Issue: 19300401

Tuesday, April 1, 1930
April 1930
4
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116
Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Articles
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0001.xml
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Advertisement: Rogers
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Rogers
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0002.xml
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1
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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2,3
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0004.xml
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4
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Cochran & McCluer Co.
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Cochran & McCluer Co.
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0005.xml
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4
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Popular Science Institute
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Popular Science Institute
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0006.xml
article
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4,6
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Stock Dividends Will Make Money Grow Faster
A Suggestion to Those Who Are Growing Older Faster Than They Are Getting Richer
How Your Investment Grows
How Your Income Increases
To Help You Get Ahead
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CHALLISS GORE
YOU remember the day—the 16-million share day on the Stock Exchange. The prolonged and uncontrolled stock market crash had swept a multitude of dream castles into the limbo of bitter memories. It was on the 5:36 train in the evening of that day, October 29, 1929, that I first took individual notice of Sid Grimm. He was an exception among the men on the train. His interest in shrinking security values was but casual.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0007.xml
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5
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ALCOA ALUMINUM
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ALCOA ALUMINUM
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0008.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0009.xml
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6
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FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0010.xml
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7
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Westinghouse
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Westinghouse
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0011.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0012.xml
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9
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ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA, Inc.
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ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA, Inc.
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0013.xml
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10
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NORTON
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NORTON
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0014.xml
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11
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Western Electric SOUND SYSTEM
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Western Electric SOUND SYSTEM
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0015.xml
article
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More Comforts for the Home
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More Comforts for the Home
New Methods in Heating and Ventilating Are Now Available to All House Owners Whether Their Buildings Are New or Old
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PECULIARLY fortunate is the man who is building a home today. He has at his disposal, as the result of scientific advance in construction, elaborate means for making his dwelling comfortable. Nowhere is this more apparent than in the matter of heating and ventilation.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0016.xml
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0017.xml
article
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14,16
Our Readers Say
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Our Readers Say
No Room for the Editor
From a Famous Family
But Suppose Your Two-Shaft Elevator Broke Down?
What Can a Poor Girl Do?
The Pleasure's All Ours
Ant Puzzle Solved; Now for Another
Why Not Charge Rent?
Florida's “Big Tree"
Do You Agree?
Bus Planes a Solution?
It’s a Good Sign, Anyway
Never Too Young to Learn
In a Nutshell
Good for You, Parson!
That Walking Fish Is Making Us Popeyed
But Where Would Amos 'n Andy Come In?
From a Model Maker
Getting a Look-In
A Life-Saver on the Farm
Found It Here, of Course
There'll Be No More Peace at the Hague
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I WANT to throw a brickbat which I am sure a large number of your readers will agree is alright. Why doesn’t the Editor give an answer to each letter printed or express his views, as the case may be? There are many scientific questions and arguments raised, to which a lot of us would like to know the correct answer.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0018.xml
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Oakland Motor Car Company
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Oakland Motor Car Company
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0019.xml
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17
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Lambert Pharmacal Company
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Lambert Pharmacal Company
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0020.xml
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18
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THE CELOTEX COMPANY
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THE CELOTEX COMPANY
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0021.xml
article
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19,20,21,159
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Fortunes That Farmers Throw Away
Capitalists Are Betting a Million Dollars That They Can Stop Waste and Save the American Farmer
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E. E. FREE
A MILLION dollars is bet on saving the American farmer. A corporation, capitalized at that amount, was recently organized to put cornstalks, the chief agricultural product of the United States, to industrial uses. Millions of dollars’ worth of cornstalks are discarded as waste by the farmers each year.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0022.xml
article
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22,23,141,142
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Modern Hotel is a Huge Machine
A Glimpse at the Mechanical Servants That Perform Superhuman Tasks Hidden from the Sight of Guests
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ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
SIX o'clock in the evening. New York's forty-three storied hotel— the highest in the world above the street and the deepest below—is preparing to open its doors to the public at midnight. An army of workmen complete last minute jobs, engineers and managers hurry through the corridors.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0023.xml
article
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24,25,152,153
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How to Get into Gliding
Why the thrilling sport of motorless flying is sweeping the country and how you can get started in this great game. The equipment you need and what it costs; how to go about organizing a club.
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EDWIN W. TEALE
ON SIXTY-FOOT wings, a human gull, W. Hawley Bowlus of San Diego, Calif., the other day soared over the California sea coast for more than six hours. His long ride on the air currents set an American endurance record for motorless planes. Bowlus, who built his own ship, is the ace of American glider pilots.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0024.xml
article
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Languages Now Taught by X-Ray
Remarkable Action Photos of Vocal Organs Disclose Secrets of Speech That Long Have Baffled Anatomists
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GEORGE H. DACY
A GOLD chain many times thinner than a watch chain, a set of X:ray photographs, and a few ingenious devices have just solved secrets of human speech that have baffled anatomists for centuries. The photographs on this page are of human subjects talking a foreign language.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0025.xml
article
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27,28,157,158
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Explore Weird Island of the Dead
Scientists plan to invade mysterious Easter Island in an effort to solve the secret of its stone images, carved centuries ago by a forgotten race. Who were the strange men who lived on this most isolated spot?
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MICHEL MOK
TO FIND the answer to a riddle that has baffled science for two hundred years, a group of twenty scientists from the University of Pennsylvania will go next spring to Easter Island, a mysterious pin point of land in the middle of the South Pacific.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0026.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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NEW BRITISH LOCOMOTIVE A STREAMLINED GIANT
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LIKE a mammoth armadillo on wheels is the new British steam locomotive built for express passenger service on the London and Northeastern Railway, which can now boast the longest and heaviest locomotive in Great Britain. The novel “streamline” giant owes its peculiar appearance to the facts that the wide boiler overhangs the locomotive’s drivewheels on each side, and that the smokestack does not project above the boiler.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0027.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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LOWER OBSERVATION CAR FROM ARMY DIRIGIBLE
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A DIMINUTIVE car carrying an observer swung hundreds of feet below a flying airship above Langley Field, Va., in a recent Army Air Corps test of a newlyapplied device for seeing through the clouds. It was believed to be the first successful try-out in America of this method, first applied in German dirigibles on bombing raids, of directing an airship’s flight while the airship itself flew above the clouds, out of the sight of persons on the ground.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0028.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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“BOMB” DROPS FREIGHT FROM AIRPLANE
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WHEN the precision clockwork within a new bomblike container is set, it may be dropped from a plane flying at heights up to 6,000 feet and a parachute will open and lower it gently to earth. The device, a Swiss invention, is intended to facilitate the delivery of goods by air freight.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0029.xml
article
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29,30
NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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NEW LENS INVENTED FOR PANORAMIC MOVIES
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THE same laws of optics that make a tall man into a squat pygmy when he observes his reflection in an amusement park mirror are put to work in a new French lens for motion picture cameras. It simplifies the making of films for the newly-popular movie screens of double width, since it permits the use of standard movie film instead of the doublewidth film used in America.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0030.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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TOOL COMBINES SQUARE, GAGE, PLUMB, LEVEL
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A COMBINATION tool of extraordinary compactness and many uses has been devised for carpenters and home woodworkers. Used in conjunction with an ordinary carpenter’s two-foot rule, it is convertible into a right- and a left-hand bevel square, a compass, and a try-square.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0031.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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NEW CORE FOR CASTINGS
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FOUNDRY practice may be made over by a new core for castings made of sand and surrounded by a rubber compound. Under the pressure of the solidifying metal, it eventually collapses, and the residue is poured out. Formerly it had to be chipped out.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0032.xml
article
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Automobiles
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HANDY PRESSURE GAGE FITS IN TIRE RIM
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A NEW substitute for the ordinary tire gage carried by motorists is an air pressure gage which fits into the rim of the wheel. Resembling a tire valve, a red dot in its center moves up and down to tell at any time the approximate pressure within the tire.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0033.xml
article
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Aviation
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STEEL BALLS NOW USED TO CARRY HELIUM
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SIX steel balls mounted on a fiat car constitute a novel helium container, recently developed for transporting the airship gas from Texas fields. Formerly elongated cylinders carried on flat cars were used for this purpose. Because their shape permits twice the usual pressure to be applied to their contents, the spherical containers can carry twice as much gas as cylinders of the same volume.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0034.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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HARDEN STEEL BY NEW MAGNETIC PROCESS
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MAGNETISM can be used instead of heat to super-harden metals, according to the recent discovery of E. G. Herbert, British metallurgist. Test specimens of steel which he hardened by subjecting them to magnetic fields of repeatedly changed polarity could not have been hardened more by special heat treatment, he reported to the Iron and Steel Institute.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0035.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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NUMBERED KEYBOARD AN AID TO BANJOISTS
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NO LONGER need aspirants to the art of banjo and guitar playing screw up their fingers to impossible contortions in order to strum melodies from the twanging strings. A new type of stringed instrument demands merely a knowledge of an index numbered from one to twenty-one for its production of chords.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0036.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Sanitary Garbage Truck.
