Issue: 19280801

Wednesday, August 1, 1928
August 1928
2
True
113
Monday, December 8, 2014

Articles
cover
0_1
0_1
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0001.xml
advertisement
0_2
0_2
[no value]
[no value]
ETHYL GASOLINE CORPORATION: ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
ETHYL GASOLINE CORPORATION
ETHYL GASOLINE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0002.xml
advertisement
1z
1z
[no value]
[no value]
CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
[no value]
CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0003.xml
tableOfContents
2
2,3
[no value]
[no value]
Table of Contents for August
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0004.xml
article
3
3
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT IS COMING NEXT MONTH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Television, or seeing by radio, is coming, they II say: You will sit in your study and see on a screen the moving march of distant events. Faraway friends will smile at you as if you and they were face to face. But when? You’ll know the truth about television when you read how far today’s experiments have really progressed toward practical success.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0005.xml
advertisement
4
4
[no value]
[no value]
UNITED STATES FISCAL CORPORATION
[no value]
UNITED STATES FISCAL CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0006.xml
article
4
4,5,6
[no value]
[no value]
Mrs. Chatsworth Increases the Value of Public Utility Shares
A Service for Readers
To Help You Get Ahead
[no value]
[no value]
WALLACE AMES
"WHAT day is this?" casually inquired Mrs. Chatsworth, as her husband picked up the paper to look over the radio programs for the evening. “It's Wednesday, the 20th,” replied Mr. Chatsworth, glancing at the newspaper date line for confirmation.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0007.xml
advertisement
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
UNITED STATES MORTGAGE BOND CO.
[no value]
UNITED STATES MORTGAGE BOND CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0008.xml
advertisement
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
[no value]
FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0009.xml
advertisement
5
5
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0010.xml
advertisement
6
6
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0011.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
Larus & Brother Company
[no value]
Larus & Brother Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0012.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
Western Electric
[no value]
Western Electric
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0013.xml
article
8
8
[no value]
[no value]
What You Want to Know
An Organization That Is Ready to Tell You
Popular Science Monthly GUARANTEE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE things we buy daily, monthly, or yearly are ones which, as a rule, we need no outside help in purchasing. But when it comes to buying something that only has to be bought once or twice in a lifetime, there is not much in the way of past experience to guide us.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0014.xml
advertisement
9
9
[no value]
[no value]
MASONITE CORPORATION
[no value]
MASONITE CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0015.xml
article
10
10
[no value]
[no value]
Our Readers Say—
The Long and Short of It
One Surprised Thief!
Why Not Buy Another Copy?
Can a Plane Fly Backwards?
Puts Science in Its Place
Another Vote for Elinor
What’s Your Figure?
Killing Time in Canada
When Old Is New
Our Art Critics Say—
Why Editors Grow Bald
Here’s to Dick Byrd!
Why an Icebox?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“THINK there should be more leading articles in your magazine and fewer short paragraphs containing inventions that are not of interest to the average reader.”—D. M., Philadelphia, Pa. “I am an enthusiastic reader of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY because I feel that it keeps me posted on all the new discoveries and inventions.”—R. P., Trenton, Tenn.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0016.xml
advertisement
11
11
[no value]
[no value]
Gillette
[no value]
Gillette
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0017.xml
advertisement
12
12
[no value]
[no value]
A. H. Grebe & Company, Inc.: Grebe
[no value]
A. H. Grebe & Company, Inc.
Grebe
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0018.xml
masthead
13
13
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0019.xml
article
13
13,14,15,107
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
What Can Happen While You Wink Your Eye
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. E. FREE
A FEW years ago, when kings were more plentiful than now and more apt to be knifed or shot, soldiers used to keep clear a space around each royal person; a kind of safety zone within which no intending assassin could penetrate and where uneasy crowned heads could feel reasonably secure.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0020.xml
article
16
16,17,131,132
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
"Folks, That’s Ramblin’!"
Will Rogers Gives the Low-Down on Covering The Country by Way of the Airplane
[no value]
[no value]
CARL HELM
THE little Kansas town was in turmoil of excitement. The ception committee, all decked to meet the Speaker of the Eve ning, was anxious and nervous. Here the town was, flags a flying, and the Distinguished Guest had failed to show up! The 6:27 train from the metropolis had chugged in and chugged out, but the Speaker wasn’t on it.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0021.xml
article
18
18,119
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Timing the Speed of a Bird
AIRPLANES and Autos Used to "Clock" the Feathered Tribe, with Amazing Results
[no value]
[no value]
MYRON M. STEARNS
A FEW months ago three carrier pigeons wheeled into the air above Hammondsport, N. Y., at 9:01 in the morning, circled overhead, and headed for Auburn, N. Y., fifty miles away. At 9:49 A. M. the first of the birds arrived, making the trip at nearly a mile a minute and losing by only three minutes a race with an airplane.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0022.xml
article
19
19,20
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
The Greatest Overseas Hop
How Four Daring Men Made the First Flight from California to Australia, 7300 Miles Over the Storm Swept Pacific Ocean
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT E. MARTIN
FOR the first time, the Pacific has been spanned by air. Out of the sky, a few days ago, the tri-motored Fokker monoplane Southern Cross swooped to a landing at Brisbane, Australia. It had covered more than 7000 miles from Oakland, Calif., in three giant hops, stopping only to refuel at Hawaii, and, later, at the Fiji Islands.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0023.xml
article
21
21,130
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Uncle Sam's Mechanical Army
Terrific Smashing Power of New "Gasoline Brigade" Tested in Mimic Warfare
[no value]
[no value]
ELLSWORTH BENNETT
NEARLY three thousand Army men, recruited from infantry. cavalry, tank corps, and air squadrons, have just formed at Camp Meade, Md., such `an Army unit as has never before been seen. Neither infantry nor cavalry, it is an experimental fighting regiment that rides in tanks and motor trucks to overwhelm an enemy by sheer speed.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0024.xml
article
22
22,23,24,124
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
The Weakling
A Real Romance in Which a Winged Ship and Its Pilot Gave Helpless Men Mastery Over the Storm
[no value]
[no value]
ALZO WYNN
TWENTY-ONE years ago, when Lord Northcliffe offered $50,000 for a flight from London to Manchester, England, a rival paper offered $50,000,000 to anyone who could fly five miles out of London and live. Today men have flown the ocean and through raging storms.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0025.xml
article
25
25,26,109
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Rockets Drive Amazing Auto
Spectacular Tests of Fire-Spouting Car May Lead to Bulletlike Aircraft Built to Hop Atlantic in Minutes
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS ELWAY
A FEW minutes past four o’clock one afternoon recently on a private race track in the little - town of Rüsselsheim in southern Germany, a dozen or so invited witnesses saw a human being fired for the first time ahead of a rocket. The vehicle was a road rocket.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0026.xml
article
27
27
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Doctors Die Fighting Fever
Famous Bacteriologists Sacrifice Their Lives in Africa to Win the Thirty-Year-Old Battle Against Yellow Plague
[no value]
[no value]
L. G. POPE
AN ARTICLE in the May issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY told of the thrilling adventures of warriors of science who have risked and sacrificed their lives for the world in the conquest of disease. To the long list of these heroes and martyrs now are added the names of the famous Japanese-American bacteriologist, Dr. Hideyo Noguchi, and of his colleague in research, Dr. William Alexander Young.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0027.xml
article
28
28,29,134,135
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Flying Planes Without Motors
German Experts Show America How to Make Gliders Soar as Birds for Hundreds of Miles
[no value]
[no value]
ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
THREE German aviators arrived in this country the other day, and announced they had come to teach America to fly without gasoline. These three, Capt. Paul Roehre, Dr. Paul Laubenthal, and Peter Hesselbach, were experts of ten years’ standing at flying gliders—airplanes without motors.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0028.xml
article
30
30
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Fighting a 50,000-Acre Fire
Ohioans Battle Blaze That Started Before They Were Born and That Has Burned Continuously for 44 Years
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK E. NICHOLSON
AT NIGHT the sky glows dull crimson—from the fires of smoldering craters. The heavens burn with an awful light. Now and again a pillar of flame leaps up in a silent explosion. A pall of smoke, a blanket of steam, darken the sun by day. Belching holes pit the countryside, mile after mile.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0029.xml
article
31
31,32,128
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Amazing New Jobs for X-Rays
How They Pierce the Heart of Metals, Expose Flaws and Fakes, Grow Super-Hens, and Save Men from Hidden Peril
