Issue: 19300201

Saturday, February 1, 1930
February, 1930
2
True
116
Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1,2
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0001.xml
advertisement
0_2
0_2
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0002.xml
advertisement
1
1
[no value]
[no value]
CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
[no value]
CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0003.xml
tableOfContents
2
2,3
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0004.xml
article
4
4,5,6
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Trading in CHINESE LAUNDRY TICKETS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WALLACE AMES
EXPLANATORY foreword: To aid getting ahead through investment —that is the object of this department; it does not foster speculation. But something happened in the financial world, beginning October 24, 1929, which affected investors as well as speculators, causing a violent re-adjustment in viewpoint and reasoning as applied to money.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0005.xml
advertisement
4
4
[no value]
[no value]
Cochran & McCluer Co.
[no value]
Cochran & McCluer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0006.xml
advertisement
4
4
[no value]
[no value]
W. Atlee Burpee Co.
[no value]
W. Atlee Burpee Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0007.xml
advertisement
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
[no value]
PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0008.xml
article
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
To Help You Get Ahead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Booklets listed below will help every family in laying out a financial plan. They will be sent on request. The House Behind the Bonds reminds the investor of the importance, not only of studying the investment, but of checking up the banker who offers it.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0009.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation: SIR GVLTER RALEIGH
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
SIR GVLTER RALEIGH
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0010.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
[no value]
FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0011.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
INVESTORS SYNDICATE
[no value]
INVESTORS SYNDICATE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0012.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
Westinghouse
[no value]
Westinghouse
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0013.xml
advertisement
8
8
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0014.xml
advertisement
9
9
[no value]
[no value]
ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA, INC.
[no value]
ENCYCLOPAEDIA BRITANNICA, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0015.xml
advertisement
10
10
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTROL INCORPORATED
[no value]
ELECTROL INCORPORATED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0016.xml
advertisement
11
11
[no value]
[no value]
NORTON
[no value]
NORTON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0017.xml
article
12
12
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Where Does the House Heat Go?
Most of It Is Lost through the Roof and Walls; How Careful Insulation Prevents Waste of Fuel
[no value]
[no value]
F. G. PRYOR
MOST people carefully bar their doors to prevent any loss of valuables, and at the same time make no particular effort to stop the heat from leaking out of the house through roof, walls, and windows. Fuel is the largest single item of expenditure in maintaining the comfort of the ordinary home, and yet it has been estimated conservatively that the annual waste in fuel in the United States amounts to $450,000,000 just because of poor or unscientific construction of dwellings.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0018.xml
advertisement
13
13
[no value]
[no value]
MASONITE CORPORATION
[no value]
MASONITE CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0019.xml
article
14
14,16
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Our Readers Say
Too Many Eyeglasses?
What About This, Randy?
A Fiery Argument
Get Out Your Pencil
Yes, but Why?
A Reader in Trouble
Tailor-Made Inspiration
M. O. R. Draws Fire
Do You Agree?
Now—A Walking Fish
“Printed Gold”
Skyscraper Stories
Hot Off the Workbench
What Do You Say, Doc?
A Cheap Education
No Worse Than Politics
Big Mystery Solved!
Champion of New Cars
More on the Way
Free Guesses—Who’s Next?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAN any one list some adequate reasons for the tremendous increase in the wearing of glasses by persons of all ages during the past thirty years? To believe the oculists you would have to assume that there was no getting away from the terrible onslaught of spectacles which was destined to engulf the whole human race within a decade or so.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0020.xml
advertisement
15
15
[no value]
[no value]
Lambert Pharmacal Company
[no value]
Lambert Pharmacal Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0021.xml
advertisement
17
17
[no value]
[no value]
Western Electric SOUND SYSTEM
[no value]
Western Electric SOUND SYSTEM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0022.xml
advertisement
18
18
[no value]
[no value]
THE CELOTEX COMPANY
[no value]
THE CELOTEX COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0023.xml
article
19
19,20,21,144,145
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Shall Speed Laws Be Abolished?
Speed-with-Safety Plan
[no value]
[no value]
THE EDITOR
“A BOLISH all the speed laws!” With that drastic suggestion, Paul G. Hoffman, Vice President of the Studebaker Corporation of America, exploded a bombshell at a recent meeting of the National Safety Council in Chicago. The members of the Council, gathered to consider methods of promoting safety in various fields, had devoted much time to the urgent problem of automobile speed limits.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0024.xml
article
22
22
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Now—The Automatic Pilot
Remarkable Gyro-Electric Mechanism Holds the Stick and Guides an Airplane on Its Course for Three Hours without Human Aid
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OVER Ohio, the other day, a big tri-motored Ford plowed through the air on its way to Washington, D. C. Four men leaned back at ease in the passenger cabin. Yet the pilot’s compartment was empty. A metal airman, scarcely larger than an automobile battery, was holding the stick.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0025.xml
article
23
23,24
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Latest Trends in Motorboating
New Inboard Runabouts, Outboard Cabin Cruisers, and Commuter Hydroplanes Meet the Demands for Sport and Speed on Uncongested Water Highways
[no value]
[no value]
ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
THE “flivver motor boat” is here. For the first time in motor boat history, a fast inboard “runabout”—meaning a small open craft for sport and errands—can be bought for the modest price of an outboard. An entirely new type of high-speed motor, light in weight and portable, that can be installed within the hull of a boat, has made it possible.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0026.xml
article
25
25
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Announcing a $10,000 Annual Award
for the Most Valuable Achievement in Science
THE COMMITTEE OF AWARD
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN 1872, Edward Livingston Youmans founded POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. A friend of Spencer, of Huxley, of Tyndall, this blind, self-taught scholar walked with the kings of science and retained his human touch. He spent his life opening a world of wonder to the many who lacked the benefit of technical training.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0027.xml
article
26
26,27,139,140
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Better Fuels for Better Motors
Here Are the Facts about Present-Day Gasoline Every Car Owner Wants to Know—What It Is, Where It Comes From, and How Science Produces and Improves the Million Barrels Consumed Daily
[no value]
[no value]
E. H. HAMILTON
GASOLINE, many people are now discovering, is not just a smelly liquid that must be pumped into the auto tank at periodic intervals. Different gasolines may look alike. They may even smell alike and yet be as different in performance as a tugboat and a Gold Cup racer.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0028.xml
article
28
28
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Solve Riddle of Egypt’s "Man Queen"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY SOLVING a mystifying archeological jig saw puzzle, members of the Egyptian expedition of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, have reconstructed for the first time shattered statues of a feminine pharaoh who ruled Egypt with an iron hand 3,400 years ago.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0029.xml
article
29
29,30,137
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
"Patterns”—The New Psychology
Art Authority Describes the Latest Theory of “Gestalt ” Comparing It with Freudian and Other Ideas of Behavior
[no value]
[no value]
A. T. POFFENBERGER
PSYCHOLOGY is the science of running things. Driving an automobile, piloting an airplane, building a house, writing a book, constructing a machine, winning a war, making a success out of a business; all these are compounded out of human thoughts and actions.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0030.xml
article
31
31
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Plan Overland "Flying Hotels”
Gigantic Eight-Motor Planes to Carry 160 Passengers and Crew in Roomy, Hollow Wings
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN E. LODGE
"FLYING hotels” with accommodations for 160 air passengers are planned for American airways, according to the recent announcement of a Connecticut firm which projects their construction. The monster land planes, whose wing span of 262 feet would make them nearly twice the size of any airplane ever built, would be used for cross-country transportation in competition with railroads.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0031.xml
article
32
32,33,142
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Sailing Faster Than the Wind
Ice Yacht Pilots Match Their Skill at 100 Miles an Hour—The Speediest Motorless Sport in the World
[no value]
[no value]
BARROW LYONS
IT IS a bleak wintry day on the Shrewsbury River in northeastern New Jersey. A cutting wind sends flurries of snow scudding across the open expanse of black river ice. Hundreds of cars, and people bundled in furs and mackinaws, line the southern shore.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0032.xml
article
34
34,35
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Canyons from the Sky
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0033.xml
article
36
36,37
Nature
[no value]
WHEN DO WE EAT?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0034.xml
article
38
38,39
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
They Got There Just the Same
Looking Back Along the Road in Transportation; Quaint Predecessors of Modern Speed and Power
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0035.xml
article
40
40
Aviation
[no value]
Keeping Pace with Aviation—The Latest Inventions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0036.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
[no value]
Testing a Transatlantic Mail Rocket—The Latest Advances in Airplane and Dirigible Construction
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOW ready for test, the first model of the transatlantic mail rocket designed by Prof. Herman Oberth, Berlin experimenter, will fly alone. No human being will venture ascent in the thirty-foot projectile that the inventor plans to fire over the North Sea in a test of its propelling fuel.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0037.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
[no value]
Girders for Airships Made Lighter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A STRUCTURAL girder so light that a sixteen-foot length can be lifted by the little finger, yet so strong that it will support sixteen men, is one of the latest achievements of the United States Bureau of Standards. It is made of trussed aluminum strips, and is being used for airship building.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0038.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
[no value]
“Weather Room” Reveals Best Aircraft Colors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SUNNY days like those of midsummer, or nights with full moon and starlit skies, are reproduced at will in a unique “weather room” constructed by a Pittsburgh, Pa., glass company to test the advantages of different colors for increasing the visibility of airplanes.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0039.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
[no value]
Four-Hand Airplane Clock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO minute and two hour hands are features of a new style of clock developed especially for use in airplanes. Two stationary hands are colored red and are set by the pilot at the start of a flight by means of a knurled knob to show the time of the take-off.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0040.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
