Issue: 19290101

Tuesday, January 1, 1929
January 1929
1
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114
Thursday, December 25, 2014

Articles
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1
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPAN
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPAN
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0001.xml
tableOfContents
2
2,3
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Table of Contents for January
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0002.xml
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4
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0003.xml
article
4
4,5,6
SPECIAL FEATURES
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How to Perpetuate Your Earning Power
I
II
A Service for Readers
To Help You Get Ahead
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WALLACE AMES
"GOOD news, Laura," announced Dwight Miller, coming home from the office early Wednesday, the night before Thanksgiving. “My salary will be increased to $5,000 the first of the year. That makes the fifth year in succession that I have started the New Year with a boost in pay.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0004.xml
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5
5
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United States Mortgage Bond Co.
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United States Mortgage Bond Co.
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0005.xml
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5
5
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FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0006.xml
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5
5
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Cochran & McCluer Co.
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Cochran & McCluer Co.
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0007.xml
advertisement
5
5
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0008.xml
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6
6
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RUXTON MULTI-VIDFR CORPORATION
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RUXTON MULTI-VIDFR CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0009.xml
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6
6
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Larus & Bro. Co.
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Larus & Bro. Co.
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0010.xml
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7
7
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Johns-Manville
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Johns-Manville
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0011.xml
article
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8
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INDEX Quaranteed Advertisements
Popular Science GUARANTEE
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY guarantees every article of merchandise advertised in its columns. Readers who buv products advertised in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY may expect them to give absolute satisfaction under normal and proper use. Tools, Radio Apparatus, Oil Burners and Refrigerators advertised in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY have been tested or investigated by the Popular Science Institute of Standards and each advertisement carries the insignia indicating approval.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0012.xml
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9
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THOMAS NELSON & SONS
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THOMAS NELSON & SONS
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0013.xml
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10
10
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Taylor Instrument Companies
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Taylor Instrument Companies
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0014.xml
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11
11
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LaSalle Extension University
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LaSalle Extension University
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0015.xml
article
12
12
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Pulling the Magic Heat Switch
Features of Heating with Oil That Have Made So Many Home Owners Turn to This Ideal Modern Fuel
Building Problems
Insulation
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COLLINS P. BLISS
“AND that’s what decided me on oil heat.” My friend had just finished describing an evening at a neighbor's home when the uncertain fall temperature had taken a characteristically sudden drop. His host's method of restoring comfort had been to pull a switch and start the oil heating apparatus going.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0016.xml
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13
13
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0017.xml
article
14
14
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Our Readers Say—
From a Hero Worshipper
A Remarkable Flying Field
What Is Your Reason?
What! No Stockings?
What’s Wanted
"Sailing On and On"
Applied Mechanics
Wouldn’t It Have to Stop?
Step Right Up, Folks
Action in Colors
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I SEE your announcement of the forthcoming great series of articles on the Wright brothers,‘Fathers of Flight.’ No doubt the author, Mr. McMahon—whose articles on housebuilding in your magazine I read diligently—will boost Orville and Wilbur clear up to the top floor of immortal fame for their services to civilization.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0018.xml
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15
15
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THORDARSON ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING CO.: THORDARSON RADIO TRANSFORMERS
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THORDARSON ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING CO.
THORDARSON RADIO TRANSFORMERS
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0019.xml
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16
16
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THE CELOTEX COMPANY
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THE CELOTEX COMPANY
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0020.xml
masthead
17
17
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0021.xml
article
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17,18,19,142,143,144
LEADING ARTICLES
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At Last—The Inside Story of Wilbur and Orville Wright, The Real Fathers of Flight
JUST twenty-five years ago the first frail airplane was launched— and, until now, the complete, intimate story of its creators never has been told. It was Mr. McMahon’s privilege to hear this story from Orville Wright himself, and to see private diaries, letters, and telegrams telling of the two brothers’ dramatic struggles to fly. Here it is repeated to you—the most thrilling narrative of its kind ever published.
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JOHN R. McMAHON
THE sky is alive with winged craft. They dart through clouds and slide across the open blue. At night, unseen, they murmur their progress along starry pathways. They wend to distant cities. They cross the Atlantic and Pacific oceans, the continents of Asia and Africa, the North Pole and—soon—the South Pole.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0022.xml
article
20
20,21,129,130
LEADING ARTICLES
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Half a Billion New Stars!
Greatest Telescope, to Enlarge the Universe Eight Times, and Marvelous “Sky-Theater” Promise Untold Thrills in Astronomy
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EDWIN W. TEALE
ON A California mountain top, a few years hence, there will take place one of the great adventures of all time. A man will look into the night sky and his gaze will penetrate beyond the most distant stars within the range of ordinary telescopes, past the lonely “island universes” revealed by the giant 100-inch Hooker instrument at Mt. Wilson Observatory, beyond the last confines of man's knowledge of the heavens, at least four times farther than any man has ever seen before!
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0023.xml
article
22
22,152
LEADING ARTICLES
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Shoots His Racing Car at a Target
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MARCEL WALLENSTEIN
WITHIN a few weeks Major H. O. D. Segrave, of Great Britain, former champion in the lists for international speed supremacy, will fire his great golden car at a target on the sands of Daytona Beach, Florida, in a do-or-die effort to regain the motor car speed record for himself and his country.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0024.xml
article
23
23,24,148
LEADING ARTICLES
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A Five-Million-Volt Gun Built to Smash Atoms
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ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
THIS is a story of modern alchemists—of bold experimenters who have dared to imprison stupendous forces. Wielding 5,000,000 volts of electricity, they seek to blast the building blocks of the universe and fulfill the long-sought dream of “transmuting the elements.” A thrilling adventure that will end—no one knows where!
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0025.xml
article
25
25
LEADING ARTICLES
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The Tallest by Fifteen Stories
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CONSTRUCTION soon will begin on what will be the world's largest and tallest building—the Chicago Tower and Apparel Manufacturers’ Mart. Seventy-five stories high and covering two city blocks, it will house in addition to offices and stores, a 440-room hotel, a 1,024-car garage, two clubs, a hospital, swimming pools, gymnasiums, and even a small golf course.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0026.xml
article
26
26,27,154
LEADING ARTICLES
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Armored Ships Win Thrilling Battles with Polar Ice
Flirting Daily with Death, They Smash through Frozen Barriers to Vanquish the Earth's Farthest Strongholds
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ROBERT E. MARTIN
SOMEWHERE in the South Pacific, Commander Richard E. Byrd and his party of fifty-five adventurous men have finished the first lap of their two-year Antarctic expedition aboard the ice-breaking whaler C. A. Larsen, largest ship of its kind in the world.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0027.xml
article
28
28,29,138,140,141
LEADING ARTICLES
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What the World Owes to 1928
Leaders in Many Fields of Applied Science Tell of the Year's Most Valuable Contributions to Progress
AVIATION
COMMUNICATION
ENGINEERING
PHOTOGRAPHY
TRANSPORTATION
RADIO
ASTRONOMY
CHEMISTRY
AUTOMOBILES
PSYCHOLOGY
METEOROLOGY
MEDICINE
PHYSICS
EXPLORATION
ANTHROPOLOGY
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IN AIRPLANE design, perhaps the most striking advance has been in the cruising speed of commercial planes, particularly of the transport type. Cruising speeds of 110 miles an hour were considered satisfactory two years ago. Now the operators demand 130 miles an hour.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0028.xml
article
30
30,31,156,156a,156b
LEADING ARTICLES
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Must We All Wear Glasses?
Surprising Tests Show Why More than Half the World Now Need “Specs” — Interesting New Facts About Your Eyes
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E. E. FREE
EVERYBODY in the world is threatened with spectacles. The percentage of people whose eyes are already glassed-in increases daily. Nearly half of a group of typical school children tested a few weeks ago by the United States Public Health Service were found to need glasses.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0029.xml
article
32
32,33,125,126,127,128
LEADING ARTICLES
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A Fighting Skipper of the Air
The Enthralling Story of Dr. Hugo Eckener, Master of the Giant Graf Zeppelin, the First Air Merchantman
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ARTHUR A. STUART
SAFELY stored in its home hangar at Friedrichshafen, Germany, the Graf Zeppelin, largest aircraft in existence and the world’s first commercial dirigible, rested after her record-breaking eastward Atlantic crossing from America.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0030.xml
article
34
34,35,36,37,38,39
SPECIAL FEATURES
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HOW TO SPOT THE AIRPLANES
THEY FLY or SWIM.
Speedy Winged Warriors of the Army
Ships of the Navy's Air Fleet
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REMEMBER the days when it was a popular pastime to see how many automobiles you could call by name as you met them on the road? Well, aviation today has arrived at that same thrilling stage of public interest. So, on these pages, we are picturing most of the leading makes of airplanes now operating in America.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0031.xml
article
40
40
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Sidelights of Air Progress
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SINCE May, 1926, the planes of one of America’s largest air transport concerns have flown more than 3,000,000 miles without injury to a passenger or loss of an ounce of mail or express. Aviation owes its wonderful records of service not to any particular invention, but to hundreds of valuable ideas like those described on these pages.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0032.xml
article
40
40
Aviation
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New Helmet for Pilots
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The latest improvement over the clumsy “football” headgear once worn by pilots is this light, close-fitting helmet of soft leather designed by the U. S. Army Signal Corps. Attached earphones and a telephone mouthpiece strapped to the chest enable pilot to hear messages undisturbed by the engine’s roar.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0033.xml
article
40
40
Aviation
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The “Whirlwind’s” Daddy?
