Issue: 19300801

Friday, August 1, 1930
August 1930
2
True
117
Monday, January 12, 2015

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0001.xml
advertisement
0_2
0_2
[no value]
[no value]
Westinghouse
[no value]
Westinghouse
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0002.xml
advertisement
1
1
[no value]
[no value]
INSULITE CO.
[no value]
INSULITE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0003.xml
tableOfContents
2
2,3
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0004.xml
advertisement
4
4
[no value]
[no value]
Cochran & McCluer Co.
[no value]
Cochran & McCluer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0005.xml
advertisement
4
4
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0006.xml
article
4
4,5,6,7
FEATURES AND DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
How You Can Be Worth $50,000 More Tomorrow
To Help You Get Ahead
[no value]
[no value]
LEON MEADOW
"OH MARTHA," shouted Peter Ransom as he crossed the threshold, home from another day's work, "where are you?" "In the kitchen, dear," his wife called out. Peter dropped his coat on the hall table, cocked an expectant ear for some greeting from his daughter, got none and proceeded into the kitchen for further investigation.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0007.xml
advertisement
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
Cessna Aircraft Co.
[no value]
Cessna Aircraft Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0008.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
LARUS & BRO. CO.: EDGEWORTH
[no value]
LARUS & BRO. CO.
EDGEWORTH
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0009.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
BOND and MORTGAGE CO.
[no value]
BOND and MORTGAGE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0010.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
Investors Syndicate
[no value]
Investors Syndicate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0011.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0012.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
Taylor Instrument Companies: Tycos
[no value]
Taylor Instrument Companies
Tycos
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0013.xml
advertisement
8
8
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0014.xml
advertisement
9
9
[no value]
[no value]
Western Electric
[no value]
Western Electric
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0015.xml
article
10
10
Refrigeration and Your Health
[no value]
Refrigeration and Your Health
Germs, some of which are dangerous, multiply fast in temperature above 50. So test your refrigerator.
INSTITUTE BULLETINS
[no value]
[no value]
F. G. PRYOR
HOW ways to has keep been food from a big spoiling problem. alDrying, smoking, or pickling was the way it was solved in early days, but the trouble was these methods changed the taste and characteristics of the food. Finally, it was found that by removing heat, food could be kept for a long time without losing any of its natural qualities.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0016.xml
advertisement
11
11
[no value]
[no value]
MASONITE CORPORATION
[no value]
MASONITE CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0017.xml
article
12
12,13
Our Readers Say
[no value]
Our Readers Say
Our Ancestors Still Govern Us
Debunking Ignorance His Favorite Occupation
More Light Wanted on Hypnotism
Stickler for English Gets Caught Napping
Anti-ash Reader Boosts Good Old Oil
Good Enough Just as It Is Now
Resistance of Air Cuts Object's Falling Speed
All Right, H. H., You Brought It on Yourself
He's Airminded and Proud of It
Soften Your Bones and Tie'Em in Knots
Radio Plays Its Part; So Does Chemistry
That Airplane Problem Explained Again
That Old Sound Question Gets an Answer
Farmer Applauds Plant Pill Miracle
Eight Ship Models Clutter Living Room
Pioneer Flyers Made Airplanes Safe
You Can Have a Lot of Fun with This Puzzle
Was This a Case of Hypnotic Suggestion?
Here's a Problem Not Easy to Solve
That Revolving Cage Proved To Be No Joke
Oh, a Wonderful Bird Is the Pelican
Eager to Fly, but a Trifle Nervous
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
You sort of poked fun at some of the primitive peoples who still do things just as their ancestors did. What about us? Are we really any better in that respect? What’s more primitive than a ferry, and yet it’s still widely used for no earthly reason, as far as I can see, except it was the best our ancestors could devise and so it’s good enough for us.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0018.xml
advertisement
14
14
[no value]
[no value]
Norton Company
[no value]
Norton Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0019.xml
article
15
15,16,17,119
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Mystery Cell Aids Television
Remarkable demonstration in theater shows big improvement in seeing and hearing by radio. New process used to aid planes blinded by fog.
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT E. MARTIN
TWO remarkable developments recently revived public interest in television, and brought the dream of practical transmission and reception of “images on the air” a step nearer realization. In a dramatic demonstration at Schenectady, N. Y., a few weeks ago, Dr. E. F. W. Alexanderson, consulting engineer of the General Electric Company, projected six-foot images bright enough to be seen by a large gathering.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0020.xml
article
18
18,19,110,111
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Thrills of Flying Six-Ton Planes
Famous Flyer Tells How It Feels to Pilot Metal Giants of the Air
[no value]
[no value]
RANDY ENSLOW
IT IS queer about big planes. They look like elephants and they fly like swallows. It is only when you take off and land that you realize how large they really are. A few years ago, I thought the wings of my seventy-fourfoot-span Ford were a mile long when I sat down after dark in a tree-lined cotton patch on a forced landing.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0021.xml
article
20
20,113
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Froth Smothers Biggest Oil Blaze
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BUBBLES of brownish froth recently won a desperate battle against one of the biggest oil fires of history. When flames threatened to wipe out a great Bayonne, N. J., refinery, fire fighters, armed with the latest chemical equipment. saved the day.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0022.xml
article
21
21,22,112,113
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Dove Is Now Night Bird of War
Carrier Pigeons Bred by the Army at Fort Monmouth Fly in Darkness, Proving Old Fanciers Were Wrong
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN E. LODGE
NIGHT flying homing pigeons, something brandnew in the bird world, have been developed by experts of the United States Army Signal Corps at Fort Monmouth, N. J., where most of the carrier pigeons for the Army are bred and trained. In rearing and teaching these birds, the Government pigeoneers have accomplished a feat which for centuries was considered impossible.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0023.xml
article
23
23,24,117
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
New Pipe Lines Point to Gas Heating Era
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
CHICAGO is going to get natural gas. San Francisco already has it. New York may get it. This is likely to make radical changes in the daily lives of millions of Americans who live in, or near, those cities. For natural gas is cheap gas. Natural gas comes from wells where Nature put it and is free for the finding.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0024.xml
article
25
25
FEATURES AND DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
LIQUID OXYGEN RUNS AMAZING AUTO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DARING attempt to drive an automobile with the terrific power of fuels like benzine burning in liquid oxygen succeeded at Berlin the other day. Shortly after, one of its two inventors was killed when he sought to repeat the feat. Dr. Paul Heylandt, German liquid air expert, and Max Valier, builder of rocket cars, were in search of something more than merely a new kind of automobile.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0025.xml
article
26
26
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
STEEL FLOORS MAY LEAD TO HOMES OF STEEL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLOORS of steel for private dwellings may become a commonplace, one of these days. They will introduce to Americans the idea of building entire houses of steel, Lee H. Miller, New York engineer, recently told the American Iron and Steel Institute.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0026.xml
article
26
26
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
NONMELTING ICE GIVES SKATERS LONG SEASON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NONMELTING, durable, artificial ice that should be a benefactor of hockey players and fancy skaters has been brought to the United States from Germany. Called “opal ice,” it is a secret composition made by adding hot water to certain chemicals.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0027.xml
article
26
26
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
RED WINDOWS STOP FLIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOU want to keep house flies out of a room, try fitting the windows with yellow or red panes of glass. That is the conclusion of tests made by a British glass company, at the suggestion of Prof. Robert Newstead, of Liverpool University, England.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0028.xml
article
26
26
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
ELECTRIC VIOLIN PLAYS WITHOUT SOUND BOX
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN “ELECTRIC VIOLIN” has just appeared in Paris. Played by hand in the usual way, it has no sound box. Instead the tone of the strings is electrically amplified and made audible through a loudspeaker. The result, according to the inventor, Ivan Makhonin, is a pure tone, especially pleasing against a background of other instruments.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0029.xml
article
26
26
Photography
[no value]
METER MEASURES LIGHT FOR PHOTOGRAPHER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CORRECT exposure for amateur moviemaking is guaranteed by a new type of “exposure meter” that measures exactly how bright the light is in which the picture is to be made. It is so sensitive that through its use a photographer may select one exposure to bring out the shadows of a man’s face or another for the highlights, depending on the effect he desires.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0030.xml
article
27
27