WHAT X-RAYS MEAN TO YOU
[no value]
[no value]
BOYD FISHER
X-RAY photography has come out of the laboratory and put on overalls. Almost every day it takes on new jobs. With X-rays, we can peer into the heart of solid metal, wood, coal, or concrete, to judge their worth or detect their flaws. Jewels, paintings, furniture—even the walls of houses—lay bare their innermost secrets.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0030.xml
article
33
33
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
How the "Modern Iceman" Works
Why the Same Electric Current That Toasts Bread or Heats an Iron Can Keep a Refrigerator Cold
[no value]
[no value]
H. C. DAVIS
MORE than twenty-five hundred readers of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY have asked questions about household refrigeration in the last three months. Most of them have inquired about electric refrigerators. “Of course I know that in an ordinary icebox the ice absorbs heat from the air,” writes a man in Dallas, Tex.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0031.xml
article
34
34,35,129,130
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
New Houses for Old
Inexpensive Brick and Stucco Veneers Make Frame Homes Beautiful, Keep Out Heat and Cold, and Reduce Fire Risk
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN R. MCMAHON
DONALD and Ada knew a lot of I things about apartments, being a very clever young couple, but when they bought a house they were practically babes in the woods. They were not cheated, yet the effect of inexperience was almost as bad. When the truth finally dawned upon them they had a heart-to-heart discussion, because they liked the place, the neighbors, and everything.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0032.xml
article
36
36
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Queer Notions about Oil Burners
Here Are the Alarming Tales on One Side and The Facts on the Other Regarding Fire Danger, Noise, Smell, and Dirt
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN E. LODGE
MISINFORMATION, like bad news, travels both fast and far, gathering embellishments as it goes. That is why people have such queer notions about oil burners. Here, for example, is a question typical of hundreds presented by readers of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY to the engineers of the Popular Science Institute of Standards: “Is it true that with those burners using an electric spark to ignite the oil there is always the possibility of an explosion?
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0033.xml
article
37
37
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Huge Engine Breaks Record
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THESE pictures show the Flying Scotsman, the English locomotive that recently made a world’s record nonstop run—between London and Edinburgh, nearly 400 miles—almost a hundred miles beyond the record made a year ago when the Royal Scot inaugurated a nonstop trip between London and Carlisle.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0034.xml
article
38
38,39,110
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Water Flivvering, New National Sport
Dashing Along at a Speed Of More Than 30 Miles an Hour, Tiny Outboard Motor Boats Break Race Records
[no value]
[no value]
EARL CHAPIN MAY
IT SEEMED a shame to accept Dick Pope’s challenge to a two-mile dash across a Winter Haven lake. Although Dick was commodore of the Florida Outboard Racing Association, he was also captain, crew, and navigator of unpainted tub about ten feet long and forty inches in the beam.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0035.xml
article
40
40,41,122,123
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Fortunes from Magic Logs
How Daring Men Face Beasts, Reptiles, and Savages of the Jungles to Bring Back Bits of Wood
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK PARKER STOCKBRIDGE
OUT of the jungles of western Panama, G. Proctor Cooper, a Yale forestry expert, has recently brought two logs of one of the rarest woods known to man. It is a strange ruby and black wood that bursts into a golden sheen when placed in the light.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0036.xml
article
42
42
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Making Street Cars Noiseless
Lead and Rubber Shock Absorbers and Asphalt-Sealed Rails Make New Vehicles Glide Like Boats
[no value]
[no value]
ARTHUR A. STUART
THE time-honored street car, which seemed to have fallen somewhat behind in the procession of modern inventions, has just gone through a major operation. It has had its noises and jolts extracted. Modeled anew, it reenters the race against its rubber-tired rivals.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0037.xml
article
43
43,136
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
A Scientist of Wall Street
After a Hectic Day on the Market, Alfred L. Loomis Turns to His Laboratory as a Hobby—How He Discovered Sounds That Burn
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE LEE DOWD
IT IS the peak of a rush day on the New York stock market. In the office of the vice president of a large Wall Street banking house, a dynamic, boyish-looking man sits at the throttle of a high-speed machine of finance. About him seethe the hubbub and excitement of the world’s money market.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0038.xml
article
44
44,45,133
RADIO
[no value]
Tuning-In the Short Waves
How to Build a Simple Adapter Unit Which Will Widen the Range of Your Electric or Battery-Operated Set
[no value]
[no value]
ALFRED P. LANE
YOUR radio broadcast receiver is like a horse fitted with blinders. The horse can see only the road in front of him. Your receiver can tune-in only the waves in the broadcast band from approximately 200 meters to about 550 meters. The only difference, in fact, is that the blinders on the horse can be removed or adjusted to widen his vision, whereas a radio receiver cannot be made to receive a wider band with maximum efficiency.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0039.xml
article
46
46
Saving Trouble in Building Radio Sets
[no value]
Coil Winding Made Simple
Short Cuts for Tyro Constructors—Secrets of Good Dial Fitting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT FREQUENTLY happens that you want to substitute a tuning coil wound on a smaller or larger form than the one specified in the wiring diagram of the receiver you are building. And then you are faced with the problem of determining the correct number of turns of wire to get the smaller or larger coil to tune to the broadcast band of wave lengths.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0040.xml
article
46
46
Saving Trouble in Building Radio Sets
[no value]
A B C’s of Radio
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRICALLY, all condensers are alike. They consist of nonmagnetic metal plates separated by insulation. The original unit of electrical capacity measurement is the farad. A condenser of one farad capacity would require a current of one ampere flowing for one second to charge it to an electrical pressure of one volt. But the farad is so large a unit that the capacity of condensers is commonly specified in microfarads, one microfarad being a millionth part of a farad.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0041.xml
article
46
46
Saving Trouble in Building Radio Sets
[no value]
Saving Time in Radio Construction
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE beginner in putting together a receiver often spends more time than necessary on some parts of the work and then, in his hurry to finish, rushes operations that ought to be done slowly and with great care. Fitting dials to the panel often leads to grief.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0042.xml
article
47
47,127
RADIO
[no value]
When You Buy a Loudspeaker—
An Article That Tells Everything You Need Know if You Wish To Get the Best Possible Reproduction of Radio Broadcasting
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN CARR
A RADIO loudspeaker is a machine that takes electrical vibrations fed into it from a radio receiver and turns them into sound. It isn’t, strictly speaking, a musical instrument. It hasn’t any tone of its own unless it happens to be out of adjustment, in which case a raucous squeal or a hollow grunt may be produced.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0043.xml
article
48
48,49,125,126
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
If a Boxer Should Hit You—
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GROVER THEIS
WHY you would be knocked out by a blow that a professional pugilist could take with a smile, In this unusual article Mr. Theis, a boxing expert, tells just how much punishment the body can take. Here you will learn what the tiny chemical arsenals of the body—called ductless glands—mean to the fighter; how Nature’s “shock absorbers” may decide a bout; where the most vulnerable spots are, and how a boxer’s endurance differs from that of a Marathon runner.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0044.xml
article
50
50,51,52,120,122
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
DICK BYRD—Adventurer
The Absorbing Story of the America’s Flight across the Atlantic—A Valiant Escape from Death in Blinding Fog
[no value]
[no value]
FITZHUGH GREEN
ON JUNE 20, 1926, the SS. Chantier steamed briskly on her way westward across the Atlantic toward New York. To the eye of a white gull that circled her mainmast she was just another ship. Yet the Chantier at that moment differed enormously from any ship ever afloat on any ocean.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0045.xml
article
53
53,54,108
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Teaching "Lindy” Navigation
Why the World’s Greatest Pilot Is Learning from a Tutor the A B C’s of the Science of Finding His Way
[no value]
[no value]
BOYDEN SPARKES
LINDBERGH, it was announced recently, has an instructor who is teaching him navigation. To most people this seemed as silly as if President Coolidge had engaged someone to teach him political economy; or as if Pershing had begun to study under a drill sergeant.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0046.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Your Dollar Grows Bigger
Why Its Buying Power Is 13 Cents Greater Than It Was in 1920
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PERHAPS a dollar doesn't seem much bigger now than during the days of its distressing leanness, but the truth is that it’s worth at least thirteen cents more to you than in 1920, the year of peak prices following the war. The great American dollar is measured, of course, by its purchasing power.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0047.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Cannibal Mosquitoes