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To remove garbage and ashes without causing odor or dust in the streets, the city of Berlin, Germany, has introduced this special truck. Refuse cans are emptied into swinging receptacles at the front of the body. A hydraulic piston swings the body to a vertical position as shown, dumping the contents into it.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0037.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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New Switch Controls High Voltages
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This compact new type of high voltage switch, encased in a vacuum chamber of glass, has been developed by Dr. R. A. Millikan and Prof. R. W. Sorenson of the California Institute of Technology to control the millions of volts used in laboratory electrical tests.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0038.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Front-Wheel-Drive Truck
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The front-wheel drive has been applied to the heavy motor truck in Germany. As pictured at the right, the engine is placed on a frame projecting far ahead of the front axle. The advantages claimed are economy of power in transmission and easy riding qualities.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0039.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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New Aids for the Deafened
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The top photo shows a new “voice picture” apparatus demonstrated before the California Association for the Teachers of Deafened Adults. A light beam projects a “picture” of the deafened person’s voice vibrations on a rotating screen, helping the subject learn how to control his or her intonations.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0040.xml
article
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Aviation
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RADIO BEACONS FOR AIRPORTS
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"RADIO roads,” leading aviators through darkness and fog from airport to airport, will be part of the equipment of every skyway in a few years, according to William Loth, a French inventor, who recently announced to the French Academy of Sciences the perfection, after several years’ work, of a novel type of radio beacon.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0041.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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A NEW COKE DUST FUEL
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THE lessened chance of spontaneous combustion, an ever-present dread in connection with coal yards and even domestic coal bins, is one of the advantages of a new “low temperature” coke dust for domestic and factory use. The Pittsburgh experiment station of the Bureau of Mines of the United States Department of Commerce has found that the distillation of coal at low temperatures gives, besides a more valuable yield of oils and tars than is obtained by traditional methods of distillation, a type of coke which ignites more readily than the best grades of ordinary coke.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0042.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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MAKES “ARTIFICIAL AIR” FOR PLANES AND SUBS
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NEW kinds of air, apparently as good or possibly even better to breathe than the sort provided by Nature, are the recent discovery of Dr. J. Willard Hershey, chemist of McPherson College, Kansas. Artificial mixtures which he has developed contain helium and oxygen, and may be applied in submarines or in high-altitude airplanes.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0043.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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PRINTING FINE FILIGREE ON RUBBER MATS
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RUBBER bath mats, table mats, and similar household objects susceptible, to decoration can now be enhanced with all sorts of fanciful designs and turned out at a low cost by a process patented by Glenn H. Willis, of Akron, Ohio. The objects are made of hard rubber and may have designs of lace, fabric surfaces, tree leaves, stone surfaces, toy outlines, or almost any pattern traced upon them.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0044.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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A Limousine Side Car.
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This latest in motorcycle luxuries, exhibited in London, has an inclosed body with sliding roof and windows, leather upholstery, and dashboard conveniences. At the rear is a luggage compartment which locks.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0045.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Air Mail Catapult
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An improved portable catapult apparatus to enable a plane to pick up air mail “on the fly" is shown here during a recent test at Curtiss Field, N. Y. A cord stretched between two masts is caught by a hook lowered from the plane. An instant later a mail sack attached to the cord is shot forward at about the same speed as that of the plane.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0046.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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New Headlight Tester.
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A pointer on the side of this test box is set to a number corresponding to the distance at which the lamp beam should strike the road. The lamp is then tilted until two bands of light, reflected on a screen at top of the box, coincide with two index marks.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0047.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Step Plate Luggage Rack
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Here is a car equipped with new running board step plates designed to serve a double purpose. The plates are so hinged to the rim of the running board that they may be swung up to a vertical position to form a convenient luggage holder. They are of sturdy construction, with foot mats of heavy corrugated rubber.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0048.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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“Electric Eye” Detects Tunnel Fumes
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A new instrument for testing the ventilation of the Holland vehicular tunnel under the Hudson River between New York and New Jersey includes a photoelectric cell which detects the slightest haze of exhaust vapors containing deadly carbon monoxide gas, as well as the presence of dust in the air.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0049.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Tests Auto Drivers.
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In this Austrian invention a roller bearing a small map of city streets is rotated beneath a stylus. Operating a miniature steering wheel which controls the stylus, the candidate for a driver’s license shows his ability to thread his way through the streets.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0050.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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INVENTS COMBINATION GLOBE AND ATLAS
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GLOBE and atlas are combined in the invention by a Los Angeles, Calif., map maker, of a model of the earth with a complete index and gazetteer inside it. Inserted in the globe are two small windows containing magnifying glasses. Inside is a mechanism that reels past this reading glass a fifty-one-foot paper tape bearing place names and descriptions arranged alphabetically.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0051.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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MAIL BOX TELLS WEATHER
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AN ORNAMENTAL letter box that will not only receive letters but tell the temperature and atmospheric conditions is the latest equipment added to the postal service in Paris, France. Standing on a base that resembles that of the “dummy policemen” in use in many American cities, the large rectangular box is decorated on each face with a border of ornamental tiles.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0052.xml
article
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Laboratory Discoveries
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NEW GRAVITY STANDARD FOR UNITED STATES
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JUST how hard the earth pulls an object toward it is now being measured, by the United States Bureau of Standards, for the city of Washington, D. C. When the three or four year task is completed the United States will have for the first time a local standard of its own from which the force of gravity in any city of the United States, or the world for that matter, may be calculated.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0053.xml
article
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Health and Hygiene
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TEST X-RAY SAFEGUARD
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X-RAYS in sufficient dosage attack healthy skin as well as diseased tissue. The problem for cancer specialists has been to get at the tumor without injuring the healthy outer skin. Recently Drs. Edith H. Quimby and George T. Pack of New York City described experiments in which they used various combinations of rays—for instance, hard and soft X-rays or hard and soft radium rays together.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0054.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Speedy Tank for Smashing Attack.
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This combination tank and armored car will travel sixty miles an hour. Here, stripped of the endless treads, which can be taken off in a few minutes, it is being shown at the Capitol plaza, Washington, to Representative Henry E. Barbour, of the House Subcommittee on War Appropriations.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0055.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Chemist Fights Deadly Gas.
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Dr. J. C. W. Frazer, of Johns Hopkins University, shown above in his laboratory, has discovered a catalyst that will rapidly convert the deadly carbon monoxide into the harmless carbon dioxide. His process would rid city air of noxious fumes.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0056.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Wheel Alignment Measured.
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When the front wheels of a car are run on to the two plates, shown above, a hand on the dial seen at the right indicates whether the wheels toe in or out. Wheels out of line move the plates, hooked up with the indicator hand. (See page 74.)
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0057.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Acetylene as Auto Fuel.
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Quick cold-weather starting, freedom from carbon monoxide, more power, and economy are features claimed by the inventors for a new system of fueling a motor car. Acetylene gas, mixed with air and water, is fed into the cylinders instead of gasoline by the carburetorlike apparatus seen in the circle above.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0058.xml
article
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NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
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Testing the Carbon Monoxide Killer.
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At left is shown a car fitted with an experimental apparatus to test the efficiency of Dr. Frazer’s method of changing carbon monoxide to dioxide.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0059.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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ST. LOUIS BOTANISTS MEASURE SUNSHINE
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HORTICULTURISTS at the Missouri Botanical Gardens of St. Louis can now tell exactly how many hours of sun their flowers are getting. A sun-measuring machine, said to be the only one of its kind in the country, records the daily sunshine there with the precision of a mathematical chart.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0060.xml
article
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Radio
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NOCTOVISION TESTED FOR SHIPS LOST IN FOG
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“NOCTOVISION,” a form of television that uses invisible rays to see through darkness, was demonstrated in New York recently as a possible aid to American ocean liners steering through fog. If favorable reports are made by the commanders of three vessels, the Leviathan, American Farmer, and American Shipper, who witnessed the tests, the United States Lines may order one of the devices to be tried out at sea.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0061.xml
article
36
36
Engineering
[no value]
CEMENT IS SHOT ACROSS RIVER IN AIR TUBE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ENGINEERS recently were confronted with the problem of how to get cement across the Allegheny River, in Warren County, Pa., for a sixteen-mile highway. They solved the puzzle by slinging a three-inch pipe, 768 feet long, from the freight cars on one side of the river to the mixing station on the other.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0062.xml
article
36
36
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
FINGER MOISTENER, IN PALM, HELPS CLERKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SPEED and convenience are provided in a new finger moistener designed for those who handle loose papers. A small felt pad, mounted on a water reservoir about the size of a wrist watch, fits tightly into the palm of the hand, the combination itself being clasped to the hand by a spring grip which does not hinder finger movement.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0063.xml
article
36
36
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
NONPOISONOUS DYES NOW PAINT THE LILY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PAINTING the lilies is now an established fact, thanks to scientific research. Cut flowers have been colored artificially for some time past, but most common dyes are poisonous to the flowers and make them wilt almost immediately. Now, according to Dr. R. B. Harvey, of the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, some brilliant, nonpoisonous dyes have been discovered.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0064.xml