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
GAGE GUARDS AGAINST MANHOLE EXPLOSIONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
So THAT manhole covers in city streets will not be blown skyward by explosions beneath them, G. W. Jones, explosive chemist of the United States Bureau of Standards, has developed a portable gas detector. It reveals in a few seconds whether the air beneath the manhole contains enough leaking gas to make it dangerously near the explosive point.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0031.xml
article
27
27
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
MACHINE WRITES AD IN CLEAR WATER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a man recently walked down a street in Barcelona, Spain, pushing a machine that left behind it a printed strip of advertising, civic authorities were aroused. What right did he have to paint advertisements on the city streets? Inspection showed they need not worry.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0032.xml
article
27
27
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
METAL RAMS AID SEARCH FOR PREHISTORIC RELICS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
METAL rams, such as workmen use to tamp paving stones in place, are now used to find excavations made by prehistoric people. The method was developed by E. Cecil Curwen, British archeologist. Walled camps surrounded by ditches were left by primitive tribes in many places in England.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0033.xml
article
27
27
Automobiles
[no value]
GUIDE FOR AUTO JACK HELPS TIRE CHANGERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
No NEED to crawl under a car in order to jack up a wheel, when a set of jackguides is installed. The guides, metal arms which extend ten to eighteen inches from the axle, are put in place by loosening the spring shackles, which are then retightened.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0034.xml
article
27
27
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
MARBLE FAKES EXPOSED BY ULTRA-VIOLET RAYS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARBLE forgeries, imitations of old masterpieces, may now be detected with the aid of ultra-violet rays. These invisible waves do not pass through glass, but when they encounter marble they so affect it as to give it a peculiar phosphorescent tinge, somewhat like that of a glowworm.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0035.xml
article
27
27
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
SEEK WAY TO LESSEN SUMMER SUN’S HEAT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
How the sun, nearly 93,000,000 miles away, creates a serious engineering problem for architects was discussed by F. C. Houghten and Carl Gutberlet, of Pittsburgh, before the International Heating and Ventilating Exposition at Philadelphia.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0036.xml
article
28
28
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
Pats Rouge on Electrically
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0037.xml
article
28
28
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
Table Keeps Cards from Blowing Away
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0038.xml
article
28
28
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
Prevents Eyestrain for Draftsmen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0039.xml
article
28
28
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
This Clock Talks English
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0040.xml
article
28
28
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
Gun That Shoots Tacks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0041.xml
article
29
29
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
Machine handles Movie Film
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0042.xml
article
29
29
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
Silent Vacuum Cleaner
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0043.xml
article
29
29
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
Home Movie Cabinet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0044.xml
article
29
29
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
Will It Tame Wild Pitcher?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0045.xml
article
29
29
Newer and Easier Ways of Doing Familiar Jobs
[no value]
False Ears for the Deaf
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0046.xml
article
30
30
Automobiles
[no value]
RAPID-FIRE GUNS ON FAST CARS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLYING companies of machine gunners, able to dash from one point to another of a battle front and deliver a decisive blow, are presaged by the newest Army equipment—rapid-fire armament mounted on fast cars. It gives the Thirty-Fourth Infantry, which is stationed at Leehall, Va., for which it was designed, the first machine gun company of the United States Army to take to wheels.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0047.xml
article
30
30
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
ELECTRIC EYE GUARDS AGAINST SUNBURN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SENSITIVE only to the particular kind of ultra-violet, or health, rays that have value in curing rickets and producing sun-tan, a new “electric eye” is the basis of a machine that automatically tells when a patient has had his daily dose of “sun rays” from a lamp.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0048.xml
article
30
30
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
PHOTO AND MESSAGE ON PHONOGRAPH POST CARD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a new way to send a greeting to a friend. Phonograph records on post cards have been made before, but now a German inventor has combined the record with a real photograph. The sender has his picture taken, records his voice on top of it, and the result is a personal record ready for the mail.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0049.xml
article
30
30
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
SULPHUR AIDS AND ENDS GROWTH OF ANIMALS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GROWTH of body cells throughout the animal kingdom is controlled by sulphur. This dramatic statement was made recently by Dr. Frederick S. Hammett, of the research institute of the Lankenau Hospital in Philadelphia, to the American Philosophical Society.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0050.xml
article
30
30
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
FIND UNEXPLODED BOMBS WITH TELEPHONE DEVICE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN Army men recently decided to dig a seaplane-towing channel at Langley Field, Va., along an area where planes had been conducting bombing practice for many years, they faced a novel hazard. The ground had been struck repeatedly by bombs that failed to go off, and these “duds” had buried themselves several feet in the earth.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0051.xml
article
31
31
Radio
[no value]
NO MEN IN RADIO OPERATED TANK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN THE future, monster implements of war may be controlled from a distance by the mere turning of a radio dial. A Japanese army officer, Major Nagayama, has invented a means of directing by radio the movements of a tank able to travel at a speed of five miles an hour.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0052.xml
article
31
31
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
PENCIL AND KNIFE ARE FITTED IN NEW DEVICE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A COMBINATION pencil and knife recently has been designed. The flattened top holds a penknife blade, while at the bottom is a pencil of the regulation mechanical type. A penknife is less likely to be lost when it forms part of a device that clips into the pocket.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0053.xml
article
31
31
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
VACUUM FURNACE BOOSTS OUTPUT OF URANIUM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
URANIUM, twice as heavy as lead and formerly one of the rarest of metals, is now available to scientists and experimenters at $400 a pound. Discovery of a way to extract the metal in a vacuum furnace made the new process possible. Dr. F. H. Driggs, research chemist of the Westinghouse Lamp and Manufacturing Company, declares. He recently exhibited plates and wires made of the rare metal. They were coated with a brownish color by the burning effect of the oxygen which is in the air, but when scratched they revealed the natural steelgray color of the metal.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0054.xml
article
31
31
Photography
[no value]
SOUNDPROOF CAMERA ROLLS ON WHEELS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SUITCASE shaped camera, containing all the apparatus necessary for taking sound pictures, now takes the place of the cumbersome soundproof camera booth formerly used. It rolls about the movie studio on a chassis with large rubber-tired wheels, suggesting those of a primitive type of automobile.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0055.xml
article
31
31
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
PREDICTS MOON FLIGHT IN HYDROGEN ROCKET
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT would a rocket-propelled ship, capable of flying to the moon, look like? A scientific vision of such a craft is outlined by Dr. John Q. Stewart, associate professor of astronomical physics at Princeton University. It would be a massive, hollow globe—the outside studded with rockets to propel it through space, the inside a chamber where men would breathe an artificial atmosphere supplied from tanks.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0056.xml
article
31
31
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
SERUMS FIGHT 20 NEW KINDS OF PNEUMONIA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWENTY new kinds of pneumonia have been discovered in the laboratories of the New York Department of Health, to add to the three varieties already known. The result, according to the director of laboratories, Dr. William H. Park, is that new serums already have been prepared for many kinds of pneumonia which hitherto resisted treatment.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0057.xml
article
32
32
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
1,300 FEET DEEP, IS DIVER’S GOAL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A QUARTER of a mile beneath the sea! That is the goal of William Beebe, noted explorer of the New York Zoological Society. From the portholes of a six-foot sphere of heavy metal, he will observe and photograph deep-sea life off Nonsuch Island, in the Atlantic Ocean near Bermuda, where he began studies last year (P. S. M., Mar. ’30, p. 49).