Strange War Planned Between The Ordinary Household Pest And a New Type from France
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the strangest wars ever waged is expected to take place on Long Island this summer. On one side, battalions of humming, voracious, man-biting mosquitoes will battle for their lives. On the other, silent-winged invading insects,imported from faraway Brittany, will move to the attack.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0048.xml
article
56
56,57,92
Now You Can Build
[no value]
Modernistic Furniture
Simple Plans by HERMAN HJORTH for a Stand and a Bookcase in the Revolutionary New Style Which Reflects the Beauty and Utility of “Skyscraper” Architecture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONLY in the more expensive and exclusive shops can you buy furniture of the new or modernistic style. The pieces are by no means moderately priced, yet the demand for them is so great that they are snatched up by impatient buyers. Department stores vie with each other in exhibiting the latest creations of designers and craftsmen; and everywhere the originality, color, and brilliance of the new movement are making themselves felt.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0049.xml
article
58
58,59,96,97,98
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
How to Make a Bremen Model
Step-by-Step Instructions for Building a Remarkable Low-Wing Monoplane That Flies 700 Feet at High Speed
Blueprints to Aid You in Building Planes
[no value]
[no value]
J. DANNER BUNCH
AVISON F. KOCH
BY BUILDING a flying model of the Bremen, the Junkers monoplane which will always hold a shining place in the history of the conquest of the air because of its east-to-west flight across the Atlantic Ocean, you can accomplish two things: First, you can make an exceedingly attractive model of a type that heretofore has not been seen at any of the model airplane tournaments.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0050.xml
article
60
60
Onward Strides of Science
[no value]
Insect Thugs Fingerprinted
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE world of insects, plants, and lower animals is full of cutthroats, murderers, robbers, and grafters, and man has taken it upon himself to do the punishing. Assuming the rôle of police officers, Dr. C. W. Stiles, of the U. S. Public Health Service, and Albert Hassall, of the U. S.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0051.xml
article
60
60
Onward Strides of Science
[no value]
Your Body a Radio Station
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALMOST everyone has had the strange experience of “feeling the presence” of some person in a room, when that person was out of sight or hearing. Ancients believed the human body gave off unseen emanations and they were more than half right, according to the latest findings of two physiologists of the Technical College of Munich, Professors Ferdinand Sauerbruch and W. O. Schumann.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0052.xml
article
60
60
Onward Strides of Science
[no value]
Greatest Meteorite in History
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN A lonely forest in the far-off province of Yenissei, Siberia, a herd of 1,500 reindeer browsed among the trees. SudLATEST discoveries, inventions and theories in the various scientific fields that are of prime importance because of their bearing on the affairs of our everyday life are recorded each month in these pages.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0053.xml
article
60
60
Onward Strides of Science
[no value]
New Elements Found in Sun
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEWLY discovered element and a familiar one in new guise have been identified in the sun—hafnium, a metal only recently discovered on earth, and cobalt, twin metal to nickel, in an electrified state—the U. S. Bureau of Standards announces. Dr. William F. Meggers, Spectroscopic Laboratory Chief of the Bureau, discerned them through examination of faint lines in the sun’s spectrum or light band.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0054.xml
article
60
60
Onward Strides of Science
[no value]
Trailing Unknown Planet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASTRONOMERS are scanning the skies these nights for an undiscovered planet believed to exist beyond Neptune, farthest known planet from the sun. Evidence that there is such an unseen planet was advanced recently by Prof. W. H. Pickering, formerly of the Harvard Observatory, in the form of charts showing that the planets Neptune and Uranus are, at times, pulled out of their usual courses, apparently by some unknown body.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0055.xml
article
60
60,113
Onward Strides of Science
[no value]
Man-made Sun Grows Wheat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE feat of Joshua in commanding the sun to stand still was hardly more miraculous than are the present-day laboratory achievements in manufacturing artificial suns and putting them to work. Some weeks ago two agricultural chemists in the University of California, Professors A. R. Davis and D. R. Hoagland, “planted” wheat seeds in a laboratory where they manufactured sunshine from a dozen 300-candlepower lamps filled with glowing argon gas and created soil by filling jars
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0056.xml
article
61
61
Ordinary Print Made Readable for the Blind—Your Body a Radio Plant—Experts Grow Wheat in a Few Weeks
[no value]
Orchid Bombards Bees
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
One of Nature’s amazing schemes of using honey-seeking bees to carry pollen from one flower to another for the process of fertilization is found in the “Poor Man’s Orchid,” pictured at the left. In the blossom is a little catapult which, responding to the insect’s weight, automatically hurls a shower of pollen upon the intruder.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0057.xml
article
61
61
Ordinary Print Made Readable for the Blind— Your Body a Radio Plant—Experts Grow Wheat in a Few Weeks
[no value]
Mystic Fire Fighter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Two Ohio consulting chemists, C. A. Hochwalt and C. A. Thompson, were as much mystified as anybody recently when they discovered that solutions containing salts of alkali metals, such as potassium, rubidium, and caesium, can put out a fire three times as rapidly as standard soda acid types of extinguishers.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0058.xml
article
61
61
Ordinary Print Made Readable for the Blind— Your Body a Radio Plant—Experts Grow Wheat in a Few Weeks
[no value]
A Manufactured Geyser
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Copying Nature’s methods, Prof. B. J. Spence, of Northwestern University, recently made this remarkable working model of “Old Faithful” geyser. A conical pipe filled with water is surmounted by a funnel. Heat is applied at the lower, larger end of the pipe.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0059.xml
article
61
61
Ordinary Print Made Readable for the Blind— Your Body a Radio Plant—Experts Grow Wheat in a Few Weeks
[no value]
Motor Fuel from Vegetables
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Daniel W. Hoge, Los Angeles chemist, is seen below in his back yard laboratory where he is distilling from vegetable matter a new liquid fuel that he says is superior to ordinary gasoline and that can be produced for a cent and a half a gallon.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0060.xml
article
61
61
Ordinary Print Made Readable for the Blind— Your Body a Radio Plant—Experts Grow Wheat in a Few Weeks
[no value]
The Blind Read by Sound
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
By an ingenious adaptation of the photo -electric cell, used in television, blind persons now are enabled to read ordinary printed words. In the apparatus, invented by Robert E. Naumburg, of Winchester, Mass., a light-sensitive cell controls the electric current operating a loudspeaker.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0061.xml
article
62
62,63
[no value]
[no value]
Practical New Home Utilities
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0062.xml
article
64
64
Engineering
[no value]
Triumph of Ancient Egypt's Engineers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MAN and modern science and machinery could transport the obelisk Cleopatra’s Needle from Egypt to New York and set it up in Central Park, but how could the ancient Egyptians have erected their great monoliths weighing from a hundred to two hundred tons and more? Man power alone could not do it.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0063.xml
article
64
64
Engineering
[no value]
Longest Arc Welded Pipe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the welding of the 11,000th joint, workmen have just completed the longest electrically welded pipe line in the world, seen at the right— a forty-five-mile line of seven inches diameter to carry gas at 600 to 1,000 pounds pressure to the square inch across hilly, swampy, and wooded country from Lamkin to Hodge, La. Previously, oxyacetylene gas welding was employed; but the electric method used throughout in the newest engineering feat is said to have effected marked economy.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0064.xml
article
64
64
Automobiles
[no value]
Know Your Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE use of gaskets is a practical necessity in the commercial production of automobiles. The cylinder head, for instance, could be fitted to the cylinder block so that no gasket would be needed to make it a tight joint. To produce such a perfect joint, however, the top surface of the cylinder block and the lower surface of the cylinder head would have to be ground on a very accurate grinding machine and then a high-priced expert would have to spend hours in hand scraping any slight irregularities.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0065.xml
article
64
64
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
"Lightning" Tamed in Test
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MILLIONS of dollars will be saved for southern California oil operators, declares John M. Gage, of Los Angeles, by a method he has devised of warding lightning from tanks. Electric flashes are conducted harmlessly to earth by a novel system of overhead wires.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0066.xml
article
65
65,112
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
How Much Do You Know of the World You Live In?
