Issue: 19290201

Friday, February 1, 1929
February 1929
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Sunday, December 28, 2014

Articles
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0001.xml
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NATIONAL CARBON CO., INC.
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NATIONAL CARBON CO., INC.
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0002.xml
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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2,3
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Table of Contents for February
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0004.xml
masthead
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2,17
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0005.xml
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THE F.H.SMITH CO.
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THE F.H.SMITH CO.
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0006.xml
article
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4,5,6
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Imposing a Saving Sentence On a SPENDTHRIFT
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II
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WALLACE AMES
THE usual mess of monthly bills had arrived, checks were drawn and the accounts paid. In addition to the current household bills there were a number of extras representing Christmas presents, holiday expenses and one or two luxuries which Mr. and Mrs. Matthews had allowed themselves.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0007.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0008.xml
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Cochran & McCluer Co.
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Cochran & McCluer Co.
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0009.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0010.xml
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FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0011.xml
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INVESTORS SYNDICATE
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INVESTORS SYNDICATE
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0012.xml
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UNITED STATES FISCAL CORPORATION
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UNITED STATES FISCAL CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0013.xml
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E. A. Campbell & Son
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E. A. Campbell & Son
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0014.xml
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0015.xml
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THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION
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THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0016.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0017.xml
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THE WORLD'S LARGEST BUSINESS TRAINING INSTITUTION
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THE WORLD'S LARGEST BUSINESS TRAINING INSTITUTION
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0018.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0019.xml
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0020.xml
article
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12
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Help for You in Building
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ARE you thinking about building a house or modernizing your present home? If you are, you are in for a thrilling time if you take advantage, as you should, of the advances that have been made in the science of building in the last few years.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0021.xml
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0022.xml
article
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14
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Our Readers Say
Eyeglasses a Fad?
It Rained Salt Water!
Thanks, Doctor
Airplanes and Death
Good Enough to Fly
Saved Their Money
More about Gliders
What Do You Say?
In the Model Ship Yards
Kind Words from Friends
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WAS amazed that either POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY or Dr. Free, whose articles I usually read with interest, should fall so hard for the propaganda of oculists and opticians as to publish that article, ‘Must We All Wear Glasses?’ “What we need is not more glasses, but fewer glasses.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0023.xml
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The American Tobacco Co.
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The American Tobacco Co.
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0024.xml
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16
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THE CELOTEX COMPANY
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THE CELOTEX COMPANY
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0025.xml
article
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17,18,19
LEADING ARTICLES
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COAL from CABBAGES
And food from sawdust, lemonade from peanut shells, lumber from straw, cotton from banana stalks! More amazing than a fairy tale is this story of chemistry’s latest magic. Here are adventure, wonder and romance right at your door
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GROVER C. MUELLER
ON THE speaker's platform in the auditorium of the Carnegie Institute of Technology at Pittsburgh some weeks ago, an unassuming man, hailing from romantic old Heidelberg, the famous university town in Germany, stood and announced in matter-of-fact tones that, after twenty-two years of experimentation, he had succeeded in making coal out of wood, cabbages, and cornstalks!
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0026.xml
article
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20,21,144
LEADING ARTICLES
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Building the Greatest Bridge
The Story of One of the World’s Most Thrilling Engineering Feats—Giant New Hudson Span Will Carry a City in a Day!
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EDWIN KETCHUM
IMAGINE all of the men, women, and children of Baltimore, Md., leaving their houses on a sultry August morning and piling into automobiles to rush away from the heat of the city. Then picture this huge procession of automobiles,—about 200,000 cars in a line that would reach two thirds of the way from New York to Chicago !—passing in that one day across a suspension bridge of a single span 3,500 feet long, and you have gained an idea of the tremendous traffic to be borne on a summer Saturday by the greatest bridge in the world.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0027.xml
article
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22
LEADING ARTICLES
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Snuffing Out a Giant Candle
Fire Fighters, Behind Shields of Steel, Win Terrific Battle with a Flaming Oil Gusher
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JOHN E. LODGE
SOOT-SMEARED, an oil driller races across the sand. His face is distorted with fear, his undershirt scorched. Behind him, amid a cluster of twenty oil derricks like ant hills on a desert plain, a pillar of flame shoots skyward. One of the towers rises bodily into the air, and is hurled in a dozen directions.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0028.xml
article
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23,137
LEADING ARTICLES
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Washington and Lincoln Both Were Inventors
New Light on the Great Presidents Whose Birthdays We Are Celebrating This Month
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HOMER CROY
FEBRUARY two Presidents, brings both to born mind in that the same month, were, in their own right, inventors. They are George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. And in their inventions they showed their different natures. We’ll take Washington first because he came first.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0029.xml
article
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24,25,146,147,148
LEADING ARTICLES
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New Proofs That Animals Really Can Think
Amazing Stories of Tigers that Reason, a Horse that Solves Deep Problems, and an Ape that Invents
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ROBERT E. MARTIN
HIS planted $10,000 four Persian shaggy upon an prayer feet exquisite rug, firmly a Shetland pony stood in the middle of the drawing room at the New York home of Sir Joseph Duveen, internationally known art connoisseur and antiquarian, one evening a few weeks ago.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0030.xml
article
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26,133
LEADING ARTICLES
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Prospecting for Gold With Electricity
Amazing Instruments Find Hidden Ores and Bring New Romances to the West
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GEORGE LEE DOWD
PROSPECTING by electricity is here. The new method, which the U. S. Bureau of Mines’ experts have just tried out in Colorado, discovers underground veins of metal without digging an ounce of earth. There is no need to drill costly “test shafts” where someone thinks there is metal.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0031.xml
article
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27,28,130,131
LEADING ARTICLES
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Liquefied Helium Boils on Ice and "Freezes" Tin
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ARTHUR A. STUART
A FEW weeks ago the little Navy blimp J-3, descending to its hangar at the Lakehurst, N. J., air station, ran afoul a weather vane. With a ripping noise her gas cells parted, and 25,000 cubic feet of helium gas disappeared to wander about among the elements, perhaps for ages before being captured and put to work again.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0032.xml
article
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LEADING ARTICLES
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A New Guide to the Heavens
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IMAGINE a giant disk wheel whirling in space. That is our universe as astronomers now picture it. Dr. Harlow Shapley, director of the Harvard College Observatory, Cambridge, Mass., has just announced that, 47,000 light years distant in the direction of the constellation Sagittarius, he has discovered the central hub about which it spins.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0033.xml
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30,31
LEADING ARTICLES
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S O S!—A Challenge to Science
HELPLESS women and children in battered lifeboats, dangling at the steel side of a sinking ship, doomed to be swallowed in the sea! Who, after the investigations that followed the tragedy, has not been stirred by the verdict of marine experts that “it could have been prevented !” Here is told how inventors are answering the Vestris challenge.
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FREDERICK TISDALE
AFTER every great sea disaster humanity searches for devices and regulations that will prevent the recurrence of such horrors. The Lamport & Holt liner Vestris sank two months ago off the Virginia Capes with a loss of 111 lives. She lies on the floor of the Gulf Stream two miles below the surface white caps
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0034.xml
article
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32,33,162,163,164,165,166
LEADING ARTICLES
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If You Had Millions to Spend—
WHAT would you do? Harry Guggenheim chose to go in for aviation. He marshalled the forces of science to conquer the flyer’s deadliest foes, and to make airplanes as safe and useful as automobiles. Here is the story of a twentieth-century pioneer, a man who looked into the future. It forms a stirring episode in the drama of the air.
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MICHEL MOK
A FEW weeks ago a new research laboratory was added to the world's gallery of modern scientific developments. It is a laboratory without test tubes, retorts, microscopes, and Bunsen burners, and without learned looking men using these intriguing paraphernalia for purposes of minute investigation.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0035.xml
article
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Models
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Making Movie Thrills with Tiny Toys
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0036.xml
article
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LEADING ARTICLES
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Ringside Seats on the Ocean Bottom
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A VICIOUS shark prowls along the sea bottom hunting for prey. Stealthily on his trail glides a monster sucker fish, bent on attaching himself like a parasite to the undersea destroyer. This and other thrilling dramas of the deep are revealed in remarkable photographs snapped recently at the sea bottom off the Bahamas by J. E. Williamson, pioneer undersea photographer, and Mrs. Williamson.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0037.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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One Jump Ahead of Death!