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0058.xml
article
32
32
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
FEVER MADE TO ORDER WITH RADIO WAVES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FEVERS made to order are the latest in medicine. A machine that gives a man a “radio bath,” and thus furnishes him a fever artificially, was demonstrated recently before the New England Physical Therapy Society. It was developed by General Electric Company engineers.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0059.xml
article
33
33
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
“IRON DOCTOR” USED TO CURE DIVER’S BENDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN “IRON DOCTOR” for divers who come up too suddenly has just been perfected by the British navy. The device is a pressure chamber in which compressed air simulates the weight of water under which divers work. At great depths gas from the air dissolves in divers’ blood.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0060.xml
article
33
33
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
GAS VICTIM SAVED BY AUTOMATIC MACHINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN EMERGENCY rescue device for restoring victims of gas poisoning, which can be carried about as easily as a suitcase and does the work of two first aid men has just been adopted by the fire department of Birmingham, England. It applies “artificial respiration,” or forced breathing, automatically.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0061.xml
article
33
33
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
THOUGHT EASIEST OF ALL WORK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
How much energy does it take to think? Recently Dr. Francis G. Benedict, nutrition expert of the Carnegie Institution, Washington, D. C., gave several subjects problems in mental arithmetic, and observed the amount of oxygen they used up in breathing—a measure of body energy.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0062.xml
article
33
33
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
SEEK METAL TEN TIMES STRONGER THAN STEEL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HUGE airships several times as large but no heavier than those now constructed, higher towering skyscrapers, and bridges three or four miles long may be built in the future if methods can be devised for making the atoms of metals cling together more tenaciously.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0063.xml
article
34
34
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
SUMMER DAYS AT WILL, WITH WEATHER MAKER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SUMMER days, autumn nights, or almost any seasonal atmosphere may now be created in the home with all the ease of turning on the radio. This is made possible by the recent invention of a “homemade weather” machine. The apparatus can either warm or cool the air in the house, give it a thorough washing, or subject it to a drying process.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0064.xml
article
34
34
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
THREE NEW WAYS TO FIND FLAWS IN WELDED STEEL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLAWS in welded structures and other steel pieces that are in actual use may now be detected on the spot by three testing methods, each of which was demonstrated recently at Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pa. The methods call into use three distinct scientific discoveries—the principle of electromagnetic induction, the physician’s stethoscope, and the X-ray.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0065.xml
article
34
34
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
GERMAN ROBOT STAMPS TURF BETTER THAN MEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOOTBALL fields, polo grounds, and areas of turf that require stamping need no longer present a labor problem if a new machine shown in Leipzig, Germany, is all that it is said to be. This novel “earth beater” does away entirely with the need for human effort.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0066.xml
article
34
34
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
COTTON HULL SUGAR IS SWEET, WON’T FATTEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SWEET that doesn’t fatten is the United States Bureau of Standards’ latest contribution to the sugar industry. The new sugar, known as “xylose,” sweetens food but is not assimilated by the body. Through a new process, it may be produced for little more than five cents a pound, the actual cost of extraction.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0067.xml
article
34
34
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
TWO-EYED MICROSCOPE SPOTS FALSE PEARLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAPID and unerring examination of pearls is now performed with a “pearlometer,” an instrument devised by an Austrian inventor. It consists of a huge binocular (doubleeyed) microscope equipped with an unusually powerful light apparatus for laying bare the innermost heart of a pearl.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0068.xml
article
35
35,115
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Sugar Will Give You Endurance
Colgate University tests offer startling proof of man's dependence on sweet.
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES W. BOOTH
IS OLD MAN PAR too much for your golf game? Are you too slow on the trigger when the traffic lights change from green to red? If so, the chances are that you don’t eat enough sugar. The man who makes a hole in four while his opponent takes five or six, does so because of a well-balanced coordination of mind and muscle.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0069.xml
article
36
36,37,38,114
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Bowlus Teaches Me How to Glide
Twenty years in airplanes failed to give a veteran pilot the thrill he got when a sailplane carried him on the wings of the wind.
[no value]
[no value]
ASSEN JORDANOFF
"THERE’S where we'll hop off,” Hawley Bowlus told me. He pointed to the top of a 165foot ridge. It lay between the pounding Atlantic and the gray waters of Long Island Sound. We were near Montauk Point at the eastern tip of Long Island. I was about to make my first flight in a soaring plane, in the ship that Lindbergh flew and which POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY had bought for me to fly.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0070.xml
article
39
39,40,118
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
What Europe Can Teach Us About Patents
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD THOMAS
THE United States has lost its world leadership in inventive progress. This, at least, is the conclusion one is bound to reach through a study of United States Patent Office statistics and a comparison of these figures with those of foreign countries.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0071.xml
article
41
41
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
MAN-MADE LIGHTNING GETS POWER FACTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE man controls the power of a million volts, in the new high-tension testing laboratory just opened by the Metropolitan-Vickers Electrical Company at Manchester, England. A touch of his fingers releases a blinding inferno of electric flame from great copper balls suspended in the testing room.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0072.xml
article
42
42
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
STEEL HOUSES IN FRANCE HAVE METAL FURNITURE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GERMANY, England, and France are hotly contesting the leadership in the movement for the ultra-modern in architecture. So far Germany rather leads the race, but the steel houses, now being erected outside of Paris, are evidence that French architects are making a strong bid for first place.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0073.xml
article
42
42
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
NEW EYEGLASSES GO INSIDE THE LIDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COMFORT and better eyesight are claimed by the inventor for those who wear lenses inside the eyelids instead of in the usual “outside” spectacles. The new glasses, devised by a German oculist, are an adaptation of the thin glass shells sometimes used to protect the cornea in cases of inflammation.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0074.xml
article
42
42
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
STUDY CELL WHIRLING UNDER MICROSCOPE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT happens to a living cell of animal or vegetable matter when it is whirled at from 2,000 to 3,000 revolutions a minute can now be seen through a microscope. The apparatus that makes it possible is the invention of Prof. E. Newton Harvey, of Princeton University, and Alfred L. Loomis, bankerscientist of Tuxedo Park, N. Y. Biologists are interested to know the structure of a cell, its toughness, and the relative density of its parts.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0075.xml
article
42
42
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
TROLLEY CARS NOW RUN 60 MILES AN HOUR
Heating and Ventilating
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TROLLEY transportation entered the competition always going on among high speed passenger vehicles when twelve new street cars, capable of sixty miles an hour, were added recently to the West Penn System in the Allegheny Valley. The cars are so designed that their highest operating efficiency is better than forty miles an hour.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0076.xml
article
42
42