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Years ago experts shook their heads when J. C. H. Ellehammer, famous inventor known as “ the Edison of Denmark,” designed this first radial air-cooled aviation motor. Yet recently, when he exhibited his early model and posed for the above photo, he revealed that it is strikingly similar to its famous present-day descendant, the Wright “Whirlwind,” which drove Lindbergh, Byrd, and Chamberlin across the Atlantic.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0034.xml
article
40
40
Aviation
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Invents Magnetic Altimeter
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Leon Theremin, young Russian professor whose “ether music” device was described not long ago in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, is seen here with his latest invention — a magnetic altimeter which, he says, tells a flyer his exact height above the earth in thickest fog.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0035.xml
article
40
40
Aviation
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To Guide Byrd Flyers
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When planes of the Byrd Antarctic Expedition begin their explorations over the South Polar ice cap, this new bubble sextant invented by Commander Byrd will enable the pilots to establish their location quickly and accurately. Ralph L. Shropshire, assistant navigator of the expedition, is shown testing the device.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0036.xml
article
40
40
Aviation
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Map Guides Air-Mail Clerks
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So rapidly are air-mail lines increasing that post office clerks have to keep a map of the routes before them while sorting the mails. This picture, taken in the Chicago post office, shows the clerks handling a flood of air-mail letters, guided by a Wall map of the various lines.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0037.xml
article
40
40
Aviation
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Testing Effects of High Altitude
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Sensations experienced by an airman climbing into rarefied atmosphere are duplicated on the ground with a new experimental apparatus (left) devised in Germany. In a steel tank the man being tested is subjected to decreasing air pressure and supply of oxygen.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0038.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Gliders and Autogiros to Go on the Market—The Army’s New Bomber—Advances in Flying Science
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SOON you will be able to purchase your own “training” glider or motorless flying" machine, if you desire. In Michigan, according to a preliminary announcement, a newlyformed corporation plans to establish what is probably America’s first glider factory.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0039.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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New Bombers Fly High
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NEW bombing planes which the Army plans to launch during the coming year will be able to drop their deadly missiles from an altitude of more than three miles. The new high “ceiling” will place these craft farther from the effective range of “archies,” or antiaircraft guns, according to Air Corps officials.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0040.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Will Market Autogiros
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LIGHT autogiro planes are soon to be marketed, according to Juan de la Cierva, inventor of this novel “windmill” type of craft. In initial tests at Hamble Airdrome, England, a two-seater model developed eighty horsepower. The new model is similar to the larger autogiro in which De la Cierva recently made a successful 1,500-mile tour of continental Europe, as described last month in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0041.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Warns of Flying Ailments
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ILL man’s physique and personality change if aviation becomes as common as motoring? Grave flying ills may become general, in the opinion of Lieut. Col. Levy M. Hathaway, Chief Flight Surgeon, U. S. Army Air Corps. At least two serious ailments peculiar to aviators have already been noted by Col. Hathaway, based on his observations of Air Corps personnel.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0042.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Safety Valve for Super-Dirigible
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LIVES of passengers on the British military super-dirigible, the R-I01, now under construction at Cardington, England, will be protected by this huge maneuvering valve which will automatically regulate the gas pressure within the bag.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0043.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Water or Air Cooling?
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FUTURE ocean-going planes, carrying 100 or more passengers, may employ water-cooled engines, according to L. M. Woolson, Packard Motor Company aeronautic engineer. “Such planes,” he recently told the Society of Automotive Engineers, “will demand enormously powerful engines, and it is inconceivable that the great parasitic resistance of many externally-mounted air-cooled power plants can be permitted.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0044.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Novel Launching Device
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SLIDING planes into the water from ship decks, so that they can take off under their own power, is made possible through the invention of a German engineer named Hammann. In this plan, which aims to rival the present method of launching planes directly with catapults, a slanting platform extends from the ship’s deck to the water's edge.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0045.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Cables to Guide Planes
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ELECTRIC cables buried underground would guide airplanes across treacherous mountain ranges and into airports, in a new system devised by a French inventor named Loth. Delicate instruments in the plane's control cabin, Loth says, could enable the pilot to follow an earth cable 8,000 feet beneath him.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0046.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Dispel Fog by Heat
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ARTIFICIALLY warming the open II. air over a landing field is the latest weapon against fog. In experiments areas up to 200 yards in diameter have been cleared in this way, Lieut. Albert E. Hegenberger, U. S. Air Corps, recently told the aviation section of the National Safety Council.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0047.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Tragedy Follows Record
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THE fog got Capt. C. B. D. Collyer, champion globe-circler, and his passenger, Harry Tucker, the other day. Their famous Lockheed plane Yankee Doodle, holder of two cross-continent records, crashed in a fog upon an Arizona crag, killing both.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0048.xml
article
42
42,43,44,157
LEADING ARTICLES
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Detectives of Science Solve Mysteries Buried for Centuries Lost Races Live Again!
MORE thrilling than fiction arc the adventures of the Sherlock Holmes’s of archeology, whose latest exploits are recounted here. It is the story of faint trails that lead to strange Mayan cities buried in the jungle; of treasure, ages old, dug from the sands of the desert; of handwriting clues to vanished men.
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MICHEL MOK
THE patient, careful sifting of some sediment encountered in the course of quarrying at Folsom, New Mexico, recently led Barnum Brown, paleontologist of the American Museum of Natural History, to the startling conclusion that America was inhabited by human beings from 15,000 to 20,000 years ago!
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0049.xml
article
45
45,46,155
LEADING ARTICLES
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Famous Magic Tricks Explained
ANOTHER absorbing article revealing deep secrets of legerdemain never before told to the public. An expert takes you back-stage and shows how, by applying simple mechanical principles, magicians escape from coffins, water tanks, and bags, and perform all manner of mysteries.
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GEORGE S. GREENE
IN MY previous article I told of some of the mechanical devices which enable a magician to fool his audience and of the men who spend their time and ingenuity in creating new apparatus for performers to use. I explained how many of the tricks are accomplished by applying simple laws of science.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0050.xml
article
47
47,150
LEADING ARTICLES
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Neon, Magic Gas That Lights the Way Through Fog
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H. C. DAVIS
FLAMING letters of scarlet sixty feet high flash the word “RICHFIELD” from a hill overlooking Portland, Oregon. Completed a few weeks ago, they form what is said to be the largest electric sign in the world. A threestory house could nestle comfortably under the crossbar of the ”H”.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0051.xml
article
48
48,49,131
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Links in the Chain of Science
Brief Bits of Fact and Interesting Comment; a New Feature Portraying the Drama of Progress
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KARL VOOGHT
WHAT’S the good of science? Every now and then such a query comes from somebody who sees in it only a cold intellectual subject remote from life. And the answer is like an endless chain—it starts anywhere and keeps on going forever. Consider, for example, as I did, the bits of news that flow over a single desk in the office of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY in just one week.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0052.xml
article
50
50,51,145,146,147
LEADING ARTICLES
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Strange Fires that Start Themselves
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JOHN E. LODGE
DID you know that an air bubble in a window pane, wet lime, or piled newspapers, may mysteriously set your house afire? If not, you’ll be interested in this story of strange spontaneous conflagrations and of the surprising ways in which they start.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0053.xml
article
52
52
Models
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A "Wonderland" of Model Machinery
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AFTER years of ingenious labor, William M. Clark, a retired business man of South Orange, N. J., recently completed a unique collection of miniature models of most of the familiar mechanisms used in domestic life and industry today.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0054.xml
article
52
52
New Processes and Inventions
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Ingenious Paper Defeats the Check Forger
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IN A laboratory at Rochester, N. Y., Burgess Smith, formerly in charge of the anticounterfeiting measures of the U. S. Bureau of Engraving and Printing, has been working for the last ten years to baffle check criminals that now exact an annual tribute of about $100,000,000 through check forgery and alteration.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0055.xml
article
53
53
LEADING ARTICLES
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One Man Could Run This Ship!
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STEAMING along the Clyde River, Scotland, at eleven and a half knots—thirteen land miles an hour—a great steamship, which one man could pilot across the ocean, recently passed its trial tests. Electric controls maneuver the 469foot oil tanker Brunswick, largest of its type in the world, now plying between America and Europe.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0056.xml
article
54
54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Hourglass, Germ Screen Added to Telephone
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NEW equipment for the telephone, shown at an international invention exhibition, held recently in London, England, included a tiny hourglass for checking the time of a long-distance call, and a device for stretching paper over the mouthpiece of a telephone to prevent germs from entering.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0057.xml
article
54
54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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River Suddenly Vanishes for Three Miles
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OVERNIGHT, three miles of a river in Colorado recently disappeared. One Friday night the White River, with its headwater at Trapper’s Lake, east of Meeker, was flowing as usual. Saturday morning, part of the stream had vanished, leaving thousands of dead trout on the dry river bed.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0058.xml
article
54
54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Curious “Rubber Snake” Is Found in Yellowstone
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THE first rubber snake ever found in Yellowstone Park was recently discovered by a party of visitors guided along one of the nature trails by a ranger who is also a naturalist. A member of the family to which the boa and the python of the tropics belong, the rubber snake is a northern species and classed as a constrictor.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0059.xml
article
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54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Rat-Eating Rats Bred to War on Their Kind
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[no value]
[no value]
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A VARIANT of the old adage that “dog eats dog,” to the effect that rat devours rat, is being put into practice at Leningrad, Russia. To combat a veritable rat epidemic in the city, where it is estimated an army of 2,000,000 of the rodents are menacing public health and destroying approximately $2,500,000 worth of property annually, a system of self-extermination among the creatures is now in progress.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0060.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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A Pencil and Handy Slide Rule Combined
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INSTEAD of chewing the end of a pencil when stumped by a problem in mathematics, the owner of a newly devised writing tool simply pulls on the end, and the pencil becomes a slide rule. The pencil is refillable, the upper end carrying extra leads.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0061.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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Now Golfers Can Tee Off in the Living Room !