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0038.xml
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Exceptional People
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Strange Sights Snapped By Our Camera Men
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0039.xml
article
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38,39
New Devices for the Home
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Inventions That Every Housewife Will Appreciate
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0040.xml
article
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Men and Ideas Setting the Pace In Aviation
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0041.xml
article
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Aviation
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STRANGEST of New Fighting Planes Is an Unseen “Ghost” of the Air—Other Astonishing Inventions and Records Mark the Month’s Progress in Flying
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A PHANTOM airplane designed for war use and said to be practically invisible in the air is nearing completion at Not" tingham, England. Recent tests showed the possibility of constructing such a plane, on which it would be impossible for enemy gunners to train artillery, as reported not long ago in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0042.xml
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Aviation
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More Records Smashed
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NOTABLE airplane records marked the last month in aviation. An unofficial world’s record for speed went to Flight Lieut. D ’Arcy Grieg, British pilot, who flew his supermarine Napier seaplane at an average speed of 319.57 miles an hour off Cals hot, England, in four consecutive dashes over a standard course.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0043.xml
article
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41
Aviation
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A Great Seaplane Harbor
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SOON Montreal, Canada, is to have one of the finest seaplane harbors in the world. Two 300-foot breakwaters built out into the St. Lawrence river from points of land along the shore will inclose a body of smooth water nearly a mile long and half a mile wide—plenty of room for seaplanes to land and to take off.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0044.xml
article
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Aviation
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Silencing Roar of Planes
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TURNING the roar of a 200-horsepower air-cooled motor into a mere hiss is the feat claimed for a new silencer developed by the makers of Fairchild planes. The invention, perfected with the aid of the Maxim Silencer Company, is a six-foot pipe as thick as a forefinger, which runs from the motor back under the cabin.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0045.xml
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Aviation
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First to Fly in Antarctic
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HILE Commander Byrd and his scientific expedition were sailing toward the Antarctic, a famous explorer already there scooped away the honor of being the first man to fly a plane over the south polar region. Sir George Hubert Wilkins, who recently arrived at his base on Deception Island, Antarctica, announced that he had already piloted one of his Lockheed planes on a short flight in preparation for his projected air trip along the coast of Graham Land.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0046.xml
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Aviation
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Planes Wear Life Buoys
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LAND planes can leave the deck of an airplane carrier for a shore visit when the sea is too rough to launch a seaplane. But should the land craft fall into the sea the plane may be lost and its crew drowned. So the Navy recently has adopted a unique “flotation gear” to turn a land plane into a seaplane in an emergency.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0047.xml
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Aviation
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New Gun Sprays Bullets
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SPRAYING bullets from a machine gun, just as water is sprayed from a lawn sprinkler, is the purpose of a unique invention under consideration by the War Department for use in fighting planes. According to the inventor, Joseph F. Butler, of Pittsburgh, it makes it unnecessary to aim a machine gun accurately; no hostile (Continued on page 132) craft could escape the novel gun’s peppering.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0048.xml
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42,43,44,152,153,154,155,156,157,158
LEADING ARTICLES
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The Real Fathers of Flight
How Two Untutored Bicycle Men Conquered the Air After Learned Experts Had Failed—The Amazing Story of Wilbur and Orville Wright, Told for the First Time in Intimate Detail
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JOHN R. McMAHON
I HEAR the Wright boys are going camping this summer,” said a citizen of Dayton, Ohio, to a neighbor in the year 1900. “That so? Making money out of their bicycle business, I guess. Where are they going?” “Queer place called Kitty Hawk, down in North Carolina.”
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0049.xml
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45,151
LEADING ARTICLES
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Tides Make the Earth Boil Over
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EDWIN W. TENLE
RECENTLY thousands of the refugees, world read carrying that pitiful bundles of salvaged goods, were clogging the roads of eastern Sicily, fleeing from an eruption of Mt. Etna. For five years this 10,758-foot volcano, fringed with villages and vineyards at its base, had been quiet.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0050.xml
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Planes Bomb w'Warship’’ on the Desert
Life-Size Dre a dnaught, Painted on Sand, Blown to Bits by Shower of Missiles from the Air in Amazing War Game
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WITH winning steel propellers,five" California National Guarl airplanes recetly wheeled into position over the shimmering Mohave Desert and released a series of high-explosive bombs in a new type of practice maneuver. On the bed of a dry lake below, the exact outline of the U. S. S. California, painted to scale, had been shaped by guardsmen, using black crude oil for paint, and brooms for brushes.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0051.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0052.xml
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47,48,158
LEADING ARTICLES
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Now You Can Eat Sunshine!
Here Is the Story of a Man Who Gave Away His $1,000,000 Discovery to Make Folks Healthy—How the Sun Is Being Put to Work
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FRANK PARKER STOCKBRIDGE
WITHIN the last few weeks a new breakfast food has appeared on the shelves of grocery stores throughout the country. During its making, it has been bathed in artificial sunshine from high-powered electric lamps. It is the first of new “ irradiated ” health foods that you may soon expect to see upon your grocer’s shelves.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0053.xml
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49
LEADING ARTICLES
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Sky Railway Runs to Strange Hotel
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TWO combined great recently engineering in a single feats enterwere prise that may be numbered among the wonders of the world. One is the famous hanging-car aerial cableway that climbs to the top of Germany’s highest mountain peak, the Zugspitze, more than two miles above sea level.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0054.xml
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Along the Road of Progress
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EVERY duced expressed shade to a numerical in figures, and tint by can formula, means be reof a device known as the recording spectrophotometer, recently invented by Professor Arthur C. Hardy, of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0055.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Farms in the Sahara?
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RECLAMATION of the Sahara Desert, long discussed, is now receiving attention as a serious project by the French government. Dwight Braman, of Boston, Mass., an irrigation engineer, has worked out the plan for letting in the Mediterranean through canals and damming the rivers which flow down from the Atlas Mountains.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0056.xml
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Aviation
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New Material for Airship Bags
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THE U. S. Bureau of Standards announces that its technicians have developed a substitute for goldbeaters’ skin for use in the manufacture of the gas cells which, inflated with hydrogen or helium, lift an airship. Goldbeaters’ skin is an expensive product.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0057.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Will the Ocean Overflow?
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TO MOST of us Commander Byrd’s expedition to the Antarctic savors more of adventure than of science; but if his researches on the south polar ice cap answer but one question they may prove of the greatest value to the world. That question is: Is the Antarctic ice cap melting?
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0058.xml
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50,51
Health and Hygiene
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New Cancer Hope
Brief Bits of Fact and Interesting Comment from the Month’s Records of Discovery and Invention
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CANCER is a disease for which no definite cure has been found except the use of the knife in its early stages. One woman in eight and one man in fourteen dies of cancer. It occurs most frequently in people whose blood is alkaline. Dr. Charles Mayo, famous surgeon of Rochester,
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0059.xml
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Laboratory Discoveries
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An Artificial Heart!
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LIFE remains one of the unexplained phenomena of the universe. It seems improbable that scientists ever will be able to produce life from nonliving materials, but through an amazing series of laboratory experiments many things about life and death are being learned.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0060.xml
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51
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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No Fire in Redheads?
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A SCIENTIFIC pronouncement which may start lively arguments comes from a report of the British Social Hygiene Council. This indicates a belief that redheads, instead of being natural fighters and fiery adventurers, are really victims of an inborn inferiority complex.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0061.xml
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51,150
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Every Man His Own Still
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NATURE has slight regard for the Eighteenth Amendment, but sees to it that every human being has his or her regular daily supply of alcohol. Three thousandths of one percent of the total weight of the normal human body consists of alcohol, says the Journal of the American Medical Association.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0062.xml
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Cathedral Blasted from Cliffs
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NEAR Peekskill, N. Y., the old Mohegan granite quarry, unworked for years, has been reopened to supply stone for the building of the great Cathedral of St. John the Divine, on Morningside Heights, New York City. Amid the skyscrapers of the metropolis, the cathedral will be unique in that it will contain no steel or wood.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0063.xml
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Aviation
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Airplane Explorers Find a New Sugar
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ONE of these days you may be sweetening your cereal, or your coffee, with an entirely new brand of sugar—scouted for by airplane, found by a searching party crashing through the brush of New Guinea wilds, and brought back to this country with 166 other varieties by Dr. E. W. Brandes, sugar plant specialist of the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0064.xml
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53,54,134,135,136
LEADING ARTICLES
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New Marvels of Plane Design
Astonishing Secrets of Engineering Behind the Latest Triumphs of Speed, Power, and Reliability in Aircraft
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THE other day a Curtiss Army plane, equipped with a Wright Whirlwind motor, sped over Langley Field, Va., at 137 miles an hour. That was a pretty good clip for this type of machine, though not unusual. The unusual part of it was that the tachometer on the pilot's dashboard showed the propeller turning over at the rate of only 1,900 revolutions a minute.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0065.xml
article
55
55
LEADING ARTICLES
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When the Sky Rains Soldiers!
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THE fought next with war, if any, may be fought with parachutes! Battalions of armed soldiers dropped from the air may play a decisive part in tomorrow's combats. Several recent developments presage this astounding innovation. From three planes speeding over Brooks Field, San Antonio, Texas, a machine gun and its crew of three men were dropped to earth, where they set up their weapon and got it into action in three minutes.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0066.xml
article
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56
New Processes and Inventions
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Swimming Turtle Is “Hour Hand” of Novel Clock
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A TURTLE tells you the time in a unique timepiece produced in Switzerland. At first glance, the clock appears to be a sundial with a circular tray, filled with water, set in the face. In this tray a small imitation turtle floats, carrying a piece of steel in its beak.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0067.xml
article
56
56,166,167
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How Much Do You Know About Astronomy?
