Issue: 19280701

Sunday, July 1, 1928
July 1928
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Saturday, December 13, 2014

Articles
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0001.xml
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ETHYL GASOLINE CORPORATION
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ETHYL GASOLINE CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0002.xml
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1
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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2,3
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WHAT IS NEW THIS MONTH
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0004.xml
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WHAT IS COMING NEXT MONTH
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The night sky glows. Pillars of flame and smoke leap high. The very ground burns. You’ll be amazed as you read an eye-witness account of “the biggest fire on earth”, which has burned unchecked for forty-four years! How would you like to speed at thirty miles an hour in your little outboard motorboat?
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0005.xml
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THE F. H. SMITH CO.
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THE F. H. SMITH CO.
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0006.xml
article
4
4,5,6,7
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Just What Is an Investment Trust?
The General Management Trust
The Fixed Share Trust
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WALLACE AMES
THE question asked in the following letter is in the minds of so many investors that we publish it, and our answer, for the information of all readers of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. WALLACE AMES, Financial Editor, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. Dear Sir: I want to invest $2,000 in an investment trust.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0007.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0008.xml
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INVESTORS SYNDICATE
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INVESTORS SYNDICATE
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0009.xml
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UNITED STATES FISCAL CORPORATION
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UNITED STATES FISCAL CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0010.xml
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6
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FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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FIDELITY BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0011.xml
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UNITED STATES MORTGAGE BOND COMPANY
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UNITED STATES MORTGAGE BOND COMPANY
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0012.xml
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7
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Cochran & McCluer Co.
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Cochran & McCluer Co.
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0013.xml
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7
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HAMMARLUND MFG. CO.
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HAMMARLUND MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0014.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0015.xml
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A DIRECT ANSWER TO THE QUESTION "Which Is the Best?"
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F. G. PRYOR
TO FIND out the truth for the benefit of its readers about products of a technical or semitechnical nature, to determine whether or not such products have evolved from the experimental stage, and to learn which makes -are reliable—these were POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY’S aims in establishing the Popular Science Institute of Standards four years ago.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0016.xml
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0017.xml
article
10
10
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Our Readers Say
How Many Are a Few?
From Future Flyers
Radio Editor: Can You Fix?
Yes, You're Right
Fool and Hero, Both
You Can’t Fool a Puzzler!
Page Sir Jagadis
How About Prohibition?
The Same Little Book
That Would Be the Limit
Can the Earth Explode?
Chewing as They Choose
Why Argue with a Woman?
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"I THOUGHT you had enough judgment not to let the present aviation craze run away with you. It appears I was mistaken. Encouraging young people to make careers of flying, as you do in ‘Breaking into Aviation,' is bound to cause much harm, even though you warn that flying offers no easy road to fortune.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0018.xml
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11
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Tycos Temperature Instruments
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Tycos Temperature Instruments
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0019.xml
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12
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A. H. Grebe & Company, Inc.
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A. H. Grebe & Company, Inc.
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0020.xml
masthead
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13
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0021.xml
article
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13,14,15
LEADING ARTICLES
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Super-Rays Reveal Secret of Creation
A FAMOUS Adventurer in Science Tells How He Found Streams of Energy a Thousand Times More Powerful Than X-Rays, Coming from Beyond the Stars—What He Learned of Their Meaning
Beyond the Boundary
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ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
A STOCKY, white-haired man spoke from the platform of the gray-domed National Academy of Sciences Building at Washington the other night. Row upon row of the nation's most distinguished scientists burst time and again into applause. He was Dr. Robert Andrews Millikan, winner of a Nobel prize for physics, and of the Edison Medal.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0022.xml
article
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16,17,136
LEADING ARTICLES
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Telling Ocean Flyers when to Hop
The Man Who Said "Go!" Reveals How Pilots Risked Their All on His Ability to Forecast Atlantic Weather
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JAMES H. KIMBALL
THE perils and hardships encountered by the crew of the Bremen in their successful flight from Ireland to America have not dulled the desire of other European airmen to make the attempt. As I write, more than a dozen of them, with one eye on the weather, are restlessly waiting to hop off.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0023.xml
article
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18,19,20,130,131,132
FICTION
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"HUNKY"
FROM South American Jungles Comes This Remarkable Tale of Men Who Risk Lives in Raging Flood for Rare Platinum Grains
Prize Racing Turtles
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WHITMAN CHAMBERS
THEY called him “Hunky.” Just why, I never knew. But he was Hunky on the pay roll and Hunky to the crew of the Consolidated’s Number Four dredger. For that matter, names don’t mean a great deal down there in the Choco. It’s a wild, God-forsaken country, that section of Colombia.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0024.xml
article
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21
News the Cameras Bring
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Aero Engines on Trial
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Only airplane motors that' pass severe tests will be certified by the U. S. Commerce Department under its system just established. The picture shows the examination of a 5-cylinder radial machine
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0025.xml
article
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21
News the Cameras Bring
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As a Bird Sees Two U. S. Fleets
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An unusual airplane view of more than a hundred Naval craft anchored in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, after recent maneuvers of the Atlantic and Pacific fieets. In the middle distance the hospital ships Relief and Mercy are identified by their white paint
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0026.xml
article
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21
News the Cameras Bring
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Auto Driven on Rocket Principle
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Driven by the force of the recoil from explosions of powder, which is converted into power applied directly to the axles, this new car invented by Max Valier, a German, is said to attain a speed of 60 miles an hour eight seconds after it starts.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0027.xml
article
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21
News the Cameras Bring
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A Pole-Bound Flying Ship
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A striking photograph of the dirigible Italia, in which General Umberto Nobile plans to visit the North Pole, nosing to earth in Pomerania after weathering storms for twenty-four hours since making start from Italy
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0028.xml
article
21
21
News the Cameras Bring
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Nonstop Tractor Feat
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“Joe”, and “Bill” Battaglia, Californians, smash Australia’s 118-hour world’s record by driving a tractor ten days and nights. California University officials timed them. The Mayor of San Jose (right) presents them with a cup
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0029.xml
article
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22,23,114
LEADING ARTICLES
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Germany—"Dark Horse" of the Olympic Games
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LAWSON ROBERTSON
WATCH a car full of men reading the morning paper on their way to work. A glance over the main news and they turn to the sport page. Why? The answer is one word: Victory! The front pages tell largely of failure and defeat, of those who commit suicide, get divorced, go to jail.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0030.xml
article
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24
LEADING ARTICLES
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Flyers Again Beat the Arctic
Continents Brought Hundreds of Miles Nearer Together by Wilkins and Eielson in Polar Flight
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ELLSWORTH BENNETT
OVER a bleak, uncharted desert of ice, two fur-clad explorers sped in a little streamlined monoplane, blazing an air trail across the Polar Sea. Apparently angered at such daring, the Arctic loosed its fury, hurling upon them blinding snow and roaring winds.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0031.xml
article
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25,26
LEADING ARTICLES
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The Truth about Fuelless Motors
An Illuminating View of the Latest Claims of Power Out of Nothing—The History of Perpetual Motion Hoaxes
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E. E. FREE
THE Hendershot “fuelless motor” announced recently by Lester J. Hendershot, of a suburb of Pittsburgh, has brought numerous similar proposals in its train. A Brazilian priest, Father Antonio d’Angelo, has declared his “ionic motor” runs by some mysterious property of the iron cores and magnets it contains.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0032.xml
article
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27
LEADING ARTICLES
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Now I'll Tell One—About Africa
True Stories That Sound Like Fibs of the Land in Which Ant Hills Are Big as Houses and Hens Lay 24 Eggs at Once
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THOMAS W. PHELPS
IN AFRICA stone floats, paper flowers grow wild, trees wear feathers, and fish wriggle out of the ocean to sun themselves. Hens taller than a man lay two dozen eggs at a time, packed in one stout shell for the convenience of wholesale bakers. Blossoms spread their petals and fly away when picked, leaves turn into butterflies, twigs into bugs, and birds make a business of leading hungry travelers to hollow trees full of honey.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0033.xml
article
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28,29,128,129
LEADING ARTICLES
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ONE to THIRTY-ONE
An Answer to the Age-Old Question: Are Women As Smart As Men?
