Issue: 19281201

Saturday, December 1, 1928
December 1928
6
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113
Wednesday, December 31, 2014

Articles
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0001.xml
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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GENERAL ELECTRIC
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0002.xml
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1
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0003.xml
tableOfContents
2
2,3
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Table of Contents for December
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0004.xml
article
4
4,5,6
SPECIAL FEATURES
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MERGER PROFITS for Your Money
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WALLACE AMES
“WTHAT'S one man's meat is another man's poison,” remarked Harry Lyon, when he returned home from the monthly meeting of the Men’s Club. “I just learned tonight that the Ethridges have sold their home on the Esplanade and are moving to a much more modest rented house on Second Avenue.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0005.xml
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4
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0006.xml
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5
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PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE Co.
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PHOENIX MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE Co.
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0007.xml
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6
6
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United States Fiscal Corporation
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United States Fiscal Corporation
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0008.xml
advertisement
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6
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0009.xml
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6
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BOND AND MORTGAGE co.
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BOND AND MORTGAGE co.
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0010.xml
advertisement
6
6
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United States Mortgage Bond Co.
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United States Mortgage Bond Co.
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0011.xml
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7
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Fansteel Products Company, Inc.,
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Fansteel Products Company, Inc.,
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0012.xml
article
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8
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Choosing the Right Radio Set
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F. G. PRYOR
THE man who is buying a radio today has wonderful opportunities before him—and some pitfalls as well. Never were there so many fine radio outfits on the market, and never were so many sets found below par by the Popular Science Institute of Standards’ tests.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0013.xml
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8
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0014.xml
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9
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0015.xml
article
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10
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Our Readers Say–
A High Hat ? Never !
Forever, We Hope
The Lid Blows Off
That Tinkling Glass
See Page Fifty-Two
Back at the Byrd Shooters
Building ’Em in India
How Do You Shovel?
Whv Not “Pilotess”?
No Human Speed Limit?
Too Useful to Miss
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I SEE all prettied your last up issue in was the middle. First it was fiction, then an editorial page blossomed forth, and now it's a rotogravure section. What next? Old Archimedes duded up with silk topper and spats? “Why not stick to plain, unvarnished science?
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0016.xml
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11
11
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GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR CO.
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GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR CO.
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0017.xml
advertisement
12
12
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A. H. Grebe & Company, Inc.
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A. H. Grebe & Company, Inc.
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0018.xml
masthead
13
13
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0019.xml
article
13
13,14,15,150
LEADING ARTICLES
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Windmill Plane Makes Good
Cross-Channel Flight of the Autogiro, Latest in Aircraft, May Bring a Safer Era in Aviation—Its Young Inventor Tells How It Works and What It Does
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MARCEL WALLENSTEIN
LIKE a leaf drifting gently to the ground, a flying windmill dropped out of the sky, the other day, and onto the aviation field at Le Bourget, near Paris. Aviators and mechanics, the usual crowd at the busy airport, watched it descend—a strange craft with the body of an airplane and four great windmill-like vanes slowly spinning above it in lieu of wings.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0020.xml
article
16
16,17,152,153
LEADING ARTICLES
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So They Wrote to Edison—
Surprising Things the Great Inventor Finds in His Flood of Mail Every Day
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WILLIAM H. MEADOWCROFT
IF YOU were to ask any group of Americans who have won distinction in the field of electricity where they obtained their first knowledge of the subject, more than half of them probably will name the same book. It is The ABC of Electricity, written in 1888 by William H. Meadowcroft.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0021.xml
article
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18
LEADING ARTICLES
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New Fuel Drives Giant Zeppelin
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"BLUE gas” as motor fuel has passed its first real test in the great Germany-to-America Graf Zeppelin, for the moment the world's largest airship. When Dr. Hugo Eckener's latest creation rose on its trial trip over Munich, Germany, preparatory to a trans-Atlantic flight to America, its engines were burning gasoline.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0022.xml
article
19
19,20
LEADING ARTICLES
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Radio Outruns the Hurricane
While the Tropical Fury Blew Paths of Death and Ruin, the “Hams” Stood by to Warn and Send Aid
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GEORGE LEE DOWD,
THE whole world was horrified recently at the destruction wrought by the West Indian hurricane that swept a path of death and ruin through Porto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guadaloupe and several smaller islands, and our own Florida. Scores of ships were wrecked, castles of the rich and cabins of the poor alike demolished, and hundreds of defenceless people drowned in floods that laid waste farms and orchards as the terrific tempest rolled northward.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0023.xml
article
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21
LEADING ARTICLES
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Laying the New Ocean Cable
How the World's Greatest Cable Ship Joins the Continents with Miles of Unbroken Wire
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THE largest and fastest cable-laying ship in the world, the Dominia, recently completed the main link— between Bay Roberts, Newfoundland, and the Azores—of the latest transAtlantic cable, which will transmit eight messages at once between the United States, Europe, and Africa.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0024.xml
article
22
22,23,137,138
LEADING ARTICLES
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Mechanical Men Walk and Talk
Amazing Automatons Invented to Operate Mighty Machinery, Speak at Meetings, Make Lightning Calculations, and Rid the World of Drudgery
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ROBERT E. MARTIN
AUTOMATONS, as such, are not new. The inventor Arch-ytos, in 400 B.C., devised the first, a flying dove. A mechanical man that played cards, exhibited in London in 1875, was surpassed only a few months ago by a mechanical chess player, which stopped of its own accord if the human opponent cheated.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0025.xml
article
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24,25,156,157,158
LEADING ARTICLES
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Romance Rides in the Air
Stirring Adventures of Famous Flyers Who Have Met the Unexpected,Face to , in the Clouds
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MICHEL MOK
“HE KNOWS his way around these parts in any weather,” ran the cheery comment of his friends when Mazel M. Merrill, the head of the Curtiss Flying Service, was reported lost on a trip from Buffalo to New York. Pilots who had made their first feeble flutterings under his smiling guidance, students who had listened to his pithy lectures, and aviators who had flown with him for years agreed that “lie could scent trouble before it came.”
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0026.xml
article
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26,151
LEADING ARTICLES
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Wonders from Molten Sulphur
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JOHN E. LODGE
IF YOU look in the New York telephone directory under “K,” you will find: “Kobbe, William H., sulphur.” Behind that final word lies one of the romance stories of industrial science. To most of us, sulphur suggests only evil odors or memories of sulphur-andmolasses spring tonic in childhood.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0027.xml
article
27
27,28,154,155
LEADING ARTICLES
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Will Insects Starve Us to Death?
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EDWIN W. TEALE
FROM all over the world, recently, scientists journeyed to Ithaca, N. Y., to plan new ways and weapons with which to fight man’s unconquered enemy, the insects. The meeting was the Fourth International Congress of Entomology. It formed the strategic council directing the world's army fighting in a war that can have no armistice.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0028.xml
article
29
29
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Queer Things Found Eatable
Roast Grubs, Fried Ants, Snakes, Skunks, and Monkeys—Even the Earth s Soil—Are Relished in Far Places
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VOLCANIC earth for food is the latest addition to a world’s menu already distinguished for its variety. From the slopes of Mount Asama, a Japanese volcano, come reports of a curious edible soil, capable of sustaining life indefinitely.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0029.xml
article
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29
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The Birth of Aviation, A Great Human Document
Begins in Our Next Issue
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ON DECEMBER 17, 1903, Wilbur and Orville Wright, bicycle mechanics of Dayton, Ohio, launched a frail contraption of canvas and wood from a North Carolina sand dune and gave the world the airplane. It is almost unbelievable, yet after twentyfive years the real story of the Wright brothers has never been told.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0030.xml
article
30
30,31,135,136
LEADING ARTICLES
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Making Your Car a Better One
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ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
BRAKES squeal. Four motor cars grind to a stop in front of a man waving a checkered flag. Haggard drivers slump forward over their wheels. It is the end of the race, a 30,000-mile epic of men and machines at Hammonton, N. J. And none too soon. The track is going to pieces!
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0031.xml
article
32
32,162,163,164,165,166,167
LEADING ARTICLES
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The Last of the VIKINGS
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BOYDEN SPARKES
SOME fishermen of Norway, steaming with their trawl nets through the rough seas twenty miles off shore from the town of TromsÖ, salvaged recently a last souvenir of the great adventurer, Roald Amundsen. It was a pontoon from the hydroairplane in which he had flown northward to the rescue of the wrecked and marooned crew of the Italia, airship of General Nobile's polar expedition.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0032.xml
article
33
33,34,35
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Someone Needed It —and Here It Is!