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HERE are ten questions selected from hundreds asked by our readers. See how many of them you can answer. Correct answers are on page 166. You'll find this an entertaining way to test your knowledge in one of the most fascinating fields of science.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0068.xml
article
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56
[no value]
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Passenger Catamaran
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WITH its twin hulls sinking only nine inches into the water, a unique air-driven catamaran carried nine passengers and attained a speed of nine miles an hour with full load when put through its paces recently at Dudley, England, by its inventor, W. F. Davies.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0069.xml
article
56
56
Nature
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Rocky Mountain Wilds Are Reserved for Science
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SEVERAL million acres, comprising forty-two separate tracts in the Rocky Mountain Forest District, have been set aside by the U. S. Department of Agriculture as “wilderness areas" to be used for science and recreation. Thirteen small areas in the national forests of Colorado, Wyoming, and South Dakota have been set aside for scientific observation and research, and all commercial and recreational activity in that territory is prohibited. A 100,000-acre wild, inaccessible area on the Washakie National Forest in Wyoming is closed to commercial use and open for recreation.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0070.xml
article
56
56
Nature
[no value]
“Busy Bee” a Myth—He’s a Loafer, Tests Show
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[no value]
[no value]
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DR. LLOYD R. WATSON, of Cornell University, a scientist wrho apparently doesn't care what happens to our pet illusions, has just announced the results of fifteen years of research work among the bees, which showed him that these insects, accepted as symbols of industry, are really work-shirkers.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0071.xml
article
56
56
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Human Body’s Electricity Reported Photographed
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IN RESEARCH work tending to show that the human nervous system is an intricate electrical network with the brain as its semiautomatic switchboard, two scientists in Munich, Germany, claim to have photographed electric current issuing from a man's body.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0072.xml
article
56
56
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Weak Feet Walk on Air in New Arch Support
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WALKING on air" is more than a figure of speech for users of a new arch support wdiich is pumped up with a small hand pump. The air cushion, attached to a thin inner sole, is made of a rubber composition said to possess great strength. One of the supports is reported to have withstood a pressure equivalent to the weight of twelve heavy men.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0073.xml
article
57
57
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Opals, Once Feared, Today Yield Vast Fortunes
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ALTHOUGH a popular superstition persists to the effect that opals are harbingers of death and sorrow, Australia, the chief source of the world’s supply of these gems, derives revenue estimated at millions of dollars from them. An opal valued at $5,000 was found recently near Walgett, New South Wales.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0074.xml
article
57
57
Automobiles
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Steam-Puffing Granddaddy of Modern Auto Found
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DUST-COVERED and with the paint peeled from its ancient body, what is thought to be one of the earliest ancestors of the 23,000,000 motor vehicles now in the United States was uncovered recently in an unused portion of a laboratory at the University of Maryland.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0075.xml
article
57
57
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Latest Ice Cream Cone Wears a Bonnet
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ICE cream cones that wear caps, invented by C. K. Gummerson, of Pittsburgh, Pa., are said to keep the ice cream in shape from five to ten minutes longer than in ordinary cones and to protect it from dirt 1 and street dust. The cap also may be used separately as an ice cream container. A flat baked cake wafer is supplied as a lid to protect the contents of this small ice cream “plate.” The cap, which is made of the same material as the cone, can also be eaten.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0076.xml
article
57
57
Health and Hygiene
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Life Span 100 Years by 1950? Experts Differ
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CENTENARIANS may be the rule instead of the exception in 1950, according to Arthur D. Rees, formerly of the University of Pennsylvania faculty, who sees no reason why a 100-year average life span should not be the usual thing. Increased knowledge of disease and dietetics will shortly extend old age far beyond the Biblical “three score and ten,” he believes.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0077.xml
article
57
57
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Soldering Jobs Simplified by Electric Furnace
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ONLY eight inches long and six inches wide, a portable electric furnace has been devised for heating soldering irons for small jobs. The temperature of the heat» ing chamber is said to rise quickly to morf than 900 degrees F., but an automatic control prevents it from mounting high enough to burn the point of the soldering copper.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0078.xml
article
57
57
Automobiles
[no value]
Know Your Car
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[no value]
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HARD starting is a winter motoring trouble that is avoidable. Cold weather affects the functioning of the car's mechanism in several ways, and all of these are cumulative in causing hard starting. Much more current is consumed by the starter motor to start a very cold engine, due to the friction of the congealed oil.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0079.xml
article
58
58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Searchlights on Wheels Aid Fire Fighters
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FLOODLIGHTING has become a part of fire fighting in Chicago. A new “light wagon,” recently added to the equipment of the city’s fire department, will respond to all important calls, furnishing light by which the firemen can work more effectively.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0080.xml
article
58
58
Nature
[no value]
English Hard for Parrots
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PARROTS, tested at the municipal zoo in Dallas, Texas, demonstrated that they could learn Spanish easier than either English or German. One parrot speaks Spanish words picked up from countless Mexican visitors and has never spoken a word in English.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0081.xml
article
58
58
Radio
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Radio Pictures Made Lifelike
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TELEVISION pictures which give the impression of depth as well as width are said to have been produced by John L. Baird, pioneer Scotch television experimenter, by using a stereoscopic receiving set. Behind the spinning disk, with its spiral perforations, two pictures appear simultaneously.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0082.xml
article
58
58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Cameraman Snaps Torpedo Diving into Waves
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LIKE a succession of huge flying fish skimming over the water and dropping into the waves, a series of torpedoes sped from the deck of one of the latest destroyers during recent tests in the English Channel. A photographer aboard the warship snapped one of the giant missiles as it plunged through the air, obtaining the remarkable photograph that is reproduced below.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0083.xml
article
58
58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Gypsum Increases Soil’s Capacity for Moisture
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MAKING land thirsty is the work of a new apparatus developed by the U. S. Department of Agriculture. In the western states some irrigated fields, known as hard spots, or hard land, do not absorb water readily. Experiments have shown that irrigation water containing more sodium than calcium increases the hardness of such soil.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0084.xml
article
58
58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Tribesmen Jail Idols If Prayers Are Unanswered
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WHEN their prayers are not granted, Moroccan tribesmen bind their religious images with ropes and leave these fetters on until the desired happening occurs or their displeasure abates, according to Edward A. Westermarck, noted English sociologist, who has just concluded a study of their ceremonies.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0085.xml
article
58
58
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Masks Safeguard Health of Paint Spray Users
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AT LEAST nine tenths of the lead in air containing paint mist is removed by the use of respirators with cotton, paper, or fabric filters, Surgeon General H. S. Cummings announces as the result of experiments by the Public Health Service, in Washington, D.C.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0086.xml
article
59
59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Begin Search for Diamond Fields in Canada
[no value]
[no value]
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ARE there diamond fields in Canada? Not long ago, some diamonds of commercial size were found in Indiana by tourists who examined debris around the rock mounds left in parts of that state at the end of ancient glacier drifts. Discovery of this treasure has revived interest among scientists in the possibility that there may be diamond-bearing rock in the James Bay region in Canada.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0087.xml
article
59
59
Nature
[no value]
Big Trees, Centuries Old, Found to Be Fireproof
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ONE of the reasons for the amazingly long life of the California Big Free, the forest giant which reaches an age of 4,000 and sometimes even 6,000 years, was discovered a few weeks ago. Experiments with its bark showed that it has a resistance to fire surpassed only by that of asbestos!
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0088.xml
article
59
59
Engineering
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Five-Mile Highway Built Across James River
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THE world’s longest highway bridge, a five-and-a-half-mile span crossing the James River in Virginia, and connecting Newport News, Norfolk, and Portsmouth, was opened to traffic recently. Built at a cost of $7,000,000, the new bridge closes a large gap in the Atlantic Coastal highway and forms a direct road down the historic Virginia Peninsula.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0089.xml
article
59
59
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Compressed Air Drill New Aid to Surgeons
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THE pneumatic drill, familiar to engineering, is the newest of aids to surgeons in the operating room. Dr. W. H. Ogilvie, an assistant surgeon at Guy's Hospital, London, England, is the inventor of the new surgical instrument, pictured below.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0090.xml
article
59
59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Your Busy Heart Is Fed by Tiny “Dinner Pails”
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THE adult heart—the only organ in the body whose muscles never rest nor sleep during life—makes an average total of 108,000 beats every twenty-four hours! How does this busy organ find time to “eat” and fortify itself for its arduous labors?
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0091.xml
article
59
59
Aviation
[no value]
Plan World’s Largest Airplane Plant
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THE largest aircraft manufacturing plant in the world is soon to be built in California, according to a recent announcement by interests that have purchased control of the Fokker Aircraft Corporation. Anthony H. G. Fokker, creator of the ships that bear his name, remains in charge of design.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0092.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Rubber Band Returns Ball In One-Man Tennis
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[no value]
YOU can play tennis with yourself by means of a simple, one-man tennis outfit, recently introduced into this country. Smashing lobs and speedy backhand strokes can be practiced in your own back yard without fear of smashing windows or losing balls, the makers of the device point out.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0093.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Chemical Makes Open-Air Ice Skating July Sport
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[no value]
ICE skating in a bathing suit under a broiling summer sun has been made possible by the recent discovery, in Germany, of a chemical substitute for ice. When sprinkled over a smooth floor, the chemical immediately hardens into a solid polished surface over which the sharp runners of the skates glide without cutting through.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0094.xml
article
60
60
Aviation
[no value]
Air Landmarks Should Be Yellow, White, Black
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CHROME yellow, white, and dead black are the three best colors for markings to guide aviators, such as towers of transmission lines along an airway and field boundary markers, according to Woody Hockaday, Aeronautics Division, U. S. Department of Commerce.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0095.xml
article
60
60
New Processes and Inventions
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Traveling Shears Clear Phone Lines of Litter
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CLEARING telephone and telegraph wires of kites and other entanglements has been made easier by the invention of Albert Hightower, a Fresno, Calif., lineman. The mechanism consists of a trolley truck carrying a pair of strong shears operated by a rope and so designed that it cannot jump the wire once it is properly mounted.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0096.xml
article
60
60
Models
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Traffic Problems Revealed by Working Models
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TOYS are now being used to teach traffic cops of Berlin, Germany, to do their work more efficiently. Tiny horses and wagons, automobiles, and street cars move along the streets of a miniature model town, part of which is shown in the photograph at the left, while the policemen, under the direction of an expert traffic officer, determine how the little control station at the street intersection should be operated to control the traffic meeting from five separate streets.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0097.xml
article
61
61
New Processes and Inventions
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Self-Dumping Scow Turns Somersault in the Water
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A SELF-DUMPING scow that flops over on its back and receives its next load upside-down, is being operated in the Puget Sound by a Seattle, Wash., company. Both the top and the bottom of the scow are identical, so it can be loaded whichever surface is on top.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0098.xml
article
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61
Health and Hygiene
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Grafts Part of Human Eye in Amazing Operation
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WHEN, in 1908, Dr. Hugh Mackay Dawbarn, the famous American surgeon, saved his son’s life by grafting a large piece of his own skin onto that of the boy’s, the operation astonished surgeons and physicians as well as laymen throughout the world.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0099.xml
article
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61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Catch Birds in Fish Nets
[no value]
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PROBABLY the stupidest winged creature is the auk, a small, web-footed, penguinlike bird whose haunts are the Arctic regions. A Canadian zoologist, recently returned from the Far North, described the catching of droves of auks by Eskimos who were armed only with fish nets!