Here Are Correct Answers to Questions on Page 65
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Test your knowledge with these questions, selected from hundreds sent in by readers. Correct answers on page 112. 1. Where does the United States own a route for another canal between the Atlantic and the Pacific? 2. Where does chinchilla fur come from?
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0067.xml
article
65
65
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Five Machines Joined in One
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AIMED at conservation of floor space and of power, thereby to reduce the costs of production, a new type of woodworking machine in which a band saw, jointer, rip saw, sander, and lathe are operated on the same table and by the same motor has been brought out by a Western manufacturer.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0068.xml
article
65
65
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Ships Talk Through Water by Sound Signals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW ships may talk together over moderate distances is shown in these diagrams of the latest type of undersea telegraph—a sounder that transmits code signals beneath the waves. Through a well in the center of a vessel is lowered an electric resonator that hurls its sound in all directions.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0069.xml
article
65
65
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Light Waves Preserve Bread
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN AN article in our June issue, Frank Parker Stockbridge told how chemists’ experiments with mineral salts in water saved a baker a million dollars a year, and produced better bread. Now scientific research has discovered a way to improve the family loaf still further.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0070.xml
article
65
65
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
A Man-Made Aurora Borealis
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ENGINEERS dissolved much of the mystery of lightning when they shot artificial thunderbolts across a room. Another spectacular mystery of Nature, the Aurora Borealis, now is giving up its secrets in a similar way. At Princeton University Dr. Gunther Carlo, of the University of Göttingen, Germany, and Dr. Joseph Kaplan, of Johns Hopkins, recently produced an artificial Aurora and discovered that electricity, discharged in a mixture of oxygen and nitrogen under certain conditions, creates the beautiful red and green northern lights.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0071.xml
article
65
65
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Heat Determines Frogs’ Sex
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE difference between male and female may not be so sharply drawn as is commonly supposed. In frogs, at least, the small difference between hot and cold may decide whether a wriggling tadpole will be masculine or feminine. Emil Witschi, of the State University of Iowa, recently raised two broods of tadpoles from eggs.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0072.xml
article
66
66
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Clock Times 20 Men at Once
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN separate experimenters in a laboratory formerly sought at the same time to test the muscular reactions of one subject, a costly and elaborate clock was required by each one. Now Dr. O. G. Harne, of the University of Maryland, has devised this single clock that times as many as twenty distinct experiments conducted simultaneously.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0073.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
What "Fair” Weather Means
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOSE who have grumbled about seeming inaccuracies in weather forecasts—particularly those disappointed by a gloomy day following a “fair” prediction—may be illuminated by a recent announcement of the U. S. Weather Bureau. “Fair,” it explains, need not mean a sunny day in the Bureau’s use of the term, which includes everything from “clear” to “cloudy” and “partly cloudy,” all three being further qualifications of the fair prophecy.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0074.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Elephants Taught to Plow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXPERIMENTAL government elephant farms have been instituted in the Belgian Congo, where the giants of the animal kingdom are trained to plow— a service they perform at a fourteenth the cost of plowing by tractor. Baby elephants, from two to ten years old, are singled out from wild herds, captured, and taught to do useful work by expert elephant men with the aid of alreadytrained older elephants. One elephant can plow two and a half acres in two days.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0075.xml
article
66
66
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Meters Read over Phone Wire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRIC current meters report their own readings over ordinary telephone wires through a new device called the telemeter, developed by the General Electric Company. Although the new system has not yet been developed to the point where it will read your household meter and replace a call by the man from the electric company, it has already been successfully installed in the substations of a great electric power concern.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0076.xml
article
66
66
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Lathe Made of Old Car Parts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OUT of discarded motor car parts, Hoyt E. Van Buren, of San Francisco, manufactured the lathe on which he turns out unusual pieces of woodwork. Pistons serve as bearings, and the two spindles were turned from an axle. The faceplate was a locomotive boiler check.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0077.xml
article
66
66
Engineering
[no value]
A Three-Mile Motor Tunnel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the recent piercing of the last section of rock between the two tunnel headings proceeding from opposite shores, England is well on its way to completion of the world’s largest motor tunnel—a great shaft beneath the Mersey River that will link Liverpool to Birken-head.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0078.xml
article
66
66
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Copper Cures Anaemic Rats; Experts Plan Tests on Men
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STRIKING cures of anaemic rats by feeding them compounds containing copper were recently reported to the American Society of Biological Chemists by Dr. E. B. Hart and other chemists of the University of Wisconsin, who may have discovered in the red metal's compounds, of which traces are found in milk and other foodstuffs, an important new cure for human sufferers.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0079.xml
article
66
66
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Spade and Fork in New Tool
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FORK and spade are combined in the new French tool of many uses illustrated below. For turning soil, the fork alone is used; when work with a shovel is to be done, a flat plate is slipped over the fork and it becomes a spade. A crossbar on the novel tool’s handle provides a better leverage for twisting it free with a load of turf or roots, and saves much backbreaking labor.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0080.xml
article
67
67
Aviation
[no value]
Dirigible Los Angeles Costs $500,000 a Year to Operate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIRIGIBLES as economical craft are hardly yet to be recommended to private owners, judging from a glimpse at Uncle Sam’s bill for running the huge Los Angeles. Operation during the fiscal year 1927 cost a little more than half a million dollars—$563,102, to be exact.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0081.xml
article
67
67
Ships
[no value]
Leviathan Sets Speed Record
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY ATTAINING a speed of thirty knots, equivalent to 36.4 land miles an hour, the 60,000-ton American ship Leviathan recently set what is believed to be a new speed record for large ocean liners. Aided by a following wind, she held the speedy pace for several hours.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0082.xml
article
67
67
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Diving Suit to Recover Gold
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOME of the $250,000,000 that lies in shipwrecks at the bottom of the sea may now be recovered through an invention of H. L. Bowdoin, of Whitestone, N. Y., seen below—a metal diving suit whose wearer can venture into hitherto unattainable depths.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0083.xml
article
67
67
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Wind Resistance of Houses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THAT a half-completed structure, of open framework, may offer more resistance to the wind and suffer greater danger of destruction than the same finished dwelling was a surprising fact revealed by recent tests of models in a wind tunnel at the Kansas State Agricultural College.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0084.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Auto Exhaust Fights Gophers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CARRYING the war on gophers into their underground homes by attacking them with the poisonous gases from, the exhaust of an automobile is announced by W. H. Carr, an oil company official at San Jose, Calif., who employs this means of ridding his lawn of the rodents.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0085.xml
article
67
67
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Dress an Engineers’ Problem
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FREE ventilation for the skin is vital for hot weather comfort, declares E. R. Clark, fellow of the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research at the University of Pittsburgh, who has just subjected underwear design to searching analysis. Using mathematical methods, including calculus equations that engineers employ in studying heat loss and evaporation, he maintains that the question of keeping the body cool is essentially like any other engineering problem.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0086.xml
article
67
67
Radio
[no value]
"Ham" Uses New Radio Band
