Issue: 19280601

Friday, June 1, 1928
June 1928
6
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112
Friday, December 26, 2014

Articles
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Popular science
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ETHYL GASOLINE CORPORATION
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ETHYL GASOLINE CORPORATION
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Division of General Motors Corporation
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Division of General Motors Corporation
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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2,3
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Table of Contents for June
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WHAT IS COMING NEXT MONTH
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How do trans-Atlantic flyers know when to hop off? They don't. But the weather man does. And the meteorologist who started Lindbergh, Byrd, and Chamberlin will tell in our next issue just what is the "right weather" for ocean flying. "I can peer into your stomach and read your future!" a famous physician recently told the editor of this magazine.
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4
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United States Fiscal Corporation
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United States Fiscal Corporation
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0006.xml
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4,5,6
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GOLD the 49'ers Overlooked
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WALLACE AMES
IN THE days of the California gold rush one of the methods of mining was the sluicing process, whereby the water from mountain streams was flushed against gold-laden hillsides. The soil thus loosened was carried through a sieve-like contrivance which caught and held the precious metal.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0007.xml
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BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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BOND AND MORTGAGE CO.
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UNITED STATES MORTGAGE BOND CO.
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UNITED STATES MORTGAGE BOND CO.
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Advertisement
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THE F.H. SMITH Co.
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THE F.H. SMITH Co.
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Advertisements
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ELECTROL INC.
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ELECTROL INC.
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0013.xml
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8
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What Good Refrigeration Costs
The Popular Science Institute Aids You in Selecting an Efficient Refrigerator
Popular Science Monthly GUARANTEE
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PROFESSOR R. D. MORRILL
TO KNOW that you have inadequate refrigeration is one thing; to know how to gob about remedying the condition is another. From Dr. Darnrau's articles in this and previous issues of the magazine, POPULAR SCIENCE readers already know that the vast majority of American homes do not have adequate facilities for Properly Preserving food.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0014.xml
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9
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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MASONITE CORPORATION
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Our Readers Say
Thoughtful Mr. Paus
Fool or Hero?
Was Elinor Right?
But It Saved Marian!
We Second the Motion
Friends Worth Knowing
But There's Jack Dempsey
A “Duffer” Learns to Drive
Well, There Are Two Sides—!
A Ship for a Car
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"AM GLAD Mr. Paus, your artist, explained in his article what the cover picture on your May number was all about. Otherwise we might be guess ingyet."-K. DV., Topeka, Kans. "I am delighted with the very decorative covers by Paus on POPULAR SCIENCE.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0016.xml
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11
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GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR CO.: Gillette
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GILLETTE SAFETY RAZOR CO.
Gillette
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A. H. Grebe & Company, Inc.
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A. H. Grebe & Company, Inc.
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masthead
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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13,14,15
LEADING ARTICLES
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Breaking Into Aviation
An Article by EDGAR C. WHEELER, Who Asked Every Licensed Pilot in the United States to Tell of His Experiences in the Flying Game, How He Got Into It, and What He Thinks of Its Opportunities
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TWO students of the New York University School of Aeronautics, Walter Hartung and Wilbert H. Steinkamp, are, at this writing, preparing to round out their course by flying from New York to Chicago! More than a thousand other young men have just applied for entrance as cadets in the flying schools of the Army Air Corps.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0020.xml
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16,17
LEADING ARTICLES
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First Plane from Europe
ACCEPTING a Challenge Which had Already Cost Seven Lives, German Plane Wings its Way to a Glorious Conquest when it Battles Through a Wall of Winds Over the Raging Atlantic and Lands Three Brave Flyers on the American Continent
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H. C. DAVIS
THE uphill sky trail over the growling Atlantic from Europe to North America has been blazed at last! Struggling against bitter headwinds that seemed bent on flinging them back, plunging through storm and fog, three daring flyers in the single-engined Junkers monoplane Bremen completed the perilous east-to-west ocean flight, the Atlantic's greatest challenge.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0021.xml
article
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18,19,20,139,140,141,142
FICTION
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HOUDINI of the Desert
Face to Face with Savage Elephants; Thrilling Story of African Wilds
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FRED GRAVES
TWO men wriggled their way along the ground, stirring up a thin fog of white dust as they dug with elbows and heels to push themselves toward a low ridge just ahead. A naked sun scorched their backs. Leafless branches of thorn tree and dom palm by which they paused gave no shade. Across the cloudless sky a vulture wheeled.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0022.xml
article
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21
Stories the Camera Tells
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The Doomed S-4 Raised
A Seagoing Auto
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The submarine that sank with 40 men emerges as water is pumped from the dry dock at Boston to which she was towed after pontoons lifted her. The tragedy was described in the March issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0023.xml
article
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21
Stories the Camera Tells
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Breaking Dam's Heavy Toll
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Four hundred persons are believed to have perished when the St. Francis Dam in California burst at both ends, leaving the middle standing, and from the canyon released a sea of water 100 feet deep on the inhabitants of the Santa Clara River Valley.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0024.xml
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21
Stories the Camera Tells
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A Seagoing Auto
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Dr. P. A. Jaggar, of Hawaii, will use this strange seaand-land craft in exploring Pavioff Volcano in Alaska
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0025.xml
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21
Stories the Camera Tells
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Lindbergh Designs a New Plane