The Thirty-One Geniuses
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PRESCOTT LECKY
IS YOUR wife as smart as you? How many times have you argued the point! Did you ever settle it? Here, for the first time, a psychologist of recognized ability presents a scientific answer. Mr. Lecky, a member of the Department of Psychology in Columbia University, has been investigating the subject for years.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0034.xml
article
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Aviation
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Comfort and Luxuries Now Offered Air Travelers
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0035.xml
article
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Aviation
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AIRPLANE Passengers Can Dictate to Competent Stenographers, Enjoy Excellent Dining Service, and Sleep in Restful Beds in the Big New Planes
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CAN air passengers fly in comfort? The answer is given in these photographs. Not long ago a Middle Western business man who had said he would never patronize a passenger plane, because he disliked the inconveniences of “camping out,” was prevailed upon to try one short trip.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0036.xml
article
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32,33
LEADING ARTICLES
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Romance with the Fishing Fleet
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CARL HELM
SCENE: An old fishing port off the coast of Cape Ann, on the rockbound coast of Massachusetts. Under a chilly moon in a freezing wind the women of the town line the docks and watch their men race against time and the ice—a gruelling, spectacular contest.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0037.xml
article
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34,35,36,121,122,123
LEADING ARTICLES
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DICK BYRD—Adventurer
Over the Top of the World with Brave Floyd Bennett—A Thrilling Story of Loyal Friendship You'll Never Forget
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FITZHUGH GREEN
NOT long after the World War ended the head of a large business said to Dick Byrd: “I’ll give you $25,000 a year salary and a long-term contract if you'll come and work for me. Pick any department you like. What I mostly want you to do is to meet some of the important people on our list and go abroad once or twice a year.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0038.xml
article
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37,38,111,112
LEADING ARTICLES
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I Can Peer into Your Stomach and Foretell Your Future
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I. SETH HIRSCH
THE man walked into my office keenly alive, flashed a quick glance at his wrist watch, and asked permission to use my telephone before the examination I was to make of his stomach. Because I had to shield my eyes behind dark goggles for five minutes or so to acquire “cat's eyes”—enlarged pupils sensitive even to feeble gleams of light—I told him to take his time.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0039.xml
article
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39
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How Silent Policemen Work
A Graphic Description of the New Manless System of Traffic Control
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HOW do the blinking red and green lights that stop traffic or send it speeding on its way really work? On this page our artist illustrates one of the latest and most ingenious types of traffic signals—developed by the General Electric Company and now in use in sections of New York City, Chicago, St. Louis, and other cities.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0040.xml
article
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40,41,134
LEADING ARTICLES
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Flyers Who Rob Caterpillar Club
Breath-Taking Escapes of Aviators Who, Face to Face with Death, Piloted Crippled and Burning Planes to Earth; How Their Amazing Skill Has Made Flying Safer for Everyone
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NELL RAY CLARKE
HIGH in the air the big Army bomber burst into flames. Lashed to the fuselage was a ton of explosives. The ship hung for a second, then plunged in a dive, fire whipping back from its disabled engine. Lieutenant Eugene L. Eubank had taken up the huge plane with a full load of torpedoes for a test flight over Wright Field, at Dayton, O. At 2,400 feet the motor had overheated.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0041.xml
article
42
42,127
LEADING ARTICLES
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Mountain Carved into Monument
Unveiling of Confederate Memorial Shows How Scientific Genius Made the Face of 800-Foot Cliff into Camera Plate for the World’s Greatest Photograph
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GEORGE LEE DOWD
IN THE heart of old Dixie there was enacted a few weeks ago a soul-stirring scene that symbolized the unity of the North and South and exemplified the capacity of man for gigantic intellectual and scientific achievements born of patriotic inspiration.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0042.xml
article
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43,44,133
LEADING ARTICLES
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Breaking Into Aviation
America’s Foremost Pilots, Engineers and Airplane Manufacturers Tell How They Won Success and How You Can Start Your Career
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EDGAR C. WHEELER
DUDLEY M. STEELE had just received his discharge from the Army Air Service. He was sitting in the Kansas City Athletic Club, one day in 1919, reading a newspaper, and wondering now and then where to get a job. At a table across from him sat Roy Nafziger, head of a large Kansas City wholesale baking company.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0043.xml
article
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45,127
LEADING ARTICLES
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New Wealth from Magic Sand
Amazing Uses Found for "Silica Gel,” a Wonder Product of the Laboratory
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WALTER E. BURTON
AS SIMPLE and ordinary a thing as sand, invested with almost magic qualities and endowed with amazing powers by the tireless research and experiment of the laboratories, was called upon for aid in raising the sunken submarine S-4 when the United States Navy encountered difficulties that threatened seriously to delay the lifting of the doomed ship with her forty heroic dead.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0044.xml
article
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46,47,48,124,125,126
FICTION
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The Movie Maker
A Romance of Real Inventions
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S. W. NEWMEYER
WAS that a crack in the ceiling or only a thin bar of sunlight? As Don's idly curious gaze followed the diagonal line across the ceiling and down the wall, he realized with bewilderment that it wasn’t his ceiling—nor his wall—nor his—yes, it was his Judy.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0045.xml
article
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49
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Face Death to Explore Sea of Ice
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0046.xml
article
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50,51
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Newest Achievements of the Laboratories
Woman Doctor May Win Nobel Prize for Cancer Research—Plants Manufacture Gas—City of Apes Planned—Man Swims Immune Among Hundreds of Huge Sharks
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THE latest steps in research and invention in all scientific fields, important for their bearing on our everyday life, are recorded in these pages.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0047.xml
article
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50
Astronomy
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New Metal Mirror Used in Telescope
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AFTER twenty-five years of . research and experiment, George H. Lutz, a Chicago engineer whose hobby has made him one of the best known amateur astronomers, has perfected a telescope mirror made of a special new metal alloy that is said to be four times as hard as steel.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0048.xml
article
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Laboratory Discoveries
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Plant Is Living Gas Works
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IF YOU read, in our April issue, the fascinating story of Sir Jagadis Bose, Hindu naturalist, and of his discoveries of the humanlike existence of plants, your flower bed and vegetable garden have taken on a new interest this summer. Here is a fascinating world which science is just beginning to comprehend.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0049.xml
article
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50
New Processes and Inventions
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Lightning Distance Finder
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WHAT the adding machine is to the bookkeeper, and the slide rule to the engineer, a new. quick-figuring machine—the trinometer—is to surveyor, gunner, and aircraft pilot, thanks to Dr. Joseph E. Rowe, of the College of William and Mary, its inventor.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0050.xml
article
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50,51
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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National Icebox Standards
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A FEW months ago the Popular Science Institute of Standards undertook to establish efficiency standards for the guidance of purchasers of household iceboxes and refrigerators. Today that undertaking is joined in a movement for nation-wide refrigeration standards.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0051.xml
article
51
51
Health and Hygiene
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What Kills Ultra-Violet Rays?