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
MINERAL WATERS USED TO CURE SNAKE BITE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SNAKE bites, diphtheria toxin, lockjaw, and mushroom poisoning may all be combated by hypodermic injections of various spring waters, according to Dr. Gustave Monod of the famous mineral spring resort at Vichy, France. In a recent report to the Hunterian Society in London, Dr. Monod outlined discoveries made by the late Professor G. Billard of the Clermont Ferrand medical school, France.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0077.xml
article
42
42
Engineering
[no value]
LONGEST TUNNEL IN EAST TAPS JAPAN’S OIL FIELD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHIMIZU TUNNEL, longest in the Orient and seventh longest in the world, drilled through the mountains of western Japan, is nearing completion. The tunnel, 31,831 feet or slightly more than six miles long, is more than 2,000 feet above sea level for its entire length, and cost $6,000,000.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0078.xml
article
43
43
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
SWINGING STAGE USED TO MAKE GIANT MAP
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOUNTAINS, canyons, and plains of the United States are seen in startling prominence on a huge relief map rapidly taking shape at the Babson Institute, Wellesley, Mass. It is said to be the largest of its kind. From the Atlantic to the Pacific coast, the map measures sixty-three feet.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0079.xml
article
43
43
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
400-POUND WEIGHT TESTS WELDED RAIL JOINTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE strength of welded joints in trolley tracks gets a gruelling test at the United States Bureau of Standards, at Washington, D. C. A section of rail, held between two anvil-like supports, is rapped by a mighty 400-pound hammer once a second for as long as the rail will take the punishment.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0080.xml
article
43
43
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
NECKTIES OF RUBBER LOOK LIKE SILK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NECKTIES of rubber are a novelty in France where they are declared to be attractive and practical. Sheets and threads of rubber are woven together in the French process, making a material resembling either silk or cotton at will. Any color scheme may be used upon the rubber ties, which are made both in bow and four-in-hand shapes.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0081.xml
article
43
43
Engineering
[no value]
TWO-WAY PHONE SERVICE INSTALLED ON TRAINS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON A crack express train of the Canadian National Railways, speeding at more than a mile a minute, a passenger talked by telephone with London the other day. The occasion was the inauguration of two-way telephone service from moving trains as a standard part of the railroad’s equipment.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0082.xml
article
43
43
Engineering
[no value]
ENGLAND DIGS BIGGEST UNDERWATER TUNNEL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE million tons of rock are to be excavated in drilling a colossal vehicular tunnel now in the process of construction beneath the Mersey River in England. The tunnel will connect Liverpool with its companion city of Birkenhead on the opposite bank.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0083.xml
article
44
44
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
FIRST PICTURES OF PASTEUR INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EACH day 8,000 tubes of vaccine and 12,000 tubes of serum leave one of the greatest centers of preventive medicine in the world—the Pasteur Institute, in Paris. It was founded by national subscription nearly fifty years ago as a laboratory for the great French chemist, Louis Pasteur, father of bacteriology.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0084.xml
article
45
45
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Heart of Far North Seen in Rare Photos
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0085.xml
article
46
46
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
CLEAN RAILWAY CAR IN HUGE KETTLE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GIGANTIC cylindrical caldron that fills with gas and holds a railway car inside it is the remarkable expedient used by the German Federal Railway to kill bacteria and vermin. After a car has been in service for a certain number of miles, it is brought to this fumigating plant.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0086.xml
article
46
46
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
SITS IN A CABINET FOR SOUNDPROOF TESTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BECAUSE his clothing might deaden the sounds of voices just a little, an engineer at the United States Bureau of Standards’ new sound laboratory sits in a box. The laboratory is a miniature theater, where the acoustics of “talking movie” installations may be tested.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0087.xml
article
46
46
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
HELIUM KEEPS FOODS FRESH FOR MONTHS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most remarkable of chemical elements is helium, the inert gas used to fill balloons and dirigibles. Although most people think of it in that connection, it has various other extraordinary uses. If a man with a deep “basso” voice should fill his lungs with helium, for instance, his voice would change to a high tenor.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0088.xml
article
46
46
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
ELECTRIC LAWS UPSET BY STRONGEST MAGNET
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE world’s most powerful magnet has just upset classical ideas of the way electricity runs through wires. So the Russian engineer who built it, P. L. Kapitza, recently reported, in describing the researches he had made at Cambridge, England.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0089.xml
article
47
47
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
BEEHIVES OR BATHTUBS FROM PALMETTO ROOTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BEEHIVES, bathtubs, and garden furniture are now made from roots of the palmetto tree, a small palm of the southern United States. By grinding the palmetto roots and mixing them with cement of a special formula C. P. Wilhelm, of Punta Gorda, Florida, produces an extraordinary material which is said to be as light and as tough as wood, impervious to water, and as enduring as concrete.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0090.xml
article
47
47
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
PROCESS FOUND TO CAN NEW IRISH POTATOES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW potatoes can be served all the year round, through a canning process put into use a short time ago at a plant in Florida. Sweet potatoes have been put up in cans for some years, but the ordinary “spud” has never been canned on a commercial scale.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0091.xml
article
47
47
Radio
[no value]
RADIO SPEEDS UP PLANT GROWTH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GARDENERS of the coming era may possibly rely on a novel variety of fertilizer—radio waves. Successful cultivation of certain vegetables in one half the time ordinarily required through stimulation by radio has been reported by a German physicist, Dr. Fritz Hildebrandt.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0092.xml
article
47
47
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
NEW WELDING GAS MADE BY ELECTRICITY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW gas called “electrolene,” produced in a special electric machine, takes the place of hydrogen gas for welding torches and brazing furnaces. Made from steam and city gas, it costs only one tenth as much as hydrogen. The machine that generates the new gas, developed by the General Electric Company, looks like a cylindrical boiler.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0093.xml
article
48
48
Photography
[no value]
MAKE TALKING MOVIE OF LATEST ECLIPSE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“TALKING MOVIES” recorded the latest total eclipse of the sun from an Army airplane over Claremont Field, Calif. Never before had this been done. The definite scientific object of the feat was to determine, more accurately than could be done with stop watches, the exact moment of each phase of the eclipse.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0094.xml
article
48
48
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
MECHANICAL BAND MAY OUST ARMY MUSICIANS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. TRUBEE DAVISON, Acting Secretary of War, recently authorized the Quartermaster General to procure for a service test “one mechanical substitute for an Army band.” The “mechanical substitute” is a three-quarter-ton truck which carries a phonograph and powerful amplifiers, developed by the Radio Corporation of America.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0095.xml
article
48
48
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
LIFEBOAT WITH DIESEL ENGINE DEFIES PANIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DIESEL or oil-burning motor, in a waterproof compartment, drives the latest “unsinkable” lifeboat. The new type of life-saving craft has been installed on the speedy transatlantic liner Bremen. In a recent demonstration at a Brooklyn, N. Y., pier, 148 persons piled into one of the boats and it was lowered to the water. Then the occupants staged a mock panic, crowding first at the fore end and then at the stern, as excited victims of a sea disaster might conceivably do.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0096.xml