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0100.xml
article
61
61
Automobiles
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Invents New Front-Wheel Drive for Autos
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ANOTHER attempt to apply the power of an automobile motor to the front wheels instead of the rear has been made recently by a French automobile engineer, M. Sensaud. In the picture above, the casing of the main driving gear may be seen in the center of the complicated front axle, just below the radiator of the automobile. Power is applied to the wheels through a system of gears. The close proximity of the driving wheels to the motor is expected to give greater efficiency by reducing loss of power in transmission.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0101.xml
article
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61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Where Half of the World’s Gold Is Weighed
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In A stream of yellow ingots, more than half the gold produced in the world passes through the weighing rooms of a refinery at Germiston, near Johannesburg, South Africa. Unrefined blocks of gold representing a fortune! are piled before the weighing official, who places them in the pans of sensitive scales, operating within dust-proof glass cases.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0102.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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New Hand Truck Picks Up Piles of Boxes
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BY PICKING up two stacks of boxes at a time, a new hand truck, invented in England, saves time by doing away with the necessity of loading eat l box on the truck separately. After the truck has been run into position, the wheels are held from rolling by application of a footbrake.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0103.xml
article
62
62
New Processes and Inventions
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Principle of Range Finder Applied to Depth Gage
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THE principle of the range finder, used in war time to determine the distance of ships and airplanes, can be applied to a special form of microscope and employed in the laboratory for minute and accurate depth measurements. This was demonstrated recently by Dr. I. C. Gardner, of the United States Bureau of Standards, before the American Optical Society.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0104.xml
article
62
62
Aviation
[no value]
“Beams” of Sound to Guide Aircraft in Fog
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A “SOUND searchlight,” described as throwing out a concentrated “beam” of sound that penetrates high into the air, as a shaft of light cuts into the darkness, was tested recently at Camden. N. J. The device is expected to prove valuable in directing aircraft to landing fields during fog, when they have approached so close that the radio beacon has become ineffective.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0105.xml
article
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62
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Speeding Typists’ Fingers with Radio “Jazz”
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A PSYCHOLOGIST connected with a Pennsylvania college not long ago conducted an experiment in which typists with their typewriters, kettledrums, saxophones, and plain, everyday pots and pans were used to prove his contention that human beings work better and faster amid the din produced by modern industrial centers than in solitude and quiet surroundings, as generally believed.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0106.xml
article
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62
Astronomy
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Screen Production Shows Motion of Planet
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OUR neighbor planet Jupiter took the leading rôle, the other night, in a remarkable motion picture thrown on the screen in Washington, D. C. By an ingenious process, similar to that used in photographing budding flowers, its motions were so sped up that spectators saw Jupiter actually revolving, and one of its satellites or moons produce an eclipse before their eyes.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0107.xml
article
63
63
Laboratory Discoveries
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Invisible Forces Photographed!
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FRST photographs of the electric field arounda conductor, made at Purdue University, promise to simplify enormously the problem of designing good high-voltage insulators and to aid in the study of what happens around a wire carrying electric current.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0108.xml
article
63
63
Automobiles
[no value]
Tractor Sets 1,330-Mile Endurance Record
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PLODDING along like the tortoise in the fable, a tractor, pulling a disk harrow over a thousand-acre field in California, set what is believed to be a world’s record recently when it kept going for seventeen nights and days. The test was made by engineers of the University of California.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0109.xml
article
63
63
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Walls Hide Radiators in Novel Heating System
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SMALL hot water pipes, buried in walls, ceilings, and floors of the new British Embassy, under construction in Washington, D. C., will furnish a novel heating system that eliminates the use of visible radiators. This is believed to be the first time the system has been installed in a building in this country, although frequently used in England.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0110.xml
article
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63
Engineering
[no value]
Bolstering Up the Leaning Tower of Pisa
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CONCRETE is being forced under the foundation of the leaning tower of Pisa in Italy, in an effort to save the famous medieval structure. The tipping of the tower has increased steadily, and fear was felt for its safety. When measured a hundred years ago, the tower was fifteen and one half feet out of the perpendicular.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0111.xml
article
63
63
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Tests Show Canary Bird Is Best Gas Detector
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THE United States Bureau of Mines, after experimenting with chickens, rabbits, dogs, mice, and other animals, has reached the conclusion that the canary is the best detector of poisonous gas in mines. In this connection, it will be remembered that Dr. Hugo Eckener, builder and commander of the Graf Zeppelin, had his pet canary aboard for this purpose when the world’s largest dirigible made its recent trip from Germany to America and back.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0112.xml
article
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64
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Why Two Sets May Look Alike, But Behave Differently
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[no value]
JOHN CARR
THE two men in the seat behind me were having a hot argument. “You sure gave me a bum steer when you recommended that lemon,” one of them growled disgustedly. “About all that alleged radio set has is a swell cabinet. The rest of it’s a bunch of junk !”
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0113.xml
article
65
65,66,149
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Rewiring for A. C. Simplified
Here You Can Learn When It Pays to Discard Batteries, and How to Change the Old Radio Set into an “Electric”
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[no value]
ALFRED P. LANE
THOUSANDS of radio fans now are trying to decide what to do about their battery operated radio receivers. They ask: “Shall I get new batteries and keep on using my set as it is? Had I better scrap it and get a new electric model? Isn’t there some way to make it over so it will be an electric? ”
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0114.xml
article
67
67
Timely Hints for the Radio Fan
[no value]
A Useful Transformer Test
Headphones Aid in Fixing Position of Instruments to Avoid Coupling Trouble—Measuring the Life of a Storage Battery
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[no value]
[no value]
THE audio transformer, as every radio experimenter knows, consists of a metal core made up of many layers of thin transformer steel on which are wound the primary and secondary windings. And there is no difference in principle between an audio transformer and the power transformer used in the modern electric radio receiver.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0115.xml
article
67
67
Timely Hints for the Radio Fan
[no value]
A B C's of Radio
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WHILE alternating current operation, as compared with battery operation, affords no better results in the radio-frequency detector, and first audio stages of a receiver, it is a big help in the last audio stage. Working from an alternating current source, you can easily obtain the necessary high Bvoltages required for best results when you use modern power tubes.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0116.xml
article
67
67
Timely Hints for the Radio Fan
[no value]
When Batteries Play Out
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AN OUTSTANDING characteristic of the lead-acid type storage battery as used in all automobiles for starting and lighting, and as the A-battery to supply filament current for a radio receiver, is the remarkable service it gives while it is reasonably new.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0117.xml
article
68
68
New Processes and Inventions
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Fabricated Lumber Cut in Labor-Saving Shapes
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHY cut a tree to pieces and then pay a carpenter money to put it together again?” That is the pertinent question put by Ross Houston, veteran lumberman of Tacoma, Wash., who recently developed and patented a unique labor-saving plan for sawing logs.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0118.xml
article
68
68
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Stunning Gowns of Metal Soon May Be the Style
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IF EXPERIMENTS made recently by German manufacturers prove practicable and popular, women soon may go to dances and theopera in stunning evening gowns of metal, while their escorts will be clad in a modern adaptation of the suits of armor worn by knights of old.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0119.xml
article
68
68
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
“Lightning” in Auto Motor
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAGGED forks of miniature lightning flash in the cylinders of your automobile every time an explosion takes place. This was revealed by recent experiments conducted in the Aeronautic Research Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0120.xml
article
68
68
Exceptional People
[no value]
He Built His Own Castle—On the Ground
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PRIVATE little castle, complete with towers and battlements, as well as a conservatory for raising flowers during winter months, has been constructed by T. Martin, a chauffeur in Hookwood, Surrey, England. During a period of unemployment, he planned and built the unique dwelling, making with his own hands all of the concrete blocks which went into its walls.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0121.xml
article
69
69
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
New Experiment Confirms Findings of Einstein
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROF. A. A. MICHELSON, University of Chicago physicist, has just repeated his memorable experiment of forty years ago, which later served as the basis of the much-discussed Einstein theory of relativity. The results, recently announced, completely confirm the test he then made with the aid of the late Prof. Edward W. Morley.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0122.xml
article
69
69
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Amazing Machines Do Work of an Office Force
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ALMOST complete “automatic office force” was included in exhibitions at the National Business Show, held recently in Chicago. One electric typewriter can be set copying an original letter and will keep on turning out duplicates until stopped.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0123.xml
article
69
69
Engineering
[no value]
Suspended by Crane, House Rides across River
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOUSES have been carried down streets and across bridges in odd moving jobs, but it remained for a Dutch contractor to accomplish the amazing feat of carrying one bodily across river. He succeeded in lifting a Rotterdam bungalow with a huge floating crane and ferrying it across the River Maas to its new location without injury.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0124.xml
article
69
69
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Put Milk in the Dark to Keep It Fresh
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXPERIMENTS by the Bureau of Dairy Industry of the U. S. Department of Agriculture show milk must be kept in a dark place to retain its flavor and freshness. When exposed to -sunlight, milk quickly develops “ a [linseed oil odor and a cardboard taste, ” the chemists found.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0125.xml
article
69
69
Radio
[no value]
Handy Radio Aerial Mast Clamps to the Roof
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DESIGNED to clamp on chimneys, around gutters and eaves, on apartment house parapets, or on window sills, a new radio aerial support has been put upon the market. Instead of nailing sticks to the roof or fastening them to the chimney to hold up serials, radio owners can save time and trouble, says the inventor, by use of the new clamp, which supports an upright metal rod surmounted by an insulator.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0126.xml
article
69
69
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
"Fountain Pen” Pistol Can Shoot Deadly Bullets
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A “FOUNTAIN PEN” that spurts thirty-eight-caliber bullets was picked up near a street corner in New York City recently and turned over to the police. The tiny weapon, little longer than the width of a man's hand, is shaped to appear merely a harmless writing instrument.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0127.xml
article
69
69
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Urge Metal Storage for War Needs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE ancient Assyrians stored huge quantities of iron in times of peace to have a plentiful supply for the manufacture of arms to be used in their frequent wars. A similar method is advocated by U. S. Army officials for present-day America. There are nine minerals, they say, of which this country would not possess sufficient stores in case of sudden hostilities. These are manganese, which forms an alloy with steel and hardens it ; antimony, which hardens lead; chromium, another steel alloy; platinum, used in chemical processes; nickel, needed for armor plate and bullet jackets; quicksilver, used in explosives, thermometers, and for several other purposes; tungsten, needed in the manufacture of electric lamps and machine tools; tin, principally used by the Army and Navy as a coating for cans; and nitrates, required in the making of artificial fertilizer.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0128.xml
article
70
70
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Nobility Not Degenerate, Genealogists Assert
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN 1385 two English barons, meeting casually during the invasion of Scotland, discovered to their discomfiture that they bore the identical family colors. Each hotly disputed the other’s right to them, and a long drawn out battle followed before a court of chivalry.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0129.xml
article
70
70
Exceptional People
[no value]
He Made American Flag of 33,000 Wheat Kernels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GLUING kernels of wheat upon a board for the equivalent of seventy working days, twenty-two-year-old Theophile Casaubon, of Los Angeles, produced this reproduction of the American flag. He used 33,000 kernels of selected hard wheat in the process.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0130.xml
article
70
70
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Would Foil Bank Robbers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CAGE for bank tellers and cashiers, constructed with shutters which could be closed instantly by bank officials by a push button on the approach of a holdup man, was proposed recently to prevent bank robberies. The idea was advanced by an expert in such matters-— a holdup man serving a life sentence in the Iowa State Penitentiary !