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Placing the engine in the Colonel's new cabin monoplane. Unlike his famous Spirit of St. Louis, this has fuel and oil tanks in the wings. Appointments suggested by "Slim" include headlights in wings, night landing flares, wheel brakes, and heater for the cabin
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0026.xml
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21
Stories the Camera Tells
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Wright Airplane Shown in London
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Here is the first machine that flew with man, at Kitty Hawk, N. C., in 1903, recently lent to the Science Museum, London, by Orville Wright
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0027.xml
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21
Stories the Camera Tells
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Edison on Job Testing Rubber
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The "Wizard" examines specimens in his Florida laboratory in his tireless search for a new rubber, as told in the December issue of this magazine
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0028.xml
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22,23
LEADING ARTICLES
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Radio Brings Politics Into Your Home
The Radio Stump at Your Fireside Should-
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EARL REEVES
THIS year radio will elect a President. There is eminent authority for that statement. Calvin Coolidge believes radio is in large measure responsible for his popularity; and the White House view is that if radio can popularize a President it can elect one.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0029.xml
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24,127
LEADING ARTICLES
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Putting the Earth on the Scales
With Apparatus Only 3 Feet Tall, Physicist in an Underground Cave Measures the Pull of Gravity
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EDWIN KETCHUM
IN A laboratory-cave, thirty-five feet underground, Dr. Paul R. Hey!, a physicist of the U. S. Bureau of Standards in Washington, D. C., is weighing the earth! Twice in the last five years this modern Atlas has figuratively placed the mass of our globe on delicate scales.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0030.xml
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25,26,131
LEADING ARTICLES
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A Great Dream Opens an Empire
THE Story of David Moffat, Last of America's Railroad Pioneers, Whose Daring Spirit Pierces the Rockies to an Area Large as France
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HOMER DYE
A FEW weeks ago, officials and citizens of Colorado and Utah celebrated the passage of the first train through the new Moffat Tunnel in the Continental Divide. Through the six-mile bore, longest in the Western Hemisphere, a special train of forty cars sped in twelve minutes, completing a trip which previously required seven . -hours of tortuous climb over the `Rocky Mountain barrier.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0031.xml
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27,130
LEADING ARTICLES
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Seventeen - Year Locusts Coming
Insects Which Live Sixteen Years Underground And One Above to Visit Ten States This Season
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A. B. CHAMPLAIN
BROOD II of the "seventeen-year locust," or periodical cicada, is expected to make its debut this year. A coming-out party of these denizens of the underworld has been predicted for this summer by authorities, and we have been tipped off that cicada conventions will be held in portions of Connecticut, the District of Columbia, Indiana, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Virginia and West Virginia.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0032.xml
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28,29,30,120,121
LEADING ARTICLES
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DICK BYRD—Adventurer
A Real Modern Romance, More Thrilling Than Fiction—In This Chapter: The Boy Who Dared
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FITZHUGH GREEN
ON A hot morning of July, 19O2, Dick Byrd, age twelve, stood before his mother, his delicate narrow face showing pale through its boyish freckles. "But I have to go, mother," he said in a low voice. Mrs. Byrd glanced at the letter in her hand to hide the tears in her eyes.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0033.xml
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Ship Swallows Whole Trains
Mammoth Seagoing Ferryboat, Strangest Craft Afloat, Carries Two Whole Railroad Trains Gulped in by Its Cavernous Jaws
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ELLSWORTH BENNETT
WIDE open swing the jaws of the newest monster of the deep-and a railroad train disappears within! Like a fairy tale dragon is the German deep-sea ferry Schwerin, launched a few weeks ago, that plies across the Baltic Sea between Denmark and Germany with whole freight trains in its hold.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0034.xml
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32,33,122,123
LEADING ARTICLES
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HUGE Flying Hotels Race For First Overseas Flight
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CARL HELM
FLASHING silver against the sun, the giant dirigible heads out to sea. A hundred people on her passenger list, and every cabin full! On the streets below crowds strain their eyes and wave their farewells as the drone of the motors of the flying hotel recedes.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0035.xml
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34,137
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Airmen Again Fight Arctic
Man Against Man, Nation Against Nation, Dirigible Against Plane, and the Unknown Arctic Against All
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BURT M. McCONNELL
TWO men prepared to fly this summer into the last "Unknown Region" of the frozen north, prepared for a hazardous race to explore the top of the world-to read the secrets of the north polar basin. One, in a monoplane, carried the Stars and Stripes.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0036.xml
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35
LEADING ARTICLES
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Huge New Super-Locomotives
Three-Power "Iron Horses" of Electricity and Incredible Steam Pressure Make Giants of a Few Years Ago Look Like Toys
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GEORGE LEE DOWD
RECENT tests of a three-power locomotive, first of its kind, emphasize the amazing progress that locomotive designers have made since their chugging toys of nearly a century ago. No throttle does the engineer of this modern "iron horse" grasp.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0037.xml
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36,37
LEADING ARTICLES
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Catching Crooks with a Camera
True Tales of Modern Master Detectives Who, With Light Rays and Chemicals, Solve Crime Mysteries Science Beats Sherlock Holmes in Finding Hidden Clues
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HOWARD MCLELLAN
ASTRIDE a weary-footed pony a gray - bearded mountaineer rode through the main street of the old Spanish town of San Felipe in the chaparral-covered foothills of southern California. A tattered and shapeless hat shaded his grizzled features from the midsummer sun and hid his face from the men who stood in knots along the street talking with violent animation about the cold-blooded murder of the two Rosencrans brothers, shot to death the day before in their cabin twenty miles up a lonely gulch.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0038.xml
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38,126,127
LEADING ARTICLES
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Galileo Galiiei, "Immortal Fool"
Paid in Persecution, He Made Over Half of Science, and His Inventions Changed the World's Entire Course
ARTHUR A. STUART
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ABOUT the time New York was born, a city of 500 souls, there lived near the Italian city of Florence a broken old man, banished from the world, an exile within his own house, soon to die of fever. Once the vigor of his mind had overthrown the dictates of wise men, had commanded the respect-and enmity-of the most powerful; now he was racked with pain and misery.