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GOLF can be played in the house by means of a new toy which records the strength of drives and putts in yards, and shows the position of each player on a miniature golf course after every stroke. A “300-yard drive” can be made in a space no larger than is required to swing a golf club, the inventor says.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0062.xml
article
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54
Exceptional People
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Champion Blood Donor Has Given 117 Pints
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A REMARKABLE record of bloodgiving has been uncovered by the French Academy of Medicine. In three years, a thirty-year-old Frenchman, named Raymond Briez, gave 117 pints for transfusions and recently he submitted to his 264th operation for the purpose.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0063.xml
article
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55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Complete Fire Department on a Two-Ton Truck
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A ONE-MAN fire department, all on a single two-ton truck, has been built by Francis E. Ingals, of Guilford, Conn. It carries 1,000 feet of large hose in the body and 200 feet of smaller hose wound on a reel on the roof, as well as an assortment of nozzles and connections of various kinds.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0064.xml
article
55
55
New Processes and Inventions
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Door Hanging Simplified by Screwless Hinge
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A DOOR hinge that requires no screws has been invented by Charles A. Genaux, of New York City, to save time and trouble in hanging doors. Slanting holes are drilled into the edge of the door and into the hinge side of the door frame, slanting up in the door and down in the frame. Into these holes are inserted metal rods attached diagonally to the hinge, as shown at the right. All that is required to remove the door with such a hinge is a slight lift, which disengages the rods from the holes.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0065.xml
article
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55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Million Mark Passed by Five U. S. Cities
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FIVE American cities have a population of 1,000,000 or more, according to latest 1928 Census Bureau estimates. These five leading cities and their estimated populations are: New York, 6,917,500; Chicago, 3,157,400; Philadelphia, 2,064,200; Detroit, 1,378,000; and Cleveland, 1,010,300.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0066.xml
article
55
55
Models
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Elaborate Model Railway Uses Tacks for Spikes
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CARPET tacks are used for railroad spikes in an unusual model railway that occupies most of the front yard of an employee of the Southern Pacific living in Brookings, Ore. A town, a farming district, and a modern highway appear in miniature along the ninety-five feet of two-and-a-quarter-inch gage track over which two electric locomotives haul little trains which include tank cars, flat cars, gondolas loaded with lumber, refrigerator and box cars, stock cars, and cabooses.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0067.xml
article
55
55
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Hand-Driven Buffer Wheel Polishes the Teeth
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A TOOTH polisher, vest pocket size, is one of the ingenious devices shown at a recent exhibition of inventions held in London, England, at which nearly a hundred women inventors displayed models of new ideas. The polisher is operated by means of a plunger, which is pressed by the thumb as illustrated in the photograph.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0068.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Indians Had Tooth Ills 3,500 Years Ago
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PYORRHEA was rampant among the Indians in New Mexico as long ago as 1,500 B.c., according to archeologists who have found very ancient skulls in the course of recent explorations in that state. The early red man, the discoveries showed, also suffered from cavities and abscesses.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0069.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Telephone Calls Triple in European Cities
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IN THREE years telephone calls between the nineteen most important cities of Europe have tripled. A record of such calls shows that three people use the phone today where one used it in 1925. This rapid growth of service in European centers of population is viewed as an aid to communication between continents. The increase in good connections in European countries advances the value of the trans-Atlantic lines that connect Great Britain, France, Germany, Belgium, and Sweden with the United States, Canada, and Cuba.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0070.xml
article
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56
Meteorology
[no value]
Philippines Will Witness Sun’s Total Eclipse
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IF YOU are interested in total eclipses of the sun, you might do well to plan to be in Manila, P. I., on May 9, 1929, when that phenomenon will occur there. The Hamburg, Germany, Observatory already has made preparations to send a party, and it is expected that several groups from other parts of Europe and also from the United States will follow. According to Father Miguel Selga, S. J., director of the Philippine Weather Bureau and the Manila Observatory, two factors will warrant the time and expense involved in observing the eclipse—first, the probability of clear weather, and second, the duration of the eclipse over accessible and convenient points.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0071.xml
article
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56
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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California Fishing Fleet Gets $13,000,000 Haul
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LARGELY through the use of scientific methods, Los Angeles fishermen made a $13,000,000 catch last year. Most of the haul, taken from the waters off southern California, consisted of sardines and tuna. Some of the vessels were equipped with Diesel engines and refrigeration, and could cruise for hundreds of miles without putting into port.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0072.xml
article
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56
Engineering
[no value]
Air Pressure Gun Shoots Cement 135 Feet
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TWO million pounds of cement were shot through five-inch hose seventyfive feet into the air recently when work began on the foundations for the Merchandise Mart in Chicago, designed to be the world ’s largest business building. The dry cement was transported in a steel vessel to a point in the Chicago river opposite the site of construction.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0073.xml
article
56
56
Engineering
[no value]
Huge Pylons to Support Greatest Arch Bridge
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FROM towering pylons of masonry that would bear the entire weight of the steamship Leviathan without crumbling, the world’s greatest arch bridge, with a central span 1,650 feet long, is being built across Sydney Harbor, Australia. The photograph below shows the main pylon, on the city side of the harbor.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0074.xml
article
56
56
Models
[no value]
Working Model Train Fits in Cigarette Case
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A MODEL train, built to scale and operated by an electric motor housed in the tiny engine, is carried around in a cigarette case by the English enthusiast who constructed it. It was built by J. Langridge, of the Wimbledon and District Model Railway Club, and shown at a recent model engineering exhibition.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0075.xml
article
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56
Engineering
[no value]
Fresh Air One Mile Down
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A MILE below the earth’s surface, miners working in the copper mines of the Lake Superior region are supplied with abundant fan-driven fresh air through canvas tubing from the mine openings. A recent survey showed that from 40,000 to 100,000 cubic feet of air per minute was circulating through the lower levels of the shaft.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0076.xml
article
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Meteorology
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How Much Do You Know About the Weather?
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TEST your knowledge with these questions, chosen from hundreds asked by readers. Correct answers are on page 158. 1. How high are the clouds? 2. What is the difference between a hurricane, a cyclone, and a tornado? 3. What causes frost? 4. What causes a red sky at sunset?
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0077.xml
article
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57
New Processes and Inventions
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It Plays a Tune When You Light a Cigarette
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WHEN you lift the lighter of an unusual smoking set recently placed upon the market, a music box concealed in its base plays a tune. The set, consisting of a lighter, a container for cigarettes, and an ash tray, forms a compact accessory for the smoker which, says its inventor, will provide entertainment each time a cigarette is lighted.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0078.xml
article
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57
Meteorology
[no value]
Timing Wind Speed a Hard Job for Weatherman
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HOLDING a stopwatch on the wind is the most difficult job of the U. S. Weather Bureau, according to its chief. Prof. Charles F. Marvin. An improved anemometer, or wind-measuring instrument, consisting of four wind-driven cups mounted on revolving cross arms, has proved an advance over previous instruments of the kind, which lagged in winds up to ten miles an hour, and then progressively recorded speeds above the actual rate for winds beyond fifteen or twenty miles an hour.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0079.xml
article
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57
Automobiles
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Know Your Car
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[no value]
[no value]
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IN ANY automobile engine except the sleeve valve type, the valves are operated by pushrods moved up and down by the cams on the cam shaft. These valves must open and close at precisely the right time if the motor is to deliver full power. There must be some play or looseness in the mechanism to allow for the expansion and contraction of the parts caused by the heating and cooling of the engine.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0080.xml
article
57
57
Aviation
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New Airway Beacon Weighs Nearly a Ton
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A FINGER of light miles long penetrates the darkness from a new million-candlepower beacon light designed to guide night flyers along the airways. It is called the largest portable beacon ever built. Its diameter is five feet and its total weight almost a ton.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0081.xml
article
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57
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Tigers and Men Fight to a Draw in India
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MEN with rifles and tigers with claws fought virtually an even battle in India last year, according to statistics of the number of tigers killed by hunters and the number of persons killed by tigers, recently issued by the Indian government.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0082.xml
article
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57
Health and Hygiene
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Yellow and Red Rays Also Vital to Body Growth
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ALL the colored rays of sunlight and not merely the invisible ultra-violet, or “health” rays, are needed to-make your body grow. That is the conclusion of Dr. Charles Sheard, of the Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn., who tried raising two broods of chickens, one in light from which colored window panes removed the red and yellow rays only, and the other in light with the green and blue rays removed.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0083.xml
article
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Models
[no value]
Remarkable Model Shows Apartment Village
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HOMES at cost for 625 families will be provided when a mammoth, blocksquare group of modern apartment houses sponsored by Marshall Field, is completed in Chicago. A model of the project, recently exhibited there, shows the ten units, which will make up the project, with air spaces between each for light and ventilation.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0084.xml
article
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58
Meteorology
[no value]
Hailstones Larger Than Baseballs on Record
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HOW big do hailstones grow? To answer this frequently-asked question, the U. S. Weather Bureau has listed some of the historic hailstorms of the past. In 1847, hailstones that measured fourteen inches in circumference are said to have fallen in New South Wales.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0085.xml
article
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58
New Processes and Inventions
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Pocket Microscope Looks Like Fountain Pen
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SLIP off the cap of this little black instrument that resembles a fountain pen, and you have a powerful pocket microscope ready for action. A sliding button on the barrel focuses a surprisingly strong lens, and a tiny mirror in the base supplies illumination from any near-by lamp or window.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0086.xml
article
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Laboratory Discoveries
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Plants, Like People, Tanned by Invisible Rays