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY A new feat in amateur radio—a cross-continent talk on the remarkably low wave length of ten meters— Charles K. Atwater, radio experimenter of Upper Montclair, N. J., has added another triumph to those of radio’s “hams.” He was recently successful in establishing two-way communication on this wave, using low power, with two amateur stations on the Pacific coast.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0087.xml
article
67
67
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Prize Offer for Moon Flight
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF JULES VERNE, famous imaginative novelist, were living, he might be surprised to hear himself called a professor of “astronautics.” That is the new name for a branch of science which has captivated men’s imaginations for centuries—that of finding a way to journey through space to the moon, or Mars, or other heavenly bodies.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0088.xml
article
68
68
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Most Gigantic Incandescent
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIKE a radio tube in appearance is the world’s largest electric lamp—a monster 50,000-watt experimental bulb just built by the General Electric Company and exhibited at Nela Park, Cleveland, Ohio. At the top of the bulb, a radiator made of metal fins carries off intense heat generated by the white-hot tungsten filament, which burns at a temperature of 5,500 degrees Fahrenheit—twice as hot as molten steel.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0089.xml
article
68
68
Aviation
[no value]
Oil Burning Motor Meets Test
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HEAVY oil for airplane fuel, to replace costly and dangerous gasoline, is brought nearer by a new oil-burning motor recently demonstrated by the National Committee for Aeronautics at Langley Field, Va. Not only is oil fuel cheaper, but it practically banishes fire hazard; it will actually extinguish a flame, until heated to a very high temperature within the motor’s cylinders.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0090.xml
article
68
68
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Black Sheets Induce Sleep
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BLACK bedclothes and pillows in a black bed, within a room of the same dusky shade, is the unusual cure for insomnia suggested by recent experiments of Dr. Mario Ponzo, of the Hospital for the Insane at Alesandria, Italy. In such a room, he says, many of his most violent patients became calm and soon fell into a deep, natural sleep.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0091.xml
article
68
68
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Thinking with Half a Brain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY brain specialists—notably Dr. Frederick Tilney of New York City —believe the human brain is used only to a small fraction of its capacity. Now that opinion seems upheld by five remarkable operations performed recently by Dr. Walter E. Dandy, of Johns Hopkins University.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0092.xml
article
68
68
Automobiles
[no value]
Campbell Plans New Effort For Automobile Speed Mark
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MAJOR MALCOLM CAMPBELL, England’s premier speed driver, has announced he will try again for the world’s auto speed record, which he so lately won only to lose again, even if he must return to America to do it. The announcement followed the recent refusal of the Royal Automobile Club to permit his proposed attempt on the Pendine Sands, in Wales, a seven-mile stretch of beach that is declared to be too short for high speed racing.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0093.xml
article
68
68
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
New Explosive Beats TNT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MIGHTIER than TNT, high-power explosive, is a newlight-green powder known as “radium-atomite” recently demonstrated at the California Institute of Technology, of which radium is said to be one important ingredient. In the tests shown here, representatives of powder companies, and of the Institute’s Reserve Officers’ Training Corps, saw small charges of the new powder, of TNT, and of dynamite—a third of an ounce of each—placed in separate 700pound lead jars and exploded.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0094.xml
article
69
69
Ships
[no value]
Sixty-Hour Trans-Atlantic Speed Boat Ready to Go
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOT long ago the little French town of Javel, on the river Seine, looked and marveled at the strangest water craft it had ever seen. It had just been trundled on heavy trucks from the marine works at Saint-Ouens, and assembled on blocks for launching.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0095.xml
article
69
69
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Ford, Lawrance and Elmen Receive Medals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR his “rare inventive ability” which enabled him to effect high-speed production of automobiles, Henry Ford has just received the Cresson Medal of the Franklin Institute. Similar awards went to Gustaf W. Elmen, discoverer of the highly-magnetizable nickel compound “permalloy,” and to Charles L. Lawrance, inventor of the Wright Whirlwind airplane motor.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0096.xml
article
70
70
Old Needs Met in New Ways
[no value]
Gage Measures Diamonds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
In measuring and cutting rare jewels precision is of the greatest importance, and this invention of a diamond specialist registers all dimensions down to a tenth of a millimeter. It gages also the bezel, the part of a jewel between top and girdle.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0097.xml
article
70
70
Old Needs Met in New Ways
[no value]
Telephone Lock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A new French device to prevent unauthorized persons from using your telephone is a lock so attached to the wires that a call cannot be made except while the keys which are held by the rightful users are inserted.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0098.xml
article
70
70
Old Needs Met in New Ways
[no value]
Diving Bell as Submarine Aid
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Secrets of the construction of a proposed diving bell to rescue men trapped in sunken submarines have been offered to the Navy by the inventors, Deseo Fischer and John Kardos, shown here demonstrating a model. The bell, supplied with air through steel tubes, is attached to the craft, into which divers cut their way.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0099.xml
article
70
70
Old Needs Met in New Ways
[no value]
Noise-Proof Walls for Radio
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Seeking the best sound-proof walls so that a radio in one room disturbs no one outside, the U. S. Bureau of Standards sets up panels of various kinds of walls and measures the sound that penetrates them. The pictures above and at left show some panels and the measuring instrument.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0100.xml
article
70
70
Old Needs Met in New Ways
[no value]
Nonsplitting Wood Nails
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Newly designed nails for cabinet making are flanged and triangle shaped, so that they cut their way through instead of forcing it. The improved and ordinary nails are shown in the photograph.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0101.xml
article
70
70
Old Needs Met in New Ways
[no value]
Portable Drill for Oil Wells
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Prospectors for oil and minerals may go anywhere with this new machine attached to the end of a motor car or truck. The drill, driven by the automobile's engine, is said to go 1,000 feet a day through hard rock. When the motoring treasure hunter finds a likely spot he starts quick action.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0102.xml
article
70
70
Old Needs Met in New Ways
[no value]
Giving Screw Heads a Finish
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A crown to prevent screw heads in chairs or elsewhere from tearing clothing is a washer that fits under the head. After the screw is driven home the four corners are bent over the head as shown.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0103.xml
article
71
71
Little Ideas to Help the Motorist
[no value]
New Pedal Jack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
One hand operates this tool without gears, ratchets, or handles. It is used to adjust brake and clutch pedals to any desired position or pressure.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0104.xml
article
71
71
Little Ideas to Help the Motorist
[no value]
Pedestrians Direct Traffic
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Los Angeles is installing at dangerous crossings traffic signals that pedestrians can operate by pressing buttons. When you touch a button a red stop light holds up traffic to let you cross the street and another lamp on the signal standard floods your path with a beam of light.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0105.xml
article
71
71
Little Ideas to Help the Motorist
[no value]
Wheels Pump Own Tires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
When one end of this device is attached to the wheel hub and the other to the tire valve an eccentric gear gives the piston inside one stroke each time the wheel turns, sending air into the tire. A safety valve, set to the correct pressure for the tire, releases surplus air.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0106.xml
article
71
71
Little Ideas to Help the Motorist
[no value]
Glare-Proof Mirror
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A “night mirror,” of black glass, is said to absorb the glare of the lights of the car behind you.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0107.xml
article
71
71
Little Ideas to Help the Motorist
[no value]
Research for Ideal Headlight
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
With this device the National Lamp Works, of Cleveland, flashes lights with all sorts of lenses and reflectors on a screen and then measures their rays and their diffusion.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0108.xml
article
71
71
Little Ideas to Help the Motorist
[no value]
Motorcycle Like a War Tank
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