A Magnet Sweeps Tacks from the Road, and a New Motor Runs Minus a Crank Shaft; Fascinating Glimpses of Latest Inventions to Meet Modern Wants
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0033.xml
article
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36
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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They Played Our Games Ages Ago
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0034.xml
article
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37
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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The World Must Drink, and So
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0035.xml
article
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38,39
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They’d Please Any Housewife
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0036.xml
article
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40
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Keeping Pace with Aviation
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0037.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Rocket “Boosters” May Start Big Planes—Extra Wing and Oil Motor Mark Advances in Aircraft
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ROCKETS as taking-off aids for heavy planes are forecast by recent successful experiments with this novel type of propulsion in Germany, observers say. A big air liner requires twice as much power to get off the ground as to cruise once it is in the air, according to experts; and rockets to supplement the propellers’ traction might boost the plane quickly to flying speed, permitting a short run instead of a long one before taking wing.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0038.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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“Extra Wing" Lifts More
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THROUGH his invention of an “extra wing” that can be attached to an airplane without altering its design, H. D. Fowler, chief engineer of a New Brunswick, N. J., company, claims that planes may carry double their normal load in passengers or freight without sacrifice of cruising speed.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0039.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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New Oil Motor Tested
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MASS production of oil-burning motors for airplanes may follow recent successful tests of a new 200-horsepower Diesel type engine developed by the Packard Motor Company. In a demonstration at Detroit, Mich., it drove a commercial monoplane successfully.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0040.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Bombing Fleet Too Late
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WHEN nine huge Army bombers flew from Langley Field, Va., to Mines Field, Los Angeles, not long ago— the largest fleet of its kind ever to cross YOU look up to see a flock of Army planes, in flying formation. With astonishing control and precision they speed, wing to wing.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0041.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Train Flying Weather Men
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HOW to forecast flying weather is being taught in an advanced course in meteorology at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass. Dr. Carl-Gustav Rossby, a Swedish meteorologist, has charge of the class. Dr. Rossby was formerly chairman of the committee on aeronautical meteorology of the Daniel Guggenheim Fund for the Promotion of Aeronautics.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0042.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Canada-Mexico Air Lines
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TWO international air lines, preparations for which were announced last month in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, are now in operation. Mexico and the L’nited States are linked at last by a new route from Mexico City to Neuvo Laredo, on the border, connecting through a Laredo-San Antonio, Texas, spur with all the air lines of the United States.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0043.xml
article
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41
Aviation
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A New Map for Navigators
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THE latest way to represent the curved earth on a flat piece of paper aids flyers to navigate. It is a new type of map, devised by Bradley Jones and R. K. Stout of the Instrument and Navigation Unit, U. S. Air Corps, primarily for use with the radio beacon.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0044.xml
article
41
41
Aviation
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Anywhere by Air Taxi
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IN A hurry to get somewhere—anywhere in the United States? Just pick up the ’phone, and call an air taxi. That is the program of the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor Company, which is preparing to establish air taxi service in twenty-five cities throughout the United States. It is said to be the first concerted attempt to establish an air taxi organization nation-wide in scope.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0045.xml
article
42
42,43,136
SPECIAL FEATURES
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You Can Look at Your House Before You Build It!
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JOHN WALKER HARRINGTON
TODAY—thanks to the latest devices of architecture—when you plan a home of your own, you can see that house of your dreams before you build it, standing complete, with all its trimmings and adornments. Long before the foundations are laid or the first spadeful of earth has even been turned, you can inspect it on the very street and lot you have selected for its site.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0046.xml
article
44
44
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Cathode Rays Put to Work
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WHAT good are cathode rays? That was the question hardheaded critics proposed when Dr. W. D. Coolidge, of the General Electric Research Laboratories, announced that chemicals underwent strange changes, and minerals glowed with fluorescence, when exposed to rays from his powerful new cathode ray tubes.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0047.xml
article
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44
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Monsters Unearthed
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HEAD bones of a huge prehistoric monster just unearthed by Roy Chapman Andrews at the southern edge of the Gobi Desert indicate, he says, that the original animal was as long as the height of the world ’s tallest building, the 792-foot Wool worth Building in New York.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0048.xml
article
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44
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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New Perfumes and Pickles
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PERFUMES and pickles lie within the field of tomorrow’s chemist, who may make startling improvements in both, according to experts of the American Chemical Society. Rich and poor women alike may soon enjoy the fragrance of the rarest perfumes, in the opinion of Col. M. T. Bogart, head of the organic chemistry laboratory at Columbia University.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0049.xml
article
44
44
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Wealth in Nitrogen
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TODAY a pound of nitrogen gas— about four barrelfuls—is worth approximately thirty-two cents, while an equal weight of gold, a bar about the size of a spectacle case, commands a price of $250. Yet nitrogen may replace gold as the standard of a nation’s wealth in the near future, H. R. Bates, vice president of the International Agricultural Corporation of Atlanta, Ga., recently told the American Chemical Society.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0050.xml
article
44
44
Geology
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Capturing Hidden Gold
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WITH the solution of a problem that has baffled experts for half a century, miners are to capture gold hidden in blue ores of the Black Hills, Nevada, district. Hitherto the most rigorous treatment with heat and chemicals has only locked the gold more securely in its ore by the formation of refractory compounds; but now the Rare and Precious Metals Experiment Station of the Bureau of Mines at Reno, Nev., announces that it has successfully extracted the gold by a new process that includes a short, low-temperature roast, a wash with lime, and then the usual treatment with cyanide.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0051.xml
article
44
44
Laboratory Discoveries
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Stronger “Death” Waves
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MORE destructive super-sound waves, vibrating at the unprecedented rate of two and a half million times a second, recently have been produced in the laboratory of Alfred L. Loomis at Tuxedo Park, N. Y. Like the inaudible, ultra-rapid waves of one third this frequency which he previously generated, they kill small animals and plants placed in a vessel of water subjected to them.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0052.xml
article
44
44
Health and Hygiene
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Winning Against Scourges
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AT LEAST one more scourge of man seems conquered, another promises to be, and medical men the world over are fighting other dread diseases. Prompt use of a newly-developed serum for infantile paralysis stamped out a threatened epidemic last summer.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0053.xml
article
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45
Photography
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Photographs Dynamite Blasts
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Dynamite explosions and streaking flames are photographed by this huge camera, weighing a ton, recently developed by I rofessors R. P. Fraser and W. A. Bone, of the Imperial College of Science, London. The shutter is snapped by electricity, making a one-ten-thousandth-of-a-second exposure, controlled by the switch seen above in the experimenter’s hand.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0054.xml
article
45
45
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Drilling Largest Reflector
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A single slip in drilling an eight-inch hole through the optical axis of this 2,500-pound, seventy-inch telescope reflector, the largest ever made in America, would have ruined a year’s labor. The glass disk was cast for Ohio Wesleyan University by A. N. Finn, of the U. S. Bureau of Standards, at Washington, D. C. He is seen at the right of the picture above, supervising the drilling.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0055.xml
article
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45
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Recording Street Noises in London
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Disturbing street noises in London, England, are to be caught and catalogued by sensitive amplifying and recording instruments. Microphones placed in the streets will pick up the sound vibrations. Amplified by the apparatus at the right, these will be recorded on the master phonograph record seen at the left of the picture above.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0056.xml
article
45
45
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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The Blow That Kills a Germ
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How much weight do you have to drop on a microbe’s back to kill it? Dr. F. Holweck, French X-ray expert, answers the question with this machine, which shoots X-ray bolts at bacteria cultures. He finds it takes a millionth part of blow struck by a speck of dust falling a hundredth of an inch!
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0057.xml
article
45
45
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Five-Million-Year Fossil
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The picture at the left shows Prof. Loye Miller, head of the Biology Department of the University of California, with the fossil of a bird believed to have lived five million years ago. It was found recently at Calabasas, Calif., near Los Angeles.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0058.xml
article
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46,47,48
LEADING ARTICLES
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How Magicians Do Their Tricks
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“NOW,” said the magician to an involuntary investigator, enticed to the stage by a ruse that left him wondering how —’ it happened—“Now, with your own eyes, you saw the young lady walk into the cabinet; and ‘presto,’ she has disappeared.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0059.xml
article
49
49,50,159,160,161
LEADING ARTICLES
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Killing Fires High in the Air
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HENRY MORTON RORINSON
MORE thrilling experiences from the life of John Kenlon, New York City’s veteran fire chief. "The best way to fight fire is to prevent it,” he says, “and the next best way is to starve it to death.” In this fascinating article he tells of modem scientific methods and devices which smother flames before they get a start, and prevent conflagrations.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0060.xml
article
51
51
LEADING ARTICLES
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A Garden Salvaged from the Sea
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EDWIN KETCHUM
NEARLY a thousand square miles of land, now under ocean water, will be turned into cultivated fields upon the completion of a twenty-eightmile-long dike, now being thrust across the mouth of the Zuyder Zee, in Holland. When the great dam is finished in 1934, a railroad and a highway, connecting the east of Holland with the west, will run along its top.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0061.xml
article
52
52
Radio
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Useful Kinks for the Radio Fan Choosing the Best Antenna
Tests Reveal Trick Aerial Devices Are Not Worth the Price—Mending a Loudspeaker—A Homemade Tube Shield
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CONSIDERABLE confusion exists as to the relative effectiveness of various types of outdoor antennas. You probably have read the statement that a hundred-foot outdoor antenna is about right. That is correct only when reception conditions are such as to require that length.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0062.xml
article
52
52
Radio
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A Novel Tube Shield
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[no value]
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THE radio fan who likes to build things for himself will find that the small size of milk shaker sold in many stores can be made into an effective tube shield. The fitting of such a shield is shown in Fig. 1. The cover is fastened under the tube socket. Be carefid that the socket terminals are not short-circuited. You can, of course, drill holes through the cover of the shaker for the wires to the socket terminals, and also a hole on the shaker itself for a grid connection if the tube is of the shielded grid type.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0063.xml
article
52
52
Radio
[no value]
Repairing Your Loudspeaker
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THE most common trouble with a loudspeaker is a burned-out coil. This happens to be a defect which can be remedied without difficulty by anyone who likes to tinker and enjoys constructing radio apparatus. Figure 2 shows a simple way to rewind such a coil at home.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0064.xml
article
52
52
Radio
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A B C’s of Radio
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THE use of resistances to secure C-voltages for radio and audio amplifier tubes in electric sets may seem mysterious. Actually, though, the principles involved are fairly simple. All voltage is relative. A wire may register six volts positive with respect to one wire, and be negative with respect to another.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0065.xml
article
53
53,140
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Making a Television Disk
If You Are Looking for New Thrills, This Article Will Help You to Start Delving into Radio’s Latest Marvel
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[no value]
JOHN CARR
A SOLEMN faced young man in his ’teens gazed gravely at a shiny red motorcycle. The time had come for a momentous decision. Should the fascinating speed machine be sacrificed on the altar of science? Were the experiments he was making in the budding science of wireless worth the sacrifice?