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0131.xml
article
70
70
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
A Mechanical Substitute for Tailor’s Shears
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INSTEAD of snipping along a line with scissors, tailors can cut out clothes in a fraction of the time, it is claimed, by use of the new mechanical cloth cutter pictured above. The machine is housed in a small box, above which a guarded blade protruaes.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0132.xml
article
70
70
Astronomy
[no value]
New Comet Discovered by an Amateur
[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
AN AMATEUR astronomer living at Rosebank, a small community near Cape Town, South Africa, distinguished himself recently by the discovery of a new comet. His “find” was confirmed immediately by officials of the Union Observatory in Cape Town.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0133.xml
article
70
70
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Folding Pushcart Runs on Rubber-Tired Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
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WHEN tradesmen finish making deliveries with a unique pushcart, recently exhibited at the Leipzig Technical Fair in Germany, they can fold it up and tuck it under their arms. When the bottom is lifted the cart folds together in the manner shown in the photograph, and may be stored in a narrow space.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0134.xml
article
70
70
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Europe May Soon “Eat” Its “Drinks” in Solid Form
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COUNTRIES now “wet” may soon go “dry” or partly so, but not as a result of international prohibition. The taking of “beverage” alcohol in solid form—in other words, the “eating” of “drinks”—has been made possible through a new German invention, which was demonstrated at one of the principal laboratories in Berlin a few weeks ago.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0135.xml
article
70
70
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Gives American “Talkies” Foreign Tongue
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the “talking movies” first made their appearance, some leaders in motion picture affairs asked, “Won’t this innovation seriously curtail the export of American-made films to foreign, non-English-speaking countries ?" Edwin Hopkins, a New York playwright, has supplied the potential answer with an invention which he calls “vivigraphic films,” which makes it possible to connect a voice record of an actor speaking in a foreign language with an American moving picture film.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0136.xml
article
71
71
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Three-Wheeled Motorcycle Runs on Endless Tread
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MOTORCYCLE in which two small, doughnutlike wheels replace the single large rear wheel has been designed in England for use in rough country and on unimproved roads. An endless tread is placed over the two rear wheels to furnish traction over especially difficult trails.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0137.xml
article
71
71
Nature
[no value]
Tiny Ocean Plants Build Houses of Health Glass
[no value]
[no value]
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IN THE Antarctic regions now being explored by the Byrd expedition live billions of microscopic plants which build transparent houses for themselves of materials so rare and difficult to manufacture that King Croesus himself would have been too poor to fashion even a small palace from them.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0138.xml
article
71
71
Exceptional People
[no value]
Paints First Scientific Portrait of Spectrum
[no value]
[no value]
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WITH the assistance of Dr. Irwin G. Priest and other scientists of the U. S. Bureau of Standards, Charles Bittinger, a noted artist of Boston, Mass., has painted what is considered the first scientifically accurate “portrait” of the spectrum of the sun.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0139.xml
article
71
71
Nature
[no value]
Landmarks Guide Pigeons Home?
[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
CONTRARY to accepted belief, bees, carrier pigeons, and other “homing” animals have no innate sense of direction, according to Armand Rio, a French naturalist. They find their way back to their hives or lofts by familiar landmarks which they memorize by short excursions within eyerange of their starting point before they set out on their flights, he says.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0140.xml
article
71
71
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Find Rare Handwork of Cave Men Jewelers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Neanderthal man, pictured by scientists as a flat-skulled, somewhat apelike individual who wooed his bride with a stone club, was a craftsman of no mean ability. Equipp ;d with flint tools of the roughest and most primitive description, he nevertheless turned out articles for his daily use so delicately wrought as to challenge the skill of the most accomplished modern artisan.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0141.xml
article
71
71
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Novel Card Table Serves Also as Movie Screen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CARD party can be changed into a movie show merely by lifting the top of a new card table, switching out the lights and turning on the home projector. The table is designed to serve as a motion picture screen when it is not in use in its ordinary capacity.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0142.xml
article
71
71
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Dry Cell Blasting Device Resembles Flashlight
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FUSES, for blasting, are supplanted by a new device which resembles an ordinary flashlight and furnishes electric current from three dry cells to discharge the explosive. According to the makers, it eliminates the danger of misfires and delayed fires caused by fuse trouble.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0143.xml
article
722
722
[no value]
[no value]
Swinging Auto Crib Rocks the Baby to Sleep
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BUMPS and jolts on rough roads rock the baby to sleep instead of disturbing him, when he is riding in a new automobile crib, according to the inventor. The crib hangs, hammock fashion, in the rear of the car, supported by two hooks screwed into the crossbeams of the car top.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0144.xml
article
722
722
[no value]
[no value]
One Time in Five It’s the Train That Is Hit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN ONE out of five grade crossing accidents, the automobile crashes into the train instead of the train hitting the machine, announces the American Railway Association, summarizing the annual toll of such accidents. In many cases the drivers first crashed through the crossing gate before hitting the train. During 1927, says the report, there was an increase of sixtysix grade crossing accidents over the twelve months preceding.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0145.xml
article
722
722
[no value]
[no value]
Road Signs Teach Geology
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIGNS placed along the highways near Ardmore, Oklahoma, call attention to interesting geological formations along the road, giving the kind of rock and the age it represents. One signboard contains a diagrammatic cross section of the Arbuckle Mountains, over which a main highway climbs.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0146.xml
article
722
722
[no value]
[no value]
Closed Car Has Removable Top to Admit Sunshine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CLOSED car with a top that can be folded back to admit, through glass windows, the beneficial rays from the sun, was one of the exhibits of a recent automobile show in London, England. By moving a handle at the right of his seat, the driver can push back the canvas cover of the car like a curtain, exposing a roof of health glass.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0147.xml
article
722
722
[no value]
[no value]
Holland Tunnel Handles 8,500,000 Cars in a Year
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EIGHT and a half million automobiles, carrying 42,000,000 passengers, passed through the Holland Tunnel, under the Hudson between New York and Jersey City, during the first year of its operation, officials report. Some of the elaborate tests made before the tunnel was built to insure against carbon monoxide poisoning have been revealed by A. C. Fieldner, of the U. S. Bureau of Mines.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0148.xml
article
722
722
[no value]
[no value]
“Auto Wheel Minus a Hub” Designed to Save Weight
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A WIRE automobile wheel without the usual central shell that fits over the axle hub is one of the latest innovations in motordom. The wheel is said to weigh only eleven pounds. A similar wheel, with the usual hub, weighs eighteen. Seven small metal rings, or eyelets, securing the inner spokes, and one large one, holding the outer spokes, take the place of the ordinary wheel hub. The small eyelets fit over the studs of the brake drums, where they bolt in place, tightening the inner spokes.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0149.xml
article
73
73
Aviation
[no value]
Bird’s-Eye View from Plane Reveals Buried City
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most paradoxical developments of modern science is found in the fact that aviation is proving itself a useful aid to archeology! There are many archeological “clues,” such as ancient roads, ditches, and the like, which are invisible to the passer-by on the ground, but which can be discovered from a height in the air because the aviator’s bird’s-eye view of the territory gives him an opportunity to observe conditions which form a scientifically unmistakable pattern.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0150.xml
article
73
73
Automobiles
[no value]
Inflates Soft Tire with Air from the "Spare"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASPARE tire becomes a service station that travels along with you to supply free air for soft tires, through the use of a new “tire balancer,” devised by Tom LeNay, of Los Angeles, Calif. The device is extremely simple. It consists of a twelve-foot rubber hose with a cap at each end.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0151.xml
article
73
73
Automobiles
[no value]
Oregon Village Sees Its First Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH more than twenty million pleasure automobiles were on the roads of the United States last year, the village of Agness, Ore., had never seen one until a roadster was sent there the other day. This community, on the Rogue River in the southwestern part of the state, contains only a handful of people and uses the river as its main highway.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0152.xml
article
73
73
Automobiles
[no value]
Every Little Dial Has a Meaning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH a dashboard containing as many instruments as are carried by a trans-Atlantic airplane, a small runabout made its appearance at Southport, England, recently. The woman motorist who drives the car has the assistance—or hindrance!—of thirty dials, clocks, and buttons, not to mention a strange assortment of mirrors, and other “gadgets.”