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TESTS have shown that the ultra-violet rays of the sun, valued for their germicidal and stimulative qualities, exist in less quantity at street level than at the tops of tall buildings, and scientists have speculated on the agency that robs the lower air of the health-giving light.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0052.xml
article
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51
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Sharks Refuse to Eat Man
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SHARKS—except one species—do not bite men. That is the verdict brought back from the Bahama Islands by Van Campen Heilner, ichthyologist of Spring Lake, N. J. As forecast in “Risking Death for Science,” in our May issue, Heilner plunged into shark-infested waters, to settle the dispute whether sharks are naturally man-eaters.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0053.xml
article
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51
Health and Hygiene
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A City of Apes
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A BATTALION of chimpanzees and other apes is being recruited to help their human cousins stamp out insanity and crime. The Medical Center in New York City announces that a community of apes soon will be established. The animals will be made subjects of tests of effects of narcotics, alcohol, and infectious diseases on successive generations.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0054.xml
article
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51
Health and Hygiene
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Woman Leads Cancer Study
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FOR outstanding work and achievement in cancer research, Dr. Maude Slye, of the University of Chicago, was recently recommended by the American College of Physicians for a Nobel Prize Award. Sober of countenance, her short-bobbed hair shot through with gray, the woman scientist is called the foremost cancer authority of the West.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0055.xml
article
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51
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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We All Walk in Circles
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IF WE couldn't see where we were going, we'd run in circles. Persons lost in the. woods often turn completely around. Experimenting with blindfolded persons, Prof. A. A. Schaeffer of the University of Kansas recently discovered that our natural tendency is to walk in narrowing spirals, like a clock spring.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0056.xml
article
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51
Health and Hygiene
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4,524 Deaths Due to Falls
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A VETERAN of the fiercest fighting in France tripped on a shoe string, fell headlong, and broke his neck. A steeplejack who had just performed breathtaking feats on a skyscraper stumbled on a curbstone and was crippled for life. Such incidents are not infrequent.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0057.xml
article
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52,53
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Surprising New Ideas of Inventors
Mucilage Fountain Pen
New Razor Blade Holder
Flashlight Writing Pad
Line Guide Aids Typists
Toe Guards Save Injuries
Unique Mechanical Golf Teacher
Driver’s Heel Guard
Seven-Sided Razor
Liquid Stocking Mender
Safety Fuse-Pulling Device
Pocketknife Handle Carries Keys
New Frame Multiplies Hack Saw Uses
Windshield Screen Keeps Out Dirt
Device Shows Notes to Speaker
New Shaving Idea
A Bathing Machine
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Designed for pocket or desk, this device has vegetable mucilage in its reservoir, which is refilled by removing the cap at the top. Press the tube on the object to be gummed and it ejects a drop of the mucilage. It closes automatically as pressure is released
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0058.xml
article
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54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Submarine "Sunk" in Test And Raised in Half Hour
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THE U. S. Submarine S-27 was sunk the other day in San Diego, Calif., harbor and rescued by her sister ship, the S-28, in half an hour. It was a sham disaster and test in the Navy’s efforts to be prepared in case of another such disaster as that of the S-4.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0059.xml
article
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54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Look Out for Poison Ivy Now!
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BEWARE the poison ivy, with its three telltale leaves in a cluster! At this time of year, the U. S. Health Service warns, the curious plant poison that causes skin irritation, violent itching, and burning sensations is particularly virulent.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0060.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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Scientist’s "Talking Book" Soon Ready to Read to You
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THAT he is working on an electric device that reads a book aloud has just been revealed by Dr. W. R. Whitney, director of research of the General Electric Laboratories. In reality this device, he explains, will be a long-running phonograph that uses, instead of wax records, long strips of photographic film such as are employed in “talking movies.”
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0061.xml
article
54
54
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Human Traffic Signal Lights
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TRAFFIC policemen in Bath, England, are equipped with the novel electrical flash-signal shown below to protect them from being run down by careless motorists. A small battery which is carried on the officer's belt supplies the necessary electric current to operate the “human lighthouse,” and make him clearly visible to automobile drivers on even the darkest night.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0062.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Earthquakes Made to Order To Help in Railroad Survey
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EXPLOSIVE charges, set off underground, are helping Russian engineers to survey the route of the proposed Turkestan-Siberia railroad. The man-made earthquakes, recorded on portable seismographs, reveal the geologic structure of the underlying rock.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0063.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Rescuing a Dying Language
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SAVING a dying language that in a few years would be extinct was the task that Dr. F. G. Speck, anthropologist of the University of Pennsylvania, recently set himself. He has just returned from a hurried trip to the Catawba Indian reservation in South Carolina, where he learned what he could of the ancient Catawba tongue from the only remaining persons who speak it—two old Catawba women, Mrs. Samson Owl and Sally Brown.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0064.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Snakes and Ultra-Violet Rays
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[no value]
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[no value]
THAT there may be truth in the belief that poisonous desert snakes are the deadliest is suggested by the recent report of two investigators to the French Academy of Sciences. After exposure to ultra-violet rays of light, snake venom, they found, became increasingly fatal.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0065.xml
article
55
55
Radio
[no value]
Push Buttons Tune Radio
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TUNING-IN a desired broadcasting station is merely a matter of pressing a button or throwing a lever, in the new automatically controlled radio receiver perfected by Harry N. Marvin, inventor and moving picture pioneer of Rye, N. Y., shown with it below.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0066.xml
article
55
55
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Clock Controls Street Lights
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OPERATING according to the hours and minutes of daily sunlight, this remarkable newly invented astronomical. clock turns on the street lights when the sun sets in the evening and switches them off in the early morning when the sun comes up over the horizon.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0067.xml
article
55
55
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Listening to Roar of Somersaulting Atoms
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ROARING noises that rivaled Niagara nearly deafened scientists who recently listened to billions of atoms in a bar of iron turning somersaults at a demonstration given by Dr. H. Clyde Snook in New York. Although so small that over one hundred million of them would form a line less than an inch long, these tiny particles of matter are not too small to be heard when their sound is amplified by an apparatus developed by the Bell Telephone Laboratories and used by Dr. Snook.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0068.xml
article
55
55
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Fireless Mine Blasting Gas
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[no value]
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HIGHLY compressed carbon dioxide, the same gas that is used under moderate pressures in many household electric refrigerators, has been successfully tried as an explosive at the Lick Branch coal mine in Maybeury, W. Va., according to Robert M. Lambie, chief of the West Virginia mining department.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0069.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Cruiser Sets Speed Record
[no value]
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STEAMING at a 36.3-knot clip, equivalent to forty land miles an hour, the French cruiser Tourville recently made what is claimed to be a new speed record among the navies of the world. A short time before, a French cruiser, also of the 10,000-ton class, the Duquesne, made 35.2 knots.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0070.xml