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MAGNETS—Strangest Tool of Man
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A MASS of steel rises upward in apparent defiance of gravity—you can see it on the cover of this magazine—to drop neatly to the spot where it is wanted. From a pile of ore great chunks of dross leap up as if alive and sapphires and diamonds remain.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0040.xml
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40,41,125
LEADING ARTICLES
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TAMING THE MISSISSIPPI
How Ages of Ruthless Flood Devastation Can Be Ended Forever and Murderous Water Made to Do Man's Work
THE EARTH'S TIDES
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MYRON M. STEARNS
A HOUSE swirls along in a mighty current. A man clings desperately to the roof. A huge uprooted tree courses alongside. Drowned cattle and horses sweep along in the rush of water. On either side an inland sea stretches thirty miles, wide as Lake Michigan. with a devastating current a hundred feet deep down the middle.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0041.xml
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42,128
LEADING ARTICLES
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Forts on Wheels Defy Bandits
An Inside Story of the Cars Armored with Steel, Wool, and Glass That Carry Safely Huge Sums In Crime-Ridden Streets
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P. A. CARMICHAEL
TRAVELING arsenals to be seen nowadays in the streets of many cities have dealt a hard blow to the holdup business. Not so long ago it was a regular thing to read of the robbery of bank messengers and payroll carriers; now criminals prefer to try holding up cashiers in their cages or cracking safes. Armor plate and bullet-proof glass have pretty effectually curbed the two-gun boys who used to ply their trade in the streets.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0042.xml
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43,44
LEADING ARTICLES
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Giant Mystery Tube Promises New Radio Marvels
It Generates Strange Rays That Kill Animals and Cook Food and May Reveal the Secret of Wireless Power
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ROBERT E. MARTIN
INSDE the encircling black wire grating of a short-wave radio research laboratory, engineers of the General Electric Company, at Schenectady, N. Y., have just turned loose the most wonderful radio tube in the world-the mystery "ZT6." And while experts are still trying to account for the startling events that occur when its short waves run wild, engineers under the direction of Dr. W. R. Whitney are launching a new investigation with longer radio waves that promises fresh wonders.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0043.xml
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45
New Processes and Inventions
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Powdered Coal Runs a Ship
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ENTER pulverized coal-the new sea fuel! Recent successful trial voyages of the freighter Merecr, first ocean ship to burn coal dust as fine as face powder, herald a new epoch in marine engineering, according to Carl J.. Jefferson, of the U. S. Shipping Board.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0044.xml
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46
New Processes and Inventions
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Harvest of the Laboratories
Microscope Movie Camera Films Bacteria in Action—Effects of Sun Spots on Atmosphere Proved—Audible Sounds of Nerve Impulses Can Be Radioed—Erysipelas Antitoxin Found
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NEWEST discoveries and inventions in the varied fields of science that are of special importance because of their bearing on our everyday life, and the present and projected researches looking toward further scientific advances and human benefits, are chronicled for you from month to month in these pages.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0045.xml
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46
Astronomy
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Watching a Star Explode
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ONE of the rare spectacles of the heavens—the explosion of a stars—is being observed through the Harvard College Observatory telescope at Bloemfontein, South Africa. The star, called Nova Pictoris, was until three years ago invisible to the naked eye.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0046.xml
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46
Laboratory Discoveries
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Nerve Impulses Heard in Tests
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RECENT discoveries have revealed human life as a wonderful electric power plant and system of transmission lines. Two experimenters in psychology at the University of Iowa, Lee E. Travis and Theodore Hunter, say they have listened to messages flashed over the network of nerves in the human body, translating the impulses of nerve currents into sound waves that human ears can hear. Electrodes attached to the body detect the impulses. Magnified 800 times by a powerful amplifier, these nerve messages, we are told, can be broadcast by radio!
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0047.xml
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46
Enczineering
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First Welded Steel Bridge
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NEWEST of engineering marvels is the first steel railway bridge to be built without a rivet or a bolt, opened at Chicopee Falls, near Springfield, Mass., on the Boston and Maine Railroad. The span was constructed entirely by arc welding, with a saving of one third in steel.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0048.xml
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47
Health and Hygiene
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New Vitamin Discovered In Experiments on Rats
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A SIXTH vitamin has just been added to that growing list of mysterious food elements without which, experts have found, men and animals cannot attain normal, healthy growth. The discovery, made by Herbert M. Evans of the University of California, and called vitamin F, is found in lettuce and liver.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0049.xml
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47
Health and Hygiene
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Medicine’s Great Advances
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THE other day anatomists from Johns Hopkins Medical School went to Cape Hatteras on the most remarkable whaling expedition in history. Their object was to find a way to prevent caisson disease, or “bends,” the dread malady which attacks deep-sea divers.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0050.xml
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47
Photography
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Living Bacteria Filmed By Micro-Movie Camera
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THE newest wonder of motion pictures is that of showing the invisible world on the screen. A microscope movie camera now is employed by Heinz Rosenberger, of the Rockefeller Institute of Medical Research, New York, to reveal the remarkable form of perpetual motion which begins when clay or other fine powder is suspended in water.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0051.xml
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47
Laboratory Discoveries
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Lightning Bolt Put to Work
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"GREAT, but what use is it?” was the question asked recently when 3,600,000 volts of electricity, stored in artificial “clouds” in the General Electric Company laboratory at Pittsfield, Mass., were let loose in a tremendous man-made lightning bolt.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0052.xml
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47
Photography
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Sun Spots Affect Radio
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THE sun’s present attack of “spotted, fever,” believed to influence vitally weather, health, crops, and other earthly interests, is lasting longer than usual, experts say. Sun spot outbreaks come in cycles, eleven years apart. Usually they continue only a few months. This time, however, they are lasting many months.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0053.xml
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48,49,50,144,145,146,147,148,149,150,151
FICTION
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The Movie Maker
Adventures of An Inventor On the "Lot"
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S. W. NEWMEYER
THE attempt of Don Kennedy, young movie director, to produce a big feature picture of his own was a series of thrilling adventures, in which he managed, by ingenuity and almost reckless courage, to keep just one lap ahead of disaster. Standing with him through thick and thin was a group of faithful friends-Judy Burke, a script girl and scenario writer; Jerry, her brother, a stunt flyer; Margaret Moreland, a once famous but fading screen star, and Professor Mahrlenburg, an aged photographer.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0054.xml
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51,124
LEADING ARTICLES
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$200,000,000 for Research~ What Do We Get?
¶ For months two research workers in the Bell Telephone Laboratories in New York studied the electrical properties of quartz crystals. Their work was purely scientific. Yet out of it, a few weeks ago, came a small crystal of quartz which virtually has solved one of the most difficult problems of vision at a distance -that of synchronizing the transmitting and receiving apparatus to assure perfect images. In the following article Mr. Stockbridge tells of many other amazing ways in which research in pure science has been applied to the use of mankind.