article
36
36
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
PROOF OF PARENTAGE IS FOUND IN BLOOD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOUNDLINGS who are uncertain whether they have discovered their parents need no longer despair. A sure proof of parentage based upon the laws of colloid chemistry has been found, according to Professor Wilhelm Zangemeister, of Königsberg University, Germany, who would rely upon reactions between minute particles in the blood serum of the child and the supposed parent to confirm the relationship.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0065.xml
article
36
36
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
NEW DEVICE SUPPORTS BIKE IN TRAFFIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CONVENIENCE for bicycle riders has recently been invented by a German experimenter. It is a device acting as a bicycle rest, especially handy when there is a traffic hold-up. Like a humpbacked roller skate in appearance, it fits beneath one of the pedals.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0066.xml
article
37
37
NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
[no value]
Section Freight Car Cuts Loading Time.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
This new railway car, recently shown in Chicago, is designed to do away with two of the steps in handling freight under the present system, as each section in the car unit can be trucked to the factory for loading or unloading.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0067.xml
article
37
37
NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
[no value]
Motor Takes Place of Pin Boy.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
On the North German Lloyd liners Bremen and Europa, electric motors have been installed in the bowling alleys to set the pins, each of which is controlled by a string. The machine also returns the ball to the player and indicates the score.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0068.xml
article
37
37
NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
[no value]
Refueling While Race Is On.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Outboard motor racers, as shown above, can take on fuel without stopping. A fuel boat equipped with a pump, a hose, and a long pipe attached to its tank draws alongside the racing boat. The pipe is swung over the racer and fuel is pumped into its gasoline tank.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0069.xml
article
37
37
NEW IDEAS AND INVENTION
[no value]
Fish Now Travel in De Luxe Car.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The all-steel Pullman shown here was built for the United States Bureau of Fisheries and will carry 500,000 one-inch fish designed to stock the lakes and streams of America. E. C. Fearnow, the Bureau’s superintendent of distribution, is seen holding a fish container.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0070.xml
article
38
38
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
POWERFUL RAY TUBE TO BOMBARD THE ATOMS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW hope of smashing atoms open to see what is inside is brought by a novel vacuum tube developed at the California Institute of Technology by Dr. R. E. Vollrath. Although it uses only 250,000 volts of electricity—terrific pressure by ordinary standards, but little enough for atom-wrecking attempts—it is as powerful as other tubes of a million volts.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0071.xml
article
38
38
Radio
[no value]
HALF OF WORLD’S RADIO SETS IN AMERICA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are 21,629,107 radio receiving sets in the world, nearly half of them owned in the United States. This estimate shows that there is one receiving set for every twelve and a half persons in this country, as against one for every fifty-three persons in Europe.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0072.xml
article
38
38
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
PAWPAW TREE FURNISHES FOOD, SOAP, MEDICINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN THE tropical mazes of South America grows a remarkable tree having a variety of uses both economic and medicinal. This is the papaya or pawpaw tree, to be distinguished from its cousin in the central and southern United States which belongs to a different family.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0073.xml
article
38
38
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
HANDY BRACELET SERVES AS MAGAZINE HOLDER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT might be a convenience to readers is a unique wrist attachment recently designed for holding magazines and small periodicals open before the eye at arm’s length. This novel book holder is a bracelet fitting snugly about the forepart of the wrist, to which is fixed a small bracket firmly supporting the periodical just as the “lyre” of a cornet supports sheet music.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0074.xml
article
38
38
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
SHOOT POISON DUST TO KILL MOSQUITOES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Two battles in which no quarter is asked or given are man’s fights with insects and disease. These are combined when communities fight mosquitoes, for these insects are not only annoying in themselves, but some kinds of them do enormous harm by spreading the germs of malaria.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0075.xml
article
38
38
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
NOVEL LIP FORM JUST STAMPS ROUGE ON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAQUEL TORRES, the famous film star, is responsible for a new device for lip rouging. A wooden stamp, shaped to the form of the lips and covered with rouge, is pressed against the lips, thus stamping the rouge on. The stamp comes in various sizes, to fit the lips of small as well as large featured persons
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0076.xml
article
39
39
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
What We Burn Up Every Year
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0077.xml
article
40
40,41,137,138,139,140,141
[no value]
[no value]
what Our $10,000 Prize Will Do for Science
Famous Men Tell What They Think of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY’S Annual Award for Outstanding Achievement in Science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT do representative Americans think of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY'S annual award of $10,000 for the year's outstanding achievement in science? Scientists, inventors, and engineers; statesmen, educators, and clergymen; industrialists and business executives have expressed their opinions since publication, in the February issue, of the announcement of the creation of the award and the formation of a committee of distinguished scientists who will select the accomplishment which, in their judgment, is of greatest potential benefit to the world.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0078.xml
article
42
42,43,155,156
[no value]
[no value]
How Air Camera Men Map Unseen Places
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES F. KEALE
A BOXING match was scheduled for the evening in a Coney Island, N. Y., stadium. It was already noon, and soon tickets were to be placed on sale. The promoter of the match looked for the floor plan to show purchasers their seats. He found to his consternation that there was no floor plan.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0079.xml
article
44
44,145
[no value]
[no value]
First Photo Took 8 Hours Now-20,000 in a Second
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. C. DAVIS
IN 1830, it required eight hours to take a photograph. The other day, Baron C. Shiba's remarkable camera re corded 20,000 pictures in one second (P.S.M., Nov. ’29, p. 31). In this dramatic advance, which has taken place within a single century, a Parisian painter of stage scenery and a magic cupboard in his home workshop laboratory played leading rôles.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0080.xml
article
45
45
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
Aircraft Carrier’s Power Lights City for a Month
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NAVY aircraft carrier supplied electric light and power to the city of Tacoma. Wash., for thirty days in a recent emergency at that port. When an unprecedented drought cut off the water supply to turn the turbines in the municipal hydroelectric power plant, a distress call to the Navy brought the electric-driven aircraft carrier Lexington to the rescue.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0081.xml
article
45
45
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
Rhythmic Noises Speed Up Workers’ Output
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Efficiency-experts are turning to music to aid modern industry, and manufacturers may soon find it to their advantage to put brass bands and perhaps entire symphony orchestras on their pay rolls. Rhythmical Sounds produced by various instruments in time with; the movements of workers during a recent experiment in an English packing warehouse is reported to have increased their output twenty percent.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0082.xml
article
45
45,46
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
Nation-Wide Survey to Fix Exact Locations
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To FIX on maps the exact position of every portion of the United States’ vast territory is the aim of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. The entire 3,000,000 square miles of the country will then be brought within the inclosure of the Government survey’s great triangulation system.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0083.xml
article
46
46
Astronomy
[no value]
The Wilk Comet Parades before the Telescope
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE latest of the heavenly bodies to have its picture taken by astronomers is the Wilk comet. The above is a three-time enlargement of the original photograph taken recently at the Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, Wis., by G. van Biesbroeck.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0084.xml
article
46
46
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
How Much Do You Know about Physics?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TEST your knowledge with these questions, chosen from hundreds asked by our readers. Answers are on page 143. 1. Would it be possible to siphon water from an elevation of 1,000 feet over an elevation of 2,000 feet high into a valley at sea level?
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0085.xml
article
46
46
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
New Composition Hard as Flint, Flexible as Paper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A REMARKABLE chemical composition recently developed promises, among other things, unbreakable phonograph records that can be stamped with the speed of a printing press and sold like papers on the news stands, as well as a fire- and waterproof varnish substitute, especially valuable on airplanes.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0086.xml
article
46
46
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
“"Ice Fans” Cool French Railway Coaches
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN FRANCE, hot, stuffy railroad trips are to be banished next summer by artificially cooled cars. In preliminary experiments last year the first of these novel trains, on a trial run of several hours from Paris, maintained a temperature of about sixty-eight degrees Fahrenheit despite the heat.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0087.xml
article
46
46
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
“Spinning Wheel” Bottles German Soft Drinks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NO, NOT an old-fashioned spinning wheel, but a “bottling” wheel is the strange contraption pictured below. It is used for putting corks into bottles of fruit juice concocted in a nonalcoholic brewery in the province of Thuringia, Germany.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0088.xml
article
47
47
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
A College for Police
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0089.xml
article
48
48
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
School for Rescue Squads in Abandoned Mine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW kind of life guard, which instead of saving men from drowning will learn how to rescue them from being buried alive, is now undergoing training in the coal mining district of Upper Silesia, on the German-Polish frontier. Here a mine long deserted is being utilized for the experiments in life-saving.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0090.xml
article
48
48
Aviation
[no value]
Pilot Launches Airplane from Speeding Auto
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TAKING off from the roof of an automobile speeding at fifty miles an hour was the novel feat performed recently at Old Orchard, Me., by a nervy airplane pilot. The stunt demonstrated that this new way of catapulting an airplane into the air is at least feasible, if not altogether soothing to the nerves of the average passenger who is not thrill hungry.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0091.xml
article
48
48
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Is There a Limit to the Size of Hailstones?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAILSTONES remain a “size” puzzle even for scientists. The difficulty lies in verifying the statements of those who claim to have seen enormous stones fall. The most convincing record is that of a stone falling July 6, 1928, at Potter, Nebraska.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0092.xml
article
48
48
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Studies Eskimo and Indian to Trace Kinship
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOME anatomical facts which have lately been gathered in Alaska by Dr. Ales Hrdlicka, of the United States National Museum, may throw new light on the problem of the relation of the Eskimo to the Indian. Dr. Hrdlicka recently reported to the National Academy of Sciences that he had measured 200 full-blood Indians and Eskimos, from head to foot.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0093.xml
article
49
49
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
Priest Explores Alaskan Volcano
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOUR adventurers who penetrated a wild region of Alaska where smoke and steam curl from thousands of holes in a valley’s floor returned not long ago with photographs and scientific records of one of Nature’s curiosities—the “Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes.”