article
55
55
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Glass Blackboards Proposed
[no value]
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BLACKBOARDS of glass, translucent and illuminated from behind, are foreseen as school equipment in a recent report of the American Physical Society. Writing on such boards, tests showed, could clearly be seen from any angle. Also, the board can serve as a screen for projection of lantern slides, and, with a diagram thrown on the screen, chalk lines can be drawn to supplement it.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0071.xml
article
56
56,57
[no value]
[no value]
New Gains in Conquest of Air
All-Metal Steam Dirigible Nears Completion and Greatest All-Metal Plane Flies—Air Safer Now Than Trains in 1842
[no value]
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0072.xml
article
56
56
Aviation
[no value]
Statistics Show Flying Safer
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WHILE more airplanes are flying farther with heavier loads than ever before, the number of flying accidents is steadily decreasing. That is the verdict of Dr. F. L. Hoffman, consulting statistician of the Prudential Life Insurance Company, after studying flying hazards.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0073.xml
article
56
56
Aviation
[no value]
All-Metal Steam Dirigible
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[no value]
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ITS envelope already more than half completed, an all-metal experimental dirigible that Thomas B. Slate is building at Glendale, Calif., is expected to be finished and ready for test some time this July. It is a 150-foot craft of extraordinary rigidity, despite its light weight.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0074.xml
article
56
56
Aviation
[no value]
Chasing Bandits with Plane
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHASING bank robbers by airplane was recently tried out by an Illinois law enforcement association. It staged a mimic bank robbery in some Lake County city, the name of which was kept secret. The “bandits” made their escape in a high-powered automobile, of which a description was telephoned to the Ford airport near Hammond, Ill.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0075.xml
article
56
56
Aviation
[no value]
Plane Surveys Electric Line
[no value]
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WITH three trips of a speedy camera seaplane over rough, undrained lake districts between Toronto and the Ottawa River, a 200-mile route for a high-tension electric line recently was surveyed at a saving of weeks of ordinary surveying and great expense.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0076.xml
article
56
56
Aviation
[no value]
Wing Slots Make Crash Safe
[no value]
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BEFORE a crowd of shuddering spectators at the Stag Lane airdrome in London, the other day, Capt. G. de Havilland, noted British airplane designer and pilot, deliberately pointed his Moth plane at the ground, crashed, and stepped from the shattered fuselage unhurt.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0077.xml
article
57
57
Aviation
[no value]
Gold Rush Made in Planes
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FOUR small and four large planes have just been ordered by a recently organized Canadian mining company, to be. used in exploring and developing mineral areas over the whole of Canada, according to the Trade Commissioner at Toronto. Prospectors will fly into new gold fields, stake out claims, and return to register them.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0078.xml
article
57
57
Aviation
[no value]
Echoes Tell Plane’s Height
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A SERIES of explosions like a machine gun’s rat-a-tat-tat, within a plane’s undercarriage, tells an airman his exact height, even when the ground is obscured by the thickest of fog, in a new device to be installed on French aircraft. Electric sound detectors pick up the echo from the ground and gage the craft's altitude.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0079.xml
article
57
57
Aviation
[no value]
Collegians’ Altitude Race
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A NEW kind of intercollegiate contest is scheduled this month at Mitchel Field, N. Y., where college airplane pilots will match their planes against one another in a novel race. Altitude and speed combined make the goal; the team whose members, flying singly, soar a mile high in the shortest time, will be the winner.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0080.xml
article
57
57
Aviation
[no value]
Lindbergh Gets New Plane
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COL. LINDBERGH, a tired, constantly feted hero since his pioneer flight to Paris in the spring of last year, flies into retirement on the wings of his new plane, a photograph of which appeared in the June POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. Its motor, a beautiful nickel-plated mechanism, gift of the Wright Aeronautical Corporation, is said to be the finest the Wright factories have ever made.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0081.xml
article
57
57
Aviation
[no value]
Smithsonian Credits Wrights
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FORMAL credit from the Smithsonian Institution for having made the first man-carrying flight in air history marks the latest step in the controversy which recently caused Orville Wright to remove his original plane from that institution and ship it to the British Museum.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0082.xml
article
57
57
Aviation
[no value]
Aviators Shot from Guns
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PILOTS of falling planes are literally lifted off their seats by a new German compressed-air gun that hurls them with their parachutes thirty feet clear of the planes. The novel device, which is to be exhibited at Cologne, is intended to avert the danger that an airman, jumping to save himself, may foul his parachute on the plane. A pull of a hand trigger, and he is shot free.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0083.xml
article
58
58
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Machines Spread "Stop Thief" Alarms
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE spreading of general alarms for the apprehension of lawbreakers in New York City’s five boroughs is speeded up by the recent installation of telegraph typewriters in the scores of precinct police stations scattered through the metropolis.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0084.xml
article
58
58
Automobiles
[no value]
A Motor Car Built to Skid
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DESIGNED to skid as often as possible, a novel automobile built by the National Physical Laboratory, in England, will eventually make motoring safer. By driving over different types of road in all sorts of weather and changing the types of tires, the investigators hope to determine the best tire equipment and pavement to make motoring safer.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0085.xml
article
58
58
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Pipe Line Saves Potato Crop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WESTERN irrigation methods were W successfully applied not long ago by Lewis A. Toan, New York “seed potato king.” When excessive drought withered his potato vines, Toan recalled a scheme he had seen used in Montana. He piped water from the village main, a quarter of a mile away, and saved his entire crop by the method seen at the right in operation.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0086.xml
article
58
58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Lightning Immunity Zones
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ABOUT every tall building equipped with lightning rods there is an invisible, but ever-present, ' cone-shaped zone of safety, according to F. W. Peek, Jr., engineer of the General Electric Company. Tests made during storms have shown, for instance, that the Wool worth Building in New York City is not only itself immune to lightning bolts, but creates all around it a conical protected area whose base is 1,100 feet in diameter.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0087.xml
article
58
58
Automobiles
[no value]
Gasoline Tax in 46 States
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[no value]
[no value]
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MOTORISTS who tour and those who merely drive near home are contributing to the cost of the highways in forty-six states and the District of Columbia through taxes levied on the gasoline they use. This economical means of supporting the nation’s network of roadways started in 1919, when three states levied a one-cent tax on each gallon of gas sold.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0088.xml
article
58
58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Tiny Meteorite Hits Baby, Second Instance on Record
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THE second recorded instance of a meteorite hitting a human being has just been reported from Japan, where a tiny pebble of celestial origin seared the neck of a three-year-old baby girl at play in Sukatu, near Tokio. Despite the tremendous number of meteorites that are known to bombard the earth each day, so rarely do they happen to fall within range of civilization that there is but one fatal accident on record—a falling stone from the heaven that killed a man in India, in 1827.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0089.xml
article
58
58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
World's Most Silent Room
[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
THE world’s most soundproof room has just been completed at the University of Utrecht, in Holland. Its silence is nearer absolute than that of uninhabited mountain peaks or Arctic wastes. Sensitive instruments it contains might tremble faintly should a jazz band burst forth outside, but the human occupant could hear no sound.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0090.xml
article
58
58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Ultra-Violet Light Varies
[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
JUST widely as there distinct are visible seven colors, ranging from violet to red, there are absolutely distinct “colors” of the invisible ultra-violet light so widely advocated for health treatment, two New,York City physicians, Dr. H. Goodman and Dr. W. T. Anderson, recently announced.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0091.xml