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FRANK PARKER STOCKBRIDGE
"WHAT good is science, anyway?" Invention is obvious. Everybody can see the use of a machine. But the chemist fiddling with solutions in test tubes, the physicist playing with electrons in a vacuum-they are dealing with mysteries that do not seem to have any practical application to human affairs. Maybe so. Let's see.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0055.xml
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52
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Aviation Reaches New Heights
Deadliest War Plane Can Climb Five Miles in Ten Minutes; Aircraft Carry Hospital Wards and Big Radio Laboratory; Americans Smash Endurance Record; italian Sets World Speed Mark
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0056.xml
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52
Aviation
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Nations Share Air Triumphs
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EUROPE shares honors with America for aviation exploits in 1927 and 1928, an analysis of recent great flights shows, though Americans were supreme in spanning the Atlantic and the Pacific. Foremost among long-distance flights was that of the Italian airman De Pinedo, who twice spanned the Atlantic to cover 25,200 miles, going from Rome to the Americas and home again.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0057.xml
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52
Aviation
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New Air Surveying Exploits
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IMPORTANT advances in surveying I by airplane are under way in England and America. The English have completed a new giant surveying plane with a cruising range of 600 miles to chart impassable regions in Africa. Landings at twenty-mile intervals hitherto have been required in surveying by airplane.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0058.xml
article
52
52
Aviation
[no value]
Planes Rise Like Rockets
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TINY planes that can dart upward at a steep slant, rocketlike, five miles in ten minutes, are the latest amazing war craft of the British Air Force. Known as "intercepter" planes, they are believed to be the most deadly weapons for short range attack in the world, so fast can they leap into the air to hurl themselves with out warning upon huge enemy bombing planes or invading airship fleets from a favorable high fighting position that they can speedily attain.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0059.xml
article
52
52
Aviation
[no value]
Radio Laboratory in Plane
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AN "AIRPLANE full of radio sets" is the giant tri-motored Fokker plane that the Army Air Corps, at Wright Field, has just fitted up as an experimental flying laboratory. While it soars above the clouds, technical experts within its spacious cabin are able to take delicate measurements, change electric circuits, and make tests with all the convenience of a workshop on the ground.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0060.xml
article
53
53
Aviation
[no value]
Plane with 150-Foot Spread Has Wheels Bigger Than Man
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LANDING wheels taller than a man, and a massive fuselage twelve feet deep at the cabin section, mark as phenomenal the new Inflexible of the British Air Force, probably the largest land plane in the world. With its 150-foot wing spread, it must be skillfully maneuvered sideways into even the largest hangars of the Air Force.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0061.xml
article
53
53
Aviation
[no value]
Balloon Dwarfs All Others
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WHAT high altitudes do to motors and men, and what uncharted winds exist in the upper stories of the atmosphere, are questions Germany is investigating with the largest balloon in the world-the spherical 353,000-cubic-foot monster Bartsch von Siegfeld, recently completed.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0062.xml
article
53
53
Aviation
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U. S. Retains Altitude Mark
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LIEUT. CARLETON C. CHAMPION, U. S. Navy flyer, holds the official world's altitude record, according to the Federation Aeronautique Internationale, despite the Italian airman Renato Donati's recent reported feat of a 88,559-foot airplane ascent.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0063.xml
article
53
53
[no value]
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Two Records Shattered
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AMERICA has regained the air endurance record with a 53½ hour flight and an Italian airman has shattered the world's speed record at the amazing pace of 318 miles an hour. At Jacksonville Beach, Fla., Edward Stinson, veteran pilot, and George Haldeman, hero of the trans-Atlantic venture with Ruth Elder, soared aloft in their single-motored monoplane, circling a distance estimated equal to a New YorkDublin trip and return.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0064.xml
article
53
53
Aviation
[no value]
New "Gear-Shift" Propeller
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WITH blades that can be set, even in full flight, to any desired angle, an amazing new type of propeller adapts an airplane for speed, for climbing, or for load-lifting at the will of the pilot. The variable pitch propeller, as the device is called, is said to be in effect a "gear-shift" for airplanes similar to the gear changes by which an automobile increases pulling power at the sacrifice of speed.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0065.xml
article
54
54
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Self-Acting Crossing Gate
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WITH the aid of a model railway, toy size, a new self-operating crossing gate was recently demonstrated to the National Safety Council at Chicago. At the approach of a train an electric apparatus makes the gate descend. In this way grade crossings throughout the country now unguarded could be made safe for motorists.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0066.xml
article
54
54
Aviation
[no value]
Planes Aid Wrecked Ships
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CYLINDERS dropped by airplanes to wrecked ships will carry life lines to the survivors if the invention of Lieut. Commander Carl C. von Paulsen, demonstrated at the right, is installed on all coast guard aircraft, as it is already on some. Flying over the shore, the aviator drops the weighted line near the coast guardsmen, then he swoops out to the stranded ship.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0067.xml
article
54
54
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Pillow Cures Sleeplessness
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VICTIMS of insomnia may now be lulled to sleep, it is said, by opening a small window in a newly invented pillow and inhaling evaporating liquid previously dropped on absorbent cotton inside. No anesthetic or narcotic is used, the inventors state, the liquid being a harmless vegetable oil.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0068.xml
article
54
54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Electricity's Strange Uses
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FROM making ice cream out of cold-storage butter in the mountains of Virginia to electrocuting bugs in a peach orchard, the uses of electricity are widely varied, a recent survey discloses. Mushrooms thrive best right after storms, and so enterprising growers in Pennsylvania create electric thunderstorms in their mushroom cellars with electricity from the light socket.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0069.xml
article
54
54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Alaska, America's Bargain, Yields Over a Billion Profit
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ALASKA, cold and barren, was sold to the United States in 1867 for $7,2OO,OOO, one of the largest real estate transactions ever completed. Russia, perhaps, was glad to get rid of such a tremendous "white elephant," and no doubt many thought that the United States was throwing its money away, yet since that time, reports reveal, Alaska has produced more than $500,000,000 worth of fish alone.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0070.xml
article
54
54
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Lost Sheen of Silk Restored
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SILK, mercerized cotton, and artificial fiber may be restored to their original gloss, lost by washing, by a new chemical preparation perfected in Berlin, according to reports. The new fluid is said also to disinfect the cloth.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0071.xml
article
54
54
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Peril in Some Public Baths
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PUBLIC pool bathing, often regarded as a boon to health, is being viewed with suspicion by public health officials after a recent survey by 2,OOO doctors in forty-one states which revealed that several epidemics of tonsillitis, colds, and skin diseases were traced to public bathhouses.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0072.xml