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PLANTS, as well as people, get tanned from exposure to ultra-violet rays! Thus reports Dr. E. M. Delf, secretary for a committee of English botanists who are carrying on experiments with plants to' determine just how they are affected by the invisible rays that sunburn the exposed necks and arms of human bathers at the seashore.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0087.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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New Army “Whippet” Tanks Built for Speed
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ARMY tanks that dash over the ground at a speed only slightly below that made by Charlie Paddock when he set the world’s record for the hundredyard dash have been successfully tested at Fort Leonard Wood, near Baltimore, Md. On level ground, the new tanks rumble along at a twenty-mile-an-hour clip.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0088.xml
article
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Meteorology
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Tower Thermometer the World’s Largest
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WHEN citizens of Munich, Germany, want to see how cold it is, they can poke their heads out of doors and look at what is said to be the world’s largest thermometer on the tower of a museum in that city. The huge instrument, which can be seen for miles, occupies nearly the whole side of the tower.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0089.xml
article
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58
Health and Hygiene
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Exercise After Meals Not Harmful, Tests Show
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UPSETTING the old belief that exercise after meals is harmful, three physicians who have made a series of tests at Guy’s Hospital, in London, England, report that moderate exercise taken immediately after eating does not retard, and may even aid, digestion.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0090.xml
article
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Engineering
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Record Blast Displaces 40,000 Tons of Rock
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A SINGLE blast in a Welsh limestone quarry recently displaced stone weighing 40,000 tons from a cliff 100 feet high. It is said to have been the largest limestone quarry blast ever set off in the British Isles. Three and a half tons of high explosives were used in the charge.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0091.xml
article
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59
New Processes and Inventions
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Newest Locomotive “Cart before the Horse”
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LONGER freight trains will climb the winding Rocky Mountain tracks when huge freight locomotives of the newest oil-burning type, constructed in the shops of the Southern Pacific Railroad, in Sacramento, Calif., are put into operation.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0092.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Giant Pump Is Lubricated With Water It Lifts
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SIXTY - THOUSAND - POUND pump that lubricates its bearings with water has been installed at an irrigation well near Etiwanda, in southern California. The giant pump lifts water 640 feet, in a single boost, from the bottom of a 450-foot well to the top of a hill where irrigation ditches carry it away.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0093.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Millions of Tons of War Explosives Put To Use
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HOW T.N.T., made for destructive war purposes, ended by becoming an aid to industry and agriculture, is told in a recent report of the Explosives Division of the Bureau of Mines. The war ended with 126,000,000 pounds of high explosives on hand in the United States.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0094.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Modern Machines Develop Rich Diamond Field
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THE long monopoly on diamonds which the South African fields have enjoyed is being threatened by the increasing output of the Belgian Congo mines. From a total output of 15,000 carats, in 1913, the production of the Kasai district, the principal Belgian Congo field, has risen to more than 1,000,000 carats.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0095.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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Sandpapering Made Easier by Handy Holder
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A NOVEL means for holding sandpaper, emery, or other abrading material for handwork is provided by this newly devised block. On both sides of the block are slots into which the ends of the polishing material are inserted. Special clamps are then pressed in as shown in the photograph, holding the material firmly in place.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0096.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Begin Search for Radium
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CARNEGIE INSTITUTION, Washington, D. C., is to conduct a worldwide search for radium. In the whole world there has been mined less than four ounces of this valuable substance. Most of it has been found in Colorado, although some has been discovered in Russia and some in Turkestan.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0097.xml
article
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Photography
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Silver Nuggets Salvaged from Movie Films
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MINING silver from the silver screen is the latest source of wealth in Hollywood. From the miles of film that run through the fixing bath in the developing rooms, the hypo takes infinitesimal particles of the silver that forms part of the sensitive outer coating of the film.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0098.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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Patrolman’s Club Also Flashlight
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A POLICEMAN'S night stick that provides a bludgeon at one end and a flashlight at the other has been devised to aid officers when they patrol the dark alleys. The stick is made of steel tubing with threads in the end of the grip, into which a flash lamp is screwed.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0099.xml
article
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Laboratory Discoveries
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Predicts Water in Place of Coal for Fuel
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THE future fuel will be water instead of coal, according to Dr. Walter von Hohenau, a Brazilian physicist, who says he has discovered a means of liberating the hydrogen from water. His process, he explains, is the result of years of research. By applying very high frequency vibrations to water, he says he has been able to break it up into its constituent elements of hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen, he contends, will be used in place of coal gas as a fuel and will make the mining of coal unnecessary. When Dr. von Hohenau presented his plan at a recent world fuel conference, held in London, the objection was raised by a member of the conference that the energy required to set up the vibrations, even if they were capable of liberating the hydrogen, would offset the energy gained by its use.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0100.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Coconuts May Rival Cows
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COWS and coconuts will become rivals if tests of a new chemical process for making a milk substitute from the fluid in coconuts proves commercially valuable. The meat of the coconut is being used in many ways, but few uses have been discovered for the “milk” within the shell.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0101.xml
article
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Meteorology
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Simple Ways to Measure the Speed of the Wind
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A SIMPLE guide for judging wind speeds has been worked out by the Forest Section of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. In forest fires, the number of men needed on the fighting line is often in direct proportion to the strength of the wind that is blowing.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0102.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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This Mail Box Sheds the Water Like a Duck
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THE proverbial duck’s back is gone one better by the mail box invented by L. A. Stelhouse, of Baltimore, Md., which sheds most of the rain from its top and directs what little enters by way of the letter slot out through an opening, so the moisture never reaches the letters deposited within.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0103.xml
article
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Photography
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Camera Records Path of Lightning Bolt
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FOR the first time in history, the flashing progress of a natural lightning bolt on its way to the ground has been recorded in a close-up photograph. The feat was accomplished recently near Lake Wallenpaupack, Pa., by a marvelously high-speed camera, otherwise known as an automatic cathode ray oscillograph.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0104.xml
article
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61
Radio
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Invents New Television System Minus Disks
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SOME television experts believe that while apparatus like spinning disks and synchronized motors are necessary today, television transmitting and receiving sets of tomorrow will have no moving parts. Working along this line, Philo T.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0105.xml
article
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61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Tests of Lumber Reveal Why Paint Fails
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WOOD has holes in it, and paint catches in them. If it can find plenty of good-sized holes or pores in the wood to enter, the paint will stick. Otherwise it will drop off in flakes. There is no inherent stick-to-it-iveness about paint. That is the conclusion of the Forest Products Laboratory, U. S. Forest Service, after careful tests to find out why paint fails.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0106.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Toy Sails 1,750 Miles
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DURING a recent celebration, Thomas J. Rubino, of Paterson, N. J., sent up a toy balloon with a note attached asking the finder to communicate with him. He received a letter from a man in Albuquerque. N. M., 1,750 miles away, saying the balloon had been found on his roof.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0107.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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U. S. Experts Seek Paper That Won’t Wear Out
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PAPER that won’t wear out is being sought by the United States Bureau of Standards in Washington, D. C. As a first step in this direction, experts of the Bureau are testing the different products that are now on the market. These will be put through accelerated aging experiments in the laboratory by the use of artificial heat and light.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0108.xml
article
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Engineering
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Deepest Oil Well Goes Down 7,800 Feet
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A TUBE of steel, driven 7,800 feet into the earth, is now bringing oil to the surface from what is believed to be the deepest producing well in the world, in the Signal Hill oil field in southern California. Experts believe that the success of this new well will lead to the reopening of fields that have been drained by shallow drilling.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0109.xml
article
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62,63,153
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Our New A.C. Set Completed
How to Add Audio Amplification to the Two-Tube Outfit Described Last Month, and Get Loudspeaker Reproduction
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ALFRED P. LANE
THE four-tube, full electric radio receiver detailed on these pages is the two-tube outfit described last month in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, with the addition of two stages of audio amplification to get loudspeaker operation on most stations.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0110.xml
article
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Useful Hints for the Radio Fan
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How to Kill the "Dynamic” Hum
Noise Trouble with New A.C. Type Speakers Easily Remedied — Better Volume Control with A-Eliminator
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DYNAMIC cone speakers require a supply of direct current to energize the powerful electromagnet which seems to be an indispensable part of these instruments. Three different methods are employed to obtain the necessary current. The simplest is to make the winding suitable for use on six volts and connect it to the storage battery that supplies the filament current to the receiver.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0111.xml
article
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64
Useful Hints for the Radio Fan
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More Durable Tubes
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WHEN the alternating current tubes, types 226 and 227, were placed on the market, they were rated for one and one half and two and one half volts, respectively. These voltages, of course, had been determined with scientific precision by the laboratory engineers who developed the tubes.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0112.xml
article
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Useful Hints for the Radio Fan
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A B C’s of Radio
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[no value]
[no value]
THE A-current supplied to a vacuum tube, either of the battery type or the newer alternating current type, is used to heat either the filament or the electron-emitting cathode. Compared with the battery tube, the alternating current tube obtains its A-current at less expense than does the battery tube.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0113.xml