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0153.xml
article
73
73
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Colored Telephone Poles to Liven Landscape
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BRIGHTENING up the landscape with colored telephone poles is a suggestion recently made before engineers attending a telephone association conference in Chicago. One expert reported that his company had perfected a new wood preservative which triples the life of the poles and can be made in a variety of colors.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0154.xml
article
73
73
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Doctor Makes 7,000-Mile Call by Radio
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DOCTOR, 7,000 miles from a patient, diagnosed the case over the radio recently. A woman suffering from a dangerous malady in Buenos Aires, Argentina, was put in communication with a specialist in Berlin, Germany, over a test short-wave apparatus.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0155.xml
article
74
74
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Tin Can Filling Station for Cigarette Lighters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM an empty tin can, you can make a filling station for vest pocket cigarette lighters by screwing on a newly devised combination metal tube, cap, and rubber bulb in place of the regular cap on the can. The can holds sufficient gasoline to fill many lighters and, the makers say, forms a handy and economical means of keeping a vest pocket lighter replenished. The bulb is designed to have a capacity just sufficient for the ordinary lighter. Thus one squeeze fills the tank to the top without making it overflow.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0156.xml
article
74
74
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Colds Blamed on Lack of Proteins in Diet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FREDERICK HOELZEL, of the University of Chicago, announces a theory, backed up by experiment, that susceptibility to colds is largely a matter of diet. Persons who eat too much sugar and starch, as most people do, and vegetarians and others who live on a lowprotein diet, are far more likely to “take cold,” he says, than those whose food is high in protein content.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0157.xml
article
74
74
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Tin Foil Amazingly Thin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE tin foil wrapped around chocolate, tobacco, or cigarettes is thick compared to the foil used in radio condensers, which measures 4,350 sheets to the inch ! The thinnest foil provides 14,500 square inches from one pound of metal. Tin and lead foil are said to have been invented by the Chinese centuries ago, by hammering bars of metal. Today they are made by automatic machinery.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0158.xml
article
74
74
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Did Man’s Legs Develop Before His Head?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN EXHAUSTIVE study recently completed by Dr. Wilhelm Gieseler, of the University of Munich, Germany, tends to show that the pedal extremities of man’s remotest ancestor developed into human legs sooner than his skull evolved into a human head.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0159.xml
article
74
74
Radio
[no value]
Stations Identified by This Radio Dial
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE latest radio dial is designed to flash the identification letters of each broadcasting station when its wave length is tuned in. Contact points are fitted in the dial at positions where the various stations are tuned in perfectly. Thereafter, each time one of the contacts is made a light flashes at the top of the dial and the letters of the station appear behind a lighted window.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0160.xml
article
74
74
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Tiny Dynamo Operates New Batteryless Flashlight
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TWIST of the wrist supplies power for a new flashlight. Turning the handle winds a spring that operates a tiny dynamo and produces current for a two-and-a-half-volt light. This Lilliputian electric light plant is said to furnish light as long as the spring is kept wound.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0161.xml
article
74
74
Nature
[no value]
New Sugar Discovered in Dahlia Juice
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW sugar has been discovered in the juice of dahlia tubers by the U. S. Bureau of Standards, it was announced the other day. In experiments to find out the structure of inulin, a starchlike substance found in dahlia juice, the sugar was discovered.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0162.xml
article
75
75
Astronomy
[no value]
Oceans on Frozen Planet May Be Liquid Air
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE sunward side of Mercury, nearest the sun of all planets in our solar system, may reach a temperature of nearly 800 degrees Fahrenheit, a heat sufficient to melt lead, zinc, or tin and to keep all water on the planet’s surface permanently in gas form, like the air on earth, according to Dr. William F. Meyer, of the University of California.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0163.xml
article
75
75
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
"Rheumatics” a Real Storm Warning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELDERLY people who say they can feel the approach of a storm or bad weather because their rheumatic pains increase, have been laughed at a good deal by the younger generation, but now physicians declare the oldsters are right. At a recent convention of the Central Society for Clinical Research, in Chicago, a trio of distinguished doctors announced that observations over a number of years had shown that there exists, indeed, a close relation between storms, rain, and rheumatism.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0164.xml
article
75
75
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Holder for Pipe Cleaners
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE smoker is provided with a new accessory in a holder for pipe cleaners which enables him to keep them within arm’s reach on a table and prevents them from becoming dirty or bent out of shape. To lend attractiveness, designs are painted on the sides of the holders.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0165.xml
article
75
75
Nature
[no value]
Lizard Hypnotized!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CURIOUS animal of the Southwest, the blue-bellied lizard, has been proved susceptible to hypnotism. Edwin D. McKee, of the educational staff of the Grand Canyon National Park, has discovered that by keeping his eyes focused on those of the lizard as he approaches the elusive animal, it will remain tense and still and can be pinned to the ground with a quick dart of the hand.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0166.xml
article
75
75
Automobiles
[no value]
Women Drivers Can Signal Now—No Excuse!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROTECTION for the dress sleeves and arms of women motorists, when they have to signal stops and turns on a rainy day, is afforded by a gauntlet of rubberized fabric just devised. The guantlet slips on the left arm, reaching above the elbow. It buckles snugly about the wrist to keep raindrops from running down the arm. When not in use, the fabric can be folded into a tight roll that occupies little space.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0167.xml
article
75
75
Nature
[no value]
If Brain Size Counted, the Whale Would Be Smart
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW substantiation of the theory that intelligence does not depend on the apparent size or weight of the brain, but rather upon its convolutions, was offered recently by a German scientist who, after years of investigation, announced that the whale, never distinguished for its brain power, possesses the largest brain of any mammal.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0168.xml
article
75
75
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Novel Lamp Cord Holds Cigarette Lighter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ELECTRIC lamp cord suspending a heating element from which the smoker can light his cigar or cigarette is the latest novelty for the living room. The lighter comes in a variety of colors to match the twisted silk-covered wire cord and so has the appearance of a tassel at the end of the cord.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0169.xml
article
75
75
Nature
[no value]
A New Kind of Mosquito! This Makes 141
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANYONE who, in sultry summer nights, has had his patience tried by a twenty-five-minute hunt for a mosquito, will admire the persistence of C. H. Bath, sanitary inspector at the Panama Canal, who has captured a new species of this pestiferous family that had eluded experts during a chase lasting twenty-five years!
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0170.xml
article
75
75
Engineering
[no value]
World’s Greatest Gas Line
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ACROSS rivers and through mountain canyons, from Amarillo, Texas, to Denver, Colorado, what is said to be the largest high-pressure gas line in the world was completed recently at the record rate of almost two miles a day. This 375-mile line, carrying natural gas from the Amarillo fields to consumers in Denver and Pueblo, Colo., was in operation just 193 days after work was begun.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0171.xml
article
76
76,126
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Decorative Metal Sawing
You Can Master the Use of Jeweler's Saw Blades While Making an Attractive Brass Teapot Stand
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD THATCHER
SAWING is one of the most important operation to master in decorative metal work. While the heavier and larger pieces, such as hinges and hardware, may be cut out more readily with chisels as explained last month, the smaller pieces and intricate pierced openings in large pieces are usually cut with a jeweler’s saw blade.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0172.xml
article
77
77,111,112,118
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Ping-Pong Table Folds into Screen
Although of Tournament Size, It Can Be Stored in Small Space
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. KING
IN THE present popular revival of interest in ping-pong, many of those who have fallen under the spell of its furious fun have asked themselves the question: “How can I build myself a good, firm, large table which will not be cumbersome or unsightly when folded up?”
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0173.xml
article
78
78,120,121
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Controlling a Model Railway
A Simple Way to Install a Central Switchboard from Which to Govern All Train Movements—Changing Voltage on Grades
[no value]
[no value]
FREDERICK D. RYDER
JUST as it is necessary to plan the track layout of a model electric railway before you start building, so it is wise to make a preliminary study of the type of electrical control system you wish to install. The ideal control system would be one that would permit you to sit in front of the control panel and perform all the operations of running the trains without leaving that position.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0174.xml
article
79
79,116,118
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Turning Rings of Wood
How to Make Napkin, Tie, and Towel Holders, and Round Picture Frames
[no value]
[no value]
HERMAN HJORTH
NOW that motorized home workshop machines and small wood turning lathes are in use in so many homes and wood turning is becoming so popular a hobby, there is a demand for designs and projects that are a step in advance of candlesticks and other elementary articles with which beginners are at first content.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0175.xml
article
80
80,81,160
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Luxuries to Add to the Home
Magical New Comforts and Labor-Saving Inventions to Help Bring the Old-Fashioned Dwelling Up-to-Date
[no value]
[no value]
MILTON G. STURGISS
HELEN, I saw a wonderful house today.” I lit my pipe, hitched up a chair to a comfortable place near the fire, and started on a “selling talk” I had prepared for my wife. “Went out to look at that ‘model house’ in Meadow ville today. Talk about your 1929 styles!
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0176.xml
article
82
82
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
EDITORIALS
Railroads, Airplanes, and Speed
John Early, Leper
The Double Duty of Science
War on the “Common Cold"
Marvels We Take for Granted
They Are Saying—
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[no value]
[no value]
RECENTLY published reports of the latest and largest locomotive in the world, built for the Northern Pacific Railroad, stress the fact that engine and tender are half the length of a city block, weigh a million pounds, can pull a loaded train two miles long on a level track, and consume twenty tons of coal and 14,400 gallons of water an hour.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0177.xml
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83
83
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0178.xml
article
84
84
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
What Feeds Gas to Your Car?
A Haughty Woman Driver Learns from Gus Why It Pays to Know How Fuel Supply Systems Work
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
YOU the mechanic here, my man?" A harsh, feminine voice rattled Gus Wilson’s eardrums and brought his head around with a jerk. “Yes’m,” he mildly replied to the bossy female whose car had coasted up behind the veteran auto mechanic. “Well,” she snapped, “I hope you’re not as dumb as most auto mechanics.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0179.xml
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85
85
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0180.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
The Month’s Best Auto Ideas
Handy Kinks That May Save You Trouble or Get You Out of It—in Ingenious Opener for Garage Doors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE “neck of the bottle” in an automobile radiator is at the top of the cooling fins or tubes. Any foreign matter that floats around with the water always gets stuck at this point and the result is retarded circulation and a tendency for the motor to overheat.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0181.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
A Tool Compartment Lock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A COMMON location for the tool compartment in the sedan or coach is under the front seat. Usually it is necessary to raise the front of the seat cushion and pull it forward in order to lift it out to get at the tools. You can fit a lock, as shown in Fig. 2, that will prevent lifting the front edge of the seat cushion and thus prevent the theft or unauthorized use of your tools when the car is stored in a public garage.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0182.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
Ten Dollars for an Idea!