article
48
48
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
TENDERNESS OF MEAT GETS ACCURATE TEST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
How tough is a piece of meat? One of the first instruments ever devised to test it accurately was recently installed at the United States Bureau of Standards, at Washington, D. C. A metal disk mounted on a board between a blunt knife and a crank handle, and attached by chains to both, records the force needed to draw the knife through a sample of meat by turning the crank handle.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0097.xml
article
49
49
Aviation
[no value]
ARMY PLANE SENDS MAP BY RADIO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Two “enemy” submarines, approaching the Golden Gate apparently with the intention of destroying ships in San Francisco harbor, were sighted the other day by an Army transport plane. Five minutes later, Army men at Sacramento, eighty miles away, held in their hands a brown-and-white map revealing the submarine’s position and bearing a recommendation that an air bomber be sent after the subs.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0098.xml
article
49
49
Aviation
[no value]
AMPHIBIANS CLIMB BUTTON LANDING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN “AQUATIC BUTTON,” a sort of miniature seadrome shaped like a saucer cut in half and inverted, serves as a landing field for amphibian airplanes on the busy San Francisco water front. The device is a semicircular stage 100 feet in diameter, with sloping edges submerged.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0099.xml
article
50
50
Aviation
[no value]
DEVICES FOR FLYERS INVENTED BY STUDENTS WHO CAN’T FLY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE test of a student’s flying knowledge is his ability to build aviation instruments. So embryo pilots of the Boeing school of aeronautics, at Oakland, Calif., have constructed the devices pictured above while they are learning to fly on the ground.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0100.xml
article
50
50
Aviation
[no value]
PLANE FLIES MAIL FROM PARIS TO BUENOS AIRES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE first transatlantic mail by airplane arrived in Brazil recently. It was brought by Jean Mermoz, French pilot, and two companions, who made the 2,000mile water jump from Africa to South America in a seaplane flight of twenty hours. The flight was authorized by the French government as a test of the practicability of sending mail by plane, after Mermoz had proved his ability to land his plane on rough seas.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0101.xml
article
51
51
Aviation
[no value]
FALLING LEAF STUNT IS DONE UPSIDE DOWN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIKE a playing card falling from a skyscraper, Lieut. Alford j. Williams, crack naval pilot, fluttered to earth in an upside down plane the other day at Washington, D. C. Thus he performed a maneuver called the “inverted falling leaf,” never tried before because it had been declared impossible to escape from it alive.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0102.xml
article
51
51
Aviation
[no value]
GLIDER, WITHOUT WINGS. SOARS ON FUSELAGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LESTER N. YOHE, college freshman and member of the Penn State Glider Club, at State College, Pa., set out to design a glider that would soar forward more than the conventional twenty feet while dropping one foot in the air. He built a model with a fuselage of concave bottom.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0103.xml
article
51
51
Aviation
[no value]
CRUDE OIL SMOKE GIVES PILOTS WIND DIRECTION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMOKE tells pilots the direction of the wind in a new invention for airports, which replaces the usual cone of fabric that swings from a pole. Burning crude oil, this new smoke pot can be run for only thirty cents daily. Installed in the center of the air field, the stream of white smoke it pours out is visible two thousand feet in the air, revealing the wind direction and aiding pilots in landing.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0104.xml
article
51
51
Aviation
[no value]
120 TO FLY IN GIANT PLANE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Now being designed in the Rumpler factory, at Berlin, is the largest airplane in the world. It will have a wing spread of 289 feet, or more than the length of a city block, and it will be 160 feet long. Called a “flying wing,” because passengers are carried within the hollow wings instead of in a fuselage, it will have a cruising radius of approximately 5,000 miles with a full passenger load of 120 persons aboard, and can carry a pay load of twenty-one tons.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0105.xml
article
52
52
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
How Engineers Crowned World’s Tallest Building
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASLENDER spire of rustless steel tops the 1,046-foot Chrysler Building, in New York City, which officially opened a few weeks ago. Many of those who see the shaft gleaming in the sunlight wonder how it was placed at the summit of the world’s tallest building.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0106.xml
article
53
53,54,55,116
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
The Talking Newspaper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MICHEL MOK
SIX o’clock of a stormy spring evening. Fire breaks out in the Ohio State Penitentiary at Columbus. Five thousand men fight for their lives behind melting prison bars. Three hundred and seventeen are killed in their cells by flames and suffocation.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0107.xml
article
56
56,57,108,109
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Splicing a Cable in Mid-Atlantic
NINE TENTHS OF BODY IS NEW EVERY 21 DAYS
[no value]
[no value]
BURT M. McCONNELL
TORN and twisted, an ocean cable last winter lay buried under a layer of clay two miles beneath the graygreen, foam-capped waves of the Atlantic, three hundred miles east of Halifax. It was shattered by the terrific earthquake that shook the Atlantic seaboard for a distance of 1,000 miles and put out of commission about half of the underwater communications between the United States and Europe.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0108.xml
article
58
58
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Universe Whirls on Plaster Sky
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICA’S only planetarium, a million-dollar project, was opened recently on an artificial island in Lake Michigan just outside Chicago. A planetarium is a building in which points of light, representing stars and planets, are projected against a dome by means of illuminated stereoptican slides to show spectators the movements of the heavenly bodies.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0109.xml
article
59
59
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
[no value]
NEW YORK HAS THE ONLY SCHOOL FOR STONE CUTTERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A STONE-CUTTING school, said to be the only one of its kind in the country, is supported by prominent society people in the famous artisans’ center of Greenwich Village, New York City, for instructing talented children. Like young apprentices in the care of the sculptors who carved the stonework of the great medieval cathedrals, these ambitious children receive routine drill in the technical mysteries of sculpturing stone.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0110.xml
article
59
59
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
[no value]
BITTER MEDICINES HIDDEN IN FOOD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SWALLOWING bitter medicines may be made less unpleasant by taking them in the guise of sea foods and other dishes, suggests Dr. Rene Loubatie, of Bordeaux, France. As an example he cites the inoculation of oysters with iodine, the chemical element that is vital to the activity of the thyroid gland.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0111.xml
article
59
59
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
[no value]
SIPPED BOOZE GIVES A SWIFTER KICK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXPERIMENTS have convinced a Spanish physician that wines and other liquors give a greater “jag” when sipped slowly. Dr. Jose Calleyaz, of Madrid, searching for the best way of giving stimulants to patients in a state of collapse, found that if he administered the alcohol drop by drop into the patient’s mouth, he got prompt effects.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0112.xml
article
60
60,61
Models
[no value]
Historic Scenes Shown in Fine Models
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
News and events of long ago re-created in miniature by master craftsmen for Museum of the City of New York. Details, faithfully reproduced, give clear vision of the days of long ago.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0113.xml
article
62
62
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
MASTS PLAY BIG PART IN AMERICA’S EFFORT TO DEFEND YACHT CUP
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN builders were called upon to fit America’s four cup defender yachts with taller masts than ever seen before, they solved a problem unique in marine design. These boats, of which the fleetest one will defend the famous America’s cup against Sir Thomas Lipton's Shamrock V next September, will all have spars more than 160 feet high (P. S. M., July ’30, p. 61).