[no value]
Commercial “Blimps” Fly 132,000 Miles Safely
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIX “blimps” operated by an Akron, Ohio, rubber concern and forming America’s only commercial dirigible fleet are reported to have carried 6,000 passengers more than 132,000 miles without injury to passengers or crew. The tiny dirigibles have landed more than 4,000 times in establishing this record.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0041.xml
article
41
41,42
Aviation
[no value]
A Clearing House for Inventions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NO MATTER how queer the inventions of aviation enthusiasts, a number of manufacturers take pains to consider them carefully for fear that otherwise some really revolutionary idea may be lost. A Detroit aircraft firm even maintains a special research bureau to consider the worth of what are generally regarded as “nut” inventions.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0042.xml
article
42
42
Aviation
[no value]
Only One Out of Twenty Passengers Is Airsick
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONLY about five percent of air passengers are subject to “airsickness,” that curious aerial malady that corresponds to seasickness on the ocean. This is revealed by a survey recently made by the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics, which also concludes that airsickness is much more easily prevented and cured than seasickness.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0043.xml
article
42
42
Aviation
[no value]
New Pursuit Plane Goes 181 Miles an Hour
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DRIVEN by a 600-horsepower motor, and with the framework of its streamlined fuselage constructed of a new lightweight type of steel, the P-6, latest Army pursuit plane, is said to be capable of a speed of 181 miles an hour. Officials say that it will enable the United States Army Air Corps to bid successfully against the air services of the world for supremacy in pursuit aircraft.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0044.xml
article
42
42
Aviation
[no value]
Air Mail to Patagonia
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PATAGONIA, the sparsely inhabited southern region of Argentina and long the symbol of remoteness, is now linked to the rest of the world by air mail. Twice-a-week mail and passenger service has just been inaugurated between the city of Commodor Rivadavia, situated less than 600 miles north of Cape Horn, and Buenos Aires, in Argentina.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0045.xml
article
42
42
Aviation
[no value]
Largest Amphibian Could Fly across Ocean
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DESIGNED for transatlantic flying, a new amphibian built at Chicago is said to be able to fly 4,200 miles without alighting. It is the largest of its kind in the world. The all-metal liner has a wing spread of seventy-two feet and carries fourteen persons.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0046.xml
article
42
42
Aviation
[no value]
Air Express Has Carried Nearly 3,000 Tons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ABOUT 5,845,000 pounds of express have been carried by airplanes operating over American air lines during the last three years, according to a recent report of the United States Department of Commerce. Fast delivery of newspapers is one of the services performed by express planes, and another has been the transfer of large sums of money in bullion and currency.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0047.xml
article
42
42
Aviation
[no value]
Stickers Call Attention to Air Mail Letters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BUSINESS letters by air mail would receive special attention, plane operators have contended, if the recipient of such a letter knew that it came by air. However, the envelope, the only evidence of its manner of delivery, often is removed and thrown into the wastebasket before a letter reaches the person to whom it is addressed.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0048.xml
article
42
42,43
Aviation
[no value]
Guggenheim Safety Test Has Few Survivors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOUR planes still remained in the Daniel Guggenheim Safe Aircraft Competition at this writing, with a fifth a possible contestant. The rest of twenty-five planes originally entered either had failed to pass the qualification tests or had withdrawn.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0049.xml
article
43
43
Aviation
[no value]
Passengers Ride in Wings of Biggest Land Plane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN A successful maiden flight of half an hour, the world’s largest land plane— the Junkers monoplane G-38, with a wing span of 148 feet—recently vindicated the expectations of its builders. It is called the nearest approach to the ideal of airplane designers—a “flying wing,” unimpeded by outer projections and with exposed motor surface and fuselage reduced to a minimum.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0050.xml
article
43
43
Aviation
[no value]
Flight to South Pole a Navigation Triumph
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most serious problems with which Commander Richard E. Byrd had to contend on his recent spectacular dash by air to the South Pole was how to find his way back, air experts declare. Capt. L. A. Yancey, air navigation authority, points out that at the pole all directions are north.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0051.xml
article
43
43
Aviation
[no value]
Cut Flowers by Plane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THROUGH a recently developed system of transporting cut flowers by airplane, thousands of tons of blooms from the Netherlands, put aboard fast planes at the Dutch airports of Schiphol and Waalhaven, reach foreign markets each day still fresh and dewy.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0052.xml
article
43
43
Aviation
[no value]
Now—Flying "Minute Men"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWENTY-TWO New Jersey civilians recently formed the “Newark Air Service,” an independent flying organization, and started taking flying lessons. Then they donned uniforms of their own creation, appointed officers, and offered their services to the Government as a unit of flying “Minute Men” in the event of a national emergency.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0053.xml
article
43
43
Aviation
[no value]
Helium Cost Cut Again
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW economy in producing helium gas for dirigibles is reported by the United States Bureau of Mines. The cost has now been reduced at its Amarillo, Texas, plant to less than a cent and a half per cubic foot. Once helium cost $2,000 a cubic foot.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0054.xml
article
44
44
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Which Five Inventions Are Greatest? Seven Cash Prizes for Best Selections
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SPIRITED discussion was started among the editors of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY the other day by the news that a Philadelphia judge had admitted the talkie confession of a burglar in evidence at the trial of the prisoner. “Here,” said Edgar C. Wheeler, Associate Editor, “is a striking example of the quick and far-reaching effects of an ingenious invention.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0055.xml
article
44
44
[no value]
[no value]
The Rules of the Contest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
1 Which, in your opinion, are the five inventions that have exercised the greatest and most far-reaching influence on the progress of civilization? For the best answers to this question, giving the names of the inventors and the reasons for your selection, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY will award $100 in cash prizes—a First Prize of $50, a Second Prize of $25, and Five Prizes of $5 each.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0056.xml
article
45
45
Engineering
[no value]
Inside a Modem Grain Elevator
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE successive operations by which a typical modern grain elevator receives, stores, and handles grain for shipment are pictured here and indicated by number. The pneumatic equipment at the left in the drawing is a recent device for reconditioning wet grain.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0057.xml
article
46
46
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Canal Paintings Saved from Ruin
How Science Conquered the Mold Which Menaced Valuable Murals of the Great Panama Waterway
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE LEE DOWD
A FEW months ago the five mural paintings depicting the construction of the Panama Canal, canta vases covering 400 square feet of wall space in the Administration Building at Balboa, were in danger of extinction from the ravages of mold.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0058.xml
article
47
47,48,147,148,149,150
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Meeting Emergencies in the Air
The War Bird-Instructor Who Taught Larry Brent Tells of Tight Adventures with the Unexpected
[no value]
[no value]
ASSEN JORDANOFF
THE unexpected rides with every pilot. From the take-off run to the three-point landing anything may happen. My strangest flying adventure took place only thirty feet above the ground. I had landed a Travel Air at a practice plot five miles from Curtiss Field, New York.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0059.xml
article
49
49
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Back of the Month’s News
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KARL VOOGHT
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0060.xml
article
49
49
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
World’s Most Accurate Portable Timepiece
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RINGS of crystal quartz not much larger than finger rings form the hearts of the most accurate portable timekeepers yet devised. Developed by Dr. W. A. Marrison, of the Bell Telephone Laboratories, New York City, the new device has operated as a precision clock, week in week out, with a daily error of less than one one-hundredth of a second.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0061.xml
article
49
49,50
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
A New Anesthetic
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN SEARCHING for a poison, two University of Toronto, Canada, biologists, G. W. H. Lucas and F. C. Henderson, recently discovered a new general anesthetic, cyclopropane. Tested upon animals, this gas is said to have proved superior to chloroform for certain kinds of surgical work.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0062.xml
article
50
50
[no value]
[no value]
U. S. Army Truck Runs On "Gasogene"—Wood Fuel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT THE Presidio in San Francisco recently United States military authorities tried out an Army truck running on a new fuel system burning wood. The combustion outfit somewhat resembles a furnace. Wood blocks are burned in an open container, the fumes given off pass through four cylinders, and emerge as gases which, carried to the engine, are there exploded like ordinary gasoline.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0063.xml
article
50
50
Nature
[no value]
A Tree Within a Tree
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NATURE’S freaks usually are the least expected. Roaming his orchard a few weeks ago, Cook Walker, of Laytonsville, Md., singled out a York Imperial apple tree thirty-five years old ready to cut for fireplace wood. He felled it and laid it on the block.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0064.xml
article
50
50,51
Engineering
[no value]
World’s Largest Shovel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MONSTER electric shovel, which can lift 100 tons—the weight of a medium-sized locomotive—to the height of a seven-story building, began a Herculean job recently when the Fidelity coal mine, Du Quoin, Ill., was opened. Largest in the world, the excavator was designed for a capacity of twenty cubic yards.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0065.xml
article
51
51
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Hearing without a Sound
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HEARING with an eardrum vibrated by electricity instead of by sound waves, a man in New York City recently listened to music inaudible to other members of an audience witnessing a demonstration by Dr. Sergius P. Grace, of the Bell Telephone Laboratories.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0066.xml
article
51
51,146
Nature
[no value]
How Birds and Flowers Get Their Colors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR the first time, the beauty of field and garden has been put on a quantitative, scientific basis. Actually charting the colors of cosmos, rose, and gladiola is the feat recently accomplished by Dr. Samuel G. Hibben, of the Westinghouse Lamp Company.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0067.xml
article
51
51,150,151
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
How Much Do You Know About the Human Body?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TEST your knowledge with these questions, chosen from hundreds asked by our readers. You will find the correct answers on page 150. 1. How do you keep your balance? 2. What makes you sneeze? 3. What makes muscles work? 4. Why do some people grow so tall?