article
54
54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Street Car Camp for Tourists
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WHAT can be done with veteran street cars after they have become too old or too unfashionable to go jouncing over the thoroughfares? An enterprising man in Lawrence, Kans., has solved the problem. He bought six of them, removed their trucks, refitted them, and set them up as a tourist camp.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0073.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Plants Growing in Tree Tops Extend Roots to the Ground
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PLANTS that perch on tree tops have been discovered in British Guiana by Dr. B. E. Dahlgren and are on exhibition in the Field Museum in Chicago. Air plants of the pineapple family, a flat-jointed cactus, and a yellow orchid are among those found in the top of a fig tree, growing in a mass which apparently existed as a parasite until its long roots, reaching down from the branches, were able to find the ground.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0074.xml
article
55
55
Automobiles
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Auto Horn Sets Traffic Light
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SOON impatient motorists at suburban street intersections may change the red signals to green ones and drive by them at will, as shown below, simply by blowing their horns! Charles Adler. a Baltimore signal engineer, has devised a control for the traffic lights that can be operated by the horn's sound waves.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0075.xml
article
55
55
Astronomy
[no value]
Astronomy's Silver Ball
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ENGRAVED with the heavenly bodies known to sixteenth century astronomers, a solid silver globe, nearly a foot in diameter, valued at $108,000, which was fashioned by the Swedish astronomer, Tycho Brahe, was recently exhibited at the American Museum of Natural History in New York.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0076.xml
article
55
55
Aviation
[no value]
Metal "Ears" Detect Planes
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HUGE mechanical "ears," perfected by the Army, are now able to hear airplanes and dirigibles fifteen miles away, and find the range for heavy antiaircraft artillery, according to reports from the Frankford Arsenal, Philadelphia.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0077.xml
article
55
55
Enczineering
[no value]
Novel Test for Steel Bridge
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HOW strong is a steel bridge? Railway engineers at Essen, Germany, recently tested the amount of vibration that this steel bridge will stand. Special recording instruments were designed and built for the tests, in which two loco motives furnished the action.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0078.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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First World Weather Maps
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FOR the first time, the weather of the world is being mapped on a single chart to discover the laws of Nature which govern it. Scientists of the Smithsonian Institution at Washington have prepared large outline maps for compiling weather data such as wind velocity, barometric pressure, temperature, and rainfall, reported by 887 observing stations in both hemispheres, according to Dr. C. G. Abbot, secretary.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0079.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Helping Nature Color Fruit
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BY PROVIDING a means of deepening the color of pale yellow oranges so that they look more like the deephued variety, science has again come to the aid of Nature. Color in fruit is not always a sign of the flavor, but people seem to prefer the more brilliant toned oranges, although the lighter ones are often more tasty.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0080.xml
article
56
56,57
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
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The "Iron Cashier"
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The new German machine (left) opens letters, counts and sorts coins and coupons, and records totals in a book, doing a man's four hour task in one
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0081.xml
article
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56
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
New Sealing Tool
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This device (right) moistens the mucilage and seals the flap of an envelope in a minimum of time and with a maximum of efficiency, according to its inventor, and it saves wear and tear on the tongue
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0082.xml
article
56
56
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
Pocket Kindling Wood
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Hunters and tourists can carry in their vest pockets a new kind of kindling wood which is said to start a roaring fire in windy or wet weather. The kindling consists of small composition cubes. A match is thrust through a hole in a cube, struck in the usual way, and the cube ignites as the flame touches it
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0083.xml
article
56
56
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
Helping the Deaf Hear Radio
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Deaf persons "hear" radio programs through their teeth with this device. A piece of hard rubber, resembling a pipe stem, is connected to the drive pin of a loudspeaker unit. It transmits the sound -vibrations to the deaf person's auditory nerves when held behind ear
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0084.xml
article
56
56
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
Tool for Many Tasks
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This combination block, vise, anvil, and clamp has one square and a triangular groove for holding metal objects. It will grip round bars and is useful for a variety of jobs
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0085.xml
article
56
56
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
Lawn Mower Carries a Light
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A new electrically driven lawn mower (left) has a spotlight attachment that permits its use at night. The motor turns the blades at. a fast, uniform rate no matter how slowly the mower is pushed, an advantage when using it in odd corners
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0086.xml
article
56
56
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
Seven-Cylinder Plane Motor
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Improvements over all other air-cooled motors are claimed for this new seven-cylinder airplane engine by Edward S. Cameron. of New York. its inventor, shown with it. The engine shown is said to develop more than a hundred horse power with only 1,800 revolutions a minute
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0087.xml
article
57
57
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
Cigarette Lights Without Match
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To light this new cigarette (left) you simply pull the paper tab protruding from the end. This novelty resulte after many exper ments by John W. Leon, of Ventnor City, N. J., who invented it. The tab, impregnated with a chemical, rubs against another bit of treated paper when it is pulled; flame results
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0088.xml
article
57
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Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
Easy Motor Signal
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Hand signaling from the window of a closed car is made possible by this device recently brought out by a Western manufacturer. It is a "porthole" which can be installed quickly with special tools supplied by the manufacturer. When not in use the opening closes tightly
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0089.xml
article
57
57
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
Overshoes That Fit in Pocket
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Men who have a habit of losing rubbers will appreciate the latest protection for their shoes, a lightweight rubber "oversole" that can be folded up and carried in the raincoat pocket for ready use when streets are wet. They slip on in a jiffy, and are inconspicuous enough to satisfy the person who objects to the inconvenience of ordinary rubbers
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0090.xml
article
57
57
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
Automatic Lighthouse Can’t Fail
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At Burnham-on-the-Sea, England, acetylene and electricity combine in this new system. If one electric light fails, the failure makes the other flash into service. And if that becomes disabled it causes a magnetic relay to light the acetylene burner
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0091.xml
article
57
57
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