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0094.xml
article
50
50
Astronomy
[no value]
Chicago’s Planetarium Nearing Completion
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE world’s finest example of a planetarium, an astronomical theater on whose domed ceiling are projected the relative motions of the heavenly bodies, is nearing completion on an artificial island off Chicago’s lake front. Inside the building spectators will sit in circular rows about a multiple projector which through 119 lenses will cast the images of stars and planets on a vaulted screen ninety feet in diameter.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0095.xml
article
50
50
Engineering
[no value]
Water Pumped Uphill to Keep Dynamos Busy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BECAUSE of the demand for electricity during the day, ordinary power stations have to install expensive dynamos that are not used to full capacity during the night. A German power plant near the town of Niederwartha has adopted an ingenious plan to keep its dynamos running at full efficiency all the time.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0096.xml
article
50
50
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Analyzes Third of a Drop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE 1,500th of a fluid ounce of chemical, or about one third the volume of a drop of water from a medicine dropper, recently yielded its secrets to a chemist in a New York City demonstration. It was the first public exhibition of a new way of testing minute quantities of chemicals.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0097.xml
article
50
50
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Predicting Thunderstorms
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY MATHEMATICAL wizardry a new kind of chart known as a “tephigram” is said to predict thunderstorms from five to six hours in advance. It shows the amount of energy available in the atmosphere for release in the form of a thunderstorm, as wind or otherwise.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0098.xml
article
50
50
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Finds Protons Play Dual Rôle; Wins Prize
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SCIENTIFIC “Bolshevik” won a $1,000 prize the other day for upsetting one more of the fundamental ideas of classical physics. Prof. A. J. Dempster, University of Chicago physicist, proved that a proton, the core of an atom, leads a dual existence as both a tangible particle and an intangible sort of wave motion.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0099.xml
article
51
51
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
Boring a Tunnel 9,000 Feet Up
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Completing a cogwheel railway up the Zugspitz, highest peak in the German Alps, workmen are driving a tunnel into the mountain at a height of 9,000 feet. Each day they travel to their job by cableway. Above: The lofty tunnel entrance, looking from within.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0100.xml
article
51
51
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
Hunts Leprosy Cure.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The only woman scientist from America who is now doing research work in the famous Pasteur Institute, Paris, France, is Adele Cohen, of Newark, N. J. At present she is searching for a serum for the cure of leprosy.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0101.xml
article
51
51
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
Through the Rocks.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
This view within the Zugspitz tunnel shows a crew of workmen biting in the wall of solid rock with a pneumatic power drill. Notice the horn at the waist of the man at the extreme right. He uses it for signaling to other crews.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0102.xml
article
51
51
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
“Taken for a Ride.”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Two of the workmen starting the descent by aerial cable car from the mouth of the railway tunnel in the Zugspitz. The railway will go nearly to the 9,722-foot summit.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0103.xml
article
51
51
PROGRESS AND DISCOVERY
[no value]
Sun Baths for Miners.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Men who work in the depths of an Idaho mine get their share of sunlight in this special solarium. The miners, stripped and wearing protective goggles, stand upon a moving platform which takes one minute to travel in front of a battery of ultra-violet lamps.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0104.xml
article
52
52
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Ocean’s Floor Is Classroom for Undersea Zoologists
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN A sea-bottom classroom, with shimmering green water for atmosphere and divers’ helmets for windows, the pupils of the marine zoology class of the University of Miami go to their work. Making semiweekly trips to the floor of the ocean, the students study the rich variety of sea flora and fauna, and occasionally bring choice specimens up with them.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0105.xml
article
52
52
Nature
[no value]
Bees’ Tongues May Yet Prove Acquired Traits Persist
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRESH evidence of the inheritance of acquired characteristics in animals, one of the major unsolved problems in biology, has been discovered by Dr. W. W. Alpatov, formerly of the Zoological Museum of Moscow, Russia, and now connected with the Institute for Biological Research, Baltimore, Md.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0106.xml
article
52
52
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Machine Measures Thought but Is No Mind Reader
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOUGHTS, as well as actions, can speak louder than words, according to Dr. Milton Metfessel, of the University of Southern California, when they are hitched up to an ingenious device he has just invented. Those thinking processes which go on so silently within people’s heads are, he says, actually the expression of powerful forces at work, nerve impulses flashing from one end of the brain to the other along complex networks of nerve fibers.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0107.xml
article
52
52
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Blue Aniline Dye Now Used in Fight on Cancer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INJECTION of small quantities of an aniline dye known as isamine blue into the blood stream is a new procedure in cancer treatment developed by specialists of the Charité Hospital in Berlin. The dye is absorbed by the cancer cells rather than by the cells of the body’s healthy tissues.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0108.xml
article
53
53,54
[no value]
[no value]
Along the Airways of the World
Curtiss Helicopter Will Soon Get Try-Out—Army Plane with Full Load Reaches 30,000 Feet
Plan Nine-Day Air Service from California to Japan
Army Plane, with Military Load, Climbs 30,000 Feet
British Dirigible Sets High Speed Record
New Land Near South Pole Claimed for Norway
Airplanes Raise Problems in Planning of Cities
Planes May Bomb Fish
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEWS that a new type of helicopter, an airplane that can rise straight up, is nearing completion at Garden City, N. Y., at last definitely confirms a report published in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY some time ago (Feb., ’28, p. 43) that the Curtiss airplane firm was building one.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0109.xml
article
55
55,56
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Are You Fit to Drive Your Car?
Yes, If You Are Properly Trained, Says Psychologist, Following Remarkable Tests
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT E. MARTIN
THE date is 1935, the scene a city traffic court. "You are charged," says the judge, "with reckless driving and endangering the lives of others. Your car, out of control, skidded and went over the curb at the corner of Broad and Main Streets. What have you to say?”
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0110.xml
article
57
57,150
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Harbors for Motor Boats
Many towns face big problem in caring for thousands of small craft—Municipal docks, now in operation, are paying returns on investment
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE LEE DOWD
A NEW way of parking motor boats is to be tried in Detroit. Individual “boat wells” of concrete, similar to stalls for automobiles in a garage, are part of a $249,000 structure planned for that city. Cruisers and runabouts speeding up the Detroit River from Lake Erie, or coming down from Lake St. Clair, will put up in these wells, which are leased by boat owners for the year.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0111.xml
article
58
58,59,146,147,148,149
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
I’ve Seen a Lot of Flying in Twenty Years
Veteran Pilot Recalls Dare-Devils and Their Flights and Tells of the Narrow Escapes When Airplanes First Flew
[no value]
[no value]
ASSEN JORDANOFF
IT IS nearly twenty years since I climbed into my first cockpit. While I have been traveling the skyways, flying fields have developed from bumpy cow pastures to concrete runways; airplanes from lumbering box kites to winged bullets; hangars from flimsy canvas tents to huge structures of concrete and steel.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0112.xml
article
60
60,144
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Do You Know Your English?
Here is your chance to test your ability to express yourself correctly. On the choice of the right word may depend your future
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A YOUNG man once wrote a letter of fifteen lines to a famous college president asking him to help him get a job. That letter is today hanging in a fine frame above this president’s desk, and he has often said it was the finest piece of business English he had ever seen.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0113.xml
article
61
61
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
[no value]
WINGED BOAT TO TRY TO CROSS OCEAN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SPEED boat that may challenge aircraft in the offering of swift and safe ocean transportation has been in process of construction at Quincy, Mass. It is announced that the odd craft will attempt a transatlantic voyage when completed. Powerful struts, banked against each side of the hull, support a monoplane wing structure forty-eight feet wide.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0114.xml
article
61
61
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
[no value]
LONGEST AIR MAIL TRIP
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARRIVAL in New York of the first air mail from Montevideo, Uruguay, South America, marked the completion of the longest air mail haul in aviation history. The 8,000-mile journey was from Montevideo across the lofty peaks of the Andes Mountains to Santiago, Chile, thence up the west coast of South America, and to New York via Panama, Canal Zone, and Miami, Florida.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0115.xml
article
61
61
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
[no value]
NEW ITALIAN STEAMER MAY BEAT BREMEN
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BEATING the record of the Bremen, fastest ocean liner afloat, is the aim of a steamer now being built at a shipyard in Genoa, Italy. The new vessel, with a 47,000-ton displacement, is expected to run from Cadiz, on the west coast of Spain, to New York, 3,151 nautical miles, in four and a half days.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0116.xml
article
61
61
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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BIRDS FORETELL SPRING BETTER THAN MEN
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As THOUGH they possessed some mysterious knowledge of the exact date of spring’s arrival in their northern home, migratory birds return to England from southern Europe and northern Africa just in time for the opening of the flowers. This curious fact has been observed by British workers in phenology, the science which each year records the first and last dates for such operations of Nature as the falling of leaves in autumn, the first appearance of buds on plants, the first opening of flowers, and the semiannual departure and return of birds of passage.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0117.xml
article
61
61
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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ANCIENT SWAMP VILLAGE FOUND IN SWEDEN
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ANCIENT ruins, perhaps dating back to the Stone Age, have been uncovered in the swamps of Dag in Ostergothland, a central province of Sweden, which have been the scene of interesting excavations since 1919. The diggings were supervised by Dr. Otto Froedin, Stockholm archeologist, and financed by the Swedish government.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0118.xml
article
62
62
Nature
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“NIGHTMARE” ANIMAL DOTES ON EGGS
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WITH claws that call up childhood memories of witches’ talons; a ghoulish, sharp-pointed face surmounted by naked ears; large, staring eyes; and an unkempt, bushy tail, the aye-aye of Madagascar, a cousin of the flying lemur, has well earned its appellation of a living nightmare.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0119.xml
article
62
62
Automobiles
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CHALK LINE FOR AUTOS
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AUTOMOBILE wheels will run in grooves in a unique roadway under construction across Queensborough Bridge, in New York City. The grooves, about two inches deep, are a new experiment in keeping cars in line. The entire roadway is twenty-six feet wide and accommodates three lanes of traffic, with grooves in each. Low side walls., about twelve inches high, will also separate the traffic lanes.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0120.xml
article
62
62
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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WOMEN STILL BEAT MEN IN TESTS OF EMOTION
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THE ancient doctrine that woman is ruled by her passions and man by his reason seems to find fresh support in a new study of sex differences conducted at Stanford University in California by Prof. Lewis M. Terman and Dr. Catherine C. Miles. The evidence, based upon the statements of students themselves in answer to questions, indicated that women strike more intensely than men on the whole scale of emotions—anger, pity, fear, or disgust.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0121.xml
article
62
62
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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$20,000,000,000 IN GOLD MINED IN 400 YEARS
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A “BULLION CUBE” only 38.5 feet high, wide, and long would result if all the gold mined in the world since the days of Columbus were cast into one solid block. While this amount seems surprisingly small when depicted in this manner, four miles of street thirty feet wide could be paved with a one-inch thickness of the precious metal, it has been estimated.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0122.xml
article
62
62
Nature
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PLANT POSES AS SNAKE TO TRAP LIVE FOOD
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NOT with the glitter of its eyes, for it has none, but by the glistening of its highly colored leaves, the darlingtonia, a unique carnivorous pitcher plant native to California, imitates the hooded cobra, which it somewhat resembles, in luring its unsuspecting victims to their doom inside its “stomach.”
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0123.xml
article
63
63
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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Danger Lurks in Liquid Steel.
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Enormous ladles of white-hot metal, which if released would spread in a devastating flood, are raised by great cranes and from them ingot molds are filled. At the right: Sixty-three tons of bubbling steel are surging into the ladle. This tapping of a furnace is one of the most thrilling moments in the whole process of the manufacture of steel.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0124.xml
article
63
63
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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Accidentally Lifts Engine.
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A crane in the Pennsylvania yards, Chicago, grabbed a passing engine-by mistake and wrecked it. The entire train was derailed and the engineer was injured. This gives a slight idea of the enormous power exerted by a big steel crane.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0125.xml
article
63
63
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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This Arm Won’t Burn.
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Machines that seem alive reach into the furnace, drag out the ingots of steel, and pass them to the rolling mill.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0126.xml
article
63
63
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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Not Much of a Rocket.