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0068.xml
article
52
52
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Airports for the Future
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0069.xml
article
53
53
Engineering
[no value]
Electrified Coaling Station Feeds Locomotives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TIME and energy saver of unusual efficiency has been introduced into railroad yards of London, England. A scene which is becoming familiar at King’s Cross Station is the coaling of a giant locomotive within fifteen minutes, by an electric elevator.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0070.xml
article
53
53
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Gems Fourteen Feet Long
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROCK crystals as long as an automobile were recently uncovered in a quarry near Albany, Maine. The remarkable columnlike structures of beryl measured from twelve to fourteen feet long and from two to three feet thick. A movement is on foot to obtain the gigantic semiprecious stones for preservation in a museum.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0071.xml
article
54
54
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Wood Fibers May Cut Cost of High-Grade Papers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A REVOLUTION in the paper making industry may result from experiments conducted by the United States Bureau of Standards to show that certain wood fibers can be chemically treated to remove the excessive amounts of impurities they contain and thus make them suitable for the manufacture of the high-grade, durable papers used for permanent records.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0072.xml
article
54
54
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Two New Vitamins Found by Women Chemists
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNTIL a few weeks ago the world’s biological chemists had let two vitamins escape unnoticed. News has come from London, however, that Katherine Hope Coward and her colleagues at the Laboratory of the London Pharmaceutical Society have captured one of these chemical eels, and that Vera Reader of the Biochemical Department at Oxford University has captured the other.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0073.xml
article
54
54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Mighty Machines Test Strength of Metals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN OCEAN liner many times as powerful as the Leviathan could be dragged backward through the water, in spite of churning propellers, if it were attached to a giant pulling apparatus for testing metals recently installed in a laboratory at Berlin, Germany.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0074.xml
article
54
54
Aviation
[no value]
Looking Down on Largest Dirigible Hangar
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS aerial photograph of the mammoth Goodyear-Zeppelin hangar under construction at Akron, O., was taken during the recent ceremonies marking the beginning of work on the United States Navy dirigible ZRS-4 Built to accommodate what will be the world’s largest lighter-than-air craft, the hangar is capacious enough for three football games to be played simultaneously within it.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0075.xml
article
55
55
Aviation
[no value]
Scale Model Shows Plan of Roof-Top Airport
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PLANS for a $10,500,000 air terminal building for Los Angeles, Calif., which will include a roof-top landing field nearly 1,000 feet long, have been embodied in a realistic model of the building prepared under the direction of O. R. Angelillo, chief engineer in charge of the project.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0076.xml
article
55
55
Exceptional People
[no value]
Back-Yard Inventor Builds Mining Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A LABOR-SAVING machine that saved no labor for its inventor was completed recently by Thomas G. Duncan, of Los Angeles, Calif., after six years of work. Duncan’s apparatus is an electrical working model of machinery designed for use in mining operations.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0077.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Finds Men Are Hurt More Easily Than Women
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN EXPERIMENTS to determine the nature of pain, Prof. Uginelli, of Florence, Italy, has found that the cheek and the forehead are by far the most sensitive skin territories of the body, while the outer arm is by far the toughest. This toughness can be explained by centuries of wear and tear to which the arms have been subjected in maintaining the body defenses.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0078.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Mysterious “Onion Rays” Cause Cells to Grow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAYS emitted by growing onion roots stimulated the growth of cells from a frog’s eye in a recent laboratory experiment conducted by a Swiss biologist, Dr. Andre Naville. His test confirmed the earlier discovery of the mysterious “onion rays” by a Russian biologist, Dr. A. Gurvitch.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0079.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Disease Stops Mice from Conquering the Earth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BIOLOGIST once computed that if oysters were allowed to reproduce without check, they would swamp the whole earth inside of eight years. Now Charles Elton, zoologist of Oxford University, England, has stated that if the mouse population did not suffer a periodic decrease, the situation for mice would be similar to that for oysters.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0080.xml
article
56
56
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Finds Germs Change Hands with Every Clasp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE alleged Chinese custom of shaking hands with one’s self instead of with the other fellow may spread over the world if sanitary experts have their way. Bacteriologists and physicians often insist that disease germs may be communicated from one person to others by a handshake.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0081.xml
article
56
56
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
New Fishing Boat Freezer Keeps the Catch Fresh
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHALE and walrus meat, centuries old and buried in glaciers, has often been found in such an excellent state of preservation that it would make palatable roast steak for dinner. A new type of fishing trawler, however, that will do the work of the glacier for ordinary fish within four seconds, recently made its trial trip at Kiel, Germany, and is expected to revolutionize deep-sea fishing methods.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0082.xml
article
56
56
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
This Farm Raises Herds of Corn-Fed Worms
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FISHERMEN need no longer fear that droughts will cut off their supply of bait, in view of a great angleworm farm which is now in the process of rapid growth at Alhambra, Calif. With a crop which for only six months reached the figure of 300,000 worms, this novel industry may challenge the raising of citrus fruits in that state for a place on the map.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0083.xml
article
56
56
[no value]
[no value]
A “Baker” of Wax Turkeys and Sawdust Pies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PASTRIES that tempt by their appearance but prove to be filled only with sawdust, and well-browned turkeys whose wax flesh defies the strongest teeth, are among the products that come from the strange kitchen of Herbert Bohrmann, of New York City.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0084.xml
article
56
56
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Pencil Holds Note Paper—Envelopes Next?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CARRYING a roll of paper in its barrel, a novel pencil from Germany, though no larger than an ordinary magazine pencil, will supply at a moment’s notice all the materials essential for writing a note. In addition, it carries extra leads, the lead and the paper being separately operated.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0085.xml
article
57
57
Engineering
[no value]
River Imprisoned in Thirteen-Mile Tunnel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIRTY-THREE giant excavators, some of them digging 8,000 tons of clay in twenty-four hours—more than 1,400 men could dig in the same time, working in ten-hour. shifts—are part of the elaborate machinery required to imprison the unruly and malodorous River des Peres, near St. Louis, Mo., in a man-made tunnel and force it to change its course.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0086.xml
article
57
57
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Racing Boat Throws Rider and Leaps Ashore
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TOSSING its driver into the water and then charging straight for the river bank, an outboard motor boat came to rest high and dry during a recent race at Rickmansworth, Hertfordshire, England. As the Invicta II sped around one of the buoys marking the course in the River Colne, a tributary of the Thames, H. G. Reigate, who was at the wheel, was jerked cleanly out of his seat and left behind.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0087.xml
article
57
57
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Lustrous Pearl Buttons from Clamshells
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MORE lustrous and valuable mother of pearl from clamshells for use in the manufacture of buttons is the aim of Professor Max Ellis, a Missouri physiologist and investigator for the United States Bureau of Fisheries. Rejecting Nature’s methods as too perilous for the early life of clams, he will raise the young ones in test tubes that can each contain millions of the little buttons-tobe.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0088.xml
article
57
57
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Habitual Leg Crossers Warned of Palsy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LEG crossing, once a unique privilege of man but lately taken over by women, should be abandoned by everybody, according to Dr. Henry W. Whitman, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., who holds the habit responsible for most cases of palsy.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0089.xml
article
57
57
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Volcanoes Help to Make the Ocean Salty
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT keeps the ocean briny? The 485 known volcanoes of the world, spouting yearly more than a hundred million tons of hydrochloric acid, combine with the rivers to salt the sea. The rivers bring down quantities of sodium which unite with the acid to form sodium chloride or common salt.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0090.xml
article
58
58
[no value]
[no value]
Heated Windshield Wiper Melts Ice on Glass
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRIC heat warms the newest automobile windshield wiper to help it clear snow and sleet from the winter driver’s path of vision. In appearance it resembles an ordinary wiper, and is attached in the conventional way. But the jointed metal arm contains a concealed heating coil, connected with wires from the car’s battery.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0091.xml
article
58
58
[no value]
[no value]
Sediment in Ocean Weighs Billions of Tons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF A swimming pool of ordinary size were contaminated with sediment amounting to one billionth of its volume, the effect would hardly be noticeable; but the waters of the deep sea, which suspend this proportion of sediment constantly, contain in all some 234,000,000,000 tons of matter.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0092.xml
article
58
58
[no value]
[no value]
Measures Flying Fitness by Thyroid Gland
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN AIRPLANE pilot’s efficiency depends upon the perfect functioning of his thyroid gland, and not alone on his eyesight, heart condition, and other factors associated with flying fitness. That is the pronouncement of Dr. Leon Asher, of the University of Berne, Switzerland, after experiments with animals.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0093.xml
article
58
58
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
New British Freight Car Carries 40 Tons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIRTY novel coal cars, designed for the largest freight train ever operated on an English railroad, are the latest equipment of the London, Midland and Scottish Railway. Built of steel, they are shaped more like motor trucks than typical freight cars.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0094.xml
article
58
58
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Machine Surpasses Expert in Photo Printing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GUESSWORK is eliminated by a new automatic machine that looks critically through an electric eye at a photographic negative, tells what grade of paper is best suited for making the finished print, and even announces the proper length of exposure to light in the printer.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0095.xml