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Folding Screen for Home Movies
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A box holds the screen with its supports. When you press a button the screen unrolls like a window shade, and folding pieces of wood hold it taut
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0092.xml
article
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Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
[no value]
This Boat Rolls on Water
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This curious boat is propelled by a small outboard motor. "Uncle Ed" R. Thomas, the inventor, conceived the idea of the galvanized iron drums by watching a tin can as it tossed about near his home at Miami Beach, Florida. In the picture below we see the craft being piloted by the inventor's son
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0093.xml
article
57
57
Fourteen New Products of Inventive Skill
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Air Mail Signal
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Air mail planes are beckoned toward their destinations by these traffic lights of the air lanes. Powerful searchlights, spun by electric motors, sweep the sky from seventy-foot steel masts. In the picture is one installed at the Trenton Junction, N. J., airport
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0094.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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Novel Boat of Canvas and Auto Tire Tubes
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A QUEER boat of canvas, that weighs only 1.50 pounds when it is stuffed with inflated rubber tire tubes, is the invention of Al Faussett, of Monroe, Wash. It may be folded into a flat case for transportation in a railroad baggage car like ordinary luggage. The inventor plans a leap over Niagara Falls with the novel craft.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0095.xml
article
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58
[no value]
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Best Telepathy Letters
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THE awards offered in February for letters on telepathy are on page 138 of this number, with the letters that earned the awards.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0096.xml
article
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58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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All Boys in 4 Generations
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A FAMILY has been discovered in San Pedro, Calif., in which the male tendency is so strong that in four generations thirty-five Sons have been born, but no daughters. Some mysterious physicaL factor that is fatal to female embryos and is handed down from generation to generation might be responsible for this, Dr. C. B. Davenport, Director of the Eugenics Records Office of the Carnegie Institution, suggests.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0097.xml
article
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58
Enczineering
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Huge Concrete Wall Moved
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MASSIVE blocks of reinforced concrete, larger than freight cars and weighing seventy tons apiece, were recently cut from a twelve-foot wall more than eleven feet high and a quarter of a mile long, moved upwards of one thousand feet on rails to a new location at Long Beach, Calif., and cemented together again. Hydraulic jacks lifted each section out of a five-foot trench onto flat cars.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0098.xml
article
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Laboratory Discoveries
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Radium Substitute Promised
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WHEN scientists have learned how WV to harness artificial lightning in the laboratory, radium, now worth more than $~,5OO,OOO an ounce, may be practically valueless, since a new and more powerful X-ray tube will do its work, declares Dr. William D. Coolidge, inventor of the present X-ray tube.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0099.xml
article
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58
Models
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Strings Control Model Auto
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A SPEED of nearly seventeen miles an hour has been made by the car shown below, called the smallest real automobile in the world-a working model with a four-cylinder, water-cooled gasoline engine, brakes, clutch, differential, and accelerator.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0100.xml
article
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Astronomy
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Temperature of Mars Taken; Fifty Above at the Equator
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DOES life exist on Mars? Would we be able to live there if we could bridge the millions of miles that separate us from the red planet? Scientists have come to various conclusions about the probability of life on Mars, and now Dr. W. W. Coblentz, of the U. S. Bureau of Standards, says-after observations at the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, Arizona-that if we should find on the planet sufficient air to breathe we should be rather uncomfortable without our winter overcoats.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0101.xml
article
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58
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Tree Rings Reveal History
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GIANT pine trees are growing in New Mexico which were saplings when Columbus discovered America, according to Dr. Albert E. Douglass, of the University of Arizona, who has made a study of the "fingerprints of time," the yearly rings of tree growth, in an effort to connect long past events in the region with the calendar of the civilized world.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0102.xml
article
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58
Health and Hygiene
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Brain Surgery Effects Cure
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BY LIFTING a patient's scalp with keen-edged instruments, breaking skull bones with forceps, and then cutting away certain brain tissues, a case of epilepsy, dreaded disease of the brain, was recently cured by the famous Dr. Foerster, Professor of Surgery at Breslau, Germany, it is reported.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0103.xml
article
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59
Photography
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Scientists Risk Death in Lava Lake to Film Volcano Kilauea in Action
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CAMERA shutters are clicking and films are recording thrilling pictures as the mighty volcano Kilauea, in the Hawaiian Islands, seethes in its latest eruption. Daring volcanologists, on precarious overlooking eminences, brave noxious fumes from the boiling lava beneath them to train cameras on the mammoth show and preserve it for science.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0104.xml
article
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Aviation
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Novel Cockpit on Ground Tests Flyers' Ability
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WHETHER prospective pilots will feel at home in an airplane is quickly determined even before they have left the ground by a novel apparatus recently adopted by the British Air Ministry for testing their fitness. Sitting in a seat the pilot like that of an airplane's cockpit, the hopeful candidate grasps realistic controls while an inspector barks at him, "Left bank! Spin! Nose dive! Stall!" What the would-be pilot does with his joy stick and rudder bar, in response to these imaginary emergencies, is graphically recorded on a charting device.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0105.xml
article
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59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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A Subway Without Trainmen
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LONDON'S new all-mechanical subway runs for six miles underground between branches of the Post Office Department, carrying forty-five ions of mail at a speed of thirty-five miles an hour without engineers, conductors, brakemen, or guards.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0106.xml
article
59
59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Old Paper Money Made Over
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WHAT becomes of all the wornout paper money? Formerly all old bills that became too ragged for use were cut up, ground into pulp and pressed into souvenirs for tourists who visited Washington. A new process of cleansing the pulp, however, makes it possible to remove the durable inks so that the pulp may be used over again for other purposes, it is said.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0107.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Any Questions?