With this machine, which has two wheels and a caterpillar belt in the rear, the rider can drive through fields and woods as well as along roads. Instead of turning the front wheel directly, the operator moves it more easily by a system of levers. The British Army is experimenting with the machine and may adopt it for some infantry units.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0109.xml
article
71
71
Little Ideas to Help the Motorist
[no value]
Air Lifts Auto
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Put this jack under the axle and compressed air from a flask, several of which go with it, flows into the mechanism, elevating the car. A service station’s air hose will also operate it.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0110.xml
article
72
72
Keeping Pace with Advances in Aeronautics
[no value]
Lindbergh Tests Imported Flivver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COL. CHARLES A. LINDBERGH is seen above testing the latest in flivver planes—a Klemm monoplane of German design that weighs but 600 pounds, has a wing spread of forty-three feet, and is driven by a two-cylinder twenty-horsepower motor.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0111.xml
article
72
72
Keeping Pace with Advances in Aeronautics
[no value]
Cost of Helium Gas Slashed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NONINFLAMMABLE helium gas used to inflate balloons and dirigibles, valued before the war at $1,700 to $2,000 a cubic foot, now costs a little more than four cents for the same quantity, according to Director Scott Turner of the U. S. Bureau of Mines.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0112.xml
article
72
72
Keeping Pace with Advances in Aeronautics
[no value]
5,000 Landing Fields
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIVE thousand landing fields now are available for the increasing number of airplane pilots in this country, according to the U. S. Department of Commerce. California leads, with 115. Most modern, however, in proportion to their number, are Wyoming’s, of which seventeen out of twenty-one are equipped with beacons and flood lights for night landings. Texas is second in number of fields, having 90.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0113.xml
article
72
72,73
Keeping Pace with Advances in Aeronautics
[no value]
Two-Day Air-Rail Line to Span U. S.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITHIN a few months at most you will be able to cross the continent in forty-eight hours, by rail and air, cutting the fastest train time in two. That much is promised by a newly-formed $5,000,000 concern, Transcontinental Air Transport, Inc., which merges the combined facilities of the National Air Transport and the Pennsylvania and 'Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroads.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0114.xml
article
73
73
Keeping Pace with Advances in Aeronautics
[no value]
Autogiro in Speed Feat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REPORTS from England state that in its latest form the Cierva “autogiro,” an experimental plane that uses an idly-revolving windmill for wings, shows amazingly capable performance when compared with standard aircraft, together with important advantages all its own.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0115.xml
article
73
73
Keeping Pace with Advances in Aeronautics
[no value]
Dirigible Lands on Liner
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FEW days ago the nonrigid army airship TC-5 caught up with the steaming vessel American Trader, landed upon its afterdeck, took on a bag of mail, and deposited it an hour later at the Lakehurst, N. J., naval air station. The successful experiment, in Lower New York Bay, was the first recorded instance of a dirigible’s landing upon a commercial vessel, and demonstrated the feasibility of transferring last-minute passengers and mail from a “blimp” to an outbound ship, or speeding the arrival of incoming voyagers and letters.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0116.xml
article
73
73,128
Keeping Pace with Advances in Aeronautics
[no value]
Giant High Altitude Camera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIX miles above the earth—far beyond the reach of antiaircraft guns—a plane equipped with the newest aerial camera can take pictures of the earth that reveal the smallest details, even houses, trees, and roads.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0117.xml
article
74
74
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science MONTHLY
A Blind Mans Vision
The Path of Good Business
Who Wants Airplanes?
Beating Nature’s Patents
When Do You Go Fishing?
If Electrons Were Dewdrops
When Playthings Pay
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIFTY-SIX years ago, Edward Livingston Youmans, a blind man, established SCIENCE MONTHLY. He saw in science “not the mystery of a class, but the common interest of all rational beings.” He promised to appeal, “not to the illiterate, but to the generally educated classes,” to the end that they might get more out of life.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0118.xml
advertisement
75
75
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING CO.
C & L 158
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING CO.
C & L 32
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0119.xml
article
76
76,111
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Spare Parts You Should Carry
Gus Tells What Will Get You Out of Trouble On the Road and What Will Just Burden You
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
"NUTS,” observed Joe Clark as he came out of the office with a letter in his hand, “are the life of the auto business.” Gus Wilson, his partner in the Model Garage, poked his head out from under the car he was repairing. “What kind?” he grumbled.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0120.xml
advertisement
77
77
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA: RCA Radiotron
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA
RCA Radiotron
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0121.xml
article
78
78
Helpful Kinks for Your Car
[no value]
Opening Garage Doors Without Leaving Car—Simple Tester For Valves — Handy Trouble Light — Single Contact Bulb
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN you come back from a drive it is a nuisance to have to get out, unlock and open the garage doors, climb back in the car, and drive in. A novel and ingenious way to arrange selfopening garage doors is shown in Fig. 1, and details of construction are given in Fig. 2.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0122.xml
article
78
78
Helpful Kinks for Your Car
[no value]
Handy Trouble Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE best place for a trouble light is where it will shed its rays on the work as nearly as possible in line with the line of sight. When working around a car you constantly shift your point of view, so no matter where you fasten the light there are often shadows just where you want to see what you are doing.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0123.xml
article
78
78
Helpful Kinks for Your Car
[no value]
Ten Dollars for an Idea!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WALTER E. BAILEY, of Maywood, California, wins this month’s $10 prize with his suggestion for garage doors opened without leaving the car (Figs. 1 and 2). Each month Popular Science Monthly awards $10, in addition to regular space rates, for the best idea sent in for motorists.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0124.xml
article
78
78
Helpful Kinks for Your Car
[no value]
Improvised Bulb of Single Contact
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOMETIMES it is impossible to obtain in an emergency a singlecontact auto bulb of the candlepower you desire. However, if you can obtain a double-contact bulb of the required candlepower, a minute’s work with a soldering iron will convert it for single contact use.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0125.xml
article
78
78
Helpful Kinks for Your Car
[no value]
Tin Can Valve Tester
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT IS not necessary to do very much grinding to make an auto valve gas-tight unless the valve is badly warped or pitted. In fact, too much grinding makes the seat too wide. It is, however, difficult to tell when the valve is actually gas-tight.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0126.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
Taylor Instrument Companies: Tycos
[no value]
Taylor Instrument Companies
Tycos
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0127.xml
article
80
80,103
For the Home Owner
[no value]
How to Enamel a Front Door
A Well-Finished Entrance Reflects Credit on a House and Spells “Welcome”—Hints for the Amateur
[no value]
[no value]
F. N. Vanderwalker
ALTHOUGH we expect much of the front doors of our homes, we pay scant attention to them once they have been selected to give the right atmosphere and architectural detail. There is, however, something else besides the character and design of the front door that conveys to guests their first impression of the home, and that is its state of preservation.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0128.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY TOOLS
[no value]
STANLEY TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0129.xml
article
82
82,99
Jack Hazzard, Racing Canoeist, Gives a Few
[no value]
Useful Hints for Outdoor Men
Showing How to Make a Fast Motor Boat from an Old Canoe, an Oven from a Lard Can, and a Weather Vane from Scraps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL hands had been looking for Bill Norton for two or three days. Not that Bill was particularly sought after; but when a canoeist goes for a week's jaunt by himself and is days overdue, there is a great wagging of wise heads, and the rocking-chair fleet at the clubhouse hang out the black crape.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0130.xml
article
83
83
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Homemade Trailer for Boats
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Newcomb Leonarde
THE trailer illustrated is well adapted for transporting outboard motor boats and other camp equipment. It is constructed on a Ford Model-T front axle, which may be purchased for a few dollars from any automobile junk dealer. The two steering knuckle arms are bent around until they are in contact with the axle itself and then bolted to it; this keeps the wheels from turning independently.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0131.xml
article
83
83
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Puller for Fence Staples
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. K.