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0066.xml
article
54
54,55
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Adding an R. F. Stage to Our New Set
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[no value]
[no value]
ALFRED P. LANE
IN THE November number of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY there appeared a detailed description of the construction of a simple one-tube radio receiver designed particularly for beginners. Several novel features were embodied in the set. It tuned the short waves as well as the broadcast band, and additions could be made to it later on.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0067.xml
article
56
56,130,131,132
SPECIAL FEATURES
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New Novelty Finishes
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[no value]
BERTON ELLIOT
THE vogue for home painting and decorating offers many opportunities for making smart Christmas gifts at a cost far less than their actual worth and market value. Because of their individuality, such gifts are far more appreciated than ones that are bought.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0068.xml
article
57
57,117,118,119
SPECIAL FEATURES
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Smart Gifts Any Man Can Make
Reader Finds Bremen Model a Remarkable Flyer
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[no value]
HERMAN HJORTH
NO MATTER what style furniture you have in your home, you can safely introduce a few accessories or small pieces in the popular modernistic mode. It is true that they are costly to buy, like everything else that is considered smart and fashionable, but you do not need to go to the stores for them; you can make them yourself.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0069.xml
advertisement
57
57
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0070.xml
article
58
58
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Banjo Clock Built for $10
All You Have to Make Is the Case—The Works, Brass Ornaments, and Glass Panels Can Be Bought Ready-Made
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. KING
HOW many home workers have wished to make a banjo clock case but hesitated because of the difficulty in obtaining suitable movements and ornamental brass work! That is no longer an obstacle, for the clock illustrated, although especially designed for readers of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, will fit one of the standard sets of brasses sold for use by amateur craftsmen.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0071.xml
article
59
59,123,124,125,126,127,128,129
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Toy Fire Engine Pumps Water
Adjustable Cord Fastener Made from Washer
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[no value]
[no value]
NO TOYS are equal to those made by Daddy. And here are some that are quite simple for him to make. They are toy tractors and trucks, strongly built of wood and as large as the expensive ones sold in the stores. They “work” too! The fire engine squirts a good stream of water from the hose; the sprinkling truck sprinkles water just like a big one; the dump truck has a hoist that tips up the body; and the tractor, being quite large and heavy, makes a noise like an engine exhaust as it rolls along on the cleats of its bull wheels.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0072.xml
article
60
60,92,134
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Stenciling Christmas Cards
A Simple New Way to Prepare Your Own Yuletide Greetings
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[no value]
F. CLARKE HUGHES
HANDMADE Christmas cards carry with them a touch of individuality and attractiveness not to be found in any machinemade cards. You have only to design and make your own cards to be certain they will be prized and preserved by all who receive them.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0073.xml
article
61
61,139
LEADING ARTICLES
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Risking Death for Invention
Heroic Divers Brave Perils of the Deep to Test Newest Devices for Submarine Rescue
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[no value]
ELLSWORTH BENNETT
WHEN three Navy divers, headed by Lieut. C. B. Momsen, crawled from beneath the rim of a diving bell 155 feet below the surface of Chesapeake Bay not long ago, they staked their lives courageously on the success of a new submarine rescue device which had been tried out for the first time in open water only a few weeks before.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0074.xml
article
62
62
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Speedy Antiaircraft Gun Joins Army’s “Gasoline Brigade”
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THE latest addition to the equipment of Uncle Sam's experimental mechanized army, described in a recent issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, is this new antiaircraft gun which can be rushed from place to place by the speedy truck upon which it is mounted.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0075.xml
article
62
62
Automobiles
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Button on the Dashboard Jacks Up the Car
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HOW many times have you come to a bumping stop with a flat tire, wishing you could jack up the wheel merely by pressing a button on the dashboard? A new French invention makes this possible, according to the Automotive Division of the U. S. Department of Commerce.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0076.xml
article
62
62
Geology
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World Growing Thinner?
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THE world's belt tightened two miles in the last century! This is the conclusion of Professor Bruno Meyermann, of the astronomical observatory of the University of Goettingen, Germany. He says the distance around the equator has shrunk, since 1828, at least one and a half miles and perhaps as much as two and a third miles, as indicated by a slight increase in the speed of the earth’s rotation.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0077.xml
article
62
62
Ships
[no value]
World’s Record Speed Boat Goes 93 Miles an Hour
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HURTLIN G over the water at ninetv-three miles an hour, George Wood, brother of Gar Wood, famous motor boat racer, recently piloted his new speed boat Miss America VII to a world's speed record. This was his average speed for his six-lap dash over the one-nauticalmile course on the Detroit River. Two $10,000 engines, of twelve cylinders each, which make up the power plant of the craft, shattered the air with a deafening roar as Wood (left) and his mechanic, Orlin Johnson, crossed the finish line.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0078.xml
article
62
62
Health and Hygiene
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Stunt Flying No Cure for Deafness, Says Expert
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THE popular idea that stunt flying will cure deafness is all wrong, according to Lieut. Col. Levy M. Hathaway, I light Surgeon, Office of the Chief of the Air Corps, Washington, D. C. Defective hearing is common among aviators, he says, and instead of curing deafness, flying tends to bring it on.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0079.xml
article
62
62
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Teaching with Movies
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[no value]
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STUDENTS in 15,000 schools in America see “movies” as part of their educational work. The Bureau of Education, Department of Interior, Washington, D. C., reports that many cities are equipping all new schools with portable projectors as well as larger ones in the main auditorium.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0080.xml
article
62
62
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Lame Hunter Invents Swift Motorized Sled
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BECAUSE lameness prevented Carl Eliason of Sayner,Wis., from keeping up wdth fellow hunters, trappers of the northern trails soon may substitute motorized sleds for sledge dogs and snowshoes. Eliason has invented a snow speeder which he says will do seventy-five miles an hour, and go anywhere a man on snowshoes can travel.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0081.xml
article
63
63
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Porto Rico Grows a New Fruit—Sweet Lemons!
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SWEET lemons may take their place beside oranges and plums as a table delicacy. A new variety, as large as grapefruit and sweet enough to eat without sugar, has been developed by growers in Porto Rico, it is reported. Another unusual quality of the fruit is said to be a remarkably sweet, penetrating odor.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0082.xml
article
63
63
New Processes and Inventions
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Novel Fire Rescue Tower Rises 220 Feet
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A SUBSTITUTE for extension ladders and life nets for rescue work at fires is found in an ingenious new life-saving and hose tower invented by James A. Anania, of Harrison, N. J. Carried on a fire truck and raised by the truck motor, it consists of two telescoping parallel steel poles, each in five sections, and rising, when extended, to a height of 220 feet.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0083.xml
article
63
63
Engineering
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Shipping the World’s Biggest Transformers
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SPECIAL railroad cars of novel design had to be built to transport the world’s two largest electric transformers from the Pittsfield, Mass., plant of the General Electric Company, where they had been constructed, to West Orange, N. J. Flat cars with depressed centers solved the difficult problem of safely transporting the huge coils, one of which weighs 151,550 pounds.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0084.xml
article
63
63
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Latest Style Boxing Ring Rises Through Floor
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“THE next bout of the evening will be-” Above the din of shouting fight fans crowding the arena of the new Dreamland Pavilion in San Francisco, Calif., the announcer bellows the names of contesting pugilists. Immediately, out of a large square hole in the floor at the center of the pavilion, appears a platform, rising like an elevator.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0085.xml
article
63
63
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Seventeen-Year Locusts Due Again in 1936
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ANOTHER brood of cicada, or “seventeen-year locust,” will appear in 1936, according to J. A. Hyslop, of the Department of Agriculture pest survey. It will be brood number X, which last appeared in 1919, when it spread through the central and eastern states as far south as Georgia.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0086.xml
article
63
63
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Tons of Waste Paper Go to Make Fireworks
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SEVENTY million pounds of old newspapers went to the Orient and became firecrackers, among other things, last year. A five-million-pound shipment of discarded newspapers goes from Los Angeles each month to manufacturers in the Orient.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0087.xml
article
63
63
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Beetles Test Human Food
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BEETLES have become “official tasters” for men, along with the white rat and the guinea pig. Workers at the Minnesota Agricultural Experiment Station, St. Paul, have begun using them in testing the effects of various foods. The short life-cycle of the insects and their rapid increase in numbers add to their value in such experiments, it is said.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0088.xml
article
64
64
Engineering
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Aluminum Replaces Copper in High-Tension Wires
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COPPER, long the standard material for electric wires, is being replaced by aluminum in many new high-voltage lines, in spite of the fact that copper is a slightly better conductor of electricity. Aluminum wires can be greatly increased in strength by the addition of a steel core, enabling them to be strung more tightly.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0089.xml
article
64
64
Aviation
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Planes Pick Up Mail on the Wing in Tests
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THE idea for a device which will permit mail planes to swoop down over small towns along their routes and pick up sacks of mail without stopping was embodied in a small model of an invention made by Dr. L. S. Adams, of Seattle, Wash., and pictured in the October POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0090.xml
article
64
64
Ships
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Submerged Wings Speed New Motor Boat
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AN “UNDERWATER airplane” is the way Aldo Curioni, of Larchmont, N. Y., the inventor of a curious “HydroFlyer” boat, describes an unusual finned keel he has devised to propel and direct the craft. When not in motion the boat's flat bottom, or plane surface, will rest on the surface of the water.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0091.xml
article
64
64
Aviation
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Faster Planes Will Speed Up the Air Mail
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PLANES with a top speed of 140 miles an hour, and a cruising speed of 130 miles, will speed up the air mail, according to plans completed by air mail operators with Post Office Department approval. Air mail now travels at about a hundred-mile-an-hour speed.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0092.xml
article
64
64
Health and Hygiene
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Experts Reveal How Much You Can Lift Safely
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HOW much weight can you carry— safely? Not more than forty percent of your body’s weight, continuously—or as much as fifty percent, now and then— is the conclusion of British investigators, as reported by the Bureau of Labor Statistics. A couple of pails of water, weighing, say, forty pounds, is just about the safe limit for a man weighing only 100 pounds himself, although the load may be increased by a half if it is compact and easily handled.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0093.xml
article
65
65
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Machine Unloads 1,000 Tons of Coal an Hour
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A THOUSAND tons of coal an hour poured out of the hold of the E. M. Young, a Great Lakes coal carrier, recently, when a new type of unloading machine set a record by emptying 8,000 tons from the hold in less than eight hours. The work, if done by manual labor, would have kept a gang of men busy for from seven to ten days.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0094.xml
article
65
65
Ships
[no value]
Twin Liners to Set New Records for Size