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It doesn’t look like a real engine, does it? But it is the great-granddaddy of all locomotives. It is an exact reproduction of the Rocket built by Stephenson in 1829. It is now in the Ford Museum, Detroit. The original is in the Science Museum in London.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0127.xml
article
64
64
Models
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ELECTRICITY RUNS MODEL STEAM LOCOMOTIVE
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IN testing various methods of generating steam in the boiler of a model locomotive which he completed recently, E. B. Stack, of Monroe, N. C., found that electricity would serve to produce the necessary heat. Instead of employing an alcohol burner, or burning coal under forced draft, two methods long and successfully used by other model makers, Stack fitted three 600-watt electric heating units directly in the boiler in contact with the water.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0128.xml
article
64
64
Engineering
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HIGHEST BRIDGE TO SPAN THE ROYAL GORGE
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MORE than twice as high as any other bridge, the loftiest in the world is soon to be under construction across the Royal Gorge of the Arkansas River, near Canon City, Colo. If a stone were to be thrown from this structure it would travel more than a fifth of a mile before it struck the river, since its greatest height will be 1,053 feet.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0129.xml
article
64
64
Radio
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WIRELESS PLAN PROPOSED NEARLY 60 YEARS AGO
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RADIO, like many other inventions, had several fathers. It was not the practical triumph of Marconi alone that started it on its eagle flight, but the discovery of the electromagnetic law by Maxwell, the birth of Hertzian waves, and the dreams of obscure scientists grasping at straws of the ultimate truth.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0130.xml
article
64
64
Automobiles
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WOMEN DRIVERS ÉXPECT TOO MUCH COURTESY?
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AUTO driving and chivalry should have little in common, according to Dr. E. B. Turner, of the Medico-Legal Society of London, who blames the feminine sense of traditional courtesy for the accidents which most women incur on the streets and highways.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0131.xml
article
64
64
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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FIND TOMB OF ANCIENT SCYTHIAN CHIEFTAIN
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NEAR the Mongolian border of Siberia, Professor S. I. Rudenko, of Leningrad, has uncovered the massive log tomb of an ancient Scythian chieftain, believed buried more than twenty centuries. It reveals that these warlike horsemen of the steppes, known to have defeated the picked troops of the great Persian king, Darius, in 512 B. c., had attained a high state of culture in Central Asia before they migrated to the westward and came in contact with Greek and Persian civilizations.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0132.xml
article
64
64
Exceptional People
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COLLECTING RARE WOODS HIS HOBBY AT 75
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AT seventy-five a man is just young enough to take up a new hobby, judging from the experience of George F. Dyar, of Waltham, Mass., who has assembled what is said to be one of the most complete collections of woods and products from the trees of the world.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0133.xml
article
65
65
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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Aqua-Skiing Adds Thrills to Sea Sport
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0134.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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TOWERS PEEK THROUGH SEA OF FOG
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A CLEAR day, with brilliant sunshine gilding dome and spire, is not always essential to bring out the high points of a great city’s skyline. A day of fog and mist may sometimes do the trick even better. This was demonstrated recently by an aerial photographer who took this random shot of New York City, blanketed in thick fog.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0135.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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ROMAN GODS FOUND IN OLD GERMAN WALL
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NEW and unexpected treasure turned up by the spades of archeologists is the discovery of a ruined foundation wall made entirely of sculptured Roman stones near the Rhine country town of Alzey in Germany. Dr. Friedrich Behn, curator of monuments at Mainz, tells the story of the remarkable wall in a recent edition of a German scientific periodical.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0136.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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GOVERNMENT COMES TO ANTELOPE’S RESCUE
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THE antelope, diminishing rapidly in the West up to a few years ago, is now coming back. This graceful and fleet-footed animal once roamed the American plains in herds numbering a million, but a census of a decade or so ago disclosed less than 5,000 of them left.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0137.xml
article
66
66
Nature
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ONLY FOUR ANIMALS OUTLIVE MAN
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GENERALLY believed to reach the fabulous age of 500 years, the whale never lives beyond forty. The longest authentic record for the elephant, supposed to live to the century mark, is seventy years. The fact that these great animals do not outlive man has been established by Professor A. D. Peacock, of University College, Dundee, Scotland, who recently completed an exhaustive study of the subject.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0138.xml
article
66
66
Exceptional People
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RUSSIAN EX-GENERAL NOW MENDS RADIOS
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MAKING balky radio sets behave is now the peaceful occupation of a former major general in the Imperial Russian Cavalry, George C. Oustimovich. The excitement and clamor of leading the Czar’s horsemen in the days before the war have been supplanted by the quiet of a small radio repair shop in New York City.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0139.xml
article
67
67
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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An Arctic Scene in New York.
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This wind-swept view of Bering Sea with Arctic birds disporting themselves looks exactly like the real thing, but actually it’s no farther north than the American Museum of Natural History in New York.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0140.xml
article
67
67
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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Ship Model Carries Crew.
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This remarkable twenty-six-foot Diesel-driven model of the North German Lloyd Liner Columbus recently cruised up the Hudson River at New York carrying a complete crew of two.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0141.xml
article
67
67
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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Driving Taught in Office.
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Chief Safety Instructor L. B. Gordon, of the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company, is displaying a board, equipped with map of San Francisco and showing traffic problems, which he uses in teaching the Company’s hundreds of chauffeurs how to drive.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0142.xml
article
67
67
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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Homemade and Simple.
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This little 480-pound airplane, designed by Earl Clark, right, and built by him and his brother, Donald, left, of Buffalo, N. Y., has only two wooden struts, five steel tubes, and four brace wires. It carries a 28-horsepower engine.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0143.xml
article
67
67
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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Building Their Own Abbey.
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Monks of Devonshire, England, started work on a new abbey twenty-three years ago. They have done all of the work.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0144.xml
article
67
67
POPULAR SCIENCE SCRAPBOOK
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Barge Is a Counterweight.
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Loading steel barges on the River Tyne gave this ship a dangerous list. So the captain swung a barge on the opposite side to keep his boat from foundering.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0145.xml
article
68
68,69
New Household Devices
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New Household Devices
Appliances, Machines, and Utensils Invented to Save Labor and Add to the Comfort of the Home
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0146.xml
masthead
70
70
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0147.xml
article
70
70
Editorials
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Editorials
What Is the Lesson of Air Crashes?
Morons at the Wheel
Safe Gliding to Be Safer
More of the Same Still Needed
They Are Saying—
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WITHIN the last few months a succession of air tragedies has shocked America. Worst of all, they have occurred on established, scheduled air lines. The victims have been passengers who rightfully expected safe transportation. It is easy to say, and true, that such accidents are inexcusable.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0148.xml
article
71
71
LEADING ARTICLES
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How Many Tubes Do You Need?
Number Is Only One Factor Performance of Set— Design of Circuit is Important
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ALFRED P. LANE
COUNTING the number of tubes in a radio receiver is no way to judge its quality. It is, in fact, no. more accurate than to judge an automobile by the number of cylinders in the engine. There is, for example, an eight-cylinder car on the market that develops 265 horsepower.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0149.xml
article
72
72
HELPFUL KINKS FOR THE RADIO FAN
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Novel Condenser Capacity Test
Drop Cord, Socket, and Electric Light Bulbs Reveal Condenser Secrets—Hooking Headphones to A.C.Set
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MEASURING the capacity of a fixed condenser is quite a problem to most radio fans. Condensers sold over the counter are, of course, marked with the capacity in microfarads. It is, therefore, easy enough to purchase a condenser of any desired capacity.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0150.xml
article
72
72
Radio
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Headphones Aid the Partly Deafened
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IF ONE member of the family is hard of hearing the radio receiver usually has to be turned on so loud as to be objectionable to the rest of the family. The solution is to add a pair of headphones. If it is a modern electric set the chances are it is fitted with a dynamic speaker, and, in such a set it is common practice to use a special output transformer of the step-down type which feeds directly into the voice coil of the dynamic speaker.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0151.xml
article
72
72
Radio
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A B C’s of Radio
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WHILE distortion obviously results in poor tone quality from the loudspeaker, poor tone quality is not necessarily distortion. As commonly used the terms “distortion" and “poor tone quality" do not have the same meaning. Poor tone quality is the term used to label the output of a radio receiver so poorly designed or built of such poor parts that all reception, whether at high or low volume, does not even approximate true reproduction.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0152.xml
article
73
73
LEADING ARTICLES
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Shifting Antenna to Avoid Static
No Known Way to Eliminate Trouble, but Altering the Aerial May Reduce Disturbance in Proportion to Strength of Incoming Wave
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JOHN CARR
THE radio antenna is an indispensable link in the chain of broadcast reception. It brings the radio-frequency impulses sent out by the broadcast transmitter into the radio receiver. No set can work without one any more than a person can see without eyes.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0153.xml
article
74
74,154
LEADING ARTICLES
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Your Car Is Pigeon-Toed
Gus explains why the front edges of tires should be a fraction of an inch closer than the rear
GUS SAYS—
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MARTIN BUNN
"THIS sure is my lucky day, Gus,” smiled Pop Topham as he stopped his shiny new car in front of the Model Garage. “What did you do—sell that corner plot for about twice what it’s worth?” Gus Wilson winked at his partner, Joe Clark, as the two garage men stepped up to Topham’s car.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0154.xml
article
75
75,76
POPULAR SCIENCE HOME WORKSHOP
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Making a Convenient Telephone Cabinet
Articles on Furniture, Models, Toys, Sporting Equipment, and All Forms of Craft Work—Better Shop Methods—The Shipshape Home
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WILLIAM W. KLENKE
FEW pieces of homemade furniture can equal the telephone cabinet illustrated above in convenience and attractiveness. Its construction is such that it can be made easily in a motorized home workshop; or, if no lathe is available, the legs can be turned to order at a wood turner’s or cabinetmaker’s shop.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0155.xml
article
76
76
Models
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How to Make a Railing for a Motor Boat Model
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BEING unable to obtain screw eyes suitable for use as stanchions in the construction of a railing for a motor boat model (that shown on POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY Blueprints Nos. 63 and 64, listed on page 111) and not wishing to pay the high price for regular model stanchions, the author made neat substitutes from the pins of ordinary hinges (see Fig. 1).
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0156.xml
article
77
77,78
Models
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Stagecoach Model Making
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EDWIN M. LOVE
WITH the main structural details of the Diamond Tally-Ho model completed, our little stagecoach begins to take on the lines of the romantic old coach from which it was copied. All that is left to do is to attach the platforms, upholster the interior, place the seats, and apply the paint and decorations.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0157.xml
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79
79,80
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Taylor Instrument Companies
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Taylor Instrument Companies
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0158.xml
article
81
81
Craftwork
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A Quaint Old Candle Lantern
How to Make a Copy in Tin and Glass of a Decorative Early American Light
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EDWARD THATCHER
COPIED from a design of Colonial days, the quaint candle lantern illustrated will give the beginner in decorative metal work an opportunity to practice the soldering operations described in the preceding article of this series (P.S.M., Mar. ’30, p. 82).