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0114.xml
article
62
62
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
36-FOOT PRESS MAKES TRUCK FRAMES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Six men, each six feet tall, standing on top of each other would only just reach from the floor to the top of a gigantic press recently completed at a mid-western plant for stamping the frames of auto trucks. The slightest turn of the huge wheels that work the mechanical monster causes a pressure of 3,500,000 pounds, the weight of a large freight locomotive, to be exerted at the bottom.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0115.xml
article
62
62
Radio
[no value]
RADIO MAKES STATE ONE POLICE STATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOON the State of Michigan will open a high-power radio station to help police catch crooks. Authority for the 5,000-watt installation at Lansing, Mich., has just been granted by the Federal Radio Commission. State patrol automobiles carrying radios will be able to pick up the station from any point in the state.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0116.xml
article
63
63
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
PLANETS ON UMBRELLA MAKE ASTRONOMY EASY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW invention for amateur astronomers is said to make self-instruction in the secrets of the skies easy and absorbing. It is a homemade planetarium, which reproduces in miniature the dome of the heavens, showing the planets and constellations mapped out in their proper positions.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0117.xml
article
63
63
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
5,500 THEATERS WILL SHOW TALKING FILMS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
How far talking movies have swept silent pictures from the screen is revealed in figures recently given the Society of Motion Picture Engineers. They show that at least 5,500 theaters—three fourths of all the motion picture theaters in the country—will be wired for sound reels by the end of 1930.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0118.xml
article
63
63
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
USES PERISCOPE IN SKETCHING FISH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE haunts of the marine underworld are an open book to Dorothy Beck, an amateur artist from Livermore, California, who is sketching as many scenes of sea life as possible during her round-the-world trip. She has merely to place her big wooden periscope in the water in order to bring before her eyes a moving picture of activities of marine life.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0119.xml
article
63
63
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
HAILSTONES LAST A YEAR
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAILSTONES that did a million dollars’ damage in Moundsville, W. Va., a year ago last March, are still in existence. A dozen of them may be seen today in the ice cream cooler of a Moundsville store. Placed there after the storm, they have been kept by electric refrigeration as large and firm as when they fell.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0120.xml
article
63
63
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
CAP AND MASK IN ONE PROTECTS DIVER’S EYES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BATHING fashions in the course of centuries have seen many novelties, but it remained for a Los Angeles, Calif., designer to think of this new headgear, which is a combination cap and face mask in one. When the first wearer recently appeared on the Los Angeles beach, the startling, round eyeholes of the mask might have suggested to a fanciful observer the appearance of a feminine Martian or a lady robot.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0121.xml
article
64
64,65
Fifteen New Ideas for Housewife
[no value]
Fifteen New Ideas for Housewife
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0122.xml
article
66
66
Editorials
[no value]
Editorials
We Take You Behind the Scenes
Ninth Planet Is Now Pluto
Much Talk Suits the Senate
A New Angle on Television
A Gallant Airman Passes
Heating Homes with Gas
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO articles in this issue are so clearly illustrative of our method of gathering news and facts for you that we cannot resist pointing out the story behind them. Some time ago we suggested to Assen Jordanoff that he write for us a comparison of flying in gliders and in power airplanes.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0123.xml
article
67
67
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
eadphones for Modern Sets
Reception late at night calls for silence, and headphones come into their own. With most sets loudspeakers can be disconnected and earpiece attachment made at binding posts. Hook-up when you can’t reach voice coil.
[no value]
[no value]
ALFRED P. LANE
IN THE early days of radio there were few loudspeakers and no good ones. Everybody listened with the aid of headphones, and illustrations of the newest sets of that period usually pictured several people attached to the receivers by headphones.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0124.xml
article
68
68
HELPFUL HINTS FOR RADIO FANS
[no value]
Keep Voltage Even in Your Set
Changing Current Gives Bad Reception and May Ruin Tubes. Temporary Repairs of Audio Transformer
TRANSFORMER REPAIRS
SHORT CIRCUIT TESTS
A B C’s of Radio
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE electric light current supply in this country, from which electric radio sets draw their power, is nominally rated at 110 volts. This is the standard electrical pressure the power companies try to maintain. Unfortunately, however, the actual voltage at the wall plug to which you connect the radio set is practically never exactly 110 volts.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0125.xml
article
69
69
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Don’t Buy Radio Tubes by Looks
Shiny Outside Means Little—What Counts Is Durability of Electron Producing Filament
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN CARR
WHEN you go to buy a vacuum tube the chances are you tell the clerk the kind of tube you want. He picks one off the shelf, unwraps it, and sticks it in the socket of the test outfit. After the tube lights up he turns various switches and presses some buttons with the result that the pointers on the dials of the test set wriggle back and forth.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0126.xml
article
70
70
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Gus and Joe Are Real Live Men
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
MANY readers of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY have asked me if Gus Wilson is a real, live man and if the Model Garage actually exists. The answer to both questions is yes. The Model Garage is located in a town not far from New York City. It is owned and operated by two men whom I have named in my stories Gus Wilson and Joe Clark.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0127.xml
article
70
70
[no value]
[no value]
$150.00 in Prizes for Letters about Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
I HAVE been wondering for some time just how much you, the readers of POPULAR SCIENCE Monthly, actually know about what goes on under the hood of an automobile; whether you choose your cars by the looks of a fancy paint job or a stylish body, or whether you pry into the innards of the car to judge the merits of the machinery that makes it go.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0128.xml
article
71
71,72,73
POPULAR SCIENCE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
How to Put a Ship in a Bottle
Making a full-rigged model that folds so as to enter the neck
$100 IN PRIZES
[no value]
[no value]
E. ARMITAGE McCANN
"HOW did it get there?” is the question always asked when a ship model in a bottle such as shown in Figs. 2 and 3 is placed on exhibition. You will observe the curious minded examining the bottom of the bottle to see where it was cut to admit the ship, or they will even inquire if the bottle was blown around the ship.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0129.xml
article
74
74,75
Woodworking
[no value]
Machine Sawing from on Top
An expert’s impressions of a new type machine, and a built-in Colonial corner closet design
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM W. KLENKE
HAVE we been doing our machine sawing upside down? I wonder—and so will you before you finish reading this article. Let’s review for a moment a previous article on “Mastering the Use of a Circular Saw” (P. S. M., Nov. ’29, p. 88). Note how all the cutting is done from the underside.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0130.xml
article
75
75
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
TESTING YOUR FUND OF WORKSHOP FACTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW many of the fundamental facts concerning house repairs, finishing, painting, lathe work, and general wood and metal working have you at your finger tips? The multiple choice questions below are designed to test your knowledge of a few of the handy man’s A B C’s.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0131.xml
article
76
76,78
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Packing-Case Camp Furniture
BILL OF MATERIALS
[no value]
[no value]
HERMAN HJORTH
BEFORE out on Rear his great Admiral adventure Byrd started to the South Pole, he had, with his characteristic foresight, provided plans not only for his camp buildings, but also for the furniture they were to contain. Now that the camping season is upon us, it behooves us likewise to plan in advance so that our vacation at the summer camp or cottage—be it by the sea or mountain lakes—will be pleasant and comfortable.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0132.xml
advertisement
77
77
[no value]
[no value]
RCA RADIOTRON CO., Inc.