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TWIN giants of the sea, each thirty feet longer than the Leviathan, are being constructed in Germany. The liners, to be named the Europa and the Bremen, will measure nine hundred and thirtyeight feet in length, surpassing the longest ship now afloat, the British Majestic, by twenty-three feet.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0095.xml
article
65
65
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Waste from Stamps
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A CURIOUS example of waste is the paper cut from sheets of postage stamps when their perforations are punched. Uncle Sam is seeking to sell these tiny disks of paper, wdiich have been accumulating at the tremendous rate of four tons a month.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0096.xml
article
65
65
Health and Hygiene
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Auto Runs X-Ray Machine at Patient’s Home
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AN INGENIOUS traveling X-ray machine, which goes to patients who are unable to come to it and which operates from the motor of an automobile, has been devised by Dr. Chester B. Moses, a member of the staff of the Deaconess Hospital, Buffalo, N. Y.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0097.xml
article
65
65
Ships
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Ship Turbines Do Work of Half-Million Men
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IT WOULD take the combined effort of half a million men to equal the daily work done by the two turbines on the Virginia, the electric vessel recently launched at Newport News, Va. The turbines deliver 17,688 horsepower, which is about equivalent to the work of 185,724 men. But, as the working day for men is eight hours and the turbines labor twenty-four, to arrive at a true comparison we must triple the number of men, making it 557,172.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0098.xml
article
65
65
New Processes and Inventions
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Invents Floating Turbine for Power from Waves
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A NEW attempt to capture the restless power of ocean waves is seen in the working model of an ingenious scheme devised by George E. Faucher, a Los Angeles inventor. He plans a 1,000-foot “wave turbine pier” which he says will supply sufficient electricity for the needs of an entire city.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0099.xml
article
66
66
Models
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Model Niagara Measures Flow Over Falls
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CAN nearly twice the present amount of water be diverted from Niagara without marring its scenic beauty? To answer this question for Canadian and American engineers, as well as for its own experts, the Niagara Falls Power Company has just completed the remarkable working model shown in the accompanying photographs.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0100.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Know Your World
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TO TEST your knowledge of the world you live in, see how many of these twelve questions you can answer. Correct answers are on page 148. 1. How did icy Greenland get its name of “green”? 2. Where did wild elephants once live in the United States? 3. What government prohibits alcohol and tobacco? 4. Where is a city water supply pumped for more than 300 miles through pipes? 5. Where are railroad bridges built of bamboo?
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0101.xml
article
66
66
Automobiles
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Super-Highways Proposed From Coast to Coast
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TWO transcontinental motor speedways to span the United States from coast to coast would link East and West by automobile, in a remarkable plan that has attracted interest among engineers. According to the scheme as outlined by R. A. Carpenter, chief engineer, West Chicago Park Commissioners, a 3,350mile Northern Transcontinental Highway would connect Boston, Mass., and Portland, Ore., while a parallel 2,800-mile Southern Transcontinental Highway would join Savannah, Ga., with Los Angeles, Calif. Each would be 250 feet wide, and would be divided into four lanes—two outer drives sixty feet wide each for light traffic, and two mside drives fifty-six feet wide for buses and trucks.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0102.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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New Vacuum Tube Control Runs the Elevator
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ELEVATORS are stopped exactly at the floor level with vacuum tubes like the ones in your radio set, in the latest control system perfected by the General Electric Company. Several tubes are mounted on each elevator car. When an elevator approaches a floor, the operator throws his lever to “off” position, but the car does not stop immediately.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0103.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Magnet Does the “Impossible”
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THOUGH experience has taught that redhot iron and steel cannot be attracted by even the most powerful electromagnets, a young electrician of a Newport, Ky., steel mill attempted the impossible—and succeeded! Now his five-foot magnet lifts tons of red-hot iron and steel ingots every day.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0104.xml
article
67
67
New Processes and Inventions
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Molten Iron Poured from “Thermos Bottle” Car
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MOLTEN iron, transported ten miles from the Hamilton Coke and Iron Co., Hamilton, Ohio, to the American Rolling Mill Co., Middletown, Ohio, is seen here being poured into a ladle from the remarkable car in which it traveled. Employing the principle of a thermos bottle, this car is able to keep metal in a molten state for as long as forty-eight hours, as told in the October issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0105.xml
article
67
67
Geology
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Hampered by Sun Spots
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SUN spots, 93,000,000 miles away, affect the discovery of oil and minerals in America. This is the conclusion of Prof. George H. Peters, astronomical photographer at the Naval Observatory, Washington, D. C., who has made daily photographs of the spots for years.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0106.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Road Signs in Pictures
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ROAD signs, in the universal language of pictures, are being introduced in Europe as an aid to international motoring, according to Pyke Johnson, American representative at the recent International Road Congress in Paris. Several European countries'have adopted a code of pictures to replace words on signs at curves, bridges, and crossings.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0107.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Chinese Making Type for 10,000 Characters
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MANY an American printer might falter at the gigantic task nearly half completed by a Shanghai printing establishment, which has been working for three years to make a complete set of type so that 10,000 Chinese characters— most of China's alphabet—can be printed.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0108.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Is Man’s Size Changing?
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ARE we growing larger or smaller physically? Were men 3,000 years ago taller or shorter than the average man of today? To answer these questions, 200 skeletons taken from ancient Babylonian ruins on the island of Kish, in the Persian Gulf, will be measured.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0109.xml
article
67
67
Automobiles
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Know Your Car
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[no value]
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MODERN improvements in automobile design and construction more than offset the tendency toward more rapid wear caused by higher engine speeds. The oil filter is one of the most important. The air cleaner is another. With the oil filtered and dirt kept out of the incoming charge of gasoline and air, the oil in the crank case would retain its lubricating qualities almost forever if it were not for one remaining source of contamination.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0110.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Birds Their Own Doctors
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BIRDS that protect their own wounds with a plaster of down plucked from feathers are reported by a French naturalist. He says he has shot woodcocks and partridges that had unhealed previous wounds. In every case, the wound had been dressed with the down.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0111.xml
article
67
67
Health and Hygiene
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Huge Steel Ball a Compressed Air Hospital
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A HOSPITAL the shape of an orange, in which the patients, it is said, will live under a constant air pressure of thirty pounds, has been constructed in Cleveland, Ohio. The million-dollar steel ball is air-tight, and the pressure within will be maintained by powerful air compressors.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0112.xml
article
68
68
Exceptional People
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Afghan Ruler Plays Safe When He Hunts
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WHEN the Ameer of Afghanistan goes hunting, almost everybody in his kingdom knows about it. His preparations assume the proportions of an army on the march. The Palace Guard turns out in force, armed as if to repel an invasion. The ministers and subordinate officials of the Ameer’s court ride to the hunt with their monarch, and direct the affairs of the cavalcade.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0113.xml
article
68
68
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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“Cannibal” Mosquitoes Are Barred from America
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NO WAR will be waged in the United States between “cannibal mosquitoes” imported from France and our own flesh-biting variety—that is, not unless officials of the Department of Agriculture change their minds. The department recently refused to grant a permit to bring into this country any of the predatory French species which were expected to.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0114.xml
article
68
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Your Christmas Tree’s Age
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[no value]
THE tree you set up at Christmas time and decorate with all sorts of ornaments takes from six to ten years to grow, according to the American Tree Association. Norway, red, and white spruce and balsam fir make the best “Christmas” trees.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0115.xml
article
68
68
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Subways May Carry Mails
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SUBWAYS may be added to the present mail-carrying network of airplanes, trains, steamships, and motors, according to the U. S. Post Office Department. Plans are being considered for dispatching sacks of mail over New York City's underground rapid transit system.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0116.xml
article
68
68
Aviation
[no value]
Arrest 219 Pilots for Air Traffic Violations
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO hundred and nineteen pilots were arrested for breaking traffic rules of the skyways during the last year. Their offenses included taking-off or landing at airports in the wrong manner, low flying over congested areas, stunt flying with pay passengers, dropping heavy objects, carrying explosives, flying without a license, carelessness, and flying an overloaded machine.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0117.xml
article
68
68
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
The First Patented Rose
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW rose, “Lady Canada,” recently exhibited in New York City, has just received a registered trademark from the Commissioner of Patents at Ottawa. According to its grower, it is the first flower ever patented in Canada, and probably in the world.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0118.xml
article
68
68
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Peanut Vines New Fodder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PEANUT vines are being added to the rations of farm animals. According to Dr. D. B. Jones, in charge of the protein investigation laboratory, U. S. Department of Agriculture, properly-cured peanut vines rival alfalfa and clover in feeding value.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0119.xml
article
68
68
Aviation
[no value]
New “Flivver” Monoplane for Beginners
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MAN can run faster than the speed at which the newest “flivver” monoplane comes to ground, according to its Asheville, North Carolina, builders. The unusually slow landing speed of twenty miles an hour, it is claimed, makes the machine unusually safe for beginners to use in practice.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0120.xml
article
69
69
Automobiles
[no value]
This Car Runs with Water as a Lubricant
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN an Elyria. Ohio, motorist finishes filling his radiator, he lifts the hood of his machine and pours water in the crank case in place of oil to lubricate the motor. He says he has driven 137,000 miles since 1923 using only this unusual lubricant.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0121.xml
article
69
69
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Round-up Nets 70,000 Rats in Ohio Factories
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO hundred pounds of “hamburger,” sixty loaves of bread, ten pounds of peanut butter, and forty-eight cans of salmon are being used in a rat round-up that recently netted more than seventy thousand rodents in various industrial plants situated on the banks of the Cuyahoga River in Cleveland, Ohio.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0122.xml
article
69
69
Automobiles
[no value]
Electricity Parks Cars in Novel Garage
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOu drive in, stop your car facing an elevator, and electricity does the rest, parking the machine on one of the upper floors of an automatic skyscraper garage being built near the Grand Central Station in New York City. An “electric parker” invented by Milton A. Kent, of New York City, is the heart of the novel plan.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0123.xml
article
69
69
Engineering
[no value]
Huge Canal Locks Nearing Completion
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EACH year some fifteen milliontons of shipping will be lifted more than forty-nine feet as it passes between the thick concrete walls of the largest canal locks in Europe, now being completed near Hanover, Germany. The new locks, said to be exceeded in size only by those in the Panama Canal, connect the old Mittelland Canal with the Hanover-Elbe Canal.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0124.xml