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G. Solomon, of Puerto Plata, Santo Domingo, wins this month’s ten-dollar prize for his suggestion of a garage door opening device (Fig. 3). Each month Popular Science Monthly awards $10, in addition to regular space rates, for the best idea sent in for motorists.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0183.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
Both Doors Open At Once
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIGURE 3 shows a novel fitting for any double garage doors. It is designed so that when you open or shut the door at the left in the illustration, the other door will open or shut automatically. The material you need consists of a board of sufficient length, three bolts, a strong iron hinge, and wood screws.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0184.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
Blowing Starts Siphon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN INGENIOUS way to siphon gas from the tank of your car is illustrated in Fig. 4. Insert one end of a rubber tube deep into the gas tank; the other into a container. Then, wrapping your fingers around the tube where it enters the tank so as to make as air-tight a connection as possible, blow into the tank.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0185.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
When the Battery Is Dead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF THE battery is so low that the car won’t start, even with the hand crank, a couple of flashlight batteries will do the trick. Fig. 5 shows how to connect them. Remove the ignition coil wire leading to the ignition switch, and replace it with a wire from one end of the two flashlight batteries connected in series (you must have at least four cells).
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0186.xml
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87
87
[no value]
[no value]
MILLERS FALLS COMPANY: EIGHT Power Tools
[no value]
MILLERS FALLS COMPANY
EIGHT Power Tools
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0187.xml
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88
88,89
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0188.xml
article
90
90
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Now for Winter Sports!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0189.xml
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91
91
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY TOOLS
[no value]
STANLEY TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0190.xml
article
92
92,122,124
Models
[no value]
Building the "Buckeye State”
If you would like to construct a model of this famous old Mississippi River steamboat, you can begin now simply by sending for POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY Blueprints Nos. 94, 95, and 96, which contain complete full size drawings. Use the coupon on page 103. This is the fourth article of the series.
[no value]
[no value]
E. ARMITAGE MCCANN
THOSE model of readers the stern-wheel who are building Missisa sippi steamboat Buckeye State now have the hull complete with two decks and the cabin house on it. Whether one is especially interested in the Mississippi River or not, this model is an attractive one to make because the Buckeye State is typical of the only completely American craft with the exception of the Indian canoe.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0191.xml
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93
93
[no value]
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING COMPANY,
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING COMPANY,
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0192.xml
article
94
94,115
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Timesavers for Shop Men
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
WITH monds the in increasing machine shops, use of many diamen have become very familiar with their care and setting. Diamonds can be purchased either set or unset. If they are bought set, they usually have to be reset after a time, depending upon the quality of the diamonds and the service to which they are put.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0193.xml
article
94
94
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Old Bill Says—
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN you are forming a radius on the corners of an end mill or a side mill, use a fine grain wheel to get a smooth finish. The average small shop generally has poor equipment for testing a lathe taper set-up; it is safest to take figures at both ends of the work. But don’t use a file to get results!
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0194.xml
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95
95
[no value]
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0195.xml
article
96
96,113,114
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Turning Oversize Work in a Lathe
How to Prevent Sagging—Saving Strain by Use of a Faceplate in Place of a Chuck—Steady-Rests
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
LYTHE work, as a rule, is balanced statically. In large and ponderous castings revolving at slow speed, this is all that is required to counteract the gravitational pull which might otherwise cause uneven running of the spindle under the changing eccentric load.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0196.xml
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97
97
[no value]
[no value]
BROWN a SHARPE TOOLS
[no value]
BROWN a SHARPE TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0197.xml
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98
98
[no value]
[no value]
THE J. B. WILLIAMS COMPANY: Williams Shaving Cream
[no value]
THE J. B. WILLIAMS COMPANY
Williams Shaving Cream
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0198.xml
article
98
98,100,107
[no value]
[no value]
Choosing a Paint Sprayer
F. N. V ANDERWALKER Describes the Various Types of “Guns” Available for Home Decorating
Types of Spray Guns and Their Uses
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[no value]
[no value]
I HAVE just been looking at two or three paint spray guns,” a friend of mine remarked to me not long ago. “They sell at less than $40 and look excellent. I would like your opinion as to which one it would be best to buy for painting the three large barns on my farm.”
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0199.xml
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99
99
[no value]
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0200.xml
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100
100
[no value]
[no value]
PRENTISS VISE CO.
[no value]
PRENTISS VISE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0201.xml
article
101
101
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Cannon for Shooting Snowballs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HI SIBLEY
AS THE winter campaign in the War of the Vacant Lots becomes more furious, defenders of the fort will need more powerful artillery. By constructing a snowball howitzer as shown, they can hold off a strong enemy force. The power is obtained from ½ in.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0202.xml
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101
101
[no value]
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.: YANKEE TOOLS
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.
YANKEE TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0203.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
CLEMSON BROS., INC.
[no value]
CLEMSON BROS., INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0204.xml
article
102
102,110
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Upholstering Old Chairs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. C. STANLEY
DISCARDED chairs, whether modern or antique, can be salvaged in many cases by replacing the upholstery or by substituting upholstery for rush, splint, or other types of seats. It is surprising what can be done with an apparently hopeless-looking chair.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0205.xml
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103
103
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0206.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0207.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0208.xml
article
104
104,105,106,107
Models
[no value]
Whitt1ing Model Propellers
Methods Used by Prize Winners in Miniature A ircraft Contests—Bending Bamboo—Other Hints
[no value]
[no value]
A. L. JACKSON
BEGINNERS in airplane model making always wish to know how experts like my little friend Aram Abgarian, who won the Stout Indoor Trophy with a flight of 353.6 seconds, carve the propellers for their record-breaking models. The first requirement is a good sharp pocketknife.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0209.xml
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105
105
[no value]
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0210.xml
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106
106
[no value]
[no value]
American Telephone and Telegraph Company
[no value]
American Telephone and Telegraph Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0211.xml
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106
106
[no value]
[no value]
W. Atlee Burpee Co.: A New Lightweight Electric Drill
[no value]
W. Atlee Burpee Co.
A New Lightweight Electric Drill
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0212.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.: ATKINS
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
ATKINS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0213.xml
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108
108
[no value]
[no value]
The Black & Decker Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Black & Decker Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0214.xml
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108
108
[no value]
[no value]
THE BLACK & DECKER MFG. CO.
[no value]
THE BLACK & DECKER MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0215.xml
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108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0216.xml
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108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0217.xml
article
108
108,109
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Home Workshop Chemistry
Simple Formulas that Will Save Time and Money
[no value]
[no value]
W. H. HAMMOND
THE man who varnishes a piece of furniture or some apparatus which he has just made, or the woman who touches up a chair, is apt to discover certain pertinent facts about varnishes from annoying experience. Some brands dry too quickly for general use and fail to form a smooth surface.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0218.xml
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109
109
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0219.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0220.xml
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110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Veeder-ROOT INCORPORATED
[no value]
Veeder-ROOT INCORPORATED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0221.xml
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111
111
[no value]
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0222.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0223.xml
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113
113
[no value]
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0224.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
BEMIS & CALL COMPANY
[no value]
BEMIS & CALL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0225.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Procter & Gamble
[no value]
Procter & Gamble
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0226.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
IDEAL AEROPLANE & SUPPLY CO., Inc.
[no value]
IDEAL AEROPLANE & SUPPLY CO., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0227.xml
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115
115
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
Old Salem Ship’s Cupboard
[no value]
Plymouth Built-in China Closet
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0228.xml
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116
116
[no value]
[no value]
THE PECK, STOW & WILCOX CO.
[no value]
THE PECK, STOW & WILCOX CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0229.xml
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116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Remington
[no value]
Remington
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0230.xml
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116
116
[no value]
[no value]
H.GERSTNER& SONS
[no value]
H.GERSTNER& SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0231.xml
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116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0232.xml
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117
117
[no value]
[no value]
J. D. Wallace & Company
[no value]
J. D. Wallace & Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0233.xml
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118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Plomb Tool Co.
[no value]
Plomb Tool Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0234.xml
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118
118
[no value]
[no value]
WACO TOOL WORKS, Inc.
[no value]
WACO TOOL WORKS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0235.xml
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118
118
[no value]
[no value]
The Parks Woodworking Machine Co.
[no value]
The Parks Woodworking Machine Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0236.xml
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118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Model Ship Supply Co.
[no value]
Model Ship Supply Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0237.xml
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119
119
[no value]
[no value]
MIDWEST RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
MIDWEST RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0238.xml
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120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0239.xml
article
121
121
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Weatherstrip for Bottom of Storm Door
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. K.
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0240.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
THE AR-CON TOOL COMPANY
[no value]
THE AR-CON TOOL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0241.xml
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122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Boucher Inc.
[no value]
Boucher Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0242.xml
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123
123
[no value]
[no value]
Ralston University Press
[no value]
Ralston University Press
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0243.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
The BILLINGS & SPENCER Company
[no value]
The BILLINGS & SPENCER Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0244.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0245.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS. Inc.
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS. Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0246.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0247.xml
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125
125
[no value]
[no value]
U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0248.xml
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126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0249.xml
article
127
127,128
The Shipshape Home
[no value]
Fastening Objects to Plaster Walls
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NAILS will hold in plaster walls only when driven right through the plaster into one of the wall studs, or uprights, to which the lath is fastened. To find one of these uprights, tap the wall very gently with a hammer and listen to the sound. The sound is hollow in tone except where the studs are located, and there is a perceptible difference in the rebound of the hammer.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0250.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
South Bend Lathe Works
[no value]
South Bend Lathe Works
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0251.xml
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127
127
[no value]
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Advertisement
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[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0252.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
SPORT FACTORIES
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SPORT FACTORIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0253.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN CHIME CLOCK COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICAN CHIME CLOCK COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0254.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY
[no value]
ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0255.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
THE WILLIAM CAMPBELL COMPANY
[no value]
THE WILLIAM CAMPBELL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0256.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
THE PORTER CHEMICAL COMPANY
[no value]
THE PORTER CHEMICAL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0257.xml
article
128
128
For the Home Owner
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How to Waterproof Shoes
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHOES can be made waterproof or at least highly resistant to moisture by the use of one of the following formulas recommended by chemists of the U. S. Department of Agriculture: Formula 1: Neutral wool grease, 8 oz.; dark petrolatum, 4 oz.; paraffin wax, 2 oz. Formula 2: Petrolatum, 16 oz.; beeswax, 2 oz. Formula 3: Petrolatum, 8 oz.; paraffin wax, 4 oz.; wool grease, 4 oz.; crude turpentine gum (gum thus), 2 oz. Formula 4: Tallow, 12 oz.; cod oil, 4 oz. Which formula to use depends upon the ease with which the materials can be obtained.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0258.xml
article
129
129
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
“What Can I Make from a Block?”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DONALD W. CLARK
EVERY boy at some time or other has held a block of wood in his hand and asked himself: “Now what can I make out of this old chunk of wood?” Why, hundreds of things! For example, a whole miniature village can be cut easily from blocks of white pine.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0259.xml
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129
129
[no value]
[no value]
SPEEDO MFG. CO.