article
59
59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Seven Babies Born at Once Make Twins Seem Ordinary
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TWINS are commonplace compared with some remarkable cases of multiple births noted in medical literature. There is one recorded instance of seven living children born together. All but one died. Five cases are known of six children born at once.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0092.xml
article
59
59
Laboratory Discoveries
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Heart Revived After 2 Days
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[no value]
JUST a few drops of a clear yellow liquid started an animal's heart beating again two days after it was removed from the body, according to reports from Australia. This miracle-performing chemical will soon be available to the world, declares Prof. Ludwig Haberlandt, who calls his preparation the most powerful heart stimulant known.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0093.xml
article
59
59
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
New Arc Welding Marvel
[no value]
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TORRENTS of electrons purify metal and assure a perfect joint in the latest electric arc welding process, developed by a Cleveland firm. It employs an electrical phenomenon considered upon its discovery a mere laboratory curiosity; but which, put to work, gives the welded part of the metal the same strength and ductility as the plates joined.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0094.xml
article
59
59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
A Word-Puzzle Tablet in Roman Ruins
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[no value]
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[no value]
BY FITTING together, like a child’s puzzle, fragments of a stone tablet, French archeologists recently solved a 1,200-year-old riddle of the ancient Roman city of Timgad, Africa, destroyed by the Arabs in A.D. 629. In the ruins they unearthed a fragment which indicated that a man whose name began with “ Ro ” had given 400,000 sesterces (about $20,000) for some purpose.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0095.xml
article
59
59
Astronomy
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Moon’s "Rays" Still a a Puzzle
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MYSTERIOUS bright "rays" observed whenever telescopes are pointed at the moon are puzzling astronomers, according to H. G. Tomkins, English scientist, who is building a special reflect ing telescope in an effort to determine their significance by photographing them at all possible angles.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0096.xml
article
59
59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
A World-Wide Radio Clock
[no value]
[no value]
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ONE clock to beat time for the world is the remarkable proposal of Prof. Arthur Korn, noted German inventor of a radio picture transmitting process. From some central observatory its ticks would be broadcast instantly by radio to the whole civilized world, giving a single, accurate time.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0097.xml
article
59
59
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Wire Nets Defy Lightning
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AS A protection against lightning, three Pacific Coast oil companies have installed systems of grounded wire networks over their oil reservoirs, in addition to 200-foot lightning rods, as seen at the left. The towers protect against direct strikes, while the network is supposed to carry off any induced charge, keeping it off the reservoir and providing a good metallic path for its passage to the ground.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0098.xml
article
59
59
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Answers to Your Questions
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY is glad to answer, whenever possible, readers’ questions on any subject within its field and to supply names and addresses of makers of devices described in the magazine. Inquiries, inclosing stamped, self-addressed envelopes, should be sent to Information Department, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, 2,50 Fourth Avenue, New York City.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0099.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
City Map in Public Square
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TOURISTS and out-of-town visitors would be able to find their way around better if they could inspect a large, detailed map of the city. So argued the authorities of Berlin, and ordered such a map installed in Potsdam Platz and covered it with heavy glass to prevent mutilation.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0100.xml
article
60
60
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
“Soundless” Police Whistles
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WHISTLES whose notes are far too high-pitched for the human ear to hear have recently been supplied to policemen in virtually all large cities in France. Equipped with one of these alarms, an officer who observes a burglar at work can summon reinforcements without alarming the suspect.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0101.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Geysers Found in Nevada
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NEVADA, too, has its geysers, it has just been announced. They were discovered last summer by Prof. C. T. Brues, of Harvard University, and his wife, who were making a motor trip across the Nevada desert regions. Greatly to their surprise, the motor tourists came upon a small patch of erupting hot springs whose craters were much like those of the world-famous Yellowstone National Park geysers in Wyoming.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0102.xml
article
60
60,115
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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How Much Do You Know Of the World You Live In?
Here Are Correct Answers To Questions on Page 60
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TEST your knowledge with these questions, chosen from the hundreds our readers send in. The correct answers are given on page 115. 1. What game like basketball was played by ancient Americans? 2. Where do angostura bitters come from? 3. Where does Cayenne pepper come from?
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0103.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
How Folks Will Live in 1978
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HOW people may look and live fifty years hence, with customs strangely changed from those of today, was recently visualized at an ideal home exhibition in London, where these photos were taken. According to the designers’ theory, the home of the future will be so constructed that all rooms will have the desirable southern exposure, regardless of the house's position with relation to the street. Interchangeable walls will be moved by pressure of buttons.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0104.xml
article
61
61
Automobiles
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Know Your Car
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YOUR automobile motor is a heat engine. It is the heat of combustion that drives it. But with the gasoline motor, efficient as it is, a considerable amount of heat is wasted. This heat goes into the cylinder walls, cylinder head, and the moving metal parts; and if it remained, the motor would quickly become so hot that it would cease to run.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0105.xml
article
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61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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House Clings to Cliff Side
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A HOUSE tailored to fit a cliff, and supporting itself by its own sheer weight against the rock face, is the unique seashore home at Solona Beach, Calif., that William Cameron Menzies has designed for two moving picture celebrities, Douglas Fairbanks and Mary Pickford, his wife.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0106.xml
article
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61
Automobiles
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Auto in Use for 37 Years
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[no value]
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REMARKABLE staying powers of some of the pioneer automobiles is evidenced by a French machine that is thirty-seven years old and still going strong. The car is owned by the priest of a little French village, and has traveled faithfully more than 200,000 miles in its long and useful life.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0107.xml
article
61
61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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120 Millions of Us Now
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BY JULY 1, 1928, the United States will have 120,013,000 inhabitants, according to the latest estimate of the U. S. Census Bureau—an increase of nearly fifteen million since 1920. New York leads the states with more than eleven million, while Nevada is last with 77,407 persons.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0108.xml
article
61
61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Boring Huge Telescope Glass
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SOON the U. S. Bureau of Standards will undertake the ticklish job of boring an eight-inch hole through the center of the largest disk of optical glass ever cast in America, and the most perfect in the world. When no commercial glass worker in the United States could be found who would risk preparing the giant glass for its place in the Ohio Wesleyan University’s new reflecting telescope, Government experts decided to perform the work themselves.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0109.xml
article
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62,63
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Helpful New Tools in the Household
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PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0110.xml
article
64
64,136
RADIO
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What Would You Do If You Were Czar of Radio?
