoking Tobacco
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0168.xml
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100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0169.xml
article
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
BLUEPRINTS for Your Home Workshop
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[no value]
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[no value]
TO ASSIST you in your home workshop, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY offers large blueprints containing working drawings of a number of well-tested projects. The blueprints are 15 by 22 in. and are sold for 25 cents a single sheet (except in a few special cases).
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0170.xml
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101
101
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
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SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0172.xml
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102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0173.xml
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103
103
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0174.xml
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103
103
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0175.xml
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103
103
[no value]
[no value]
U. S. School of Music
[no value]
U. S. School of Music
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0176.xml
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104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0177.xml
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105
105
[no value]
[no value]
FEDERAL SCHOOL of COMMERCIAL DESIGNING
[no value]
FEDERAL SCHOOL of COMMERCIAL DESIGNING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0178.xml
article
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
HUNT OYSTER BEDS FROM AN AIRPLANE
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[no value]
[no value]
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HUNTING OYSTERS from the air is a recent innovation over Chesapeake Bay along the Maryland coast. An aviator demonstrated that oyster beds which cannot be seen from the surface of the bay are visible from a plane.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0179.xml
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106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0180.xml
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107
107
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0181.xml
article
108
108
UNUSUAL FACTS AND IDEAS
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INVENTS NEW MACHINE TO EAT GRASSHOPPERS
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[no value]
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DESIGNED to devour grasshoppers and turn them into chicken-feed and fertilizer, an invention by Walter S. Jardine, a Nebraska State Representative, is expected to prove of value in combating insect plagues. The apparatus, attached to an automobile or tractor, will move across the fields sucking the insects into a huge metal hopper where they will be ground up and then expelled in long “windrows” to fertilize the ground or to be collected and fed to poultry.
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0182.xml
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108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0183.xml
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109
109
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0184.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0185.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0186.xml
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113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Ethyl Gasoline Corporation: ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
Ethyl Gasoline Corporation
ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0187.xml
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114
114,115,116
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company: CAMELS
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
CAMELS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19320701_0121_001_0188.xml