article
64
64
Useful Hints for the Radio Fan
[no value]
Better Volume Control
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PECULIAR situation has developed with regard to the use of modern types of A-eliminators. You may install one of these pieces of apparatus to run the receiver formerly operated with a storage A-battery. The outfit will prove satisfactory except in one way.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0114.xml
article
65
65,153
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Your First Television Set
How You Can Build and Operate an Amateur Experimental Apparatus Hooked to Your Radio Receiver
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN CARR
THE accurate construction of one of the most important parts of a television receiver, the scanning disk, was described in the December issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. The three vital parts of the television receiver are the scanning disk, the neon tube, and the motor that rotates the disk.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0115.xml
article
66
66
Aviation
[no value]
Parachutes Have Snatched 115 Flyers from Death
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NINETY-SIX airmen in America have saved themselves from certain death by leaping from disabled planes and trusting to their parachutes. In foreign countries, nineteen flyers have done the same, says a recent announcement of the U. 'S. War Department.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0116.xml
article
66
66
Automobiles
[no value]
Gas Taxes Build Roads
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MORE than two hundred million dollars were added to the price of gasoline in the form of “gas” tax last year. The tax, totaling $258,966,851 for the whole country, was levied in all of the states except two, New York and Massachusetts. The tax ranged from two to five cents a gallon.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0117.xml
article
66
66
Engineering
[no value]
Huge Domes Strengthen New Coolidge Dam
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RECENT completion of three huge concrete dome-shaped buttresses marked one of the final steps in the construction of the $10,000,000 Coolidge Dam on the Gila River, east of Phoenix, Arizona. These domes, said to be the largest in the world, are designed to give the dam a maximum strength with economy of material.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0118.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Largest Grindstone Is Built in Sections
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GRINDSTONE for a giant to turn is the one recently exhibited at a machine tool and engineering exposition in England. The huge abrasive wheel, said to be the largest ever constructed, will do the grinding of tools in an English machine shop.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0119.xml
article
66
66
Meteorology
[no value]
Aided by Weather Man
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TELEGRAMS from the local weather bureau recently guided engineers in building a bridge across the Rio Grande at Brownsville, Texas. Information about conditions upstream during a threatened flood enabled the bridge builders to plan each day’s work and to strengthen the falsework piling supporting the main structure in time to save the work which was already completed.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0120.xml
article
66
66
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Handy Shaving Lamp Moves Around the Mirror
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALIGHT that slides in a groove about three sides of a mirror is one of the latest aids to shaving. Instead of dodging from side to side to get different portions of his face in the light, a shaver using the new mirror simply shifts the light up or down or to one side or the other as he progresses with his shaving.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0121.xml
article
66
66
Automobiles
[no value]
Your Choice of 765 Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN you buy a new car, you may take your pick from 765 types of automobiles manufactured in the United States. Recent statistics reveal that many distinct models of cars are being made in this country. Instead of becoming more standardized, the styles in automobiles this year have a greater range than ever before.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0122.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Post Office Tries Mechanical Stamp Clerks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXPERIMENTING with methods of eliminating the long lines of customers at the stamp windows, officials of the main post office in New York recently installed several coin-in-the-slot stamp vending machines in the lobby. The machines sell stamps at their face value, with the insertion of the correct change and the turn of a crank.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0123.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Phone Net Widens
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOU own a telephone, there are 25,000,000 people with whom you can talk. A sudden increase in the number of possible connections came recently with the advent of trans-Atlantic telephone service. This number will be further increased soon by opening of Canadian transcontinental lines and by lines to South America.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0124.xml
article
67
67
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
New Tool Invented to Cut Curves in Wood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE often difficult task of shaping delicate curves in wood, as in making curved legs for tables and chairs, has been simplified by the invention of this new draw plane. Resembling a spokeshave, it has an adjustable blade which the worker can set to cut the curve he desires. With a little practice, the inventor says, any amateur woodworker can use the new tool to replace the several tools ordinarily required for such work.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0125.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Buttons, Combs, and Pens from Skim Milk
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN you button your shirt, comb your hair, or sign your name with a fountain pen, you give little thought to skim milk. Yet, says Dr. G. E. Holm, head chemist of the Bureau of Dairy Industry, U. S. Department of Agriculture, skim milk played an important part in producing the buttons, comb, and fountain pen.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0126.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Twelve-Foot Pie Hauled to Oven by Tractors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN APPLE pie with a 600-pound . lower crust and containing 100 bushels of apples was cooked recently at Albion, N. Y. Two tractors were required to haul this one-ton culinary masterpiece along small rails into a specially-built oven. When the halfinch-thick crust was reeled on a long steel rod and carried to the huge pie tin, four men strained under its weight.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0127.xml
article
67
67
Photography
[no value]
Living Human Cells “Act” on Movie Screen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOVIES will play an important part in the medical education of the future, according to scientists who attended the twenty-ninth annual meeting of the American Roentgen Society, held recently in Kansas City, Mo. A feature of the meeting was the projection of a moving picture of living tissues, showing just what happens to the cells of the body and to cancer cells when radium is applied.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0128.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Strong Men Lose Tug of War with Magnet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the strangest of tug of war contests was staged at an industrial plant near Los Angeles, Calif., the other day, when six professional strong men pitted their strength against the powerful magnet of an electric crane. The men were in two teams of three men each.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0129.xml
article
68
68
Automobiles
[no value]
Rollers Park the Car Sideways
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INSTEAD of backing and twisting to get into a parking space, the driver of a car equipped with the latest parking device merely has to head into a vacant place, pull a lever, and the rear of the machine rises and swings around to the curb. It requires little more parking room than the length of the car, according to the inventors.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0130.xml
article
68
68
Automobiles
[no value]
Motor Fuel Is Made from Alcohol and Water
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW motor fuel, described as a chemical combination of alcohol and water, is said to have given remarkable results in Switzerland, where it was invented recently. Costing one third as much as gasoline, it is reported to give twenty percent more efficiency in motors and to assure complete combustion, leaving no residue in the cylinder.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0131.xml
article
68
68
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
World’s Longest Railroad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE recent acquirement of additional lines in Kansas and Texas is said to have made the Santa Fe the world’s longest railroad, slightly exceeding its nearest mileage rival, the Southern Pacific System, which has 13,165 miles of track. Other long lines in the United States include the Pennsylvania Radroad, 10,527 miles, and the Chicago, Milwaukee, and St. Paul Railway, 11,193 miles.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0132.xml
article
68
68
Automobiles
[no value]
Oil Cup Invented to Stop Battery Corrosion
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SIMPLE yet ingenious new device designed to prevent corrosion of automobile storage battery terminals consists of a small oil reservoir made of lead, with a cuplike projection at one side, into which a felt washer fits. The terminal clamp holds both the washer and the oil receptacle firmly in place.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0133.xml
article
68
68
Automobiles
[no value]
Dashboard Register Keeps Oil Mileage Record
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN did you last change the oil in your crank case? Unless you are an unusual motorist, you will have to guess the answer. But with a new device, which resembles a toy speedometer and attaches to the dashboard with a rubber suction cup, the inventor says you can tell exactly when your motor needs a fresh supply of oil.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0134.xml
article
68
68
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
New Highways for Brazil
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR the first time thousand-mile automobile trip is possible in Brazil, according to G. M. de Menezes, representative from that country at the recent meeting of the Highway Education Board in Washington. A new highway connecting Rio de Janeiro with Sao Paulo makes such a trip possible for motorists.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0135.xml
article
68
68
Meteorology
[no value]
Proposes “Smoke Rings” to Prevent Hurricanes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHOOTING smoke rings thousands of feet into the air from twenty or thirty hundred-foot steel cones scattered over southern Florida and the Bahama Islands, is the unusual method of preventing West Indian hurricanes suggested by Prof. William S. Franklin, physicist of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0136.xml
article
69
69
Automobiles
[no value]
Reverse Pliers Serve As Handy Valve Lifters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN INGENIOUS tool that takes up little room in an automobile mechanic’s kit, but solves the difficulty of holding up the valve spring of a motor, when cleaning around it or removing the valve, has been put on the market by a French inventor. The device consists of a pair of reverse pliers with a series of teeth on the upper handle.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0137.xml
article
69
69
Photography
[no value]
Altitude Told by Camera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW cameras may decide close contests for the world’s airplane altitude record was demonstrated recently over Dayton, Ohio. Two Army airmen took off from McCook Field and soared to a height believed to have been 40,200 feet. At their highest point, one of the men snapped a picture of the city of Dayton far below.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0138.xml
article
69
69
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
“Thrillers” Soothe Nerves, Experiments Reveal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOU are nervous, read a murder story before going to bed! The value of this paradoxical advice seems to have been shown by a series of tests conducted recently in the University of Chicago psychological laboratories. By means of charts of pulse and respiration, and similar scientific data, it was shown that after reading a “thriller” for an hour or more, the average person tested had a quieter pulse, slower respiration, and greater self-control than before he began reading.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0139.xml
article
69
69
Automobiles
[no value]
Autos Checked in Baggage Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN AUTOMOBILE baggage car, recently added to a fast train running between San Francisco and Del Monte, Calif., enables passengers to check their machines during the trip and to drive away in them at the journey’s
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0140.xml
article
69
69
Automobiles
[no value]
Invents Anti-Glare “Specs” for Night Drivers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DRIVER’S spectacles designed with the upper halves of the glasses colored green are the latest idea for protecting the eyes from the glare of approaching headlights at night. When you meet dazzling headlights, simply drop your head slightly and look through the green, explains the sixty-year-old California motorist who invented the specs.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0141.xml
article
69
69
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
May Save Lives of Carbon Monoxide Victims
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF A new resuscitation method, recently tried in animal experiments in the laboratory of Dr. Ludwig Schmidt-Kehl, of the University of Würzburg, Germany, proves as successful in the case of human beings as it has in that of cats, there will be fewer victims of carbon monoxide asphyxiation in closed garages in the future.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0142.xml
article
69
69