article
58
58
[no value]
[no value]
Handy Car—If It Doesn’t Fold up on the Road
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH sides and hood of fabric which can be easily detached, and with a body structure that allows the machine itself to fold up quickly and easily after a few bolts have been removed, a three-wheeled automobile designed in Germany is capable of being stored in a very small space.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0096.xml
article
59
59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Berlin Clock Sets 60-Year Nonstop Record
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A RUN of sixty years without a stop is the record claimed for the “Big Ben” of Berlin, the giant timepiece in the tower of the City Hall. One reason for the clock’s efficiency is that it is inspected and adjusted once a week by its makers, in accordance with an agreement with the city authorities.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0097.xml
article
59
59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Origin of Dollar Sign Is Traced to Mexico
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROBABLY few people, when they make out checks, realize that the history of the dollar sign inscribed thereon has been a source of controversy for decades. The actual word dollar has been traced readily to the German word “thaler,” referring to a piece of silver which was in common use in Europe as long ago as the fourteenth century.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0098.xml
article
59
59
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Plays Sweet Music When the Alarm Goes Off
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WAKING in the morning to the tune of a dreamy waltz or a stirring jazz selection, instead of to the clamor of an alarm bell, is now made possible by a novel combination alarm clock and phonograph. The outfit resembles a portable phonograph, with a clock set into the case.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0099.xml
article
59
59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Chemical Baths Valueless in Preserving Flowers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GIVING cut flowers medicinal baths to prolong their existence is a waste of time, concludes the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Yonkers, N. Y., after a survey of the problem. Though flowers are not known to develop headaches, there has been a popular notion that they will be stimulated by baths of aspirin and various other chemicals.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0100.xml
article
59
59
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Father Grows Bald When Babies Are Born
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARRIVAL of an innocent baby may cause the father to lose his hair, Dr. Donald B. Rogers, of Neenah, Wis., has reported to the American Medical Association. He describes a patient who shortly after the birth of his first child lost most of the hair on the left side of his head.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0101.xml
article
59
59
Nature
[no value]
Ants Go Insane, Too
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANTS, like men, may go insane, according to the observations of Dr. Robert Staeger of Berlin, Germany. Watching an ant colony, he saw one individual that was doing circular acrobatics, attacking its fellows, and otherwise acting queerly.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0102.xml
article
59
59
Aviation
[no value]
Smoke Bombs Warn Airmen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THREE shells bursting near the plane at ten-second intervals, and producing clouds of black or yellow smoke, mean “Land at once” to a Cuban aviator. The warning is the recently adopted way of notifying him that he is to descend immediately and explain why he has violated one of the local air rules.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0103.xml
article
60
60
Engineering
[no value]
Highest Suspension Bridge Crosses Canyon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HIGH above the waters of the Arkansas River, across the Royal Gorge that in places attains a depth of 2,600 feet, cables are being slung for a suspension bridge which, it is said, will be the highest in the world when completed, near Canon City, Colo. Huge, openwork steel towers sunk into solid concrete masonry on either side of the gorge support the work.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0104.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Armored Banks on Wheels Call on Depositors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW “armored car” banks have been introduced by a Los Angeles, Calif., banking institution to accommodate clients who are unable to get away from work long enough to reach even a neighborhood branch bank. The banks-on-wheels roam through the suburbs of the city continually during banking hours, and the system accounts for a scene becoming more familiar every day there.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0105.xml
article
60
60
Ships
[no value]
Ship Travel the Safest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRAVEL by steamship is far safer than travel by airplane or by train, according to a recent accident report by the United States Bureau of Steamboat Inspection. The report shows that for every 7,000,000 passengers carried by steamship during ten months of 1929, only one life was lost; while one life was lost for every 150,000 passengers carried by tail.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0106.xml
article
60
60
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Stomach Shapes as Varied as Fingerprints
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IDENTIFYING the stomach by an X-ray fluoroscope may become a future method of criminal detection rivaling that of fingerprinting. In a study of normal stomachs among students of the University of California, Dr. Robert O. Moody and his assistants found four distinct types of the healthy stomach, with numerous gradations in between.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0107.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
New Grain the Offspring of Rye and Wheat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FEW months ago a Soviet plant wedding between rye and wheat took place in the laboratories of the Minsk Botanical Observatory in Russia, and the offspring, says the Leningrad Red Star, is a hybrid grain of such unusual qualities that it may turn the Russian grain industry inside out.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0108.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Swarm of Honeybees Ties Up Railway Traffic
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DRUNK on honey, a swarm of bees held up traffic on a railway line for nearly twelve hours. Near the town of Karlovac, in Serbia, a switch engine tried to move a freight car and derailed it. A jar of honey was cracked and the honey flowed out on the ground.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0109.xml
article
61
61
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Bone Grows from Cells in a Test Tube
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE self-reliance of the individual body cell was demonstrated by recent experiments of Miss Honor B. Fell, working at the Strangeways Laboratories in Cambridge, England. She succeeded in isolating tiny pieces of cartilage gristle from the six-day-old embryo of a fowl and furthering their growth into normal bone in a test tube.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0110.xml
article
61
61
[no value]
[no value]
Moving Rods Test Ability of Bus Drivers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO TEST the mental agility of bus drivers, the Paris police department now employs the “perceptotaquimeter,” an invention of Professor Emilio Mira, of Barcelona, Spain, which measures the ability of a driver to judge the speed of approaching vehicles.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0111.xml
article
61
61
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Acid of Hard Cider Now Used in Silk-Making
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM hard cider to silk is a far cry, but according to Professor D. B. Keyes, of the University of Illinois, the sour acetic acid which changes cider to vinegar will play a major part in a new process for making artificial silk developed by him in collaboration with E. P. King and Sherwood Swann of the same university.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0112.xml
article
61
61
U. S. Army Truck Runs On "Gasogene"—Wood Fuel
[no value]
Tire “Fingerprints” to Trace Bandit Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SCIENTIFIC identification of bandit cars by the tracks of their tires is facilitated by a new photographic “fingerprinting” method developed by David Chapman, attached to the Sheriff’s Office in Los Angeles, Calif. It is based on the simple procedure of placing a try-square beside the imprint of the tire tread on the road when the imprint is photographed.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0113.xml
article
61
61
Aviation
[no value]
’Chutes for Army Gliders
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PARACHUTES will be a part of the equipment of the United States Army Air Corps’ pilotless gliders in the future, according to a recent announcement. These gliders are towed into the air by airplanes and released. Then they serve as targets for antiaircraft shells. Should the artillery fire miss the costly craft, they are likely to be destroyed by a rough landing.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0114.xml
article
61
61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
“Fares” Summon Taxis by Street Corner Phones
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WAITING in vain on a street corner for a cruising taxi need no longer be the lot of citizens of Rome, Italy, where street telephones have been installed to connect the prospective passenger with the nearest taxi station. Lifting the receiver flashes a signal light in the station.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0115.xml
article
61
61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Cosmetics for “Hot Dogs”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"HOT DOGS” with complexion varieties worthy of a beauty parlor’s ingenuity were displayed not long ago at a meeting of the American Institute of Meat Packers in Chicago. Dyed in shades ranging from blond to brunette, with countless gradations in between, the flapperish frankfurters showed their seasonal styles like mannikins in a Paris fashion show.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0116.xml
article
62
62
[no value]
[no value]
Electric Ocean Liners to Carry 450 Passengers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CONSTRUCTION of two 600-foot electrically driven passenger liners, the first of their kind for transoceanic service, will begin soon in the yards of the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company, Newport News, Va., for the Dollar Steamship Line.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0117.xml
article
62
62
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Electric Tides Flow High above the Earth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EIGHTY or ninety miles above the ground, three great belts of electric current are continually swirling like tidal floods above the earth, creating the equivalent of millions of horsepower. This conclusion was announced recently by Dr. E. O. Hulburt, of the Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, D. C., a laboratory which has been engaged for several years in studying the electric and magnetic properties of the earth which may affect radio transmission at sea.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0118.xml
article
62
62
[no value]
[no value]
Hunts in China’s Wilds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER a year of lonely wandering through the wilds of China, unaccompanied by any other white man, Herbert Stevens, English ornithologist, arrived at Shanghai recently with more than 11,500 "specimens which he had collected for the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0119.xml
article
62
62
[no value]
[no value]
Canvas Track Helps Auto Out of the Mire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HEAVY canvas and small bits of rope constitute a device invented by a Chicago woman to extricate an automobile when it is stuck in sand, mud, or snow. This easily portable “tractor" is simply a length of canvas, slightly wider than the tire of a car, with crosspieces of tar rope stitched at five-inch intervals.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0120.xml
article
62
62
Nature
[no value]
Tarantula Cannibals Grow Meek in the Zoo
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHIPPED in separate compartments to keep them from devouring one another, fourteen giant cannibalistic tarantulas captured on Ancon Hill, Canal Zone, Panama, arrived recently at their new home in the Reptile House of the Bronx Zoological Park, New York City.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0121.xml
article
62
62
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Midget Fire Engine Will Get There First