article
69
69
Aviation
[no value]
French Airplanes Aid in Predicting the Weather
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLYING weather bureaus have been established in France to aid the Meteorological Bureau in their predictions. Three airplanes make regular observation trips aloft each day. One reports conditions over Paris, another watches the vicinity of Lyon, and a third ascends from Saint-Raphael, on the Riviera.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0125.xml
article
69
69
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Simplify Codes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOSE who send cables in code will have to limit the words to five letters instead of ten, if the proposal considered by representatives of telegraph and cable lines on five continents, recently, is carried out. Code words in the past have been accepted under the condition that they could be pronounced in English, German, Spanish, French, Dutch, Italian, Portuguese, or Latin.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0126.xml
article
70
70
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Queer Island Dog Kingdom Ruled by a Terrier
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A lonely island, inhabited only by dogs, has been reported off the coast of Africa by French sailors, who believe the animals have descended from pets shipwrecked or abandoned there. The island, called Juan de Neva, lies in unfrequented waters between the African coast and Madagascar.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0127.xml
article
70
70
Exceptional People
[no value]
His Hobby Is Collecting Miniature Books
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A Lilliputian library is the hobby of James D. Henderson, of Brookline, Mass., who has collected tiny volumes from all over the world. Among the little books, which he reads with the aid of a magnifying glass, is a complete edition of Shakespeare printed on pages little larger than postage stamps.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0128.xml
article
70
70
Radio
[no value]
Radio and Airplane Aid in Missionary Journey
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Radio will play an important part in a 240,000-mile missionary trip into isolated districts of Australia, led by the Rev. G. M. Scott, an Australian clergyman, whose party carries wireless sending and receiving equipment. Wherever he finds settlers requiring immediate help, the missionary will send a radio message to headquarters of the Australian Mission, and assistance will be sent by airplane.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0129.xml
article
70
70
Engineering
[no value]
French School Trains Women as Engineers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Only women are admitted to a new electromechanic institute at Paris—France’s first exclusively feminine school of engineering. Its graduates will be as well qualified for high technical positions as male applicants, for its equipment is said to be as complete as that of any school in the world.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0130.xml
article
70
70
Radio
[no value]
Champion Radio Fan Uses Chorus of Speakers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
One ordinary loudspeaker isn’t enough for O. Mampe, of Palisade, N. J., owner of what he claims to be the most elaborate private radio apparatus in the country. This confirmed radio fan has fitted a large baffle board to several dynamic cone-type speakers, so that he can get any volume from a whisper to a thunderous roar.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0131.xml
article
70
70
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Huge Indoor Ocean Beach Planned in Germany
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
An imitation seashore, under a great dome of glass and steel, is planned in Germany to provide winter bathing under summer conditions. In the center of the imitation ocean, a large sand hill will be surmounted by a restaurant where bathers may dine, wearing beach pajamas and imagining they are spending a holiday at Deauville or the Lido.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0132.xml
article
70
70
Automobiles
[no value]
Would Improve Auto Lamps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Automobile lamps constructed so that their light would be visible from all angles, is an improvement suggested to the Society of Automotive Engineers as a means of reducing the hazards of night driving. While the cowl lights on some makes of cars can be seen from the side, the lamps on most automobiles are visible only when seen head-on, especially when dimmed or in bad weather.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0133.xml
article
71
71
Exceptional People
[no value]
Deep-Sea Diving Is Hobby of British M. P.
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
His colleagues may have their golf or shooting or whatnot for recreation, but when Captain Sidney Streatfield, Member of Parliament, wants to enjoy himself, he goes for a deep-sea dive. The British legislator has been a confirmed diver in his leisure time for the last twelve years, and has gone down as far as five fathoms.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0134.xml
article
71
71
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Pumps Air into Brain for X-Ray Study
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
By pumping rarefied air into the brain, Dr. Max Ludin, director of the X-ray department of a hospital at Basel, Switzerland, has been able to discover the exact location of tumorous growths through X-ray photographs. These pictures of the brain, after the air has been pumped in, show the healthy cells as white stains and the diseased ones as almost black.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0135.xml
article
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71
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
The Sky’s Blue Measured by New Color Chart
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The blue in the sky is being measured by an ingenious color chart prepared by a German physicist and color expert, Professor Wilhelm Ostwald. It contains all the sky colors, from the bluest known to almost colorless gray. By comparing the colors of the chart with that of the sky, and picking out the shade that most nearly matches, the amount of blue in the sky can be determined, says Professor Ostwald.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0136.xml
article
71
71
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Metric System for China
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The latest convert to the metric system is China, whose Nationalist Government recently replaced the old measurement standards with the system used in practically all countries except England and the United States.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0137.xml
article
71
71
Radio
[no value]
His Keen Ears Test 250 Loudspeakers a Day
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Both radio loudspeakers and radio amplifiers for phonographs are tested for tone by comparison with a master speaker unit over their entire musical range, in the experimental laboratory of a Chicago radio manufacturing concern. One of the expert testers, Martin T. Olsen, is said to have tested more than half a million speakers, averaging 250 every day for almost eight years.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0138.xml
article
71
71
Models
[no value]
Boy of Eleven Builds Prize Model Plane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A model of a tri-motored monoplane, almost as long as the builder, won for Tony Verlatti, an eleven-year-old San Francisco boy, first prize for the most interesting model shown at a recent tournament in that city. The builder named his white monoplane the City of San Francisco.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0139.xml
article
71
71
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
The First Coin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Only four known specimens exist of what is believed to be the first coin ever minted—a Greek gold drachma which experts think was struck off about 700 B.C. One of these, in the collection of J. P. Morgan, New York banker, is conservatively valued at $3,500.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0140.xml
article
71
71
Aviation
[no value]
Huge Flying Sign Flashes from 2,000-Foot Height
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A huge electric sign, ninety feet long and six feet high, circled in the sky 2,000 feet above Broadway, in New York, recently, testing out a new form of advertising— the airplane signboard. Flaring red letters, taking up the entire lower wing surface of a giant bombing biplane, alternately flashed the name of an advertiser and his address.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0141.xml
article
71
71
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Explains Why Actors Are Free from Paralysis
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The reason few actors have paralysis is because they give their emotions exercise! This is the conclusion of Dr. Julius Heller, of Germany, after an investigation of the causes of death of more than 1,400 actors. Only one and a half percent of the group studied died of paralysis.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0142.xml
article
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72
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Strange Glasses Turn the World Upside Down
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIDEWALKS seem to hang above your head, people appear to walk with their feet in the air, and clouds and buildings change places when you put on the strange “upside-down glasses” with which students at Clark University, Worcester, Mass., are being tested.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0143.xml
article
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72
Radio
[no value]
Huge Cone Loudspeaker Covers a Ceiling
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE’S plenty of music in the air when programs come from a huge cone loudspeaker which takes up almost the entire ceiling of a room in the home of a radio enthusiast in Oak Park, Ill. It serves a purpose both useful and ornamental. From its center is suspended an overhead lighting fixture. It is said to reproduce radio programs perfectly.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0144.xml
article
72
72
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
U. S. History Recorded in Postage Stamps
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A“NORSE-AMERICAN” series of stamps, commemorating the arrival in America of first immigrants from Norway in 1695, is the latest of many depicting the history of America, according to the Post Office Department. Twelve previously issued begin with the Columbian Series of 1893, illustrating the discovery of America, and include the Victory stamp of 1919, celebrating the ending of the World War, 1920’s Pilgrim Tercentenary issue, the Huguenot-Walloon series of 1924, and the LexingtonConcord issue of 1925.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0145.xml
article
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72
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Safety Tunnels
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNDERGROUND subways or passageways for pedestrians at dangerous street intersections in Highland Park, Mich., have proved so successful that plans for additional tunnels are under way. School children using two subways already provided are able to cross busy streets in safety.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0146.xml
article
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72
Laboratory Discoveries
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Largest Magnet Is Heavier Than a Locomotive
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE world’s largest magnet, a 120-ton monster that weighs more than many a locomotive, has recently been completed at the Bellevue laboratory of the French National Research Bureau. Resting on massive pillars, it will aid in important researches in light, electricity, and radioactivity.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0147.xml
article
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72
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Painting the Towns Red
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN UNUSUAL donation received by the Lapland Geographical Society is a recent anonymous gift of red paint— $1,500 worth. The nameless donor specified that it was to be used to paint farm houses along the Torne River valley, in northern Sweden, so that the color-dotted landscape may set an example to dreary Finland homesteads across the border.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0148.xml
article
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72
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Old Fire Engine Has Job Cleaning Plane Motors
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CLANGING dashes down the street behind galloping horses are over for the old-fashioned fire engines, but one has found a job on an aviation field in St. Louis. It has solved the problem of cleaning dirt and grease from airplane motors that are to be overhauled.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0149.xml
article
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73
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
An Improved Depth Finder for Coast Survey
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ECHOES from the sea bottom are enabling the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey to map the ocean floor along the Atlantic seaboard more accurately and speedily than ever before, through the use of an improved “fathometer,” or sonic depth finder, developed by Dr. Herbert G. Dorsey.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0150.xml
article
73
73
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Lamp Burns for 23 Years
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN “Lindy” was three years old, a 200-watt electric light bulb was screwed into a socket in the window of a Grove City, Pa., store. It has been on the job ever since, giving continuous light for twenty-three years. Another similar lamp, installed at the same time, burned out only recently.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0151.xml
article
73
73
Automobiles
[no value]
Builds Auto from Parts of Twenty-Seven Others
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[no value]
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[no value]
TWENTY-SEVEN standard automobiles contributed parts to a miniature homemade car in which the builder, Charles R. Gifford, of Tampa, Fla., intends to tour the United States. The midget machine, pictured below, is less than three feet high and weighs 1,200 pounds.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0152.xml
article
73
73
Aviation
[no value]
Over Mt. Blanc by Air
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BIRD'S-EYE view of the highest mountain in Europe, the famous Mount Blanc, is now provided travelers through the inauguration of a French sightseeing air line circling the peak. The aerial buses are two-passenger cabin planes that fly at an altitude of 14,000 feet, mounting from an air field near the railroad leading to Chamonix, France, from which most of the ascents on foot have been begun.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0153.xml
article
73
73
Geology
[no value]
Interior Tides May Slow Down the Earth.