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Huge Tree from Tiny Seed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TINY seed only a quarter of an inch long produces the giant sequoia tree of California, whose average height is 275 feet and which may weigh 6,000 tons.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0143.xml
article
70
70
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Stainless Steel Propellers Save Repairs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A KITCHEN paring knife has resulted in saving a San Francisco ferryboat company $12,800 a year! It suggested the feasibility of making boat propellers from stainless steel. An engineer of the company noticed that a stainless steel knife in his kitchen even after years of constant use, did not become corroded by acids or by water.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0144.xml
article
70
70
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
The Birds Set Records in Trans-Atlantic Flight
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE first trans-Atlantic flyers were the birds. A British ornithologist, T. A. Coward, has made a collection of the records of their feats of over-sea flying, which show the remarkable stamina of the feathered voyagers and their uncanny ability at navigation.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0145.xml
article
70
70
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Odd “Duck” Suit Permits Walking in Water
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MAN can walk through deep water and across streams if he wears a strange suit recently tried out with success by firemen in Germany. A life preserverlike buoy about the waist keeps the wearer afloat and weighted shoes keep him in an upright position.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0146.xml
article
70
70
Radio
[no value]
Radio Piano Invented to Hush Twanging Sound
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A “RADIO PIANO,” designed to eliminate the twang of vibrating wires in radio reception by transmitting only the pure tone when the keys are struck before the broadcasting microphone, has been designed by an inventor in Toulouse, France.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0147.xml
article
70
70
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
“Doughnut” Rowboat Offers Novel Water Sport
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE “Dippy Boat,” a queer round metal craft propelled by invisible oars, was tried out recently by its inventor, Julius Goldman, in Los Angeles, Calif. A large circular pontoon, filled with air, supports as many as eight people. The craft is propelled forward or backward, and also steered by means of the handles being operated by the passengers in the photograph. These handles are connected with oars which move under the body of the tanklike pleasure craft. A bumper extends around the outside of the boat.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0148.xml
article
71
71
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Life’s Riddle Is Nearly Solved, Says Chemist
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DISCOVERY of the secret of life— the crowning achievement of science —seems just around the corner, Prof. F. G. Donnan, London chemist, recently told the British Association for the Advancement of Science. Describing the work of Dr. A. V. Hill, noted British biologist, he announced that this expert is on the verge of discovering, if he has not already found, a principle “of astounding importance to science”—a series of facts that may enable science dimly to understand the difference between life and death, and hence the very meaning of life itself.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0149.xml
article
71
71
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Speedy “Footmobile” Folds and Parks in Closet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN you reach home in this runabout, you can fold it up, take it into the house with you, and park it for the night in a closet! It is a folding “footmobile” recently introduced in England, where wide use of it is predicted. The foot-propelling mechanism has three gears, and the bicycle wheels, running with a minimum of friction, are said to carry the light car at speeds of twenty and thirty miles an hour, without great effort by the driver.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0150.xml
article
71
71
Automobiles
[no value]
Camera Clicks as Racing Car Climbs Fence
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RUNNING wild at more than a mile-a-minute clip! Out of the driver’s control, with its steering gear useless, this racing car plunged toward the iron fence that borders the track at Mineola, N. Y. Spectators scuttled for their lives as it slammed into the barrier and reared its nose skyward, only an intrepid photographer remaining to snap this remarkable picture.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0151.xml
article
71
71
Exceptional People
[no value]
He Agrees to Kill Five Million Prairie Dogs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the strangest contracts on record was made recently in South Dakota, when A. R. Plummer, of Belle Fourche, signed up to kill 5,000,000 prairie dogs in two years. He contracted to eradicate a prairie dog “town” which is so extensive that it occupies parts of two counties.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0152.xml
article
71
71
Exceptional People
[no value]
Champion Linguist Knows Two Hundred Tongues
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE world’s record for proficiency in foreign languages is said to be held by a retired mathematics professor in Frankfort-on-the-Main, Germany. He knows 200 tongues. He claims to be able to read and write all of these languages, ranging from Sanskrit through Egyptian hieroglyphics and Chinese picture writings to modern tongues, and he is constantly adding to his list.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0153.xml
article
71
71
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Record Overland Vision Nearly 200 Miles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW far can the human eye see over the surface of the earth? Engineers on the French Mediterranean coast are reported to have sighted lights atop the mountains of Corsica, a distance of 168 miles from the coast of France. In the United States, twelve-inch mirrors on Mount Shasta, in California, were recently seen from Mount Helena, one hundred and ninety-two miles away.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0154.xml
article
71
71
Aviation
[no value]
Plane Terrifies Pygmies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SO TERRIFIED were New Guinea pygmies by the apparition of an American airplane out of the sky that it took members of an aerial expedition exploring the country hours to convince them that no harm would come to them. “They bolted for cover in all directions when we dropped from the clouds in our airplane,” Dr. W. W. Brandes, of the U. S. Department of Agriculture, who headed the party, reported when it recently returned to civilization. It had covered 11,000 miles of wild country.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0155.xml
article
72
72
Exceptional People
[no value]
Keeps Hundreds of Antique Clocks Ticking on Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANTIQUE clocks may be ancient, but those in the collection at New York University, New York City, must not run behind the time; So Professor D. W. Hering, in charge of the James Arthur collection, has a job on his hands. He is here pictured making the rounds of the hundreds of ancient time-recorders to regulate them.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0156.xml
article
72
72
Engineering
[no value]
Upside-Down Skyscrapers Proposed in Japan
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN “UPSIDE-DOWN skyscraper,“ descending eighty stories into the earth, is suggested in Tokyo, Japan. The building would be sunk 1,100 feet deep. The design calls for a huge circular well braced with steel framework. The offices would be lighted continually with electric lights, and ventilating shafts would provide the necessary fresh air.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0157.xml
article
72
72
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Lighted House Numbers, Law in Stockholm
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOUSE numbers that can be seen in the dark are required on all homes in Stockholm, Sweden, by a recent municipal ruling. In the winter, darkness falls early, sometimes by two o’clock in the afternoon, and the difficulty of finding addresses in unfamiliar districts aroused the city officials to action.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0158.xml
article
72
72
Aviation
[no value]
Plane’s Wreckage Tells of Amundsen’s Fate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BATTERED wing-tip float, pulled from the icy waters of the Arctic Ocean by some Norwegian fishermen recently, gave the first concrete evidence of the fate which befell Roald Amundsen and his four French companions who took off in search of the Italia survivors last June.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0159.xml
article
72
72
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Electricity Fights Pests; Electrocutes Rats
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRICITY is fighting man’s battle against insects and rodents in an increasing number of ways. In Switzerland, it has been used to save a field of tomatoes from grubs which formerly ruined fifty percent of the crop. Brilliant electric lights, with reflectors directed toward the soil, were placed at intervals in the field.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0160.xml
article
72
72
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Searchlight Battery a War Game Spectacle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LONG white fingers of light crossed and recrossed in the darkness at the recent Army Ordnance demonstration of new war material, held at Washington, D. C., as they combed the sky for nightflying aircraft as part of imaginary battle operations.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0161.xml
article
73
73
Photography
[no value]
X-Ray Movies Reveal Blooming of a Rose
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE secret of what takes place in the heart of a rose, as it unfolds from the bud, is revealed for the first time in an amazing moving picture film recently made by a Berkeley, Calif., photographer of botanical subjects, Arthur C. Pillsbury. He employed an X-ray tube of low voltage, which casts the shadow of delicate objects upon the film, without destroying them.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0162.xml
article
73
73
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Rum Runner, Set Ablaze, Tests Fire Boat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW use for rum-running vessels— that of testing the efficiency of fire boats—was demonstrated recently in the East River at New York City. One of these captured outlaws, the Halcyon, was set on fire in the river. As the blazing vessel drifted past one of the spans that bridge the water between Manhattan and Brooklyn, the crack fire boat of the New York Fire Department, the John Purroy Mitchel, its propellers churning the water as it slowly moved into position, went into action.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0163.xml
article
73
73
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Airplane Pioneer Builds Novel Motorcycle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COMBINING the comforts of an automobile with the economy of a motorcycle, a novel two-wheeled machine has appeared in England. It was designed by A. V. Roe, famous airplane builder and the first man to make a flight in a British plane on British soil, early in 1908.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0164.xml
article
74
74,75
[no value]
[no value]
Latest Inventions for the Household
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0165.xml
article
76
76,77,117,118
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Setting Up a Model Railway
How to Plan Your Layout to Make the Most of the Space — Laying Track—Curves and Grades—Portable Outfits—Muffling Noise
[no value]
[no value]
FREDERICK D. RYDER
IN THE operation of a model railway, there comes a time when you tire of watching the train go round and round a plain circular or oval track. And then, quite logically, you decide to expand it into a more comprehensive system. As a result you buy yourself some more track, a few switches, and such other accessories as happen to appeal to you.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0166.xml
article
78
78,111,112
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
When and How to Apply Kalsomine
Methods, Materials, and Tools for Decorating New and Old Walls and Ceilings
[no value]
[no value]
F. N. VANDERWALKER
KALSOMINE may be the most suitable finish for the walls and ceilings of your home, or perhaps for the ceilings alone. “But how can I decide that?” you ask. Well, take the case of a new house. Usually the owner wants to occupy it at the earliest possible time.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0167.xml
article
79
79,119,120,121
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
You Can Make Artistic Hinges
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD THATCHER
TO BE durable and look well, homemade hinges, handles, and key plates should be made of reasonably thick metal—the larger the piece, the thicker the metal. From Nos. 14 to 12 standard B. & S. gage sheet metal should be used for most of this work, but small hinges may be made of No. 16 gage.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0168.xml
article
80
80,81,159
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
How to Build a Real Fireplace
The Trick of Making an Open Hearth Supply Cheery Warmth without Smoke Is No More of a Mystery than in Olden Days
[no value]
[no value]
BASIL EWING WEBB
YOU’VE often heard it said that fireplace construction is a “lost art.” In this article Mr. Webb reveals that it is more of an exact science than ever before. And he gives simple rules and measurements that will turn your dream of a cosy fireside into more than puffs of grimy soot.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0169.xml
article
82
82
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Popular Science MONTHLY
The Driving Force That Wins
New Ways to Make a Million
When Editors Miss the News
We Need a New Calendar
They Are Saying—
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO articles in this issue drive home the same point. One tells of Hugo Eckener, master mariner of the sky. The other begins a series about Wilbur and Orville Wright. Eckener was a mature man, with a reputation as an economist and a writer, when he interviewed Count Zeppelin and became interested in the possibilities of airships.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0170.xml
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83
83
[no value]
[no value]
SKF INDUSTRIES, INC.