PRIZES FOR BEST LETTERS
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BY NO stretch of the imagination is it possible to run six cars abreast on a road only wide enough for four. It simply cannot be done. And yet that, in a nutshell, is just what radio broadcasters are trying to do. Several hundred stations are broadcasting in a band of wave lengths only wide enough to accommodate about ninety stations.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0111.xml
article
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65
RADIO
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Radio Hints for Summer Use
Wave Traps, Sharper Tuning of Antenna, and Tuned Frequency Amplification Cure Difficulties
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ALFRED P. LANE
RADIO loses some of its popularity in summer because it has to compete with so many other attractions. Motoring, golf, tennis, and other outdoor activities lure the radio fan away from his dial-twisting. There was a time, too, when with summer came a noticeable falling off in the quality of the broadcast programs.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0112.xml
article
66
66
Radio
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A Budget of Wisdom for Radio Owners Giving the Grid Tube a Shield
What Wire to Use at Various Points and Why—When Is a Tube Dead?
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RADIO experimenters who are working with the new shielded grid tube find that as soon as an attempt is made to use more than one stage of radio-frequency amplification employing these tubes, difficulties are encountered in the shielding. To get a high degree of amplification out of the 222 tube under these conditions, the shielding has to be very complete, otherwise the particular features of the shielded grid construction are of no value.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0113.xml
article
66
66
Radio
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The Right Kind of Wire
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BEGINNERS in radio often are confused as to the proper wire to use to connect up the various parts in the radio receivers they are constructing and for battery, antenna, and loudspeaker connections. For the internal connections of a receiver any kind of wire will give good results.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0114.xml
article
66
66
Radio
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When Is a Tube Dead?
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[no value]
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A VACUUM tube used in a radio receiver consists of a base, a glass bulb, a filament, a wire grid, and a plate. Assuming that the tube does not meet with an accident that breaks the glass bulb, the life of the tube is governed by the filament, which is the wire that is heated to red heat by the current from the A-battery or, in the case of alternating current type tubes, by the low voltage current from the filament heating transformer.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0115.xml
article
66
66
Radio
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Light Socket Antennas
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BEFORE you put up an indoor antenna for your radio receiver, it is a good plan to try out one of the special plugs, to be screwed in the lamp socket, that allows you to use the electric light wiring as an antenna. Frequently, the light socket antenna will give you better results than the ordinary indoor antenna and sometimes it will rival the results to be obtained from an outdoor antenna.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0116.xml
article
66
66
Radio
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A B C’s of Radio
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[no value]
WORKING knowledge of the fundamental relation between volts, amperes, and ohms, the three basic units of electrical measurement, will prove useful to the radio beginner. The volt is the unit of electrical pressure; the ampere, of volume; and the ohm, of resistance.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0117.xml
article
67
67,68,135
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
When You Plan to Build—
This Article Will Help You Solve Some of the Problems Faced by Everyone Who Wants a Real Home
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN R. McMAHON
A FRECKLED-NOSE office boy with ears adapted to take in baseball scores made a sad blunder the other day in the. Home-building Department of this magazine. He switched the contents of two outgoing envelopes so that the advice intended for a reader in Florida almost went to one in Alberta, Canada, and vice versa.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0118.xml
article
69
69
Astronomy
[no value]
Strange Ways of Studying Stars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0119.xml
article
70
70,113
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
How "Bootleg" Gas Ruins a Car
Gus Tells Why You Can't Save Money by Buying Cheap Fuel and How You Can Guard Against Roadside "Gyps"
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
"HERE'S another long distance flyer down with a busted oil pipe!" exclaimed Joe Clark in the noon hour as he sat with the morning paper in one hand and a huge piece of chocolate cake in the other. "Those airplane motor manufacturers must be awful dumb if they can't even fit the oil pipes so they'll stay put."
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0120.xml
advertisement
71
71
[no value]
[no value]
THORDARSON ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
THORDARSON ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0121.xml
article
72
72
Automobiles
[no value]
Useful Ideas for Your Car
Lifting Car Off Springs—Dented Fender Smoothed—New Battery Cover—Guard Saves Bumper—Clever Oil Filter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ORDINARY iron C-clamp proves serviceable in many cases in removing dents from automobile fenders. To prevent damage to the finish, a wooden block of suitable size is placed under the mud guard and another on top of it at the point where the dent is located.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0122.xml
article
72
72
Automobiles
[no value]
Taking Weight Off Springs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE front end of an automobile may be easily raised to permit the removal of the springs. All you need is the regular jack, a wooden two-by-four, and a block of wood, arranged as in Fig. 2.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0123.xml
article
72
72
Automobiles
[no value]
Fender Guard Avoids Hooking
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN FIG. 3 is shown a simple rear fender guard that will keep the other fellow’s bumper from catching in yours if he happens to swing in too close. It is made of angle iron with portions cut away at the points indicated to clear the edge of the fender.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0124.xml
article
72
72
Automobiles
[no value]
Ten Dollars for an Idea!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E.E. LINDSAY, of Champaign, Ill., wins this month’s $10 prize with his suggestion of an oil filter (Fig. 5). Each month POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY awards $10, in addition to regular space rates, for the best idea sent in for motorists. Other contributions published are paid for at the usual rates.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0125.xml
article
72
72
Automobiles
[no value]
Ingenious Oil Filter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIG. 5 shows a homemade oil filtering system that can be applied to any automobile to make it modern and up-to-date. You need one vacuum tank in good working order. A serviceable one can be obtained at a low price from any auto wrecking yard. In addition, you need the outer shell of another vacuum tank to serve as a filter compartment.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0126.xml
article
72
72
Automobiles
[no value]
Cover Keeps Battery Clean
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KEEPING the starter battery clean is worth while because the dirt that collects on the top of the battery eventually becomes soaked with creeping acid from the battery and greatly increases the corrosion as well as the leakage. A piece of oilcloth as shown in Fig. 4 will serve to keep dirt and water splashed up from the road from collecting on the top of the battery.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0127.xml
advertisement
73
73
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0128.xml
article
74
74
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
World’s Queerest House All Windows
Transparent Walls Are Shifted While Ceilings Rise and Fall—All to Find Secrets of Sunlight
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHALL we live, some day, in glass houses? Are present-day dwellings with massive walls and gloomy interiors all wrong? In order to find out, the U. S. Public Health Service has just erected on the outskirts of Washington a dwelling all of glass, whose ceiling moves up and down in sections and whose windows appear and disappear as if by magic.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0129.xml
article
74
74
Astronomy
[no value]
Two Pin Points of Light
Replace Single Star and Puzzle the Astronomers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARE astronomers watching through their telescopes a star that has cracked in two and is flying apart? African and South American dispatches have just confirmed the fact that Nova Pictoris, an apparently single star when it mysteriously blew up in a flash of light in 1925, is for the first time discernible as a very close double star.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0130.xml
advertisement
75
75
[no value]
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0131.xml
advertisement
76
76