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN INNOVATION in firefighting equipment is a “baby engine,” about half the size of the usual fire truck, designed by Sir William Morris, noted British motor car expert. Capable of a speed of fifty miles an hour, its purpose is to dash ahead of the heavier and slower apparatus in response to an alarm.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0122.xml
article
63
63
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
“Vacuum Bottle” Truck Speeds the Milkman
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNLOADING 8,000 quarts of milk in ten minutes with only one man conducting the operation is the record claimed for a huge “vacuum bottle” milk truck recently introduced in New York City and pictured above. This vehicle is used in transporting the milk from the dairies to the pasteurizing and distributing plant.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0123.xml
article
63
63
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Measuring Height of Clouds by Spot Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the advent of night flying, a special type of electric searchlight known as the “ceiling light” has been employed at airports and landing fields to measure the height of low clouds for the information of pilots flying in darkness. The ceiling light is mounted on a pedestal and trunnion, so that the light can be elevated at any angle desired.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0124.xml
article
63
63
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Coming—Butter, Tires, and Leather from Crude Oil
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PETROLEUM, in the future, may supply not only the fuel for automobile engines, but also the rubber for their tires, the material for the raincoats of their passengers, and butter substitutes for picnic sandwiches. Moreover, it may provide soap for use by motorists after a dusty day in the country.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0125.xml
article
63
63
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
America’s 149,521 Doctors Migrating to Cities
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STATISTICALLY speaking, there is only about four fifths of one physician for every 1,000 men, women, and children in the United States. According to a recent Government survey, 149,521 doctors now are practicing among the 118,127,645 of this country’s population.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0126.xml
article
63
63
Nature
[no value]
Cypress 2,000 Years Old
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CYPRESS tree in Tallahassee, Fla., now grown to enormous height and to a girth of fifteen feet, may well lay claim to an antiquity rivaling that of the famous California redwoods. Professor Herman Kurz, of the Florida State College for Women, asserts that this giant cypress is between 2,000 and 2,800 years old.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0127.xml
article
64
64
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Slices a Thousand Loaves of Bread an Hour
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO DELIVER to customers loaves of bread neatly sliced and ready for the table or for sandwich making, a baker of St. Louis, Mo., has invented a machine which can divide a loaf into twenty-nine even slices with one slash of its blades. Requiring only one operator, it can cut 1,000 loaves in an hour.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0128.xml
article
64
64
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
This Portable Toilet Kit Includes Running Water
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A COMPLETE toilet outfit, including running water, may be carried about as easily as an overnight bag if the portable kit recently shown at a Paris exposition proves as serviceable as is claimed. The equipment consists of a small metal box, divided into two compartments.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0129.xml
article
64
64
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
It Looks Like a Lighter, but Sprays Perfume
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SPRAYING a tiny jet of perfume when its plunger is pushed down, a novel atomizer resembling a cigarette lighter in appearance may be carried in a woman’s hand bag, it is said, without danger of spilling its contents. Its nozzle is covered with a cap which is released by a plunger.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0130.xml
article
64
64
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Twin Babies Test Value of Child Training
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“IDENTICAL” twin baby girls recently served Yale psychologists as subjects in an experiment to determine whether training hastens the development of brain and nervous capacity in very young children. The investigators trained one of the little girls, at the age of forty-six weeks, to climb a set of five steps every day.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0131.xml
article
64
64
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Hollow Lamp-Posts Remedy for Street Blasts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOLLOW lamp-posts, to act as “subsoil chimneys,” have been suggested by E. J. Silcock, an English engineer who headed a commission which investigated the cause of a mysterious explosion that blew up several city blocks of London pavement some time ago.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0132.xml
article
64
64
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Smoke Turns Copper Green
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE green coating on copper domes and spires of city buildings can be traced to the action of sulphuric acid in coal smoke, state Dr. W. R. J. Vernon and L. Whitby, of the Chemical Research Laboratory of Teddington, England. The age-film, known as “verdigris” or a “patina,” is composed of basic copper sulphate.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0133.xml
article
65
65
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Ruins of Ancient Village Discovered in Arctic
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE frozen ruins of what was once a large Eskimo settlement on St. Lawrence Island in the Bering Sea have lately been explored by two American archeologists, who found there evidence of a culture in the Arctic that may date back a thousand years or more.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0134.xml
article
65
65
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Type of Medium Size Is Read Most Easily
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LARGE type cannot be read faster than medium-sized type, according to Professor Donald G. Patterson, of the University of Minnesota. He recently made tests upon 320 sophomores at the University. They were given paragraphs printed in six-point, eight-point, ten-point, twelve-point, and fourteen-point type.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0135.xml
article
65
65
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Sleeping Sickness Enters Mouth of Crocodile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SLEEPING with the mouth open is apparently as bad for crocodiles as it is for mankind. For as the green monster slumbers with its jaws ajar, the dread tsetse fly, carrier of the sleeping sickness microbe, is likely to enter. The disease is not transferred by a bite, but a bite may annoy the crocodile so that it wakes up and snaps at the fly, swallowing it and the germ.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0136.xml
article
65
65
[no value]
[no value]
Front-Wheel Drive for $25,000 Speed Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A HIGH-SPEED runabout of an unusual design is being built for the private use of Phillip Chancellor, heir of a wealthy New York family. While it will not attempt to shatter the world’s speed record of 231 miles an hour set by Maj. Sir. H. O. D. Segrave, it will be able to amble along at 125 miles an hour, quite fast enough for the requirements of city or interurban travel.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0137.xml
article
65
65
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
The Latest—A Folding Outboard Motor Boat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A COLLAPSIBLE rowboat, lighter and more portable than a canoe, has been introduced in England. Weighing a bare thirty pounds, it can be folded so easily and compactly that almost any adult can lift it single-handed and pack it away in one side of a garage.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0138.xml
article
66
66
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
Speed and Common Sense
Wanted—An Automatic Linguist
Science at the South Pole
Shunning the Roof Tops
Running Away from a Bullet
They Are Saying—
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RESTRICTIVE law, the popular American panacea for almost any trouble, turns out to be bad medicine with which to cure the automobile speed problem. Neither the motorist nor the pedestrian is benefited by arbitrary and frequently ridiculous limitations on speed.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0139.xml
article
67
67,68,141
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
New Help for the Hard of Hearing
The author of this article is Professor of Otology in Cornell University Medical School. He tells how science may rescue millions from the borderland of deafness.
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE B. McAULIFFE
OF THE hundred million and more persons in this country yearly subjected to the general noise of life, one out of every six has defective hearing. The fact is so startling as to merit restatement. Although there are only 55,000 deaf mutes in the United States, more than twenty million men, women, and children suffer from deafness in some degree.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0140.xml
article
69
69
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Modernizing the Old Radio Set
Most Any Out-of-Date Receiver Can Be Improved in Volume and Tone Quality by a New Speaker and Audio Amplifier Equipment
[no value]
[no value]
ALFRED P. LANE
WHAT shall I do about the old radio set? That question has almost as many answers as there are types of out-of-date receivers. To find the correct one in any particular case, a number of factors must be considered. First is the age and present condition of the receiving equipment.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0141.xml
article
70
70
Radio
[no value]
Spotting Dynamic Speaker Ills
Where to Look for Troubles That Cause Queer Noises or Fading Volume—How to Test Electric Sets for Hum
Useful Hints for the Radio Fan
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN MANY ways the dynamic cone speaker is an extremely rugged mechanism. The field magnetism, since it is produced by the flow of an electric current, never weakens so long as the current flow is maintained. The dynamic speaker has definitely improved tone quality.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0142.xml
article
70
70
Radio
[no value]
A B C’s of Radio
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO DETERMINE the cost of current to operate an electric set, first shut off every house light. Then, watching the electric meter, turn on the radio set and count the number of turns the disk in the meter makes in one minute. Shut off the set and, by experiment, find the number of lamps which must be turned on at once to make the meter disk rotate at the same rate.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0143.xml
article
70
70
Radio
[no value]
Reviving B Batteries
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY B batteries produce grating and scratching noises some time before they are actually exhausted. Such noises can be eliminated and the useful life of the battery extended by connecting across the block a two-microfarad filter condenser of the type ordinarily sold for use in building a B eliminator and power amplifier circuit.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0144.xml
article
70
70
Radio
[no value]
Testing for Hum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE critical point in any full electric receiver—the point where hum is most likely to be produced—is the detector circuit. Consequently whenever an A. C. receiver begins to develop a steady hum the detector tube should be investigated. In many types of circuits, when the set is first turned on, a hum immediately develops and then dies out as the detector tube heats to operating temperature.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0145.xml
article
71
71
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Current Filters for A. C. Sets
How Receivers Draw B Voltage Supplies from Light Sockets
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN CARR
ALL radio receivers, however designated, actually operate on direct current. Though alternating current flows into a modern electric set from the light socket, direct current still does the work in the radio receiving circuits just as it did in the days before light socket operation was possible.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0146.xml
article
72
72,143
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
A Revolution in House Plumbing
Improvements that give the simple suburban bungalow in America a more complete system of sanitation than is found in many an Old World palace or mansion.