[no value]
SKF INDUSTRIES, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0171.xml
article
84
84,154
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
How You Can Test Antifreeze
Gus, Turning the Model Garage into a Laboratory, Works Out Easy Formula for Radiator Solutions
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
SOME people,” grumbled Gus Wilson, “sure do waste a lot of time finding out what they want to know.” The veteran auto mechanic disgustedly shoved the telephone away from him. Joe Clark, his partner, who had called him into the office of the Model Garage to answer the phone, grinned sympathetically.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0172.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA: RCA Radiotron
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA
RCA Radiotron
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0173.xml
article
86
86
[no value]
[no value]
A Kit of Ideas for Motorists
If the Fan Belt Breaks, or You Need Tire Chains in a Hurry, Here's the Remedy—And Some Other Handy Kinks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEGLECT to carry a trouble light in the tool kit of the car may cause no end of annoyance on the road at night in the event of some minor difficulty. However, often it is possible to obtain all the light necessary for a small repair on the ignition systei?
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0174.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
Snow Hooks of Hose
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE chains of the ordinary type usually will give you traction in snow or mud, it is a dirty Fig. 1. Emergency tire chains made by threading rope through hose and tying on. job to apply them. And when most of the route is clear, with only a short section of road in bad shape, chains will come in for a lot of unnecessary wear besides chafing the tires.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0175.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
Three-Tone Horn
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE note produced by one type of auto horn depends on the voltage applied to it. If your horn is of this type you can make it sound three different notes by the use of resistances and buttons wired as shown in Fig. 4 at the right.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0176.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
Ten Dollars for an Idea!
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
August Grosze, of Collinsville, 111., wins this month’s $10 prize for his suggestion of a novel bushing press (Fig. 2.) Each month POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY awards $10, in addition to regular space rates, for the best idea sent in for motorists.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0177.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
Novel Bushing Press
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE bolt, one nut, and two washers will permit you to press king-pin bushings, or any similarly assembled bushing, into place just about as well as it can be done in an arbor press. And there is no risk of deforming the edge of the bushing, as there would be if you pounded it into place.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0178.xml
article
86
86
Automobiles
[no value]
Fan Belt Repair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOUR auto motor is equipped with a plain, flat fan belt made of either fabric or leather, it is possible to repair it well enough to get to the nearest service station. You will have to loosen the belt-tightening adjustment to obtain the necessary slack so that you can overlap the ends, and fasten them together with safety pins, as shown in Fig. 3.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0179.xml
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87
87
[no value]
[no value]
THE BLACK & DECKER MFG. CO.: Electric Tool Chests
[no value]
THE BLACK & DECKER MFG. CO.
Electric Tool Chests
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0180.xml
article
88
88,104
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Setting Up a Bench Saw Table
How to Build a Rigid but Easily Moved Machine Support with a Belt Tightener and a Dust Chute
[no value]
[no value]
W. CLYDE LAMMEY
THE saw table support illustrated is designed to overcome some of the ills attendant upon the operation of a bench saw driven by a separate motor. Where such an outfit— now to be found in many home workshops—is mounted on a heavy plank or the like, it is difficult to move the assembly about the shop, to prevent the belt from slipping, and, if the table has the tilting feature, to place the saw so that long stock will clear the bench when cutting angles.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0181.xml
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89
89
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY TOOL CHEST
[no value]
STANLEY TOOL CHEST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0182.xml
article
90
90,102
Models
[no value]
How to Build a River Packet
You Can Begin Now to Construct the Latest Type of Ship Model, Even if You Missed Our Preceding Articles About the Buckeye State
[no value]
[no value]
E. ARMITAGE McCANN
IN TWO previous articles we described how to make the hull and many of the fittings of the stern-wheeled Buckeye State, a passenger and freight Mississippi steamboat of 1878. Those who missed these issues, yet wish to build this picturesque and now most popular type of model, need not hesitate.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0183.xml
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91
91
[no value]
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0184.xml
article
92
92,109,110
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Mounting Your Lathe Work
Hints on Setting Up Awkward, Unbalanced Pieces to Prevent Distortion and Vibration
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
EVEN skillful machinists experience difficulty at times in two classes of lathe work—that which requires high accuracy, and large, heavy jobs which may exceed the capacity of the lathe. In many cases the trouble is due to distortion caused in the spindle and faceplate by strains imposed inclamping and through the weight of the work itself.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0185.xml
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93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
No. 450 Folding Steel Rule
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
No. 800 Starrett Nail Set
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0186.xml
article
94
94
“This Helped Me in My Work”
[no value]
Expert Machinists Give Shop Hints
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN MY experience of sixteen years as a toolmaker and four years at tool designing, I have never seen a better tool-bit holder than that illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2. I made one for myself and find it saves time to be able to pick up at once the exact tool bit needed instead of having to search for it.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0187.xml
article
94
94,108
“This Helped Me in My Work”
[no value]
A Tool-Bit Holder and Other Ideas
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALBERT E. BIRD
PENDING the arrival—some weeks off —of a regular broach for use in a broaching machine, it was necessary recently in a large shop to finish a number of blanks which had been roughed out, ready for broaching. Several attempts at hand broaching resulted only in breaking broaches.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0188.xml
article
94
94
“This Helped Me in My Work”
[no value]
Old Bill Says—
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF THE boss gives your neighbor the best work, look up a good reason before you begin to criticize him. To safeguard the end of a piercing punch for tempering, it is advisable to make it with a male center. If you have to change the cutting edge of a good drill for a brass job, regrind it before you turn it in.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0189.xml
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95
95
[no value]
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE TOOLS
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0190.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Plomb Tool Co.
[no value]
Plomb Tool Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0191.xml
article
96
96,104
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
It’s Easy to Build an Igloo
And a Big Snow Fort, Too, if You Use a Wooden Form to Help You Press the Blocks into Shape
[no value]
[no value]
J. V. HAZZARD
WITH Commander Byrd, and Scout Siple facing strange adventures in the Antarctic, it is safe to assume that a bumper crop of “snow houses” will be built this winter by American boys after what they imagine to be the latest styles of Eskimo architecture.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0192.xml
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97
97
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[no value]
MILLERS FALLS COMPANY: MILLERS FALLS Electric Drills
[no value]
MILLERS FALLS COMPANY
MILLERS FALLS Electric Drills
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0193.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0194.xml
article
98
98,100
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Cabine — 1929 Model
How to Build One of the Simplest Yet Most Characteristic Types of Modern Furniture
Cutting List
[no value]
[no value]
HERMAN HJORTH
THE modernistic cabinet illustrated was designed by W. H. Varnum, Associate Professor of Applied Arts at the University of Wisconsin, according to certain principles formulated by the late Professor Hambidge and described in his book Dynamic Symmetry.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0195.xml
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99
99
[no value]
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0196.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
The BILLINGS & SPENCER Comapny
[no value]
The BILLINGS & SPENCER Comapny
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0197.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
MIDWEST RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
MIDWEST RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0198.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Boucher Inc
[no value]
Boucher Inc
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0199.xml
article
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
Makes Paint Sprayer at Small Cost
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAVING many small paint jobs to do about the shop and also desiring to repaint my old car, I looked about for a good paint sprayer. Homemade sprayer The cheap ones controlled by trigger. did not come up to my idea of good mechanical design, and the more expensive did fit my purse.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0200.xml
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103
103
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.: "YANKEE" TOOLS
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
"YANKEE" TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0201.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
CLEMSON BROS., INC.
[no value]
CLEMSON BROS., INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0202.xml
article
105
105
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Blueprints for Your Home Workshop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OUR blueprints can be obtained for 25 cents a sheet. In some cases there are two or three sheets to one subject. The blueprints are complete in themselves, but if you wish the corresponding back issue of the magazine in which the project was described in detail, it can be had for 25 cents additional so long as copies are available.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0203.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
No. 130 Countershaft
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
No. 706 Buffing Spindle
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0204.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
The David Maydole Hammer Co.
[no value]
The David Maydole Hammer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0205.xml
article
106
106,113
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Furniture Polishing Secrets
How to Restore the Glow to Dull Looking Antiques—Removing Spots and Rings
[no value]
[no value]
R. C. STANLEY
AFTER a piece of furniture has been oiled and waved, as sugested in the article on refinishing tiques in the November issue, the grain of the wood, especially in dark wood, may appear white. This is nothing to be discouraged over; it proves that the grain has been well filled with the wax, as should be the case.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0206.xml
article
107
107
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Oil Burner Improved with Baffle Plates
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE FULLER
A YEAR or more ago I had one of the best oil burners installed in my home. After some use I realized that the boiler, like most home boilers, could not absorb all the heat which the oil gave off in burning. A large part of the hot gases went rapidly up the stack.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0207.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0208.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0209.xml
advertisement
108
108
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[no value]
Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0210.xml
advertisement
108
108
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0211.xml
advertisement
108
108
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[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0212.xml
article
108
108
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
A Spring Winding Tool
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE spring winding tool illustrated can be quickly and cheaply made and will give complete satisfaction. It consists of two pieces of machine or tool steel of about the width of standard lathe tools and of a height to suit the tool post. The upper and lower sections have a V groove, from 1/16 to ⅛ in.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0213.xml
article
108
108
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Holding Flat Form Tools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLAT forming tools of varying thicknesses may be held in the tool holder illustrated with equal security. It is simply two square pieces of steel with a pilot-ended set screw in one of them, and a shoulder planed for the tool in the other. It would usually be used on the larger lathes for forming heavy work, and, of course, should be made as rugged as the tool post will allow.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0214.xml
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109
109
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[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0215.xml
advertisement
110
110
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[no value]
veeder-ROOT INCORPORATED
[no value]
veeder-ROOT INCORPORATED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0216.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
J. D. WALLACE & CO.
[no value]
J. D. WALLACE & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0217.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Buescher Band Instrument Co.: Saxophone
[no value]
Buescher Band Instrument Co.