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY TOOLS
[no value]
STANLEY TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0132.xml
article
77
77,92
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
SPEED with a Homemade Coaster
An Improved Design for a Safe Swift Toy That Teaches Boys Steering, Braking, and Road Wisdom
[no value]
[no value]
HI SIBLEY
FEW recreational devices afford children more wholesome pleasure than a well-made wheel coaster. Incidentally, this motor-car type of toy gives them sound preliminary training in steering, braking, and road rules long before they are permitted to take the wheel of the family car.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0133.xml
article
78
78,104,105
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
A "Rise-off-Ground" Model
It Will Fly 1,000 Feet After Taking Off under Its Own Power Like a Real Plane—Designed For the Beginner
Airplane Model Plans
[no value]
[no value]
J. DANNER BUNCH
AVISON F. KOCH
THE rise-off-ground “pusher” airplane model illustrated is an exceptionally good one for the beginner to construct. The little model reproduces in miniature the flying characteristics of a full size airplane unusually well; it makes pretty take-offs and good landings.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0134.xml
article
79
79
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Back Yard Swimming Pool
J. V. HAZZARD Tells How His Children Use for Their Own Little Old Swimming Hole a Homemade Substitute, Which Is Merely a Collapsible Wooden Framework Lined with Canvas
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER a short stay at the seashore, it became almost impossible to keep my two small children out of the water. Swimming in local streams, notably unsafe for competent swimmers, was out of the question for them; and, remembering a boyhood proclivity for the old swimming hole—with or without parental approval—I set to work to produce a safe pool at home.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0135.xml
article
80
80,102
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Decorative Metal Working
The Simplest Way to Form Thin Brass and Copper into Artistic Candlesticks and Ash Trays
[no value]
[no value]
Edward Thatcher
ABOUT the simplest type of decorative metal work is made by cutting out sheet metal with the snips or a cold chisel, forming it with the aid of wooden blocks, and fastening the parts together with rivets. Some very fine work may be done in this simple way.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0136.xml
advertisement
80a
80a
[no value]
[no value]
L. E. Waterman Company
[no value]
L. E. Waterman Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0137.xml
advertisement
80b
80b
[no value]
[no value]
Elgin
[no value]
Elgin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0138.xml
article
81
81,98,109,110
Models
[no value]
Our Mayflower Sets Sail
How to Complete the Rigging of the New POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY Ship Model—Aloft with the Canvas and the Flags!
[no value]
[no value]
E. ARMITAGE McCANN
TO FIT the sails to the yards of our model of the Mayflower and to rig the yards in position with running gear, are the only tasks remaining. We may then hoist the flags, and our ship will be ready to brave the battle and the breeze—of the feather duster.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0139.xml
article
82
82,106,107,108
BETTERSHOP METHODS
[no value]
Steel Ball Magic for Mechanics
You Can Put the Hardened Spheres to Many Uses and Save Both Time and Labor if You Follow These Suggestions
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
IMPROVEMENTS in machines, tools, and instruments crowd upon each other in such rapid succession that we are apt to overlook the possibilities in some of the smaller, yet none the less remarkable, things with which progress is also furnishing us.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0140.xml
advertisement
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0141.xml
article
84
84
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Lathe Used to Cut Small Gears
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN FIG. 1 is shown a homemade device made by E. H. Redfield, of Springfield, Vt., for cutting clock gears on an engine lathe. The gear is shown in position with a “fly” cutter directly above it. The fixture is held in the tool post. There is an ordinary index plate, the holes in which were drilled with the aid of a milling machine index head.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0142.xml
article
84
84
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Mounting a Small Lathe Chuck
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON A small lathe, especially those sold at moderate prices, the chuck is not always accurately fitted. In one case, where the chuck was mounted on a back plate screwed to the nose of the lathe spindle, this trouble was satisfactorily remedied by the following method.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0143.xml
article
84
84
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
How to Prevent Valve-Stem Packing from Unwinding
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF THERE is an aggravating thing around any plant, it is the spool of small valve-stem packing, which is always getting unwound. Cut off one leg of a 1/8-in. cotter key about 2 in. long and sharpen the other leg. Slip the free end of the packing through the eye.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0144.xml
article
84
84
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Fixture Holds Washers While Being Ground
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE fixture illustrated was designed for grinding to thickness a number of thin washers, shims, and similar parts. It is difficult to hold small, thin pieces on the magnetic chuck, but this fixture will take four pieces at one setting so they can be ground as thin as .010 in. by feeding carefully.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0145.xml
article
84
84
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Set of Plug Gages Made from Old Slitting Saws
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE plug gages illustrated were made from worn-out slitting saws. After the sizes nearest to the desired diameters had been selected, the saws were rough-ground to plus .010 in. cylindrically and then finish-ground and lapped. They were also ground on the side just enough to remove their concavity.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0146.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE TOOLS
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0147.xml
advertisement
86
86
[no value]
[no value]
Clemson Brothers, Inc.
[no value]
Clemson Brothers, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0148.xml
article
86
86
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Novel Piano Bench Contains Music Filing Compartment
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
D. A. PRICE
THIS piano bench has a novel and useful feature in its roomy compartment for filing music. It was made to take care of a larger quantity of music in a more efficient manner than the usual bench. The compartment under the lid was made wider and deeper so that sheet music up to 10¼ by 13¼ in. (the largest size) can be easily filed between the slanting wallboard partitions.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0149.xml
article
86
86
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Bedpost Bracket for Clock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HECTOR J. CHAMBERLAND
A FIXTURE for holding an alarm clock may be made and attached directly to any bed with round or square posts by the method illustrated. The bracket consists of two pieces of 1/16-in. washer stock 1¼ in. wide. Each piece is bent to fit the bedpost after a strip of cardboard or rubber has been placed around the post to prevent scratching.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0150.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Millers Falls Company
[no value]
Millers Falls Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0151.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
PECK, STOW & WILCOX CO.
[no value]
PECK, STOW & WILCOX CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0152.xml
article
88
88
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Modern Electric House Wiring
What the Home Owner and Handy Man Should Know about the Use of Armored Cable
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE A. WILLOUGHBY
“GEORGE, I need some pointers on house wiring,” said Clyde, one of my neighbors, when we met one day near our homes. “I have a permit from the inspection department at the City Hall to do some of my own wiring, but their inspector is going to look it over when I get finished, and I want to be sure I’m right before I go ahead.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0153.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
J. D. Wallace & Co.
[no value]
J. D. Wallace & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0154.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
The David Maydole Hammer Co.
[no value]
The David Maydole Hammer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0155.xml
article
90
90,91,103
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Applied WOOD TURNING for Beginners
HOW to use your lathe in making a graceful table—Fourth in a series of instructive articles
[no value]
[no value]
HERMAN HJORTH
THE stand or small table illustrated in Fig. 2 is an example of what the woodworker can accomplish in the line of furniture making when he has an elementary knowledge of wood turning. From the wood turner’s point of view, this project is very simple, as there is only one turned piece.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0156.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0157.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
APCO MOSSBERG CORP.