[no value]
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[no value]
THAT the earth’s interior, like its oceans, has tidal movements is the theory advanced by Prof. Benjamin Boss, of the Carnegie Institution, to account for the known fact that the earth is slowing down and its days growing longer at the rate of about one second every 100,000 years.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0154.xml
article
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73
Photography
[no value]
“Lungs” of Leaf Revealed in Motion Pictures
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[no value]
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[no value]
LIKE animals and human beings, leaves have lungs or they would suffocate. The “stomata,” as the breathing cells are called, absorb nutriment from the sunlight, the rain, and the air. How these cells work is revealed remarkably by a recent English moving picture film called “Secrets of Nature,” which presents highly magnified pictures of the leaf’s breathing organs.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0155.xml
article
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73
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
New Cloth from Plants
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOON you may be wearing clothes made of kendyr. That is the name of a fiber plant, discovered recently growing in large quantities in Asia, and found to produce textile yarn of high quality. A cloth made half of kendyr and half of cotton, tests show, is attractive and durable.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0156.xml
article
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74
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Odd Machine Plays Sound Effects for the Movies
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MERELY by pressing a button, almost any imaginable sound can be produced on this machine, according to its inventor, A. W. Nichols, of New York City. He is seen assembling the complicated mechanism designed to make movies more realistic.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0157.xml
article
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74
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Canadian Tar Sands Tested for Roads
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[no value]
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[no value]
IN THE far Athabaska country of western Canada, famous in stories of the Royal Northwest Mounted Police, tar sands are being mined to make roads of a new kind in the Jasper National Park, Alberta. Over gravel roads, the bituminous sands are spread to a depth of about two inches and form a layer similar to asphalt.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0158.xml
article
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74
Radio
[no value]
Whalers of the Antarctic Aided by Wireless
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHALERS who go down to the sea in ships are taking science with them. The vessels, putting out from the South Shetland Islands into the Antarctic Ocean, are being equipped with wireless to direct the operations of the small boats that leave the mother, or “factory" ship, in search of quarry.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0159.xml
article
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74
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Chemists Trace Source of Ancient Copper Weapons
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DETECTIVE work by chemists recently trailed the copper used in ancient Mesopotamian weapons to the mines where it was obtained. Archeologists wanted to know where the men of Sumer, oldest of Mesopotamian kingdoms, got their copper. Inscriptions on bricks failing to tell them, they sought help from the metallurgical chemists.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0160.xml
article
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74
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Mechanical Pole Setter Does Work of Twenty Men
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[no value]
[no value]
ROCKY hills or marshes filled with underbrush are boulevards to this ingenious new machine for erecting telephone poles. It can go anywhere a man can walk. Perched on the brink of a precipitous incline, it swiftly bores a seven-foot hole in the earth; then a derrick at its business end swings a fortyfive-foot pole bodily into position and drops it upright.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0161.xml
article
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74
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Seasick for Twenty Years
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HALF a million miles on shipboard, and seasick every voyage, has been the strange experience of James Barger, a sixfoot, two-hundred-pound sailor who has been in the U. S. Navy for twenty years. He has circled the globe three times.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0162.xml
article
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74
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Ink and Stain Made from Sequoia Seed Cones
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A RIVAL of the seventeen-year locust is the giant Sequoia tree of the Pacific slope, which sometimes retains its seeds for sixteen years before dropping them from the cone. These trees are in no hurry. They are called the oldest living thing on earth.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0163.xml
article
74
74
Automobiles
[no value]
New Roads, 10,753 Miles
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A ROAD stretching from Gibraltar to within 600 miles of Yokohama could be made with the new highways under construction in the United States during 1928. The Government reports that the total mileage of these new roads came to 10,753, costing the states and nation $264,000,000.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0164.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Unusual Locomotive Uses Its Steam Twice
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[no value]
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[no value]
THE unusual photograph below is a head-on view of one of the twenty new-type locomotives recently put into operation on the Boston and Maine Railroad. Two unique features are the placing of the bell above the pilot instead of overhead, and the feedwater heater which forms a cowl in front.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0165.xml
article
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75
Geology
[no value]
Mountains Commit Suicide With Volcano Blasts
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A VOLCANO is a mountain committing suicide. This unique definition is suggested by the National Geographic Society, which says the mountains of the South Pacific are destroying themselves with volcanic activity. The virtues of a volcano outweigh its vices, it is pointed out.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0166.xml
article
75
75
Models
[no value]
Model Plane Sets Record for Weight Lifting
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CARRYING more than its own weight, a tiny, rubber-band-propelled model airplane, built by Arthur Horn, of Brookline, Mass., sped down a wooden runway and rose gracefully into the air for a ten-second flight at a recent meet in Boston.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0167.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
A Mountain of Giant Timbers for China
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[no value]
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SOME of the largest timbers ever exported from the forests of the Pacific Northwest were recently piled upon the wharf at Seattle, Wash., for shipment to China. The size of these giant timbers can be appreciated by comparing them, in the picture below, with the two girls of average size, photographed at the base of the mountain of wood.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0168.xml
article
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75
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Find Saber-Toothed Tiger Had the Toothache
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE sad plight of the giraffe with the sore throat seems to have been equalled by the saber-toothed tiger with a toothache. More than a thousand jaws of this mighty hunter of prehistoric days are being examined at the Los Angeles, Calif., Museum, where they were collected from the tar pits at Rancho la Brea, known as “The Death-Trap of the Ages.”
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0169.xml
article
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75
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Novel Photo Shows Size of Extinct Giant Bird
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[no value]
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[no value]
FOR the first time, a photograph in composite has been produced to show the comparative sizes of a human being and the extinct New Zealand moa— largest bird ever known to have lived. These birds, abundant in New Zealand 400 years ago, vanished, it is thought, because of their cannibalistic trait of eating their own eggs during a shortage of their natural food.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0170.xml
article
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Engineering
[no value]
Links of Huge Chain Weigh Nearly a Ton Each
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE toppling dome of the famous St. Paul’s Cathedral, in London, will be held together by a huge chain of stainless steel which has been constructed especially for the purpose in a Sheffield, England, steel works. The cathedral, built more than two centuries ago by Sir Christopher Wren, was condemned in 1925 as a “dangerous structure” when the dome was found to be gradually tipping toward the southwest.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0171.xml
article
75
75
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
New Sound-Absorbing Stone Kills Noise in Rooms
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BUILDING stone that absorbs sounds has been found in Florida. The rock is somewhat porous, filled with tiny cavities which soak up sound waves that come to it when used in walls and ceilings of rooms. Tests by the late Professor Sabine, of Harvard University, showed that extreme noisiness in a room is caused by the reflection of sound back and forth by walls and ceilings.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0172.xml
article
76
76
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
EDITORIAL
Breaking the Rocks of Knowledge
Always New Wings to Try
Royal Gifts for All
A Just Decision
Rivals to Be Respected
They Are Saying—
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT THE Illinois State Museum, Springfield, a curious stone column is being erected. It is formed of blocks from the various strata of the earth ’s surface, arranged in the order in which they were deposited ages ago. The base is of Altyn limestone from Glacier National Park, stone estimated to be more than 200,000,000 years old.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0173.xml
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77
77
[no value]
[no value]
SKF Industries, Inc.
[no value]
SKF Industries, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0174.xml
article
78
78,141
SPECIAL FEATURES
[no value]
Can Your Car Stand the Cold?