[no value]
[no value]
ROGER B. WHITMAN
PLUMBING, first used because it saved the labor of carrying water in buckets, has developed into a national household safeguard of health, as well as an indispensable household convenience. Some dwellings now are equipped with a bathroom for every bedroom and one or two more for general use, while in virtually every modern home are kitchen and laundry fixtures designed for labor-saving and water supply and waste outlets placed where they will be most serviceable.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0147.xml
article
73
73
LEADING ARTICLE
[no value]
Novel Wing Parachutes Fail Plane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE extraordinary photographs on this page were taken during a recent test of a new system of huge parachutes designed to support an airplane in the sky—an experiment from which the pilot of the plane, M. J. McKeon, of San Mateo, Calif., barely escaped with his life.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0148.xml
article
74
74,75
New Devices for the Home
[no value]
Household Inventions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0149.xml
article
76
76,138
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
What Horsepower Really Is
Gus Explains How Auto Designers Get More Pull Out of the Engine Cylinders by “Continuous Levers”
Gus SAYS—
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
"ONE hundred horsepower!' Joe Clark whistled to himself as he read the specifications of one of the new cars. Gus Wilson, veteran auto mechanic and Joe’s partner in the operation of the Model Garage, merely grunted. His mouth was too full of ham sandwich for articulate expression.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0150.xml
article
77
77,78,80
[no value]
[no value]
Now—Model Stagecoaching
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWIN M. LOVE
LOCKED away in an old fair building in Balboa Park, San Diego, Calif., stands the Diamond Tally-Ho, a stagecoach that ran for many years between that city and the little mining town of Julian. It is stripped of lamps, curtains, and boot sides.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0151.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
Houde Engineering Corporation
[no value]
Houde Engineering Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0152.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
RCA-VICTOR COMPANY, INC.: RCN RADIOTRON
[no value]
RCA-VICTOR COMPANY, INC.
RCN RADIOTRON
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0153.xml
article
82
82
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Skates, Skis, and Ice Boats
How to Sharpen Thin-Bladed Tubular Runners— Keeping Bent Wood in Shape and Other Hints
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE H. VAN WALTHER
ESPECIALLY true of winter sports—skating, skiing, and ice boating—is the statement that success depends upon keeping ones equipment in first-class condition. Skates with the old-fashioned wide blade were ground at the beginning of the season and not touched again for the remainder of the winter.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0154.xml
advertisement
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON &. SON
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON &. SON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0155.xml
article
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Ever Drive into the Garage Wall?
How to Build a Timber Stop That May Save a Costly Crash—Other Ideas Car Owners Have Found Useful
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOST home garages are lightly constructed. While strong enough to resist ordinary strain, the entire back wall of the garage may be wrecked by a blow from the car bumper so light that the bumper itself is not damaged. Figure 1 shows how to make a stop to avoid such trouble.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0156.xml
article
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Repairing Broken Brush Springs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOMETIMES a break in a spring that presses a brush against the commutator on the starting motor makes the starter inoperative. Figure 2 shows a temporary repair. Cut a strip of rubber from an inner tube and pass it through the openings in the motor frame as shown.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0157.xml
article
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Mousetrap Burglar Alarm
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ORDINARY mousetrap (Figure 3) can be converted into an effective auto burglar alarm. Two wires with spring clips attached to their outer ends are attached as indicated. One clip is attached to the live terminal of the horn and the other to the metal frame of the car.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0158.xml
article
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Clearing the Windshield
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CONSTANT stream of warm air can be directed against the windshield to prevent fogging and frosting (Figure 4). Raise the rear edge of the engine hood on each side enough to insert a small block of wood. This will produce an opening along the top rear edge of the hood through which heated air from the engine flows and strikes the glass.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0159.xml
article
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
Simple Hood Rest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIGURE 5 shows an easy way to make a rest for the hood when it is opened. The only mechanical work needed is the hack-sawed slot in the edge of the cowl and two holes for bolts that hold the angle pieces to the dash. The straight piece and the two angle pieces are stock items from standard toy mechanical construction sets.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0160.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
VACUUM OIL COMPANY
[no value]
VACUUM OIL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0161.xml
article
86
86,88
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Cutting Curves on a Small Band Saw
Construction of Boudoir Chair Gives Practice in Use of Motorized Tools
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM W. KLENKE
MOTORIZING the home workshop has made it possible for the amateur craftsman to construct many furniture projects—such as the boudoir side chair illustrated in Fig. 1— which are more elaborate and attractive than those that ordinarily can be made by hand.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0162.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
DISSTON
[no value]
DISSTON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0163.xml
article
88
88
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Removing Scratches
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DEEP scratches that go clear through the finish on pieces of furniture can be removed if the right procedure is followed. First, stain the wood in the scratch with a matching stain. Allow the stain to dry for about 24 hours, and then coat the scratch carefully with a first-class grade of furniture varnish.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0164.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0165.xml
article
90
90,92
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Timesaving Aids for the Shop
Use of Familiar Materials Simplifies Many Otherwise Difficult Shop Operations
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
MONEY in the and machine time often shop can through be saved the use of familiar and inexpensive materials which are not ordinarily employed in routine operations. A number of short cuts of this type are illustrated. Some odd jobs for paper, other than as a friction material, are illustrated in Fig. 1. By using the paper in the manner demonstrated at A, the clearance as well as the cutting ability of dies can be gaged before starting work, and troubles can be more readily analyzed than from the metal blank.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0166.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0167.xml
article
92
92
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Electric Muffle Made from Heating Unit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN EFFICIENT electric muffle for heat treating metals in the home workshop can be made from the common reflector type of portable electric heater designed for household use. This type of heater has the resistance wire wound on a porcelain tube.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0168.xml
article
92
92
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Chalk Holder Aids in Accurate Scribing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY mechanic knows that in marking work a much larger surface is usually chalked than is necessary because the exact position is not known until the surface gage is used. With the chalk holder shown, the chalk marks the exact place that the scriber will follow and thus no time is wasted.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0169.xml
article
92
92
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Old Bill Says—
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOU remove the center from the headstock of your lathe for any reason, plug the hole with a piece of clean waste to keep the dirt out. A flat drill will often drill hard, tough materials better than a twist drill. When a drill squeaks in the hole, it is usually a sign that the side clearance has worn away.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0170.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Brown &. Sharpe Mfg. Co.: Brown & Sharpe Tools
[no value]
Brown &. Sharpe Mfg. Co.
Brown & Sharpe Tools
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0171.xml
article
94
94
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Copying an Antique Low Boy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. J. BRYANT
WOODWORKERS often like to try their hand at copying a fine specimen of antique furniture—such a piece, for example, as the low boy illustrated. The original, which was made about 1740, is noteworthy for its grace, and because of its limited size would look as well in a small as in a large room.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0172.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
GREENFIELD TAP AND DIE CORPORATION
[no value]
GREENFIELD TAP AND DIE CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0173.xml
article
95
95
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
How to Fit a Flush Ring Door Catch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the projecting case and knob of an ordinary cupboard catch or latch is objectionable, the handy man will find tucked away upon the shelves of the nearest large hardware store just the substitute he needs—a flush ring catch. A flush catch leaves the face of the door and of the bookcase, cupboard, or chest of drawers with no projection to mar its smoothness.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0174.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
"YANKEE" TOOLS
[no value]
"YANKEE" TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0175.xml
article
96
96
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Embossed Leather Decorates Metal Paper Knife
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. CLARKE HUGHES
BY INCASING its handle in embossed leather, a plain paper knife can be converted into an attractive ornament for any desk, as shown at the right. The embossed design is similar to one used in making the leather book ends previously described in this series (P.S.M., Jan. ’30, p. 100).
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0176.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN SCREW CO.
[no value]
AMERICAN SCREW CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0177.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0178.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Palmolive, Dept.
[no value]
Palmolive, Dept.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0179.xml
article
98
98,99
[no value]
[no value]
Building Simple Swiss Pattern Furniture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HI SIBLEY
FOR simplicity of construction and general adaptability, the Swiss breakfast set illustrated probably has few equals. The table and chairs, which are an exact copy of original Swiss furniture, are the handiwork of Fred Hauser, of Pasadena, Calif.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0180.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
The Casein Manufacturing Company of America, Inc.
[no value]
The Casein Manufacturing Company of America, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0181.xml
article
99
99
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Using a Small Grinding Wheel in the Lathe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN it is necessary to grind an oval form—as for flanging some light tank heads—a machinist in a small shop is likely to be at a loss as to how best to get the outline true without undue expense. A unique method is to chuck a grinding wheel in a lathe and use the compound rest as a work support.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0182.xml
article
99
99
For the Home Owner
[no value]
How to Remove Cement and Plaster from Tiles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO REMOVE cement and plaster from tile floors, first scrape off as much as possible and then apply muriatic acid in the proportions of one part acid to ten parts water. Add the acid slowly and cautiously to the water and handle the mixture with care.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0183.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
CARBORUNDUM
[no value]
CARBORUNDUM
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0184.xml
article
100
100
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Painting Model Railroads
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. D. RYDER
HIGH-GRADE model railway locomotives and the various cars are painted by a dipping process, and the enamel is baked on to give an attractive and durable finish. Repainting is, however, often necessary. Cars will become derailed and collisions will occur even on the best regulated model railway, so that the enamel in time becomes chipped and scratched.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0185.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Esterbrook Pen Co.