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0159.xml
article
82
82,84
Models
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Building a Model Glider
A Miniature Motorless Plane Like That Piloted by Schulz
COMING FEATURES
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[no value]
HI SIBLEY
BESIDES being a delightful hobby and pastime, the construction and flying of model gliders present an opportunity to learn the principles of airplane construction and the theory of flight. What could be a more instructive project for the embryo aviator than building a model of the famous motorless plane in which Ferdinand Schulz broke a world’s record by staying aloft for over fourteen hours?
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0160.xml
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83
83
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Houde Engineering Corporation
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Houde Engineering Corporation
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[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0161.xml
article
84
84
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Rubber Ball Saves Sliding Door from Slamming
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R. H. DAUTERICK
WHEN the easily constructed device shown below is installed on the jamb of a sliding door, it is impossible for anyone to slam the door closed and perhaps ruin the catch and spring jamb. The device consists of a small soft rubber ball attached to a steel arm, which in turn is fastened to the jamb of the door in such a way as to rest against the inside of the jamb when the door is open.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0162.xml
article
84
84
Ideas for the Handy Man
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How to Build a Sturdy Sawhorse
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C. A. K.
STURDY horses for use in supporting work are an indispensable part of the home workshop equipment. Makeshifts are bound to give difficulty in even the simplest of jobs and should therefore be avoided. The tops (B) of the horses shown can be made from spruce, fir, or similar wood.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0163.xml
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85
85
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RCA RADIOTRON CO.,INC.
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RCA RADIOTRON CO.,INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0164.xml
article
86
86
Helpful Ideas for the Car Owner
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Helpful Ideas for the Car Owner
Spring Holds Jack
Wiper Arm Holder
Pump Tests Loose Bearings
Simple Test for Leaks
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IF ALL roads were level and smooth, the problem of jacking up a front or back wheel to change tires would always be simple. Unfortunately, however, there are many times when the normal safe place for a tire change, off the paved portion of the road, presents unexpected difficulties.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0165.xml
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87
87
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THE INSULITE COMPANY
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THE INSULITE COMPANY
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0166.xml
article
88
88,90
Woodworking
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Completing Our Seascoot Boat
How to Plank and Calk the Sides and Bottom, Build Decks, and Attach the Deck Fittings
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W. F. CROSBY
WITH the frame erected and the seam battens, chine logs, keel, and other parts in place, our 15½-ft. outboard motor boat Seascoot began to look like a real boat. The construction had been carried to the point described in the preceding article (P. S. M., Mar. ’30, p. 75), and the frame was ready for the planking.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0167.xml
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89
89
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GRINNELL COMPANY
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GRINNELL COMPANY
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0168.xml
advertisement
91
91
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THE STUDEBAKER CORP. OF AMERICA
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THE STUDEBAKER CORP. OF AMERICA
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0169.xml
article
92
92,94
Hints for the Mechanic
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More Ways to Put Wire to Work
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HENRY SIMON
SO MANY are the uses of wire that every mechanic, amateur or professional, needs to know how to handle it expertly. And, strange to say, there are more “kinks” in using wire than anyone is likely to think—save, perhaps, the apprentice who carelessly snips apart a tightly wound coil of music wire and discovers all at once what a lot he has to learn.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0170.xml
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93
93
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0171.xml
article
94
94
Hints for the Mechanic
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Dividing Work in the Lathe
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WORK being machined in the lathe can be laid out for drilling equally spaced holes by the method illustrated. A surface gage and plate and a prepared three- or four-jawed chuck are the means employed. The chuck must be machined true on its outer cylindrical surface and then divided into 360 equal parts.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0172.xml
article
94
94
Hints for the Mechanic
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Old Bill Says—
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TO GRIND aluminum or its alloys cylindrically, use kerosene and water if no grinding compound is available. Educate yourself to safety habits; it will be profitable to you and to all those who work with you. To give a tool made of stellite a high finish, dry-grind the last .0005 in.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0173.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Tools
Micrometer Depth Gauge No. 607
Brown & Sharpe Tools
Rod Depth Gauge No. 614
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0174.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
American Safety Razor Corp.
[no value]
American Safety Razor Corp.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0175.xml
article
96
96
Woodworking
[no value]
Magazine-Rack End Table
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. CLYDE LAMMEY
USEFULNESS in the sense that it supplies ample room for books and current magazines is one of the outstanding features of the end table illustrated. For its construction the following is needed: 1 piece of 13/16 by 14 by 24 in. 5-ply walnut veneer, 1 piece of ⅜ by 24 by 48 in. 3-ply walnut veneer, 2 pieces ½ by 10 by 20 in. red gum, 1 piece 13/16 by 4 by 20 in. red gum, and 2 pieces 13/16 by 12 by 28 in. red gum.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0176.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON CO., Inc.
4-PILLAR TUBES
NATIONAL CARBON CO., Inc.
4-PILLAR SCREEN GRID
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0177.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
LARUS & BRO. CO.: EDGEWORTH SMOKING TOBACCO
[no value]
LARUS & BRO. CO.
EDGEWORTH SMOKING TOBACCO
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0178.xml
article
98
98
Craftwork
[no value]
How to Make an Embossed Leather Trinket Box
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. CLARKE HUGHES
FEW tools are needed in the construction of the attractively embossed sole leather trinket box shown. The leather can be quickly cut to shape with a sharp knife, and the embossing process is accomplished through the use of simple wire forms which are pressed into the surface of the leather.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0179.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
Indian MOTOCYCLES
[no value]
Indian MOTOCYCLES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0180.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
THE VLCHEK TOOL CO.: DURA
[no value]
THE VLCHEK TOOL CO.
DURA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0181.xml
article
100
100,102
[no value]
[no value]
Builds Home in Spare Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BUILDING bit by bit during his spare time, R. J. Stephens, of Kansas City, Mo., constructed the remarkable five-room bungalow illustrated. It is thoroughly modern, even to a built-in garage, and its materials are of the best quality throughout, yet the cost for the house and a 50 by 142 ft. lot, exclusive of Mr. Stephens’ labor, was only $2,500, every item having been recorded.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0182.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
Universal Aviation Schools
[no value]
Universal Aviation Schools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0183.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
GREENFIELD TAP AND DIE CORPORATION
[no value]
GREENFIELD TAP AND DIE CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0184.xml
article
102
102
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Varnish Sticks Cloth to Desk Top
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF A cheap, thick, quick-drying resinous varnish is used as an adhesive, a desk or table top can be re-covered easily with cloth or, for that matter, genuine or imitation leather. What is known as patching varnish will answer quite as well, but a cheaper and thicker varnish is still better.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0185.xml
article
103
103
Craftwork
[no value]
Making a Balancing Gander of Wood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. KING.
THE steadfast man is a well-balanced man—and the same is true of this gander! Its steadfastness, however, depends upon the weight of a lead slug. For making the gander, one piece of pine or whitewood by 2½by 6 in. and one piece ⅜ by 2½ by 3 in. are required.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0186.xml
article
103
103
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Where to Look for Other Mechanical Articles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY short articles of interest to mechanically minded men are scattered through the magazine in the sections preceding the Home Workshop Department. If you happen to have missed any of the following, it will pay you to turn back to the pages noted and read them.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0187.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS MFG. CO.: YANKEE
[no value]
NORTH BROS MFG. CO.
YANKEE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0188.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
AUTOSTROP SAFETY RAZOR CO., INC.: VALET Auto Strop BLADE
[no value]
AUTOSTROP SAFETY RAZOR CO., INC.
VALET Auto Strop BLADE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0189.xml
article
104
104,105
Craftwork
[no value]
Miniature Pirate’s Chest Built to Hold Jewelry
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM C. CLARK
ALTHOUGH I designed this antique looking brass-bound chest as a small filing cabinet to match a desk set I had made, my wife decided it would be much more appropriate as a jewel case. So today my filing box graces her dressing table. American black walnut is perhaps the best wood for a chest of this kind; one well-seasoned, straight-grained board ¾ by 6 in. by 4 ft. is sufficient.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0190.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Palmolive: Palmolive Shaving Cream
[no value]
Palmolive
Palmolive Shaving Cream
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0191.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Esterbrook Pen Co.: Copper Lantern
[no value]
Esterbrook Pen Co.
Copper Lantern
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0192.xml
article
106
106
Craftwork
[no value]
Decorative Glow Lights
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RICHARD GRAVES
SIMPLICITY of construction and attractiveness of design make the glow lights or torchères illustrated a worth while problem for the amateur wood turner. The lathe operations are of the simplest, and the small amount of electrical work required should not prove a stumbling block for anyone.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0193.xml
article
107
107
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Folds of Cloth Safeguard Files in Tool Box
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
K. RENNER
KEEPING files in good condition—and they are usually much abused tools— is not half so difficult if you provide a holder for them like the one illustrated. Each file is protected by cloth and is readily accessible. The holder is a box 4 in. high, long enough to receive the longest file, and deep enough to accommodate the desired number of files.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0194.xml
article
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
Stand Converts Hose into Garden Sprinkler
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. B.
BY EQUIPPING your garden hose with an adjustable nozzle and the simple standard shown, it is possible to supply a 20 ft. diameter section of your garden with an even, gentle flow of water. The standard, which can be easily made from scrap lumber, has four legs which are spread far apart to insure steadiness even with high water pressure.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0195.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
SILENT AUTOMATIC CORPORATION
[no value]
SILENT AUTOMATIC CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0196.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation: SIR WALTER RALEIGH Smoking Tobacco
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
SIR WALTER RALEIGH Smoking Tobacco
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0197.xml
article
108
108,109
Craftwork
[no value]
New Finishes for Woodwork
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BERTON ELLIOT
ASIDE from the large group of paint, varnish, and enamel finishes for interior woodwork, there are a number of special finishes that the amateur craftsman can apply. These finishes harmonize with the more modern type of wall decoration and make it possible to carry out any desired color scheme on both walls and woodwork.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0198.xml
article
109
109
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Rubber Band Helps Start Nails in Awkward Places
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. G. HOTCHKISS
NAILS can be started in awkward places if they are held firmly against the side of a hammer head with a rubber band in the manner shown. The twisted band serves as a means of holding the nail upright and immediately releases the nail as soon as it is started into the surface of the wood.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0199.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
Johnson Motor Co.: SeaHorse "24"
[no value]
Johnson Motor Co.