Timothy, a Timid Soul, Thought His Couldn't, Until Gus Told Him a Few Easy Ways to Make It Winter-Proof
Speedy Travel by Air Express
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
A CHILL wind whistled an accompaniment to the squeal of the brakes on Gus Wilson’s machine, as the veteran auto mechanic stopped his car in front of the Model Garage and tooted his horn. The doors swung open and a mingled odor of burning kindling wood and hot steam pipes greeted his nostrils as he drove in.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0175.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
RCA Radiotron
UX-112-A
RCA Radiotron
UX-171-A
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0176.xml
article
80
80
Automobiles
[no value]
Handy Kinks for Car Owners
A Convenient Place for the Road Map—How to Stop Tire Rim Creaks—Other Ingenious Ideas You May Find Useful
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOWADAYS nearly every car is built with the top so low that every time you go over a severe bump, your hat brushes against the ceiling. This results in soiled spots, unless special precautions are taken. The simplest of these is show n in Fig. 1.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0177.xml
article
80
80
Automobiles
[no value]
A Ground for the Timer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most baffling ignition troubles is a poor ground on the timer housing, caused by the 1oosening of the bearing between the breaker cam shaft and the housing. A varying resistance thus is introduced into the path of the current.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0178.xml
article
80
80
Automobiles
[no value]
To Stop Rim Creaks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the lugs wear so much that they no longer can be clamped solidly against the rim, a disagreeable creaking noise is produced. You can remedy the trouble by oversize lugs or by fitting a piece of sheet tin over each lug, as shown in Fig. 5, at the left.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0179.xml
article
80
80
Automobiles
[no value]
Novel Place for Licenses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AUTO owners’ and drivers’ licenses often become misplaced, and then you are out of luck when a traffic cop demands that you produce them. However, if there are pull curtains at the window-s of your closed car, you have an excellent place to keep them.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0180.xml
article
80
80
Automobiles
[no value]
Ten Dollars for an Idea!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. D. Villwock, of Edwardsport, Ind., wins this month’s $10 prize for his suggestion of a curtain road map (Fig. 4). Each month POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY awards $10, in addition to regular space rates, for the best idea sent in for motorists.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0181.xml
article
80
80
Automobiles
[no value]
A Handy Curtain Road Map
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ORDINARILY, when you want to consult a road map, you have to unfold a large and hard-to-handle sheet of paper. A convenient way to carry the map is to fit a roller curtain just above your windshield so that it can be pulled down, as shown in Fig. 4. Glue or otherwise fasten the map to this curtain.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0182.xml
article
80
80
Automobiles
[no value]
A Useful Electromagnet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are many times, in auto repair work, when electricity can be made to save a lot of work. For instance, if a steel ball that operates as a check valve in the oil line is in such a position that it will not roll out by gravity, you may have to turn the part upside down to let it roll out.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0183.xml
advertisement
80a
80a
[no value]
[no value]
L. E. Waterman Company: Wetter man’s Number7
[no value]
L. E. Waterman Company
Wetter man’s Number7
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0184.xml
advertisement
80b
80b
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY TOOL CHESTS
[no value]
STANLEY TOOL CHESTS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0185.xml
article
81
81,108,109
Models
[no value]
How to Build a Stem-Wheel Mississippi Steamboat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. ARMITAGE McCANN
YOUR Mississippi steamboat model should have its main deck laid by this time, if you followed the suggestions given in the last issue. Those who missed that article, which was the first in our new ship model series, can easily make up for lost time, if they wish to build this unusually decorative, romantic, and original little boat, by sending for POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY Blueprints Nos. 94, 95 and 96 (see page 102).
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0186.xml
article
82
82
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
"Tell Me What to Turn,”
Says the Man with a Lathe—So Here Are Six Designs Suitable for Gifts
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM W. KLENKE
PORTABLE motorized home workshop outfits are now available that give the amateur woodworker the use of a lathe and other machines. These have aroused new enthusiasm for the old-time and most fascinating art of wood-turning. With the help of articles on the use of a lathe such as are published from time to time in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY and with the aid of a textbook or two, anyone can easily master wood-turning at home and then make beautiful, useful articles from scrap or waste material.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0187.xml
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83
83
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING CO.
C&L 158
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING CO.
C&L 32
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0188.xml
article
84
84,86,133,134
[no value]
[no value]
Clamps for Speedy Work How to Make Clamps for Speedy Work
How to Make and Use Them for Fastening Parts to Lathe Faceplates and to Machine-Tool Tables
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
RGELY, no doubt, because of the many “highbrow” production problems which constantly call for attention, some of the everyday shop tasks, such as holding and clamping work on machines, are not receiving the care that they deserve.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0189.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT Co.
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0190.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
P. S., Brown &. Sharpe Mfg. Co.
PLANER AND SHAPER GAUGE
P. S., Brown &. Sharpe Mfg. Co.
STAINLESS STEEL RULE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0191.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS &CO.
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS &CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0192.xml
article
88
88,90
[no value]
[no value]
Craft Work for Christmas
Tin Can Toys — Doll’s House —Santa Claus Novelties — Archery Game — Other Projects
Gifts to Make
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[no value]
[no value]
BY UTILIZING a variety of old tin cans, any handy man can make durable Christmas toys at next to no expense. An example of what can be accomplished is shown in Fig. 1. This is a tin can toy town built by Jack M. Deckard, of Massillon, Ohio. Bean, soup, and tomato cans form the twentv-five houses, which, however, have real glass in the windows and are individually lighted.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0193.xml
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89
89
[no value]
[no value]
The A. C. Gilbert Company
[no value]
The A. C. Gilbert Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0194.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
PLOMB TOOL CO.
[no value]
PLOMB TOOL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0195.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0196.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
THE PECK, STOW & WILCOX CO.
[no value]
THE PECK, STOW & WILCOX CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0197.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Electro Magnetic Tool Co.: Discard Your Hand Tools
[no value]
Electro Magnetic Tool Co.
Discard Your Hand Tools
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0198.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN SCREW CO.
[no value]
AMERICAN SCREW CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0199.xml
article
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
Novel Cigarette Holder Shaped Like Elephant
[no value]
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SHAPED like an elephant, the attractive little cigarette holder illustrated forms an ornamental addition to any smoking table. It can be constructed very easily from stock ⅝ or ¾ in. thick and two pieces from a cigar box, or other thin wood.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0200.xml
article
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
Keeping a Storm Door Shut
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ON MANY storm doors the catch does not engage the latch strike plate if, because of a high wind or for other reasons, the door is not shut hard by its spring. The result is that the door remains open part of the time. A method of getting around this difficulty is to drill and file another opening in the outstanding section of the strike plate, as illustrated.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0201.xml
article
94
94
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[no value]
Putty for Hardwood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DURABLE putty for nail holes and cracks in hardwood which is to be varnished can be made by mixing a little dry white lead powder with high-grade linseed oil and whiting putty and adding a very small amount of japan drier to make a stiff paste.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0202.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
[no value]
Brown & Williamson Tobacco Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0203.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
Taylor Instrument Companies
[no value]
Taylor Instrument Companies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0204.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0205.xml
article
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Special Plate Used for Grinding Chuck Jaws
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNIVERSAL chuck jaws are frequently ground on the inside while they are expanded into a ring, which serves to keep them rigid. This method is about the simplest, yet it violates all principles of accurate work. In order for the jaws to hold work accurately, they must be ground in the same position as if they were in use.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0206.xml
article
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
How to Magnetize a Drill
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DRILLINGS can be prevented from falling inside a manifold if a magnetized drill is used for making whatever holes are necessary. Any drill can be magnetized in the following manner: Make a spool of brass or fiber tubing 3 in. long, with an opening through the core to allow the drill to fit loosely.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0207.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
THE LIONEL CORPORATION
[no value]
THE LIONEL CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0208.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
THE KODEL ELECTRIC & MFG. CO.
Kuprox A.C. Power Pack
THE KODEL ELECTRIC & MFG. CO.
Kuprox Multi-rate Rectifier
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0209.xml
article
98
98
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Santa Claus Figure Rings a Bell on Christmas Tree
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CARL G. ERICH
A SMALL figure of Santa Claus stands beneath our Christmas tree and, by pulling a cord, rings a tiny bell in the boughs above him. His motions are spirited and lifelike. What inspires the little old fellow's activity is a continuation of the string, which runs unnoticed along the floor tothereal bellringer, who pulls it at will.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0210.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
THORDARSON TRANSFORMERS
[no value]
THORDARSON TRANSFORMERS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0211.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Western Electric Co.
[no value]
Western Electric Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0212.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Hetherington Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Hetherington Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0213.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
H. GERSTNER & SONS
[no value]
H. GERSTNER & SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0214.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
HOBART BROS. CO.
[no value]
HOBART BROS. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0215.xml
article
100
100
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Neat, Inconspicuous Fire Screen Built at Small Cost
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HI SIBLEY
THIS effective fire screen will appeal to those who prefer simplicity to ornateness. In fact, one doesn’t realize there is a screen in front of the fire at all. yet it completely covers the fireplace opening. The construction requires only an hour or two, and the original screen cost the writer exactly fifty-eight cents for materials.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0216.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
MIDWEST RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
MIDWEST RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0217.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE CO: hammer
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE CO
hammer
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0218.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0219.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.: EVEREADY
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, INC.
EVEREADY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0220.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0221.xml
article
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Old Bill Says —
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE workman who spends the most time studying his drawings generally turns out the best work in the shortest time. It’s no use! Some old-timers still insist on taking half an hour or more to file an arbor to size, when it could be ground in five minutes.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0222.xml
article
104
104
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Vise Jaws Serve for Bending Small Duplicate Parts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BENDING operations can be done with a bench vise when only small lots are required and the expense of making dies is not warranted, or in small jobbing shops where better facilities are not available. Auxiliary vise jaws are made for bending the piece and are substituted for the regular vise jaws.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0223.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Meccano Co., Inc.
[no value]
Meccano Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0224.xml
article
106
106
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Home Workshop Chemistry
Simple Formulas that Will Save Time and Money
[no value]
[no value]
E. BADE
CHEMICALLY, soaps are the sodium, potassium, or ammonium salts of the animal or vegetable fats. In the process of manufacture glycerin is given off, and the salt of the fatty acid is the soap. The hard soaps are made by adding a solution of lye (sodium hydroxide) to the melted fat.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0225.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Clemson Brothers, Inc.
[no value]
Clemson Brothers, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0226.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
HESTON & ANDERSON
[no value]
HESTON & ANDERSON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0227.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
STUDEBAKER WATCH COMPANY
[no value]
STUDEBAKER WATCH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0228.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
KARAS ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
KARAS ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0229.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
J.D. Wallace & Co.