[no value]
Esterbrook Pen Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0186.xml
article
101
101
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Assembling Miller Cutters for Use on Large Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN ORDER to accomplish some milling operations it is often well to use extra wide cutters. A method for interlocking two or more cutters is shown. The greater part of the work is done on the surface grinder. In cutter No. 1 cut two parallel slots 3/32 in. deep, using a 6-in. medium grade elastic grinding wheel ⅜ in. wide.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0187.xml
article
101
101
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Nonslip Faceplate Bolts Are Aid in Machining
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIFFICULTY in strapping and the possibility of error in attaching a laid out job to the faceplate on an engine lathe are removed when the nonslip faceplate bolts illustrated are used. The bolts are made from ⅞-in. stock, as the head of the bolt is ⅞ in. square.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0188.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
FOLMER GRAFLEX CORPORATION
[no value]
FOLMER GRAFLEX CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0189.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
LARUS & BRO. CO
[no value]
LARUS & BRO. CO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0190.xml
article
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Midget Plane Flies Indoors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS CONDAX
DURING the winter months model airplane flying usually has to be confined indoors. This fact was responsible for the designing of the 5½-in. indoor flying model illustrated—a midget plane that well deserves the name of Parlor Scout: Because of the simple construction of this model, it is a good starting point for the boy who has had little or no experience in model building, yet its unique design and unusual flying qualities make it a worthy project for the expert.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0191.xml
article
103
103,104
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
A Sturdy Locker Made Cheaply
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. KING
FOR storing a boy’s sporting equipment and various treasures, this modernistic looking locker or closet is just the thing. Any handy boy can make one for himself. First, the two ends ¾ by 12 in. by 5 ft. 1¼ in. should be made. Cut the decorative angles accurately, but, if extreme simplicity is desired, the embellishments may be omitted and the ends made the full 12 in. wide, which will allow each shelf to be made 1 in. wider.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0192.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0193.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
LE PAGE'S GLUE
[no value]
LE PAGE'S GLUE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0194.xml
article
104
104
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Spirit Soldering Flux
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BETTER flux for the home workshop than the ordinary “killed spirits” may be made by dissolving stick zinc chloride in methylated spirits. The stick zinc chloride is sold in sealed glass tubes containing 1 oz., for about twenty-five cents.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0195.xml
article
105
105
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Stationery Cabinet Protects Paper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. W. FOWLER
BY USING the easily made cabinet shown, it becomes a simple matter to keep stationery clean and where it will be readily accessible. Pine or basswood can be used in the construction. The top, door, and bottom are cut from ½-in. stock; the back and shelves from ¼-in. stock; and the ends from ⅜-in. stock.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0196.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Millers Falls Company: MILLERS FALLS ELECTRIC TOOLS
[no value]
Millers Falls Company
MILLERS FALLS ELECTRIC TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0197.xml
article
106
106,107,108
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Refinishing an Auto Cheaply with a Paint Sprayer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERETT EAMES
IF MODERN methods are employed, it is not difficult to refinish an automobile at home. Quick-acting chemical paint removers and electrically operated paint sprayers are rapidly replacing tedious scraping and brushing operations.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0198.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0199.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
GOODELL PRATT CO.
[no value]
GOODELL PRATT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0200.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0201.xml
article
108
108
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Boring Straight Holes in Split Wooden Parts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM RENFROW
FOR boring holes in wooden line shaft boxes, in wooden split pulleys, or in any parts where a true, deep hole is required between two pieces of wood, first make a pencil guide mark on the abutting face of one piece and saw the mark out accurately so as to leave a groove about 1/16 in. deep extending clear across the block, as shown.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0202.xml
article
109
109,110
[no value]
[no value]
Toy Dancer Follows Music Perfectly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DICK HUTCHINSON
THE toy illustrated, which can be made cheaply, will surprise you with its lively actions and clog steps. Grown-ups as well as children will marvel at the realism of this toy dancer. The body is made from one piece of ¾-in. gumwood, or any available wood will do.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0203.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
The David Maydole Hammer Co.
[no value]
The David Maydole Hammer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0204.xml
article
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Sheet Metal Holder Keeps Clothespins Handy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS design of a clothespin carrier won first prize in the elementary metal working division of the shop problem competition for teachers conducted recently by the Educational Department of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. The design is the work of Mr. W. A. de Vette, of the manual training department of the Wilson Junior High School, Erie, Pa.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0205.xml
article
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Leather Strop for Tools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PIECE of leather glued to the top of the oilstone case makes an excellent strop for putting the final edge on a tool. It is desirable to make a second cover to fit over the leather and protect it from the dust, if the oilstone is not kept in a dust-proof drawer or cabinet.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0206.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0207.xml
article
111
111,112
Shipshape Home
[no value]
Hints on Remedying Sticking Doors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS defect may be the result of repeated coats of paint and varnish. Inspect the screws of the hinges carefully to be sure that they are driven home. If the door still gives trouble and the width of the crack along the lock joint will permit it, loosen the screws in the jamb and insert a piece of pasteboard between the butt (hinge) plate and the jamb.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0208.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
THE J. B. WILLIAMS COMPANY: Williams SHAVING CREAM
[no value]
THE J. B. WILLIAMS COMPANY
Williams SHAVING CREAM
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0209.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0210.xml
article
113
113,114
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Complete Miniature Stage and Scenes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MINIATURE stage, besides being a plaything for children, is of value to anyone, young or mature, who is interested in marionettes or who is a student of costuming, dramatic grouping, or scenic effects. As the scale is an inch to a foot, the stage illustrated is large enough for really worth while presentations and allows ample room for properties and scenery constructed upon the same scale.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0211.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS &. CO.
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS &. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0212.xml
article
114
114
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Handy Wooden Stand Keeps Women’s Hats in Shape
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. E. EAMES
INDIVIDUAL hat trees are used in department stores not only as exhibition stands but also to preserve the shapes of the hats. These little stands conform to the rounded shape of the crown and hold the brim out of contact with the shelf. As will be noted from the sketch and photo, these trees are simple in construction and can be put together in a few minutes.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0213.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0214.xml
article
115
115,116
[no value]
[no value]
Home Workshop Chemistry
Simple Formulas that Will Save Time and Money
[no value]
[no value]
W. H. HAMMOND
THERE are at least three good reasons why the amateur painter should learn a few simple tests for paints, even though carrying them out may require a little more care and trouble than just stirring up the mixture in the can and applying it. The first reason is that a knowledge of these tests puts a man in a position to recognize good paint from bad and to be a discriminating purchaser.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0215.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0216.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0217.xml
article
117
117,118
[no value]
[no value]
Two Block Puzzles That Test Skill
Sizes for Letter Puzzle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW well can you solve block puzzles? The two illustrated below are easy to make and will perhaps give you a surprise in working out the solutions. The wood used can be either ½ or ¾ in. square, and dimensions for both sizes are given. If the two puzzles are cut from the same stock one set should be marked in some unmistakable way.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0218.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
COLGATE, Dept.
[no value]
COLGATE, Dept.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0219.xml
article
118
118
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Wrench Extension for Use on Heavy Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE it is usually bad policy to use too much force in applying a wrench on nuts, it is occasionally necessary to pull nuts exceedingly tight. Cases in point are bolts for holding tools in stamping machines, draw rods for pulling bushings into place, or for loosening nuts that have rusted.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0220.xml
article
118
118
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Hints on Applying Paint on Metal Surfaces
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GUTTERS, downspouts, and the like should not be painted until particular care has been taken to remove all rust, scale, and dirt with a wire brush, putty knife, and sandpaper, and by scrubbing with kerosene, if necessary. It is important to remove all rust; for rust, even if painted over, will eat its way through the paint.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0221.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0222.xml
article
119
119,120
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Deceptive Trout Flies Have Soft Rubber Detached Bodies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. P. LINCOLN
BY USING a small sliver of light-colored automobile inner tube for the detached body, it is possible to make realistic trout flies inexpensively and easily. Trout fishermen who believe that the artificial fly should be a counterpart of the living insect agree that the detached body of the fly is of the utmost importance.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0223.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
J. D. WALLACE & COMPANY
[no value]
J. D. WALLACE & COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0224.xml
article
120
120
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Tightening Loose Casters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CASTERS which have a horn projecting into a hole can be kept from falling out when the furniture is lifted by wrapping friction tape or rubber bands around the stems. To tighten a caster of the socket type, remove it, wrap tough paper or cambric around the wood over which the socket fits and glue well.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0225.xml
article
120
120
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Home Workshop Uses for Old Dental Tools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SAMUEL GORE
WITH a little shaping, discarded dental tools can be turned into useful additions to the home workshop tool chest. Because these tools and drills must stand the strain of cutting porcelain and bone, they lend themselves well to many of the delicate and difficult little jobs that the home worker so frequently encounters.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0226.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0227.xml
article
121
121
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Glass Mount Allows Underside of Moth to Be Viewed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. G. PRATT
THE easily made glass mount illustrated permits the inspection of moths and butterflies from both sides and also is effective as a wall or mantel decoration. Cut a strip of cardboard from ½ to ¾ in. wide and sufficiently long so that it can be bent into a square or oblong that will allow a ½-in. margin all around the specimen.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0228.xml
article
121
121
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Supporting Bar Clamps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN boards are to be glued up on the workbench, it is often difficult to keep the cabinetmaker’s bar clamps from turning over. Blocks, cut from any hard wood as shown, will hold the clamp upright. Where the clamps are not all of the same make, blocks are provided so that all will rest at the same height from the BENCH.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0229.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
LIBERTY HOMES
[no value]
LIBERTY HOMES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0230.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
The Pierce Model Works
[no value]
The Pierce Model Works
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0231.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
ARKOGRAF PEN CO.