HERE is another tool for pulling obstinate staples when fencing. It gets them all; indeed, it is better than an expensive pair of fencing pliers that I have. I made the puller from ¾ in. square steel and hardened it.—H. H. IN MAKING saw cuts across the grain of a board for the purpose of forming a groove or dado, the beginner in woodworking may have trouble in following the lines accurately. A short straightedge, bradded or held with a hand screw against the outer side of the knife mark, will guide the saw.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0132.xml
advertisement
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.: YANKE TOOLS
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
YANKE TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0133.xml
article
84
84,86
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
Simplified Cutter Grinding
Hints on Selecting the Right Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
Hector J. Chamberland
LARGE manufacturing plants that use many milling cutters and similar tools usually make a certain amount of their tool equipment, not as a matter of economy—for the cost generally runs higher than if the tools were ordered outside—but because the work helps to keep the tool room or machine shop on a regular working schedule and, in case of a rush job, makes it possible to supply special needs almost immediately.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0134.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
L. S. STARRETT CO.: Starratt Tools
[no value]
L. S. STARRETT CO.
Starratt Tools
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0135.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE Tools
PLANER AND SHAPER GAUGE
BROWN & SHARPE Tools
STAINLESS STEEL RULE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0136.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0137.xml
article
88
88,89,105
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Don’t Chop Up That Old Table
You Can Restore It Even if the Top Is Warped and the Frame Is Falling Apart
[no value]
[no value]
R. C. STANLEY
ANTIQUE drop-leaf and gate-leg tables are so popular and good ones are so hard to get these days, that it pays to do all the patching and repairing necessary in order to save any promising old table. With care and patience one can restore nearly any piece to its original condition.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0138.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
Palmolive: PALMOLIVE Shaving Cream
[no value]
Palmolive
PALMOLIVE Shaving Cream
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0139.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
APCO MOSSBERG CORPORATION
[no value]
APCO MOSSBERG CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0140.xml
article
90
90
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
How to Do Trick Whittling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OLYMPIC JONES
EVERYONE who has seen ornate and delicate fans whittled from a single piece of wood, like those illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2, has wondered how the work was done. They appear to be the result of almost miraculous skill and patience. As a matter of fact, anyone who is reasonably handy with a pocketknife can make them.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0141.xml
article
90
90
Models
[no value]
Snap Fasteners Make Neat Ship Model Deadeyes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALFRED PELLE
SHIP model builders usually find the task of making deadeyes irksome in the extreme, but they can save themselves this work if they are willing to use dress snap fasteners instead. Fasteners of the type illustrated are a good substitute.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0142.xml
article
91
91
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Dust Plugs for Chucks and Faceplates
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. L. WHEELER
IN SHOPS where lathe chucks and faceplates are kept on the floor when not in use, they collect dirt and grit in the threaded holes. In time the threads become gummed up and screw on the spindle with too much resistance. Operators are sometimes careless about cleaning the threads out, especially if they are hurrying on piece work.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0143.xml
article
91
91
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Scrap Parts Converted into Spray Gun for Painting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. B.
THE accompanying illustrations show a practical paint spray gun made from an old blowtorch and a regulating valve bracket from a scrap lubricator. The air is carried into the head through the feed glass drain vent, retapped to take %-in. pipe. The outer nozzle was the only turned part made, and it was secured by the original glass packing nut. For a small homemade affair, it has proved handy in covering parts about the shop not conveniently worked with a brush.—F. B.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0144.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
STUDEBAKER CORPORATION
[no value]
STUDEBAKER CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0145.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
MOLLÉ COMPANY
[no value]
MOLLÉ COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0146.xml
article
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Home Workshop Chemistry
Simple Formulas that Will Save Time and Money
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CRUDE natural rubber, which is also called caoutchouc, is soft and elastic. In its crude state, it is obtained from the sap of a number of different trees and shrubs. To render it fit for use it must be vulcanized, which makes it more elastic.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0147.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Veedex—ROOT INCORPORATED
[no value]
Veedex—ROOT INCORPORATED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0148.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
CELOTEX COMPANY
[no value]
CELOTEX COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0149.xml
article
94
94,95
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
How to Turn Ornamental Legs for a Footstool
Materials for Footstool
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAVING mastered the wood turning exercises and projects described in the preceding articles of this series, we can have much real fun making furniture that is ordinarily beyond the amateur woodworker. The important thing in furniture construction is not only good workmanship, but also—and perhaps to a greater extent —good design.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0150.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
Silver Steel
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
Taper Ground
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0151.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
CHAMPION Spark Plugs
[no value]
CHAMPION Spark Plugs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0152.xml
advertisement
96a
96a
[no value]
[no value]
Elgin
[no value]
Elgin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0153.xml
advertisement
96b
96b
[no value]
[no value]
LISTERINE
[no value]
LISTERINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0154.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0155.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Clemson Brothers, Inc.
[no value]
Clemson Brothers, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0156.xml
article
99
99
For the Home Owner
[no value]
How to Cement Rain Pipes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHERE a galvanized or copper downspout from a roof gutter enters the tile sewer opening, it is sometimes necessary to renew the cement filling, which breaks off and allows the water to flood out during heavy rains. Such a filler may be mixed from any sharp sand (rescreened torpedo) and Portland cement.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0157.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS: SOUTH BEND LATHES
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
SOUTH BEND LATHES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0158.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
Crescent Tool Co.