SeaHorse "24"
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0200.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Pal and BIKE
[no value]
Pal and BIKE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0201.xml
article
110
110
Craftwork
[no value]
How to Whittle a Toy Seaplane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DONALD W. CLARK
ANY boy who is handy with his jackknife and a few ordinary tools can easily build the realistic twenty-passenger toy flying boat illustrated. The hull is whittled from a 1 7/8 by 2 by 16 in. piece of soft pine, the pontoons from ¾ by ¾ by 4 in. blocks, and the wings from a piece of stock ⅜ by 3¾ by 20 in.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0202.xml
article
110
110
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Chucking a Paper Friction in the Lathe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES ELLIS
REBORING a paper friction generally involves the difficulty of placing the cylinder in the chuck so that it will be centered and will revolve true. This can be accomplished with little trouble, however, by placing the cylinder on an arbor that is a loose fit in the center holes of the flanges.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0203.xml
article
110
110
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Folded Paper Airplane Explodes on Landing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT L. SHAW
A TOY airplane that will explode and burn when it hits the ground can be made by attaching a large match to the nose of an airplane made by folding a piece of paper to form the fuselage and wings. A small nut similar to the kind used on dry cells is slipped over the stem of the match and allowed to rest against the head.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0204.xml
article
111
111
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
BLUEPRINTS FOR YOUR HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO ASSIST you in your home workshop, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY offers large blueprints containing working drawings of a number of well-tested projects. Each subject can be obtained for 25 cents with the exception of certain designs that require two or three sheets of blueprints and are accordingly 50 or 75 cents as noted below.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0205.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
COLGATE
[no value]
COLGATE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0206.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0207.xml
article
112
112,113
Craftwork
[no value]
Homemade Lathe for Making Deadeyes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KENNETH KOEHNLEIN
MOST amateur ship model builders find the making of deadeyes and other small fittings a long and tedious task. Excellent models sometimes remain unfinished because of the great number of deadeyes and blocks needed. With the simple lathe illustrated (Fig. 1), enough deadeyes can be turned out in a single evening to complete an elaborate model.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0208.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
BOSTON VARNISH COMPANY: Kyanize
[no value]
BOSTON VARNISH COMPANY
Kyanize
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0209.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT CO.: HANDY POCKET SCREW DRIVER SET
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT CO.
HANDY POCKET SCREW DRIVER SET
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0210.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Model Ship Supply Co.: MODEL SHIPS
[no value]
Model Ship Supply Co.
MODEL SHIPS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0211.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
HESTON & ANDERSON
[no value]
HESTON & ANDERSON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0212.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
W. B. & J. E. BOICE
[no value]
W. B. & J. E. BOICE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0213.xml
article
114
114
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Bringing Wall Switches within Child’s Beach
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. H. RUGG
MOST wall switches are too high for a small child to reach. A very simple and at the same time convenient method of bringing these switches to a lower level is shown in the illustration. An advantage of this arrangement is that the walls are in no way disfigured, and the device can be removed when it is no longer required.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0214.xml
article
114
114
Models
[no value]
Model Plane Flies Too Fast for His Camera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KNOWING that there are many who would enjoy seeing the products of other readers’ skill, Mr. Claire Wilson, of Calgary, Alberta, Canada, sent in the photograph below of his completed model of the Spirit of St. Louis. In his letter Mr. Wilson said: "I was unable to get pictures of the model in flight, as I found that it flew too swiftly for the type of camera that I used.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0215.xml
article
115
115
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Turning Heavy Pipe in a Small Lathe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. SOMAN
D. G. SURNIS
IN CONSTRUCTING a large dam in India it was necessary to machine a large pipe bend so that it could be used as part of the sluice valve piping. Such a bend should be turned on a large lathe, but since none was available it was a case of doing the best with the machines at hand.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0216.xml
article
115
115
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Accurate Jointing with Hand Plane and Guide
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. C. L.
ACCURATE jointing or edge planing of thin stock can be accomplished easily by clamping a hand plane and wooden guide in a bench vise as shown. Sharpen the plane iron to a razor edge and set it to take a very light cut. Then make a guide from a sound piece of stock and on the back of this nail a second piece about 5 in. wide, placing it so it will project 3½ in. below the lower edge of the first piece.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0217.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
J. B. WILLIAMS COMPANY: Williams SHAVING CREAM
[no value]
J. B. WILLIAMS COMPANY
Williams SHAVING CREAM
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0218.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0219.xml
article
116
116,117
Craftwork
[no value]
Hints on Building a Game Table
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G. A. REIMER
IN BUILDING a small-size pool table (such as the type described in P.S.M., Mar. ’29, p. 124), a few simple kinks can be applied that will not only simplify the construction but make the work more nearly perfect. Small size billiard balls are hard to obtain and when they are obtainable are expensive.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0220.xml
article
117
117
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Jars under Shelf Hold Hardware
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. L. FAUROT
BY SUSPENDING mayonnaise jars under your workshop shelves as shown, you can save space and at,the same time keep screws, bolts, lock washers, and various spare parts in full view. One twist of the jar will free it from its cover, and a like twist in the other direction will fasten it back in place.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0221.xml
article
117
117
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Stopping a Leak in a Hot Water Tank
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a hot water storage tank develops a leak, most householders consider it beyond repair. But a small leak can be stopped easily by driving a tapered plug of white pine or walnut into the hole. The plug should have a very gradual taper with the entering end almost as sharp as a needle.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0222.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0223.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
THE MENNEN CO.: MEIINEN SHAVING CREAMS
[no value]
THE MENNEN CO.
MEIINEN SHAVING CREAMS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0224.xml
article
118
118,119
THE SHIPSHAPE HOME
[no value]
Electric Fittings Designed to Do Double Duty
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the new and improved lighting fixtures, switches, bells, plugs, and verious appliances now on the market, it is an easy matter to add to the electrical conveniences of your home. The accessories, for the most part, are simply installed, and each has some special feature and often does double duty.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0225.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Templeton,Kenly & Co.
[no value]
Templeton,Kenly & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0226.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
The Woodworking Machinery Co., Inc.: The Electric Carpenter
[no value]
The Woodworking Machinery Co., Inc.
The Electric Carpenter
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0227.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Wm. F. Nye, Inc.
[no value]
Wm. F. Nye, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0228.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
THE BRIDGEPORT HDWE. MFG. CORP.: RIBBED BLADE
[no value]
THE BRIDGEPORT HDWE. MFG. CORP.
RIBBED BLADE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0229.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0230.xml
article
120
120
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Easy Method for Bending Large Diameter Conduit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CONDUIT between 2 and 3 in. in diameter can be bent neatly with the aid of two heavy beams and two crosspieces bolted together as shown. The position of the crosspieces is determined by how far the bend is to be from the end of the conduit, and a number of bolt holes can be bored to allow adjustments to be made quickly. The crosspieces should be of reasonably soft wood and care should be taken to do the bending cautiously to avoid kinking the conduit.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0231.xml
article
120
120
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Simple Tool Facilitates the Driving of Nails
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NAILS can be easily driven in awkward places if the simple tool illustrated is used. The tool consists of a brass tube about 8 in. long inside of which is placed a piece of drill rod having the same outside diameter as the inside of the tube.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0232.xml
article
120
120
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Useful Tool Made from Discarded Calipers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. C. F.
WITH the expenditure of little time and trouble it is possible to convert a pair of inside iron calipers into a very handy measuring tool. Heat the ends of the inside calipers and bend them so the points point in as shown in the illustration. These points can then be trued up with a file and the tool is ready for use.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0233.xml
article
121
121,122
Woodworking
[no value]
Sewing Stand Has Two Handy Trays and a Workbag
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. KING
BESIDES providing ample space for sewing equipment, the convenient, lightweight, sewing stand illustrated also has a deep bag for unfinished work. While the design is based on a segment of a circle, the construction should not be difficult for the home craftsman.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0234.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
DETROIT AIRCRAFT
[no value]
DETROIT AIRCRAFT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0235.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0236.xml
article
122
122
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Increasing the Life of Form Cutting Tools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. L. WHEELER
BY MAKING form tool holders a little higher and providing them with three binding screws instead of two, it is possible to obtain more use from any given length of tool stock. The extra screw allows the bit to be moved up farther and thus makes it possible to use the tools long after they would have become too short for the shorter type of form tool holder.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0237.xml
article
123
123,124
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Casting Concrete Stepping Stones in the Ground
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. B.
STEPPING stone garden walks of the flagstone variety can be easily and quickly constructed by casting concrete to the various shapes desired right in place instead of molding the blocks or using the natural stones and fitting them together in the proper pattern.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0238.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
P. F. COLLIER & SON DIST. CORP.
[no value]
P. F. COLLIER & SON DIST. CORP.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0239.xml
advertisement
124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0240.xml
article
124
124
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Checking Small Holes with Vernier Calipers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH C. FISHER
BY THE addition of small pins fitted on the jaws of a pair of vernier calipers, it is possible to measure accurately the distance between small holes drilled in thin plate stock. The pins are fitted in plugs which, in turn, fit the ends of the caliper jaws and are held in place with small THUMBSCREWS.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0241.xml
article
125
125
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Easily Constructed Rack Holds Fishing Rods
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT PAGE LINCOLN
ANY small amount of set that the tip of a fishing rod may have sustained in the course of a day’s fishing can be removed if the rod is hung in the handy clothespin rack shown below. The heads of a number of clothespins are shaved off and the pins inserted in holes bored in a strip of wood 1 in. thick and 2½ in. wide.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0242.xml
article
125
125
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Support for Power Hack Saw Stock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. L. WHEELER
A SUBSTANTIAL and handy support for rod stock which is being cut in a power hack saw can be made from short ends of scrap iron. The parts assembled consist of two pieces of 2-in. angle iron, 8 in. long and bolted to a piece of 10-in. channel iron, which are supported from the floor by two legs which can be made from any suitable size of flat stock iron bent to the shape indicated.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0243.xml
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125
125
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
ADDISON-LESLIE CO.