[no value]
ARKOGRAF PEN CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0232.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Foley Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
Foley Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0233.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
THOMPSON BROS. BOAT MFG. CO.
[no value]
THOMPSON BROS. BOAT MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0234.xml
article
122
122,124,126
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Finishing the Bluenose
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. ARMITAGE MCCANN
AS THE rigging on our model of the Bluenose nears completion, the little fishing schooner takes form and begins to display its full beauty. Since the rig of a schooner is its most characteristic feature, and since cleancut, seamanlike rigging is always the distinguishing mark of a high-grade model, it is imperative that the rigging on the Bluenose be assembled with meticulous care.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0235.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
THE AMERICAH SCHOOL
[no value]
THE AMERICAH SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0236.xml
advertisement
124
124
[no value]
[no value]
THE NEW YORK ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
THE NEW YORK ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0237.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
RCA INSTITUTES, Inc.
[no value]
RCA INSTITUTES, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0238.xml
article
126
126
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Automatic Cup Keeps Machine Greased
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the expenditure of a little time and money it is possible to equip your machines with self-feeding grease cups of the type illustrated. The cup fits on the high pressure type of fittings and is filled by applying a high pressure grease gun to a similar fitting on the side of the cup.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0239.xml
article
126
126
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Marking Straight Lines on Rough Surfaces
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIXING metal furniture leg slides to the guide of a marking gage will facilitate the marking of a straight line on rough wood. The needle marker must be advanced as much as the guides project above the surface of the guide face. This will keep the graduations on the side of the marker accurate by counteracting the height of the slides.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0240.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0241.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
STANDARD BUSINESS TRAINING INSTITUTE
[no value]
STANDARD BUSINESS TRAINING INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0242.xml
article
127
127,128,129
[no value]
[no value]
Magical Spiritphone Answers Questions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE S. GREENE
MAGIC fascinates most of us but often leaves us with the feeling that all good tricks are too difficult or complicated for us to attempt. The spiritphone illustrated, however, is easy to construct and still easier to operate, and is one of the most effective tricks for the amateur magician.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0243.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
National Radio Institute
[no value]
National Radio Institute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0244.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0245.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO & TELEVISION INSTITUTE
[no value]
RADIO & TELEVISION INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0246.xml
article
130
130,131
[no value]
[no value]
Combining a Window Seat and Chest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. KING.
BESIDES providing a comfortable window seat, the bench illustrated has an added advantage in supplying a roomy chest for the storage of books, sheet music, and clothing. It may be made of any hardwood such as oak, ash, or mahogany to match other furniture; or of a more easily worked wood as red gum, whitewood, or white pine if it is to be painted or lacquered.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0247.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0248.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
ENGINEER DOBE
[no value]
ENGINEER DOBE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0249.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
[no value]
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0250.xml
article
132
132,134,135
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Bookbinding Made Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AUSTIN G. TRIBUTE
THE home workshop enthusiast who delights in books can quickly learn to rebind damaged or worn editions and make bound volumes of his magazines that will safeguard them indefinitely. Let us take, for instance, six months of our favorite—POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY— and see how easily a bound book can be made.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0251.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
American School Dept.
[no value]
American School Dept.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0252.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Clarence A. O’Brien
[no value]
Clarence A. O’Brien
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0253.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0254.xml
article
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Easy Ways of Removing Broken Set Screws
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. W. SWOPE.
OFTENTIMES we are confronted with the not altogether pleasant job of removing a broken set screw’. Aside from the unpleasantness of the job, it is usually difficult and presents somewhat of a puzzle as to the correct procedure. When a set screw’, holding a pulley in place or used in some similar part of a machine, breaks off, it invariably twists off close to or even below the surface of the threaded hole.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0255.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0256.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0257.xml
article
136
136
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Small Bench Punch Aids in Cutting Odd Shapes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASK any watchmaker what his most useful tool is, and nine times out of ten he will show you a collection of punches together with a G-shaped stand, the whole of which is usually knownas a “staking tool.” With this design in mind, the writer made the device illustrated, and has found it well worth the time spent in its production.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0258.xml
article
136
136
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Drilling Holes at an Angle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FIXTURE for holding small pulleys, sheaves and similar work at an angle for drilling oil holes or set screw holes can be made from wood as shown. The foot piece is notch ed in the center to keep the work from moving sidewise. In shops where even a moderate amount of this class of work is handled, several such fixtures will soon pay for themselves.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0259.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
THEO. AUDEL & CO.
[no value]
THEO. AUDEL & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0260.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
Landon & Warner, Dept.
[no value]
Landon & Warner, Dept.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0261.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
Buescher Band Instrument Co.
[no value]
Buescher Band Instrument Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0262.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
High School Home Study Bureau
[no value]
High School Home Study Bureau
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0263.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
McCarrie School of Mechanical Dentistry
[no value]
McCarrie School of Mechanical Dentistry
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0264.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Foley Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
Foley Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0265.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
CONN
[no value]
CONN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0266.xml
advertisement
139
139
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0267.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
Popular Science Publishing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0268.xml
article
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Cleaning Concrete Floors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN EFFECTIVE cleaner for removing oil and grease spots from concrete driveways and garage floors is tri-sodium-phosphate, similar in appearance to common table salt. Wet the concrete thoroughly, then sprinkle the chemical evenly over the spots and let it stand for several hours.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0269.xml
advertisement
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0270.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0271.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
FIRST HAWAIIAN CONSERVATORY of MUSIC, Inc.
[no value]
FIRST HAWAIIAN CONSERVATORY of MUSIC, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0272.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
Fireside Industries
[no value]
Fireside Industries
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0273.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0274.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
EAKINS CO.
[no value]
EAKINS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0275.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.
[no value]
McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0276.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
Universal Aviation Schools
[no value]
Universal Aviation Schools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0277.xml
article
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Kill Insect Pests with Short Wave Radio
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLIES, cockroaches and orchard insect pests killed by radio is a new marvel announced the by the New Jersey Agricultural Experiment Station at New Brunswick, N. J. Recently Dr. Thomas J. Headlee, entomologist of the station, demonstrated how insects placed in a glass tube and exposed to powerful radio waves from a high-frequency transmitter, died in a few moments.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0278.xml
article
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Search for Inca Gold
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INCA gold, believed to have been hidden for nearly four centuries, is being sought in a high pass of the Andes Mountains, just north of Peru, as the result of a recent accidental find by a party of prospectors. A cave containing ancient skeletons and an Inca idol, symbolic of the sun, suggested that the region may contain the fabled gold and jewels, valued at $15,000,000, which were collected to ransom the last Inca king of Peru, Atahualpa, from the Spanish conqueror, Pizarro.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0279.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0280.xml
article
146
146
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Beer 5,000 Years Old
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT sort of beer the Pharaohs drank, whether it was light like Pilsener or dark like Münchner, has been determined precisely by Prof. Johannes Gruess of Berlin. Taking to his laboratory a consignment of Egyptian jugs and bottles dating as far back as 1,700 years before King Tut, sent by H. E. Winlock of the Metropolitan Museum in New York City, Professor Gruess subjected them to severe analysis.
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0281.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0282.xml
advertisement
147
147
[no value]
[no value]
Institute of Applied Science
[no value]
Institute of Applied Science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0283.xml
advertisement
147
147
[no value]
[no value]
Federal School of Illustrating
[no value]
Federal School of Illustrating
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0284.xml
advertisement
148
148
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0285.xml
advertisement
149
149
[no value]
[no value]
U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0286.xml
advertisement
149
149
[no value]
[no value]
Central States Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Central States Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0287.xml
advertisement
149
149
[no value]
[no value]
LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
[no value]
LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0288.xml
advertisement
150
150
[no value]
[no value]
Addison-Leslie Co.
[no value]
Addison-Leslie Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0289.xml
advertisement
151
151
[no value]
[no value]
Taylor Instrument Companies
[no value]
Taylor Instrument Companies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0290.xml
advertisement
152
152
[no value]
[no value]
ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0291.xml
advertisement
153
153
[no value]
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0292.xml
advertisement
154
154,155,156
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: LUCKY STRIKE CIGARETTE
[no value]
[no value]
LUCKY STRIKE CIGARETTE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19300201_0116_002_0293.xml