[no value]
J.D. Wallace & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0230.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Bouches Inc.
[no value]
Bouches Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0231.xml
article
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
Methodical Methods Save Time in Painting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most common mistakes of amateurs in painting a wall, ceiling, or floor is to start any old place and work in all directions. Soon they find the area coated so large that they cannot keep all edges wet, and when they attempt to bring fresh paint up to half dry edges they do not get good joints.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0232.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.: YANKEE
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.
YANKEE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0233.xml
article
110
110,111
Shipshape Home
[no value]
Replacing a Broken Sash Cord
What is the quickest and easiest way to replace sash cord?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FEW defects around the house cause greater annoyance than a broken window cord. Yet, like many other things that go wrong, it may be easily remedied without calling in the aid of a mechanic, if you approach the task with confidence and have some degree of ability to use your hands.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0234.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
DeVry Corporation
[no value]
DeVry Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0235.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
WESTERN CLOCK COMPANY
[no value]
WESTERN CLOCK COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0236.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0237.xml
article
112
112,113
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
New Humpty Dumpty Dancing Toy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES M. MILLER
HUMPTY DUMPTY, like some other noted personages, has had a comeback and is more popular than ever. He makes an especially good toy when mounted as illustrated so that he can be made to perform clog dances. We first must have a good outline of his comely form.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0238.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
BEMIS & CALL CO.
[no value]
BEMIS & CALL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0239.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Procter & Qamhle
[no value]
Procter & Qamhle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0240.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
American Chime Clock Co.
[no value]
American Chime Clock Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0241.xml
article
113
113
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Airplane Bird Feeder Turns in the Wind
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO MAKE the airplane bird feeder illustrated, a few nails and boards, a hammer, and a saw are about the only materials and tools needed. The feeding shelter is 11 in. wide and 23 in. long, and is 11 in. high at the open end and 6 in. at the closed end.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0242.xml
advertisement
113
113
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Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0243.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
The BILLINGS&SPENCER Company
[no value]
The BILLINGS&SPENCER Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0244.xml
article
114
114
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Quick-Change Hinges for Storm and Screen Doors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. K.
WHEN the storm door is brought out in the fall after the screen door has been stored away, fortunate is the man who does not discover that the hinge screws are missing, or the screw holes are too large, or some extra work of fastening and fitting has to be done. But this annual annoyance can be avoided.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0245.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
FOLEY SAW TOOL CO., INC.
[no value]
FOLEY SAW TOOL CO., INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0246.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
PORTER-CABLE MACHINE CO.
[no value]
PORTER-CABLE MACHINE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0247.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0248.xml
article
115
115
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
How to Make Use of Corrugated Fasteners
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DAVID WEBSTER
FEW home workers realize the advantages of corrugated fasteners for making strong joints. The fasteners are simply applied, effective, and economical. They may be obtained in most hardware stores and many ten-cent stores and are listed by large mail order houses.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0249.xml
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115
115
[no value]
[no value]
L C Smith & Corona Typewriters Inc.
[no value]
L C Smith & Corona Typewriters Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0250.xml
article
116
116
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Strap and Chain Prevent High-Chair Accidents
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER our baby had taken a dangerous fall from a high chair, we decided that the strap that reaches from the center of the tray to a position in the seat between the baby’s legs was insufficient. It had its usefulness, but was not enough in itself to safeguard an especially strong, active infant.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0251.xml
article
116
116
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Tinsel Causes Short Circuit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. N. C.
BY DROPPING a Christmas package tied with tinsel ribbon across the tracks of a toy electrical railroad, my boy caused a short circuit. The sparks set fire to the tissue wrapping around the box, and the flames quickly fired a sheet spread under the Christmas tree.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0252.xml
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116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0253.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0254.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Veeder
[no value]
Veeder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0255.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
GYM JUNIOR CO.
[no value]
GYM JUNIOR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0256.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0257.xml
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118
118
[no value]
[no value]
The Parks Woodworking Machine Co.
[no value]
The Parks Woodworking Machine Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0258.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0259.xml
article
120
120,121
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
How to Make a Light Tea Tray Stand
Tiny Drills for Model Work
How to Clean Tiles
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK O. TAAFEL
A TEA server is a real asset for the busyhousewife during the afternoon tête à tête. To construct one requires little skill or expense for materials, especially if whitewood, redwood, white pine, cypress, or other easily worked woods are used.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0260.xml
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120
120
[no value]
[no value]
C. G. CONN
[no value]
C. G. CONN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0261.xml
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120
120
[no value]
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS, Inc.
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0262.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
CeCo MANUFACTURING CO., Inc.
[no value]
CeCo MANUFACTURING CO., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0263.xml
article
122
122
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Window Ventilators Made from Old Windshields
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. M. COOK
IF YOU wish to make window ventilators for your home and happen to live near a dealer in salvaged auto parts, you can obtain broken windshields for the purpose at little cost. Any pieces of broken glass, if large enough, will do. In fact, by inserting one or more grooved divisions in the frame, it is possible to utilize relatively small pieces.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0264.xml
article
122
122
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Casement Weather Strips
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G. W. ROYER.
CASEMENT window sash that are hung so as to swing inwards very often give trouble by admitting wind and rain at the bottom. To remedy this, I have made a practice of applying flexible weather strips as shown, has proved tive in every case in which it was used.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0265.xml
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122
122
[no value]
[no value]
WACO TOOL WORKS, Inc.
[no value]
WACO TOOL WORKS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0266.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
REDDING MASONIC SUPPLY CO. INC.
[no value]
REDDING MASONIC SUPPLY CO. INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0267.xml
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123
123
[no value]
[no value]
Colgate & Co.
[no value]
Colgate & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0268.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
The David Maydole Hammer Co.
[no value]
The David Maydole Hammer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0269.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
The Mount Carmel Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Mount Carmel Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0270.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
GILSON SLIDE RULE CO.
[no value]
GILSON SLIDE RULE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0271.xml
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125
125
[no value]
[no value]
Up-to-Date Home Manager
[no value]
Up-to-Date Home Manager
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0272.xml
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126
126
[no value]
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0273.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0274.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Buescher Band Instrument Co.
[no value]
Buescher Band Instrument Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0275.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
DAY-FAN ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
DAY-FAN ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0276.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
TRIMONTMFG.CO.lnc
[no value]
TRIMONTMFG.CO.lnc
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0277.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN MODEL AIRCRAFT CO.
[no value]
AMERICAN MODEL AIRCRAFT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0278.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
MECCANO COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
MECCANO COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0279.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
JIMMY DeFOREST BOXING COURSE
[no value]
JIMMY DeFOREST BOXING COURSE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0280.xml
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129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0281.xml
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130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0282.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0283.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0284.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Buffalo Jewelry Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Buffalo Jewelry Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0285.xml
article
132
132
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Shellac Protects Book Bindings from Wear
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RALPH R. LE COMPTE
A GOOD method to protect the binding of books is to apply a coat of white shellac. Use a small, soft brush, and coat the covers evenly. The shellac does not harm the binding or obscure the title and other lettering. Dust and dirt may be wiped from the treated binding with a slightly damp cloth.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0286.xml
article
132
132
Automobiles
[no value]
Keeping Brakes Adjusted
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAY F. KUNS
IF AUTOMOBILE brake drums are scored badly, it is folly to expect them to stay in adjustment. The drum should be removed and reground or replaced with a new one. Difficulty in adjusting brakes may be caused by grease and dirt, which sometimes will get into the brake lining and rot it.
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0287.xml
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132
132
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0288.xml
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132
132
[no value]
[no value]
J. C. Deagan, Inc.
[no value]
J. C. Deagan, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0289.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0290.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
CHICAGO STOCK GEAR WORKS
[no value]
CHICAGO STOCK GEAR WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0291.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
ARKOGRAF PEN CO.
[no value]
ARKOGRAF PEN CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0292.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN PRODUCTS CO.
[no value]
AMERICAN PRODUCTS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0293.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Hammarlund-Roberts, Inc.
[no value]
Hammarlund-Roberts, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0294.xml
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134
134
[no value]
[no value]
M. HOHNER, Inc.
[no value]
M. HOHNER, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0295.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0296.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0297.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
SPEEDO MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
SPEEDO MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0298.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
F. SPORS & CO.
[no value]
F. SPORS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0299.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
The Geo. W. Walker Company
[no value]
The Geo. W. Walker Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0300.xml
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136
136
[no value]
[no value]
BURGESS BATTERY COMPANY
[no value]
BURGESS BATTERY COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0301.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0302.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0303.xml
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139
139
[no value]
[no value]
ELKON, INC.
[no value]
ELKON, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0304.xml
advertisement
139
139
[no value]
[no value]
THE KELSEY Company
[no value]
THE KELSEY Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0305.xml
advertisement
139
139
[no value]
[no value]
Rock Squab Company
[no value]
Rock Squab Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0306.xml
advertisement
139
139
[no value]
[no value]
HAMMARLUND MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
HAMMARLUND MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0307.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
E. T. CUNNINGHAM, Inc.
[no value]
E. T. CUNNINGHAM, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0308.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Belden Mfg. Company
[no value]
Belden Mfg. Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0309.xml
advertisement
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE CO.
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL RESISTANCE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0310.xml
advertisement
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
RAYTHEON MFG. COMPANY
[no value]
RAYTHEON MFG. COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0311.xml
advertisement
142
142,143,144,145,146,147,148,149,150,151,152,153,154,155,156,157,158,159,160,161,162,163,164,165,166,167
[no value]
[no value]
Money Making Opportunities
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0312.xml
advertisement
168
168
[no value]
[no value]
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF AMERICA
[no value]
ALUMINUM COMPANY OF AMERICA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0313.xml
advertisement
169
169
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0314.xml
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170
170,171,172
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company: Camels
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
Camels
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19281201_0113_006_0315.xml