Saxophone
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0218.xml
article
110
110
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Tool to Aid in Cleaning Machine Fixtures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR RILL plates and similar machine fixtures often accumulate hard spots of caked grease that cannot be removed with a brush. One machinist made it a practice to keep a piece of tin handy for scraping the surfaces clean, finishing off with a brush, but the tin would be mislaid sooner or later.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0219.xml
article
110
110
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Quick Way to Space Holes.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARTHUR KENDALL
WHEN absolute accuracy is not essential, the method of marking off holes illustrated in the accompanying photo will be found quick and convenient. The work shown is a collar, which is to be marked for five “tommy” holes. After chalking the bench plate well, I described a circle slightly larger than the collar, divided it into five parts, and marked five radial lines. All I had to do then was to lay each collar within the circle and pencil mark the five positions, after which I center punched the pieces ready for DRILLING.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0220.xml
advertisement
111
111
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[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0221.xml
article
112
112
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Caustic Soda Found an Aid in Gluing Several Woods
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STRONG glued joints can be obtained by treating with caustic soda certain species of wood which otherwise frequently produce weak or inferior joints, according to experiments made by the Forest Products Laboratory of the United States Forest Service.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0222.xml
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112
112
[no value]
[no value]
ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY
[no value]
ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0223.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
THE WILLIAM CAMPBELL COMPANY: CAMPBELL’S INFRA-RED RAY LAMP
[no value]
THE WILLIAM CAMPBELL COMPANY
CAMPBELL’S INFRA-RED RAY LAMP
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0224.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
GIFT CRAFTERS
[no value]
GIFT CRAFTERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0225.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
HOBART BROS. CO.
[no value]
HOBART BROS. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0226.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Up-to-Date Machine Works
[no value]
Up-to-Date Machine Works
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0227.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Brown and Williamson Tobacco Corporation
[no value]
Brown and Williamson Tobacco Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0228.xml
article
114
114,115
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Replacing a Broken Window Pane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Paste this Home Workshop Reference Sheet, including the head above, in your scrapbook in the section marked windows. (Jan., 1929, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.) What are the steps in replacing a broken window pane! NOTHING of equal size can more effectively give an air of general dilapidation to a room or to the exterior of a house than a broken pane of glass.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0229.xml
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114
114
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[no value]
STUDEBAKER WATCH COMPANY
[no value]
STUDEBAKER WATCH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0230.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
SPORT FACTORIES
[no value]
SPORT FACTORIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0231.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
MANN & BENTON
[no value]
MANN & BENTON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0232.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
LePage’s Craft League
[no value]
LePage’s Craft League
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0233.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0234.xml
advertisement
116
116
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[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0235.xml
article
116
116
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[no value]
Clothes Drier Built Over Stairs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DAVID O. WOODBURY
THE problem of drying the family washing during rainy days and in winter, when everything wet freezes the minute it is put on the line, often causes the housewife much annoyance. Particularly is her problem a difficult one when there are several small children for whom daily washing must be done.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0236.xml
article
116
116
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Improving an Automatic Gas Range Lighter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER an automatic gas range lighter has been in use for a while, it sometimes will cause almost unbearable fumes and make the bottoms of pots and pans sooty. Soon it becomes difficult to maintain a flame in the little pilot light. All of these troubles are due to the formation of carbon in the combustion chamber.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0237.xml
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117
117
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0238.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
H. GERSTNER & SONS
[no value]
H. GERSTNER & SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0239.xml
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117
117
[no value]
[no value]
ARKOGRAF PEN CO.
[no value]
ARKOGRAF PEN CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0240.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
HESTON & ANDERSON
[no value]
HESTON & ANDERSON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0241.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0242.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN MODEL AIRCRAFT CO.: REAL AIRPLANE
[no value]
AMERICAN MODEL AIRCRAFT CO.
REAL AIRPLANE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0243.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
The Parks Woodworking Machine Co.: WOODWORKING MACHINES
[no value]
The Parks Woodworking Machine Co.
WOODWORKING MACHINES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0244.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0245.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0246.xml
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120
120
[no value]
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS, Inc.
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0247.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
No. 871
[no value]
No. 872
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0248.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
THE PORTER CHEMICAL COMPANY
[no value]
THE PORTER CHEMICAL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0249.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0250.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
IDEAL AEROPLANE & SUPPLY COMPANY, INC.
The IDEAL New York-Parls Monoplane
IDEAL AEROPLANE & SUPPLY COMPANY, INC.
The IDEAL FOKKER North Pole Monoplane
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0251.xml
article
122
122
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
How to Turn Large Columns
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE H. WHITEAKER
OF THE conventional plans published for pedestals, jardinière stands, and similar turned pieces, very few are available for use in the average home shop because the columns are glued up in six or eight pieces. Many amateurs do not have the patience or equipment to make the necessary long hexagonal or octagonal joints.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0252.xml
article
123
123,124
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Hints on Applying Corner Braces
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DAVID WEBSTER
MANY products of home industry would last longer and be more worthy of their makers’ pride if a few corner braces were fitted at strategic points in their anatomy. The accompanying illustration, which shows a few types of the common braces found in almost every large hardware store, should suggest their value to the home worker, and the obvious ease with which they may be installed should encourage their use.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0253.xml
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123
123
[no value]
[no value]
LEWIS MFG. CO.
[no value]
LEWIS MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0254.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
MECCANO COMPANY, Inc.: Tri-Motored Model Airplane
[no value]
MECCANO COMPANY, Inc.
Tri-Motored Model Airplane
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0255.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
THE PORTER-CABLE MACHINE CO.: PORTABLE SAWS
[no value]
THE PORTER-CABLE MACHINE CO.
PORTABLE SAWS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0256.xml
advertisement
124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0257.xml
article
124
124
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Mounting a Map on a Desk for Ready Reference
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
V. HAMMOND
HAVING constant use for a city street and house number map in a city health department, one of the office secretaries suggested that the map be mounted on cloth and placed on a curtain roller, which was attached to blocks clamped to the back edge of the desk.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0258.xml
article
124
124
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Steam Heater for Mash
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. R. SMITH
STEAMED mash aids obtaining eggs, from during the winter. A simple heater for the mash may be made from a large pail and a disk of sheet metal slightly larger than the bottom of the pail. In the disk are punched a number of holes for steam. An inch or so of water is placed in the pail and the disk fitted above it.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0259.xml
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125
125
[no value]
[no value]
The Electro Thermal Company
[no value]
The Electro Thermal Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0260.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
CARTER RADIO CO.
[no value]
CARTER RADIO CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0261.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
PAN - AMERICAN BAND INSTRUMENT & CASE CO.
[no value]
PAN - AMERICAN BAND INSTRUMENT & CASE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0262.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0263.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
W. B. & J. E. Boice
Handi Jointer
W. B. & J. E. Boice
Band Saw
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0264.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
WACO TOOL WORKS, Inc.
[no value]
WACO TOOL WORKS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0265.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
C. G. CONN, Ltd.
[no value]
C. G. CONN, Ltd.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0266.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0267.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
ELKON, INC.: ELKON RECTIFIER
[no value]
ELKON, INC.
ELKON RECTIFIER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0268.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Hammarlund-Roberts, Inc.
[no value]
Hammarlund-Roberts, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0269.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0270.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE PUBLISHING CO.
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE PUBLISHING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0271.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
THE GEO. W. WALKER CO.: Victoreen Quality Radio Parts
[no value]
THE GEO. W. WALKER CO.
Victoreen Quality Radio Parts
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0272.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: PHASATROL
[no value]
[no value]
PHASATROL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0273.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
CeCo Mfg Co., Inc.: CECO Radio Tubes
[no value]
CeCo Mfg Co., Inc.
CECO Radio Tubes
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0274.xml
advertisement
132
132,133,134,135,136,137,138,139,140,141,142,143,144,145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157,158,159
[no value]
[no value]
Money Making Opportunities
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0275.xml
article
158
158
[no value]
[no value]
Here Are Correct Answers to Questions on Page 56
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
1. The formless, foggy clouds known as “stratus” may float as high above sea level as 3,000 feet. Cumulus clouds, that look like masses of cotton wool, average from 4,500 to 0,000 feet high. Cirrus clouds, those isolated feathery white clouds, average 27,000 feet above the earth.
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0276.xml
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160
160
[no value]
[no value]
R. R. DONNELLEY & SONS CO.
[no value]
R. R. DONNELLEY & SONS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0277.xml
advertisement
161
161
[no value]
[no value]
L C Smith & Corona Typewriters Inc: CORONA
[no value]
L C Smith & Corona Typewriters Inc
CORONA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0278.xml
advertisement
162
162,163,164
[no value]
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.: Lucky Strikes
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.
Lucky Strikes
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19290101_0114_001_0279.xml