[no value]
RCA RADIOTRON CO., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0133.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0134.xml
article
80
80,82
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Pointers on Punching and Drilling Sheet Metal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
ABOUT the simplest of all shop operations is that of putting a round hole through sheet metal. You have your choice of punching it or drilling it. And yet again—it may not be quite so easy. Presses have a habit of being tied up when you need them for smaller jobs; and for each size of punched hole, there must be a punch and a die.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0135.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT COMPANY
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0136.xml
advertisement
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0137.xml
article
84
84
Hints for Men Who Work on Cars
[no value]
Axle wedge stops shimmying. Rim spreader is easy to make. Door locks to guard children.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHIMMYING are due to a slight and hard inaccuracy steering in often the setting of the king-pin angles. If the king-pins are too nearly vertical, or the king-pins actually lean forward instead of backward, the wheels will not have the proper tendency to straighten out by themselves after rounding a curve.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0138.xml
article
84
84
Hints for Men Who Work on Cars
[no value]
REPAIRING BRAKES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF, THROUGH wear or an accident, one of the connecting lines to a hydraulic brake leaks or is broken off, no pressure can be applied to the other brakes. Under such conditions, the temporary repair shown in Figure 2 will render the three remaining brakes operative.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0139.xml
article
84
84
Hints for Men Who Work on Cars
[no value]
RIM SPREADER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE device shown in Figure 3 will prove serviceable in mounting tires on rims of various sizes. It consists, as shown, of a wooden platform in which three rings of holes are bored part way through. Four-foot lengths of iron pipe are strung together with a wire through holes in the pipe as shown and the top disk is notched to support the other ends of the pipes.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0140.xml
article
84
84
Hints for Men Who Work on Cars
[no value]
UNMATCHED DOORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT IS customary to make the doors of equal width on the ordinary twelve by eighteen foot home garage. With doors of this width it is necessary to open first one door and then go back and open the other one. If one door is made extra wide and the other narrow, as in Figure 4, time is saved because the narrow door can be pushed all the way open even in a strong wind, while a hold is still retained on the other.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0141.xml
article
84
84
Hints for Men Who Work on Cars
[no value]
TWO LOCKS FOR DOORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN children are carried in the back seats of cars fitted with four doors there is always a chance that one of the children may pull open the latch of one of the rear doors and fall out. Figure 5 shows two ways to prevent this trouble. The view at the lower left shows a strap arranged to hold the door latch in a closed position.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0142.xml
article
85
85
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
New Hinges Require No Mortises
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DAVID WEBSTER
MANY amateur mechanics have learned by experience the difficulty of hanging doors, especially large ones, with ordinary butt hinges, because of the accuracy with which the hinge mortises must be marked and cut. Hinges are now available which have much the same appearance as regulation butts and yet require no mortising; they are therefore very easy to apply.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0143.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.: “YANKEE"
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
“YANKEE"
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0144.xml
article
86
86
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
A Rustic Rock Pool for Your Garden
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EMANUEL E. ERICSON
NO MATTER how small a garden may be, there is always room for a rock pool. Properly planned and set in a background of wellchosen plants, it is a source of joy to the owner and of admiration to his friends. Pools may be round, elliptical, kidney shaped, or made to fit the contour around large boulders or trees.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0145.xml
article
87
87
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
HOME WORKSHOP CHEMISTRY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. BADE
WITH ordinary ink and a pen it is possible to write distinctly on glass. One advantage of this process is that the ink, being very dark, stands out strongly against the transparent glass. Sometimes the ink will take on unprepared glass without blurring, and this is especially true if the glass has been rubbed with the fingers or if it has been covered with a little saliva and allowed to dry.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0146.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Palmolive
[no value]
Palmolive
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0147.xml
article
88
88
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Close-Limit Gaging on Milling Machines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. J. WILHELM
EVERY machinist and toolmaker knows that the graduations on the feed screw dials of ordinary milling machines and boring mills cannot be depended upon for the close limits desired on such work as boring jigs. If, however, the machine is in fairly good condition, it is neither difficult nor expensive to rig up an arrangement whereby the dimensions can be held as close as humanly possible, which is about plus or minus .0001 or .0002 in., provided the preliminary drilling and boring operations are done with the utmost care.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0148.xml
article
88
88
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
EASILY MADE CONTAINER FOR BLUEPRINT PAPER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE problem of storing small quantities of sensitized blueprint paper becomes an easy one when you provide yourself with a suitable tube container similar to the one to be described. The tube portion of the container can be made from a piece of paper tubing such as furniture and rug companies use in rolling rugs for shipment.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0149.xml
article
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
Old Bill Says—
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ANGLE plate gripped in a vise will serve as an excellent surface plate for small work. Always drill and ream a hole at one setting, if it is possible. Remove as much metal as you can with a drill and a power hack saw before placing the work in the miller.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0150.xml
article
89
89
Craftwork
[no value]
A Fairy-Tale Chair Amuses Children
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DON HOUSEWORTH
REPRESENTING the little white house with the green shutters where the three bears lived and the scene of the familiar fairy tale, the chair illustrated forms both an attractive and durable piece of furniture for either the nursery, playroom, or child’s bedroom.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0151.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
THE CASEIN MANUFACTURING COMPANY: CASCO GLUE
[no value]
THE CASEIN MANUFACTURING COMPANY
CASCO GLUE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0152.xml
article
90
90
Models
[no value]
True-Pitch Propellers for Model Airplanes
You do not have to be an expert to design and make
[no value]
[no value]
EDWIN T. HAMILTON
FEW model builders, if I may venture an opinion, have mastered the art of designing and cutting truepitch propellers. On recent inquiry, I find that this is due to a mistaken belief that no one but an aeronautical engineer can understand propeller mathematics.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0153.xml
article
91
91
Models
[no value]
Whittling a Bowlus Sailplane Model
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DONALD W. CLARK
BECAUSE of the keen interest displayed everywhere in the sport of gliding, a Bowlus sailplane has been chosen for the subject of the fifth article in the present series on constructing simple, nonflying models of modern planes. There are so few parts that the model should not be difficult for anyone to make, yet when neatly finished and carefully painted, it will be a unique and worthy addition to the models previously described (see P. S. M., Apr. ’30, p. 110; May ’30, p. 124; June ’30, p. 95; July ’30, p. 76).
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0154.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & Company
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0155.xml
article
92
92
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Easy-to-Build Garden Trellises
Ten Suggested Designs That You Can Construct Easily at Trifling Expense
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE VAN WALTHER
BY USING the ten ornamental trellis designs shown as a basis for construction, the home worker should encounter little difficulty in supplying his garden with a variety of fences, screens, and attractive supports for climbing vines, flowers, and shrubs.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0156.xml
article
93
93,94,95
THE SHIPSHAPE HOME
[no value]
Hints on Making Many Varieties of Shelving
What is the best way to construct a bookcase?
How may doors for a bookcase or other shelving be built?
What are some simple methods for constructing adjustable shelves?
When shelves of the skeleton type are required, how may they be built?
How may hanging shelves be made and hung?
How are shelves finished?