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THIS magazine is more than glad, whenever possible, to answer readers' questions on subjects within its scope and also to supply names and addresses of manufacturers of devices mentioned in its pages. Responses are made as quickly as possible, considering the time often required for research.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0108.xml
article
60
60
New Processes and Inventions
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Grain Transplanting Device Increases Crop Five Times
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A NEW German grain transplanting machine sets out more than 12,000 plants an hour, one to each square foot, using one thirtieth as much seed as ordinarily used, and yielding from three to five times as many bushels to the acre, besides saving many times its cost in labor, according to the inventors.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0109.xml
article
60
60
Automobiles
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No Gear Shift in New Auto
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ALL gear shifts may be eliminated from automobiles if the design of a new motor demonstrated in Philadelphia recently is universally adopted. One pedal feeds gas to the motor. Instead of being geared to the rear axle, this motor drives an electric generator, which supplies power to an electric motor to turn the rear wheels.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0110.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Blue Paint Joke on Baboons
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WILD animals are being repulsed in the British Crown Colony of Kenya by grotesque but humane treatment which does away with the necessity of shooting them. Elephants, hippopotami, bushpigs, and baboons were recently sur prised to find among their number a queer animal that resembled a baboon, except that it seemed to have had all its hair shaved off, and wore a coat of bright blue.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0111.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Transplanting Hawaii's Fish
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"TRANSPLANTING" Hawaiian fish, prized for their food quality, to other parts of the world is the difficult feat being attempted by the trans-Pacific liner Calawaii. During the next voyage to the United States 500 fish will swim and leap in a specially constructed tank in the hold, as shown at right.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0112.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Smallest Fire Boats Fastest
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WHAT are said to be the smallest and swiftest lire boats in the country have recently been put into service by the fire department of Portland, Ore., for use along the Willamette River. The boats, two of which are shown in action in the photograph, are but eighty-six feet long, but the three can concentrate 9,000 gallons of water a minute on a waterfront fire.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0113.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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If Men Had Bats' Wings
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BATS have such large wings in proportion to their bodies that man, to equal them, would have to develop ten-foot-long fingers with webbing between.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0114.xml
article
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Radio
[no value]
Radio Aids in Paper Making
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A RADIO fan's idle trick of tuning out stations received on his radio set by slipping pieces of paper between the plates of his tuning condenser has resulted in the design of special radio apparatus to test the thickness and moisture content of paper manufactured in the mills at Bangor, Maine.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0115.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
How Rocks Fan Mine Fires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COAL mine fires that rage underground long after all attempts to suffocate them have failed are kept alive by "breathing rocks," in the opinion of Prof. W. Spencer Hutchinson, metallurgist of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. By "inhaling" air when the barometric pressure is high, these porous rocks fan the fires in mines such as that at Butte, Mont. Although completely sealed by concrete walls, the mine continues to burn deep under the ground while miners work in new tunnels alongside.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0116.xml
article
60
60
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
How Much Do You Know of the World You Live In?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THESE questions are selected from hundreds sent in by our readers. Test your knowledge with them. Correct answers are on page 129. 1. What ancient American people anticipated modern astronomy? 2. Where is asphalt taken out of lakes? 3. What South American country was traded for New York City?
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0117.xml
article
61
61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Biggest Electric Ocean Liner
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HER maiden voyage successfully completed at a nineteen-knot clip, the 2,00O-ton ocean liner California, largest merchant vessel ever built in this country and the largest in the world boasting an electric drive, was recently pronounced ready to go into commission.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0118.xml
article
61
61
Automobiles
[no value]
Know Your Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BROKEN-DOWN condenser leaves you absolutely stranded on the road. The condenser consists of two strips of tin foil wound into a compact roll with a piece of paper to insulate them from each other. One piece is connected by way of a wire to one of the breaker contacts, and the other to the remaining breaker contact.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0119.xml
article
61
61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Monorail Motor Bus Trains
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOTOR trains," large automobile busses that balance themselves as they speed over a single rail track trailing a second car after them, have been introduced in Hungary to replace the usual railroads, according to latest reports from Vienna.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0120.xml
article
61
61
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Sounds Have Their Colors, Says Psychology Professor
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[no value]
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[no value]
Do you see a vivid color in your mind's eye when you hear a pleasant sound? Does a brilliant kaleidoscope flash through your mind when you hear a jazz orchestra, and do you see soft, velvety waves of a particular shade of blue when the church organ throbs?
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0121.xml
article
61
61
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Life Rafts Made of Kapok
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MATTRESSES of kapok, a floating floss resembling cotton, will soon be used on some ocean liners in place of the usual lifeboats, according to reports from Paris. Rafts made of four or more of the mattresses will be easier to handle than lifeboats because they will not be swamped by huge waves, it is said.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0122.xml
article
61
61
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Theater Seats of Rubber
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THEATER seats, chairs, table tops, and mats of rubber, all beautifully designed, were displayed at an exposition of the rubber industry in England recently to demonstrate new uses of the substance. The first rubber overshoes, with their original mold, which Thomas Hancock made nearly a century ago, were also displayed.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0123.xml
article
61
61
Aviation
[no value]
New Radio Talks to Flyers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARMY aircraft far up in the skies may be directed from a dugout in the ground with the new portable radio set shown in the illustration below, developed by the Signal Corps. It may be packed up and carried from place to place as easily as an ordinary trunk.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0124.xml
article
62
62,63
[no value]
[no value]
A Host of New Devices for the Household
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0125.xml
article
64
64,65
RADIO
[no value]
How to Adapt Your Set to A. C.
A Complete, Practical and Simple Way to Electrify Your Old Receiver—A Method Approved by Our Institute's Engineers
Send for This List
[no value]
[no value]
ALFRED P. LANE
CAN I change my battery-operated radio receiver into a full electric model? Is A. C. conversion practical? What does it cost? What parts do I need? Is there much hum? Those questions, and others on the same subject, are on the lips of radio set owners everywhere.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0126.xml
article
66
66
Right and Wrong Ways in Radio Work
[no value]
Repairing Your Own Set
How to Use Solder—Fixing Parts That Fail—Choosing Special Tools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MAKING a good soldered connection is simple and easy, yet most beginners approach a soldering job with fear and trembling. They anticipate failure and, in most cases, unhappily, their worst fears are fully realized. The beginner constructing his first radio receiver may be ever so careful to get each connection exactly right.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0127.xml
article
66
66
Radio
[no value]
Repairing Radio Parts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN your radio receiver stops working the first problem is, of course, to find out what has gone wrong. The next is to remedy the trouble. If it happens to be a broken connection, the remedy is obvious, assuming that you can get at the connection.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0128.xml
article
66
66
Radio
[no value]
A B C's of Radio
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN THE early days of radio broadcasting, when ordinary vacuum tubes were hard to get, cost from six to nine dollars apiece, and used four times as much current from the A-battery as modern tubes, reflex type circuits were popular. In the typical reflex circuit, one or more tubes were made to do double duty.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0129.xml
article
66
66
Radio
[no value]
Special Tools Save Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY difficult jobs in assembling radio parts into a set become easy if a long, thin-shanked screw driver is in your tool kit. It will permit you to get at mounting screws that are down between two parts where there is no space for fingers or a hand holding an ordinary length driver.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0130.xml
article
67
67,68,130
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
House Starts Life Over Again
WHEN Napoleon Took Moscow This Home Was New, When Lee Surrendered to Grant It Was Old, and Now, After 116 Years, the Noble Old
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN R. MCMAHON
"MARTHA, how about building that new house?" "Times are unsettled, Hiram," replied his wife. "The almanac says, `-Don't start anything in 1812.' " "Well, we've just started a new war with England," chuckled the head of the house. "I hear Napoleon has started into Russia, and maybe that is what the warning applies to."