[no value]
SPEEDO MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0260.xml
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129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0261.xml
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130
130
[no value]
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0262.xml
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130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Buescher Band Instrument Co.
[no value]
Buescher Band Instrument Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0263.xml
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130
130
[no value]
[no value]
CHICAGO STOCK GEAR WORKS
[no value]
CHICAGO STOCK GEAR WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0264.xml
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130
130
[no value]
[no value]
SHAW MFG. CO.
[no value]
SHAW MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0265.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Hammarlund PAECISION PRODUCTS
[no value]
Hammarlund PAECISION PRODUCTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0266.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0267.xml
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131
131
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[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0268.xml
article
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Huge Machine Makes Trick Shots for the Movies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN THE latest moving picture technique, the camera is used much in the same manner as the human eye, seemingly wandering up and down and to the left and right at will. This new technique is responsible for the life-like quality of such scenes as, for example, a per formance of a trapeze artist in the top of a circus tent, followed by a closeup of a section of the staring.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0269.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
ELKON, INC.
[no value]
ELKON, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0270.xml
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132
132
[no value]
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0271.xml
article
132
132
Aviation
[no value]
Fights Fire in the Air
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT is said to be the only automatic fire extinguisher for planes has recently been introduced by an American plane-building firm. The device, a European invention, consists of a central chemical tank from which seven pipes terminate in nozzles at strategic points particularly subject to fire.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0272.xml
article
132
132
Aviation
[no value]
“Prop” Blades Made Hollow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOLID propeller blades may go out of style if six new experimental models recently ordered by the Navy prove successful. The new blades, of chrome vanadium steel, are hollow. They are said to be the first of this type that can withstand the strains of a highspeed airplane.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0273.xml
article
132
132
Aviation
[no value]
Hops from Train—Crash!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CHICAGO pilot tried to take off, in his plane, from the roof of a speeding railroad train the other day. His plane was wrecked but the flyer escaped unhurt. Eddie Ballough, the commercial pilot who made the try, was seeking to show the possibility of dispatching air mail from a moving train. His diminutive Monocoupe machine was secured to the top of an Illinois Central train outbound from Chicago.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0274.xml
article
132
132
Aviation
[no value]
“Aerial Fish Express”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN INTERNATIONAL “aerial fish express” is soon to be established between Mexico and the United States, according to a Mexican government official. Refrigerator airplanes are to rush cargoes of perishable sea food between Laguna Madre, Mexico, and Houston, Texas.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0275.xml
article
132
132
Aviation
[no value]
Duration Record Stands
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RECOGNITION by the U. S. branch of the “F. A. L,” world aero governing body, makes official the new American duration record of fifty-nine hours in the air, set not long ago by the round-the-world aviators William Brock and Edward Schlee. The world's record is held by Germans.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0276.xml
article
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
Even Ice Cream by Air Mail
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO quarts of ice cream recently traveled from Utica, N. Y., to Texas via air mail, to be eaten there next day. With the container, the bundle weighed twelve pounds and bore $18.50 in air mail stamps. Hundred-mile-an-hour mail delivery has sped other odd items on their way; everything from bread to pawn tickets and jewelry.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0277.xml
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132
132
[no value]
[no value]
Tobacco Corporation
[no value]
Tobacco Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0278.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
LEWIS MFG. CO.
[no value]
LEWIS MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0279.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
THE PORTER-CABLE MACHINE CO.
[no value]
THE PORTER-CABLE MACHINE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0280.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
CONN
[no value]
CONN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0281.xml
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134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0282.xml
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134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0283.xml
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134
134
[no value]
[no value]
THE WILLIAM CAMPBELL COMPANY
[no value]
THE WILLIAM CAMPBELL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0284.xml
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134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Radiall Company
[no value]
Radiall Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0285.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0286.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRAD INC.
[no value]
ELECTRAD INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0287.xml
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136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0288.xml
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137
137
[no value]
[no value]
RAYTHEON MFG. CO.
[no value]
RAYTHEON MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0289.xml
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137
137
[no value]
[no value]
CeCo M(g. Co., Inc.
[no value]
CeCo M(g. Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0290.xml
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138
138,140,142
[no value]
[no value]
Money Making Opportunities for Readers of Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0291.xml
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139
139
[no value]
[no value]
THE AMERICAN SCHOOL
[no value]
THE AMERICAN SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0292.xml
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141
141
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0293.xml
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142
142
[no value]
[no value]
Chicago Technical School
[no value]
Chicago Technical School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0294.xml
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143
143
[no value]
[no value]
Radio Institute
[no value]
Radio Institute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0295.xml
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144
144
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0296.xml
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145
145
[no value]
[no value]
The NATIONAL SCHOOL of VISUAL EDUCATION
[no value]
The NATIONAL SCHOOL of VISUAL EDUCATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0297.xml
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146
146
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0298.xml
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147
147
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE
[no value]
NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0299.xml
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148
148
[no value]
[no value]
The NEW YORK ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
The NEW YORK ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0300.xml
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148
148
[no value]
[no value]
THE AUDEL&C0.
[no value]
THE AUDEL&C0.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0301.xml
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148
148
[no value]
[no value]
OGILVIE PUBLISHING CO.
[no value]
OGILVIE PUBLISHING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0302.xml
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148
148
[no value]
[no value]
American Products Co.
[no value]
American Products Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0303.xml
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149
149
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0304.xml
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150
150
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0305.xml
article
150
150
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Colored Snapshots—When?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the next great inventions will be a way -of taking snapshots in color. Already “still” color photographs have been made, seemingly on paper, althoiigh actually consisting of transparent overlaid films. The most recent modification of this process has just been announced by F. J. Tritton, a British photographer.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0306.xml
article
150
150
Nature
[no value]
From Mountains of Mystery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PARSLEY nine feet tall and Scotch heather fifty feet high are among the vegetable curiosities growing on the slopes of the Mountains of the Moon, in Central Africa, according to Carvaeth Wells, British explorer. Every kind of fruit known in North America grows at different altitudes on the slopes of these mysterious mountains which, because of fog and cloud screens, are visible only a few hours every three or four months.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0307.xml
article
150
150
Nature
[no value]
Killed by Too Much Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COLOR and duration of light have a decided effect upon plant growth, Dr. John M. Arthur, of the Boyce Thompson Institute, recently reported to the American Optical Society. The tomato is killed by continuous illumination; buckwheat thrives when lighted twenty-four hours a day.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0308.xml
article
150
150
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
The Men Prefer Blue
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COLOR preferences are determined by an instrument called the “chromopathometer,” invented by William E. Walton, a graduate student of psychology in the University of Kansas. Tests of 800 men and women were made with the invention. The men showed a decided preference for blue, with green second; women preferred green, with red second.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0309.xml
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151
151
[no value]
[no value]
FEDERAL SCHOOL
[no value]
FEDERAL SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0310.xml
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152
152
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0311.xml
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153
153
[no value]
[no value]
J. A. STRANSKY MFG. CO.
[no value]
J. A. STRANSKY MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0312.xml
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154
154
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0313.xml
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155
155
[no value]
[no value]
Engineer Dobe
[no value]
Engineer Dobe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0314.xml
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155
155
[no value]
[no value]
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
[no value]
FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0315.xml
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156
156
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0316.xml
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157
157
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0317.xml
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157
157
[no value]
[no value]
J. C. Deagan, Inc.
[no value]
J. C. Deagan, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0318.xml
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157
157
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0319.xml
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158
158
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0320.xml
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159
159
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0321.xml
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160
160
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0322.xml
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161
161
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0323.xml
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162
162
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0324.xml
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163
163
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0325.xml
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164
164
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0326.xml
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165
165
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERTSON FLYING SERVICES,Inc.
[no value]
ROBERTSON FLYING SERVICES,Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0327.xml
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165
165
[no value]
[no value]
Independent Electric Works
[no value]
Independent Electric Works
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0328.xml
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165
165
[no value]
[no value]
Fireside Industries
[no value]
Fireside Industries
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0329.xml
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166
166
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0330.xml
article
167
167
[no value]
[no value]
Trap High-Flying Insects
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TNSECT traps attached to airplanes have found the pink boll weevil moths and other injurious insects, at altitudes and distances previously unsuspected, investigators of the U. S. Department of Agriculture working with Mexican officials, report.
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0331.xml
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167
167
[no value]
[no value]
The Fate-Root-Heath Co.
[no value]
The Fate-Root-Heath Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0332.xml
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167
167
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0333.xml
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167
167
[no value]
[no value]
BABY CALCULATOR SALES CO.
[no value]
BABY CALCULATOR SALES CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0334.xml
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167
167
[no value]
[no value]
/ FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
[no value]
/ FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0335.xml
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168
168
[no value]
[no value]
SHORT &. MASON, Ltd.
[no value]
SHORT &. MASON, Ltd.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0336.xml
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169
169
[no value]
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0337.xml
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170
170,171,172
[no value]
[no value]
RHODES MFG. CO.
[no value]
RHODES MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290201_0114_002_0338.xml