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. K
TO CONSTRUCT the best type of shelving for any special purpose, the handy man must be familiar with a wide variety of designs. Suggestions are therefore given in this article for building a bookcase of a superior type, with or without doors, and for making adjustable, skeleton, and hanging shelves.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0157.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
COLGATE
[no value]
COLGATE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0158.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0159.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTOR COMPANY
[no value]
HARLEY DAVIDSON MOTOR COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0160.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY: PLASTIC WOOD
[no value]
ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY
PLASTIC WOOD
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0161.xml
article
96
96,97
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
There’s an Air Mattress Hidden in This Sleeping Bag
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. C. NODERER
SUCCESS and pleasure in camping depend upon carrying the largest amount of comfort in the smallest and lightest bundle. That is why the sleeping equipment presents one of the most stubborn problems. Ordinarily, it is necessary either to take a cumbersome outfit which includes a folding bed, mattress, bedding, and tent or to go to the other extreme and sleep on the hard ground, unprotected from the elements.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0162.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0163.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
DETROIT AIRCRAFT
[no value]
DETROIT AIRCRAFT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0164.xml
article
98
98
Craftwork
[no value]
Brain-Teasing Block Puzzles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ERIC B. ROBERTS
HERE are two more block-puzzle teasers. They can be made in two sizes, the parts being either ½ or ¾ in. wide and of any desired thickness. In cutting the letter-A puzzle from wood, you will need a miter box marked in degrees, because the cuts must be accurate.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0165.xml
article
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ON WORKSHOP FACTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BELOW are given the correct answers to the home workshop questions given on page 75. The wrong word or terms have been left out in each sentence. 1. The teeth on a crosscut saw are beveled. 2. Direct current should be used in plating and similar electrochemical reactions.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0166.xml
article
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
CLEANING RAZOR STROPS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES H. LIEB
WHEN the grain of your razor strop has become “filled” with oil, dirt, and the wear of steel blades, and will no longer give the service for which it was intended, it can be renovated at no cost whatever and within two minutes’ time. Turn the fine edge of an old blade by drawing it, under pressure and at about a 45° angle, across a bottle-neck.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0167.xml
article
99
99
Models
[no value]
$100 in Prizes for Bottle Models
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO ENCOURAGE a friendly competition among model makers, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY will give $100 in cash prizes for the six best ship models built in bottles according to the general method described by Captain McCann. The awards will be as follows:
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0168.xml
article
99
99
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
DRYING TACKY PAINT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS TO what to do when the paint is still tacky at the time of repainting— in some cases a mixture of three fourths turpentine and one fourth drier will dry up the sticky paint. In other cases, a coat of aluminum paint will serve.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0169.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0170.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
The Russell Jennings Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Russell Jennings Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0171.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
CROSMAN ARMS CO.
[no value]
CROSMAN ARMS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0172.xml
article
100
100,101
Automobiles
[no value]
Auto-Camping Trailer Built for Less Than $25
Materials for Trailer
[no value]
[no value]
HALVOR ANDERSON
DOES it pay to build your own trailer? That is the question I asked myself—and the answer is the trailer illustrated, which cost $23.30. My object was to build it both substantially and economically. The angle iron for the framework and the curved brace on the front were obtained from an old iron cot.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0173.xml
article
101
101
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
REMOVING OLD FINISH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE CURREN
IN REMOVING varnish or other finishes after they have been softened with a commercial remover, a liberal supply of sawdust may be used to soak up the old finish instead of rags or excelsior. After most of the finish has been removed, the surface is brushed briskly with an old whisk broom or coarse brush to clear away the dried particles from the work.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0174.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0175.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON CO., INC.
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON CO., INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0176.xml
article
102
102
Craftwork
[no value]
Providing Your Hunting Knife with a D urable Sheath
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. CLARKE HUGHES
EVERY hunting knife deserves a good sheath, whether it is a homemade knife, such as was described in a previous issue (P. S. M., July ’30, p. 116), or a commercial knife, the sheath of which has been lost or worn out. It is not difficult to make a durable and neat looking sheath from three small pieces of good grade sole leather and a few split rivets.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0177.xml
article
103
103
Woodworking
[no value]
BLUEPRINTS FOR YOUR HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO ASSIST you in your home workshop, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY offers large blueprints containing working drawings of a number of well-tested projects. Each subject can be obtained for 25 cents with the exception of certain designs that require two or three sheets of blueprints and are accordingly 50 or 75 cents as noted below.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0178.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0179.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Outboard Motors Corporation: EVINRUDE
[no value]
Outboard Motors Corporation
EVINRUDE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0180.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0181.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Outboard Motors Corporation: FOLD-LIGHT
[no value]
Outboard Motors Corporation
FOLD-LIGHT
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0182.xml
article
104
104,105
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Making a Gym for Boys
Swing, horizontal and parallel bars, rings, and trapeze in one combination
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. KING
WITH its five varieties of apparatus, this easily constructed combination forms a complete gym for children up to twelve years of age. The horizontal bar, trapeze, and rings can be adjusted to suit the skill and experience of each young athlete.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0183.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0184.xml
article
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
When You Do Outside Painting
These Six Practical Hints by BERTON ELLIOT Will Insure a Durable, Good-Looking Finish
[no value]
[no value]
BERTON ELLIOT
UNLESS paint is properly mixed before it is used, it cannot be expected to give good results. Stirring round and round in the manner shown at the left will not mix paint thoroughly, and attempting to stir a full can will generally result in the spilling over of a good deal of the oil.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0185.xml
article
107
107
Woodworking
[no value]
FOLDING DRYING RACK FOR USE INDOORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES B. BARR
A CONVENIENT folding rack for drying a few small articles indoors can be made as illustrated in the accompanying photographs from stock wooden dowels, a piece of webbing, six large screw eyes, and two rivets. The stand opens up scissors-fashion and is intended to stand in the bathtub.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0186.xml
article
107
107
For the Home Owner
[no value]
SOLDERING LEAKY PANS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BEFORE attempting to repair a small leak in a pan or kettle, rub the spot around the hole inside the dish with emery cloth or other abrasive until bright. Place the hot copper under the hole to heat the metal. Rub the upper side with flux, then apply a drop of solder.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0187.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
RCA INSTITUTES, INC.
[no value]
RCA INSTITUTES, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0188.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Creo-Dipt Co., Inc.
[no value]
Creo-Dipt Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0189.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Chicago Technical College
[no value]
Chicago Technical College
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0190.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
ENGINEER DOBE
[no value]
ENGINEER DOBE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0191.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
Franklin Institute
[no value]
Franklin Institute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0192.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
BLISS ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
BLISS ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0193.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
LaSalle Extension University
[no value]
LaSalle Extension University
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0194.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
NATIONAL ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0195.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
THE NEW YORK ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
THE NEW YORK ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0196.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE PUBLISHING CO.
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE PUBLISHING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0197.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0198.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
The Pelman Institute of America
[no value]
The Pelman Institute of America
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0199.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0200.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
American School
[no value]
American School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0201.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
McSWEENY SCHOOLS
[no value]
McSWEENY SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0202.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0203.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0204.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0205.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Central States Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Central States Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0206.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0207.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
COYNE ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
COYNE ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0208.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
DETROIT SCHOOL OF LETTERING
[no value]
DETROIT SCHOOL OF LETTERING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0209.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0210.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0211.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0212.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0213.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
THE LANDON SCHOOL
[no value]
THE LANDON SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0214.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0215.xml
article
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
LAKE THUNDER MYSTERY BAFFLES SCIENTISTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STRANGE sounds like the distant boom of guns have been heard again this year across Lake Seneca, N. Y. The “lake guns,” of which examples are known all over the world, have never been satisfactorily explained. Scientists have established only the facts that they are not thunder and are not of human origin.
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0216.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0217.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0218.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
GRINNELL COMPANY
[no value]
GRINNELL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0219.xml
advertisement
122
122,123,124
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.: Camels
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
Camels
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300801_0117_002_0220.xml