[no value]
APCO MOSSBERG CORP.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0158.xml
article
92
92
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
This Funny Little Toy Duck Waddles on Its Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. Clarke Hughes
THE body of this amusing toy duck is cut from soft pine ¾ in. thick, and the head and wheels are shaped from ½ in. thick wood of the same kind. The head is drilled as shown to receive an eightpenny nail, which passes through two large glass or wooden beads and enters the body.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0159.xml
article
93
93,100
The Shipshape Home
[no value]
How to Fill and Hide Wall Board Joints
Reinforcing the Joints
Decorating the Walls
Smoother Stippling
[no value]
[no value]
F. N. Vanderwalker
A SURPRISINGLY large area of fiber wall board and plaster board is nailed in place each year by amateur mechanics, not alone in summer cottages and in temporary structures, but also in houses, new and old. The manufacturers furnish such complete and clear instructions that there is little difficulty in applying wall board, but when it is in place, the question arises as to how it is to be decorated.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0160.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0161.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
WESTERN CLOCK COMPANY: Westclox Auto Clock
[no value]
WESTERN CLOCK COMPANY
Westclox Auto Clock
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0162.xml
article
94
94
For the Home Owner
[no value]
Combination Chest and Desk
How to Build a Space-Saving Piece of Furniture That Is Early American in Style
[no value]
[no value]
Charles A. King
AN UNUSUALLY interesting piece of furniture, especially for a small apartment, is the combination chest of drawers and desk illustrated. What appears to be the top drawer is a well appointed desk when pulled out. The simple construction brings the project easily within the range of the average amateur cabinetmaker.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0163.xml
article
95
95
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Home Workshop Chemistry
Simple Formulas that Will Save Time and Money
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ETHYL or grain alcohol, which is called alcohol for short, is the result of the fermentation and distillation of fruits and sugars by yeast. Denatured alcohol contains, in addition to ordinary 95 percent alcohol, certain poisonous constituents.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0164.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORP. OF AMERICA
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORP. OF AMERICA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0165.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Veeder-Root, Inc.
[no value]
Veeder-Root, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0166.xml
article
96
96,97
For the Home Owner
[no value]
How to Patch Old Furniture
Workmanlike Methods of Concealing Nail and Screw Holes and Other Blemishes
[no value]
[no value]
R. C. STANLEY
THE patching of wood is an art. Every handy man has frequent occasion to practice it. When done artistically, it is a credit to the mechanic; but done slovenly and crudely, it may be worse than the original defects which it replaces. Patching, as described here, is for the purpose of preserving parts of antique furniture, and, as the patches add to the percentage of new material in the piece, they should be as small as possible.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0167.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Palmolive
[no value]
Palmolive
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0168.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0169.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0170.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
The Pompeian Company
[no value]
The Pompeian Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0171.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY
[no value]
ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0172.xml
article
100
100
Models
[no value]
Decorating Ship Model Sails
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. H. PREY
FOR striping and decorating the sails and flags of ship models, tinted shellac like that used by lamp shade classes and available even at some ten-cent stores, can be used. It is first exposed to the air until it has thickened to the consistency of paint.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0173.xml
article
101
101
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
This Toy Howitzer Shoots Crackers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. K.
DESPITE drastic regulations in many cities, that old and dangerous Fourth of July combination—a small boy and a bunch of firecrackers—still exists in all parts of the country. It can be minimized in individual cases by constructing the relatively safe firecracker cannon illustrated.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0174.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
American Telephone and Telegraph Company
[no value]
American Telephone and Telegraph Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0175.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
GILSON SLIDE RULE CO.
[no value]
GILSON SLIDE RULE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0176.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
Superior Oxy-Acetylene Machine Company
[no value]
Superior Oxy-Acetylene Machine Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0177.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
W. B. & J. E. BOICE
[no value]
W. B. & J. E. BOICE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0178.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0179.xml
article
102
102
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Cleansing Grease, Tar and Paint Spots
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. L. NEWCOMB
AMONG cleaning agents, carbon tetrachloride is one of the most generally used. It has the advantage of being noninflammable, but it has a tendency to leave a ring on fabrics unless it is thoroughly evaporated by friction while being applied.
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0180.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
The BLACK & DECKER MFG. CO.
[no value]
The BLACK & DECKER MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0181.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
CROSMAN ARMS COMPANY
[no value]
CROSMAN ARMS COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0182.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
The SHALER Company
[no value]
The SHALER Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0183.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
The P. A. GEIER COMPANY
[no value]
The P. A. GEIER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0184.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
EVINRUDE MOTOR CO.
[no value]
EVINRUDE MOTOR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0185.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0186.xml
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105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Franklin Institute
[no value]
Franklin Institute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0187.xml
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106
106
[no value]
[no value]
REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0188.xml
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106
106
[no value]
[no value]
The Lacquer-Well Spray Co.
[no value]
The Lacquer-Well Spray Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0189.xml
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107
107
[no value]
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0190.xml
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107
107
[no value]
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0191.xml
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108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0192.xml
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109
109
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0193.xml
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110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0194.xml
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111
111
[no value]
[no value]
BEMIS & CALL CO.
[no value]
BEMIS & CALL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0195.xml
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111
111
[no value]
[no value]
SIMONDS SAW AND STEEL COMPANY
[no value]
SIMONDS SAW AND STEEL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0196.xml
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112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0197.xml
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113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0198.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Bauer & Black
[no value]
Bauer & Black
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0199.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Apparatus Engineering Co.
[no value]
Apparatus Engineering Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0200.xml
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115
115
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0201.xml
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116
116,117,118,119,120
[no value]
[no value]
Money Making Opportunities
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0202.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
L. L. COOKE
[no value]
L. L. COOKE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0203.xml
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122
122
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0204.xml
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122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Chicago Technical College
[no value]
Chicago Technical College
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0205.xml
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123
123
[no value]
[no value]
Chief Drafting Engineer AMERICAN SCHOOL
[no value]
Chief Drafting Engineer AMERICAN SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0206.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
THEO.AUDEL & CO.
[no value]
THEO.AUDEL & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0207.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
STANDARD BUSINESS TRAINING INSTITUTE
[no value]
STANDARD BUSINESS TRAINING INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0208.xml
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125
125
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0209.xml
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126
126
[no value]
[no value]
American School
[no value]
American School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0210.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
Clarence A. O'Brien
[no value]
Clarence A. O'Brien
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0211.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF AUTOMOBILES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0212.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0213.xml
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128
128
[no value]
[no value]
CENTRAL STATES MFG. CO.
[no value]
CENTRAL STATES MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0214.xml
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129
129
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0215.xml
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130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0216.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0217.xml
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132
132
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO INSTITUTE OF AMERICA
[no value]
RADIO INSTITUTE OF AMERICA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0218.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0219.xml
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134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0220.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0221.xml
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136
136
[no value]
[no value]
OIL HEATING INSTITUTE
[no value]
OIL HEATING INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0222.xml
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137
137
[no value]
[no value]
Lambert Pharmacal Company
[no value]
Lambert Pharmacal Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0223.xml
advertisement
138
138,139,140
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company: CAMEL
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
CAMEL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280701_0113_001_0224.xml