Dented Fenders
ADDISON-LESLIE CO.
Worn Out Door Bumpers
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0244.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0245.xml
article
126
126,127
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Installing Closet Conveniences
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DAVID WEBSTER
IN THE hardware store, the department store, the home furnishing store, and even in the "five and ten" may be found various inexpensive closet fixtures which add much to the capacity and convenience of any closet. To install them requires nothing more than the ability to use a screw driver, for usually all necessary screws and fittings come with them.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0246.xml
article
127
127
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Steel Square Simplifies Structural Layouts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. B. DEAN
A CONVENIENT square for use in laying out either timbers or structural steel can be made as illustrated by cutting a right-angle triangle from lightweight sheet metal. The triangle is extended 1 in. below the base line for attaching the wooden guides, which are fastened in place with four soft copper rivets.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0247.xml
article
127
127
Craftwork
[no value]
Block Puzzling—The Latest Craze
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BLOCK puzzling, which is fast becoming popular with puzzle enthusiasts, is not new to the readers of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. Puzzles of this kind have been described in this magazine many times in the past, and six especially ingenious puzzles of this type are included in our Blueprint No. 65 (see page 111).
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0248.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0249.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0250.xml
article
128
128,129,130
Craftwork
[no value]
An Escape Trick and Envelope Mystery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE S. GREENE
DOING what seems to be the impossible is one of the requisites of all magicians, amateur and professional. For instance, escape from the “witch stocks” illustrated would be quite a feat—unless you knew just how the trick is done. The effectiveness of the trick is only surpassed by the ease with which the stocks can be constructed and the simplicity of the trick itself.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0251.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
J. D. WALLACE & COMPANY: WORKACE Electric WOODWORKER
[no value]
J. D. WALLACE & COMPANY
WORKACE Electric WOODWORKER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0252.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0253.xml
article
131
131
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Cheap Self-Feeder Reduces Cost of Keeping Pigs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the expenditure of but a little time and money, it is possible to supply a farm with a waste-preventing self-feeder for pigs as shown below. The practical value of this design can be gaged by the fact that Prof. B. V. McCaul, of the North Dakota Agricultural College, has built several of them for use on his own farm.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0254.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Savogran Co.: SAVOGRAN CRACK FILLER
[no value]
Savogran Co.
SAVOGRAN CRACK FILLER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0255.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
International Mill & Timber Co.
[no value]
International Mill & Timber Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0256.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
The RUSSELL JENNINGS MFG. CO.
[no value]
The RUSSELL JENNINGS MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0257.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0258.xml
article
132
132
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
HOME WORKSHOP CHEMISTRY
Simple Formulas That Will Save Both Time and Money
[no value]
[no value]
H. BADE
FOR cracks in floors and other woodwork that are too wide to be filled satisfactorily with common types of crack fillers, a hard, nonshrinking filler can be made as follows: Heat ½ lb. of yellow ochre (a finely powdered pigment obtainable at any large paint store) over a flame to drive off all moisture.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0259.xml
article
133
133,134,135
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Remodeling a Tool Grinder to Do Tap Fluting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
O. S. MARSHALL
REFINEMENTS in modern machine shop taps demand that the flutes be spaced and ground accurately. As yet no special machine is available to do this work, but with the application of a few simple attachments it is possible to convert a small tool and cutter grinder into an accurate flute grinder and spacer for use on small taps.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0260.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Delta Specialty Co.
[no value]
Delta Specialty Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0261.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
PLYMOUTH ROCK SQUAB CO.
[no value]
PLYMOUTH ROCK SQUAB CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0262.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN CHIME CLOCK COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICAN CHIME CLOCK COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0263.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
TRIMONT MFG. CO.: TRIMO FERGUSON PATTERN BUMPING TOOLS
[no value]
TRIMONT MFG. CO.
TRIMO FERGUSON PATTERN BUMPING TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0264.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
HAMMARLUND-ROBERTS, Inc.: CUSTOM RADIO
[no value]
HAMMARLUND-ROBERTS, Inc.
CUSTOM RADIO
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0265.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
LOFTIS BROS.& CO.
[no value]
LOFTIS BROS.& CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0266.xml
article
135
135
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Tapered Keys Accurately Machined in the Miller
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. S. GALLMAN
TAPERED keys can be machined quickly and accurately in the milling machine if they are held at the proper angle in the miller vise by the use of small blocks. For purposes of illustration, let us say that the taper figures .075 in. in every 6 7/8 in.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0267.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0268.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Old Town Canoe Co.
[no value]
Old Town Canoe Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0269.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
J. C. Deagan, Inc.
[no value]
J. C. Deagan, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0270.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
CARHART PRODUCTS: Oil Filling Pipe Cap
[no value]
CARHART PRODUCTS
Oil Filling Pipe Cap
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0271.xml
article
136
136
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Molding a Concrete Roller for Lawns
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. B. BROOKS
FEW tools and supplies are needed in the construction of the serviceable concrete lawn roller shown in Fig. 1. The roller as made by the writer is 18 in. long by 18 in. in diameter and weighs approximately 400 lb., allowing for the shaft and handle.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0272.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON CO., Inc.
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON CO., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0273.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
The CARBORUNDUM Company
[no value]
The CARBORUNDUM Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0274.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0275.xml
advertisement
139
139
[no value]
[no value]
RCA INSTITUTES, Inc.
[no value]
RCA INSTITUTES, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0276.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0277.xml
advertisement
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO & TELEVISION INSTITUTE
[no value]
RADIO & TELEVISION INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0278.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0279.xml
article
143
143,144
[no value]
[no value]
Here Are Correct Answers to Questions on Page 46
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
1. Water cannot be siphoned above the height to which it can be pushed by atmospheric pressure. As atmospheric pressure at sea level is approximately sixteen pounds per square inch, and a column of water thirty-two feet high weighs sixteen pounds per square inch, this height represents the theoretical limit.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0280.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
L. L. COOKE SCHOOL OF ELECTRICITY
[no value]
L. L. COOKE SCHOOL OF ELECTRICITY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0281.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
BLISS ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
BLISS ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0282.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0283.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
[no value]
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0284.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0285.xml
article
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
Tomb Found in Mongolia May Solve Greek Myth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Greeks believed that far to the north of them lived a weird people called the Hyperboreans, or “Dwellers behind the North Winds.” Archeology has come forward to prove they were right. A Russian explorer, Professor Peter Kozlov, has just discovered a remarkable tomb in the mountain passes of northern Mongolia, in which he found various significant objects, unspoiled by the dust of passing centuries.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0286.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
THE FATE-ROOT-HEATH CO.
[no value]
THE FATE-ROOT-HEATH CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0287.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0288.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
American School
[no value]
American School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0289.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Aviation Institute of U. S. A.
[no value]
Aviation Institute of U. S. A.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0290.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0291.xml
advertisement
147
147
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0292.xml
advertisement
148
148
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0293.xml
advertisement
149
149
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0294.xml
article
150
150
[no value]
[no value]
Rheology, a New Science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RHEOLOGY is the science involved when you spread a brushful of paint on the garage door. It is the science of flow, so christened by a group of chemists and physicists who recently gathered at the United States Bureau of Standards in Washington to study the deforming and flowing action of paints, oils, lacquers, and other plastic substances.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0295.xml
advertisement
150
150
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0296.xml
advertisement
151
151
[no value]
[no value]
CLARENCE A. O’BRIEN
[no value]
CLARENCE A. O’BRIEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0297.xml
advertisement
152
152
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0298.xml
advertisement
153
153
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0299.xml
advertisement
154
154
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0300.xml
article
154
154
[no value]
[no value]
Skull with Apelike Jaw May Be That of a Man
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF THE skull with an apelike jaw, found recently near Peking by Dr. Davidson Black, of the Peking Union Medical College, should prove to be that of a human being, evolutionists will have established a very valuable link in their theory of man’s ascent from the monkey.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0301.xml
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155
155
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0302.xml
article
156
156
[no value]
[no value]
Moth’s Birth Rings Bell
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE birth of a royal prince or princess is usually hailed with the pealing of chimes, but in the new Slough Entomological Laboratory in London, England, a bell rings every time a moth is born. The entomologists in charge of the laboratory find it necessary to keep accurate records of their study specimens, including the exact time of their birth.
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0303.xml
advertisement
156
156
[no value]
[no value]
McCARRIE SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL DENTISTRY
[no value]
McCARRIE SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL DENTISTRY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0304.xml
advertisement
156
156
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0305.xml
advertisement
157
157
[no value]
[no value]
American School
[no value]
American School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0306.xml
advertisement
157
157
[no value]
[no value]
R. B. SPECIALTY COMPANY
[no value]
R. B. SPECIALTY COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0307.xml
advertisement
157
157
[no value]
[no value]
Federal Schools Bldg.
[no value]
Federal Schools Bldg.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0308.xml
advertisement
158
158
[no value]
[no value]
DWIGHT LUMBER COMPANY
[no value]
DWIGHT LUMBER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0309.xml
advertisement
158
158
[no value]
[no value]
Procter & Gamble, Dept.
[no value]
Procter & Gamble, Dept.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0310.xml
advertisement
158
158
[no value]
[no value]
Veeder-ROOT INCORPORATED
[no value]
Veeder-ROOT INCORPORATED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0311.xml
advertisement
159
159
[no value]
[no value]
FOLMER GRAFLEX CORPORATION
[no value]
FOLMER GRAFLEX CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0312.xml
advertisement
160
160
[no value]
[no value]
ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0313.xml
advertisement
161
161
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON CO., INC.
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON CO., INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0314.xml
advertisement
162
162
[no value]
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.: Lucky Strike
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.
Lucky Strike
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300401_0116_004_0315.xml