[no value]
Crescent Tool Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0159.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
H. GERSTNER & SONS: Tool Chest
[no value]
H. GERSTNER & SONS
Tool Chest
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0160.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
W. B. & J. E. BOICE: Boice-Crane Machines
[no value]
W. B. & J. E. BOICE
Boice-Crane Machines
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0161.xml
article
100
100,101
Lt. A. R. McCracken, U. S. N., Describes an Easy Way to Make
[no value]
Sails for Ship Models
Linen Tracing Cloth Is Used—Its Natural Curl Gives a Picturesque, Wind-Blown Effect
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO questions are of vital interest to everyone who admires ship models and wishes to build them. One is what size to make the model. A large model requires considerable space for building as well as for display, yet small models generally have minute and complicated details which make their construction much more difficult.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0162.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
J. D. Wallace & Co.
[no value]
J. D. Wallace & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0163.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0164.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
The Mount Carmel Mfg. Co.: MOCAR
[no value]
The Mount Carmel Mfg. Co.
MOCAR
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0165.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
THE P. A. GEIER CO.
[no value]
THE P. A. GEIER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0166.xml
article
102
102
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Blueprints for Your Home Workshop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OUR blueprints can be obtained for 25 cents a sheet. In some cases there are two or three sheets to one subject. The blueprints are complete in themselves, but if you wish the corresponding back issue of the magazine in which the project was described in detail, it can be had for 25 cents additional so long as copies are available.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0167.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0168.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
LEWIS MFG. CO.
[no value]
LEWIS MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0169.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
NEW WAY SPRAY GUN COMPANY: LACQUER SPRAY
[no value]
NEW WAY SPRAY GUN COMPANY
LACQUER SPRAY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0170.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
Apparatus Engineering Co.: 100 POWER MICROSCOPE
[no value]
Apparatus Engineering Co.
100 POWER MICROSCOPE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0171.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0172.xml
article
104
104
Models
[no value]
How to Mold Ship-Model Blocks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. W. SAWYER
YOU will find that you can hasten and simplify the work of making deadeyes and blocks for ship models by molding them from plastic wood putty of the type sold in cans at hardware and paint stores for filling cracks and holes. The mold is made by boring holes in a 34or ⅜-in. board.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0173.xml
article
104
104
Models
[no value]
Plane Model Built from Our Blueprints
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY blueprint was used by C. H. Tanner, of Urbana, Ill., in building this remarkably realistic modelofLindbergh’s trans-Atlantic plane. The blueprint, which is No. 67 in the list on page 102, gives full size drawings for a toy model of the Spirit of St. Louis.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0174.xml
article
104
104
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Fan Converts Hot Attic into Livable Room
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VENTILATING engineers say that the ordinary attic can be made livable for play or sleeping purposes, particularly during the summer months, by placing a comparatively inexpensive propeller type of ventilating fan in the gable end. The fan should be so arranged that it will draw out or exhaust the hot air during the daytime, but at night it is turned around so as to drive outside air into the attic space.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0175.xml
article
104
104
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Sharp Tools Save Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. K.
FEW amateur woodworkers realize that minutes spent in keeping tools in working order mean hours of more effective work. A glint of light on the cutting edge of a tool tells the skilled workman that it should be sharpened on the oilstone, though it may not need to be ground.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0176.xml
article
105
105
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Portable Seat for Outdoor Events
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Long waits at air spectacles and parades can be made less tiresome with these seats. TO VIEW a parade or such an event as the arrival or departure of a famous aviator, it is often necessary to arrive an hour or two ahead of time. This entails a tiresome wait, especially if no seats are available.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0177.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
SIMOND SAW AND STEEL COMPANY: SAWS FILES KNIVES STEEL
[no value]
SIMOND SAW AND STEEL COMPANY
SAWS FILES KNIVES STEEL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0178.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Up-to-Date Machine Works
[no value]
Up-to-Date Machine Works
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0179.xml
article
106
106
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Cabinets to Guard Your Tools
One Type Is for Saws Alone, Another Holds a Complete Kit— A Simple Way to Improve a Carpenter’s Vise—Other Kinks
[no value]
[no value]
FRED. E. FOX
E. G. LEVINE
HOWARD DICK
N. M. BALDWIN
NOTICING that my saws rusted when not in use, I made the case illustrated in Fig. 1. This is hung on the wall, and a dish of kero sene is kept in the bottom. I now find that my saws do not get rusty, no matter how long I leave them. Furthermore, the teeth are not exposed to accidental damage as when the saws are hung on nails in the open shop.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0180.xml
article
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
Identical Twins’ Parallel Lives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOUR family includes identical twins, should you count them as one person instead of two? Dr. J. M. Wolfsohn, of San Francisco, and Dr. S. A. Kinnear Wilson, of London, England, advanced the surprising theory that such twins, usually strikingly alike, are destined to run the same course of life.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0181.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
The SHALER Company
[no value]
The SHALER Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0182.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0183.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
WESTERN CLOCK COMPANY: Westclox watch
[no value]
WESTERN CLOCK COMPANY
Westclox watch
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0184.xml
article
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
U. S. Bands 270,000 Birds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW knowledge of birds’ migration habits is being gained, and long-standing mysteries solved, through the banding and releasing of birds by the U. S. Biological Survey, according to F. C. Lincoln, in charge of the work. To date, 270,000 birds have been banded and 10,338 recovered.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0185.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
Von Hoffman Aircraft School
[no value]
Von Hoffman Aircraft School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0186.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0187.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0188.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0189.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0190.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0191.xml
article
113
113
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Hunting Lost Races of Men
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXPLORERS, following the dim trails of lost men, are unfolding some of the most thrilling mystery stories ever told. German, Austrian, and Russian scientists are climbing to the “roof of the world” in the Himalaya Mountains of Russian Turkestan in search of a lost race of white men believed to have been marooned for centuries on the desolate peaks.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0192.xml
article
113
113
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Most Daring North Pole Plan
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE one regret expressed by Capt. George 3H. Wilkins at the completion of his astonishing airplane flight across the Polar Sea was that he dared not chance a landing on the rough ice to make soundings and observe ocean currents. Such observations are necessary, he conceded, before the true nature of the Arctic, and its influence on the rest of the world, can be understood.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0193.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0194.xml
advertisement
114
114,115,116,117,118,119,120,121,122,123,124,125,126,127,128,129,130,131,132,133,134,135
[no value]
[no value]
Money Making Opportunities
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0195.xml
article
119
119
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Bolt Turns Corners
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BOLT that can go around a corner is a structural novelty developed by a cablemaking concern, which claims for its flexible shaft unique advantages in industry. It can double up in a U-shape to serve as a hanger for pipe; other uses are practically unlimited in bolting machinery parts and shackling temporary wall fittings.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0196.xml
article
128
128
Aviation
[no value]
Attack Problem of Icy Wings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WAYS to prevent the formation of ice on airplane wings—one of the greatest remaining perils of air travel—are being tried by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, which is studying the particular weather conditions that favor production of the ice coat.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0197.xml
article
132
132
Aviation
[no value]
What Lettering on Planes Means
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LETTERS painted on Navy planes disclose to 1 the initiated the type and builder of the plane, the purpose for which it is used, the type of engine, and often additional information, according to the Navy's latest revised code book. “V” as a prefix is used on airplanes alone, indicating heavier-than-air craft; dirigibles would use the letter “Z”.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0198.xml
article
135
135
Aviation
[no value]
Today’s Planes “Just Kites”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FUTURE airports will be huge concrete platforms a mile square or even larger, according to Capt. E. V. Rickenbacker, American war ace. The largest planes of today, he says, are mere kites compared with tomorrow’s monsters; and in five years the concrete airport will be as commonplace as macadam roads are today.
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0199.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
OIL HEATING INSTITUTE
[no value]
OIL HEATING INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0200.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0201.xml
advertisement
138
138,139,140
[no value]
[no value]
Rhodes Manufacturing Co.: KRISS KROSS
[no value]
Rhodes Manufacturing Co.
KRISS KROSS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280801_0113_002_0202.xml