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0131.xml
article
69
69
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Why Most Home Refrigerators Are Really Worthless
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FREDERIC DAMRAU
AMONG other A luxuries in a great new apartment building near my home there is a beautiful private ballroom for the use of the tenants. Each apartment is equipped with prettily nickeled white enameled refrigerators. But nice as they are to look at, as refrigerators they are about as effective as so many white soap boxes.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0132.xml
article
70
70,128
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Gus Explains a Broken Axle
How Your Car Turns a Corner in Safety and Why EveryAutomobile Requires Differential Gears in the Rear End
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
"YOU might know we'd get stuck behind a bunch of cars on a hill like this," grumbled Gus Wilson as he shifted into low and prepared for the long grind up Smoke Hill. It was Sunday, and the string of cars constantly passing in the other direction forced Gus and his partner Joe Clark to stay in line.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0133.xml
advertisement
71
71
[no value]
[no value]
SKF INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED
[no value]
SKF INDUSTRIES, INCORPORATED
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0134.xml
article
72
72
Handy Kinks for Car Owners.
[no value]
Strong Start on Weak Battery Other Useful Hints
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EASY starting for the automobile motor depends on the proper mixture of gasoline and air and on a strong, hot spark, assuming of course that the mechanical condition of the motor is good. By pulling out the choke knob you can be sure that there will be plenty of gasoline in the mixture, and by using the arrangement shown in Fig.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0135.xml
article
72
72
Handy Kinks for Car Owners
[no value]
Novel Ash Disposal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOU have ever tried to knock the ashes from your cigarette or cigar by putting your hand out of the window and have had the ashes blown back into your face and all over the inside of the car, you will appreciate the ash disposal system detailed in Fig.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0136.xml
article
72
72
Handy Kinks for Car Owners
[no value]
Emergency Hose Repair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF THE water-hose clamp-screw becomes stripped or the clamp cannot be tightened any more, you can make an emergency repair with a long strip of rubber cut from an old inner tube. Slide the clamp down out of the way and wind the strip of inner tube tight around the end of the hose and down onto the pipe.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0137.xml
article
72
72
Handy Kinks for Car Owners
[no value]
Spring as Fan Belt
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE the only proper VV thing to do with a worn-out fan belt is to replace it with a new one, you can make a screen door spring serve in an emergency, as shown in Fig. 4. Two springs may be hooked together to take the place of a very long spring. Of course it is desirable to replace the spring belt with a regular leather belt at the earliest opportunity, as the spring belt will wear a groove in the pulley if used for any length of time and the groove will cause excessive wear on the new leather or composition rubber belt when you eventually fit it.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0138.xml
article
72
72
Handy Kinks for Car Owners
[no value]
Round the Spring Edges
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOMETIMES springs will wear in such a way that the car will ride with a peculiar bumpy motion. This occurs when the shorter leaves are formed so that the edge gradually wears a section of the leaf below it. When the wheel strikes a bump slightly larger than normal the edge of the spring is forced to ride up over the corner of the depression worn in the lower spring.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0139.xml
article
72
72
Handy Kinks for Car Owners
[no value]
Ten Dollars for an Idea!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HARRY W. PETERSON, of Seattle, Wash., wins the $10 prize this month with his suggestion for overcoming battery weakness, shown in Fig. 1. Each month Popular Science Monthly awards $10, in addition to customary space rates, for the best suggestion for motorists sent in by a reader.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0140.xml
advertisement
73
73
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
RADIO CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0141.xml
article
74
74
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
Treat Your Plants Like Babies
Study Their Illnesses, Their Likes, and Their Dislikes, and from Your Garden You Should Get Rare Results in Flowers and Vegetables
[no value]
[no value]
E. BADE
IF YOU would have success with your garden the green plants which begin to flourish in May and June must be treated like babies. They have their troubles, their sicknesses, their likes and dislikes. Though a sick plant, like an ill baby, may live, only the healthy, sturdy flowers and vegetables will produce large flowers and fruits.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0142.xml
advertisement
75
75
[no value]
[no value]
FRIGIDAIRE CORPORATION
[no value]
FRIGIDAIRE CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0143.xml
advertisement
76
76
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY TOOLS
[no value]
STANLEY TOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0144.xml
article
77
77,111,112,113,114
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
A Seaplane Model That Flies
It Rises from the Water to Give Amazing Performance in the Air —Has 30-in. Wing and Three Pontoons—Easy to Construct
[no value]
[no value]
J. DANNER BUNCH
AVISON F. KOCH
SKIMMING over the water on the steps of its forward pontoons and with its tail pontoon entirely out of the water, the tiny seaplane model speeds forward. Faster and faster it goes. Then, with a graceful skip, it rises into the air and flies like a real seaplane.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0145.xml
article
78
78,95
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
Simple Workbench Kinks
Wood Carving You Can Do Quickly—A Tool—Rack Planing Strips for Models—Handmade Hinges
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY A surprisingly simple method, folding screen frames and other pieces of homemade furniture and novelties can be decorated with artistic wood carving. Choose a soft, c1ear, straight-grained wood such as red cedar, and, if you wish to make a three fold screen with frames such as those illustrated in Fig. 1, buy¾ by 1¾ in. strips-regular screen stock.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0146.xml
article
79
79,98
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Surf Sleds and Boards
Simple Ways to Build Them—One Type Is Only a Piece of Plywood, yet. It Gives Thrilling Sport
[no value]
[no value]
HI SIBLEY
THERE used to be a tradition that no one but a native Hawaiian could ride a surf board. Young America, expert in the sports of all nations, soon exploded that myth. Now nearly every beach on the Atlantic and Pacific Coasts; as well as on the Great Lakes, has its devotees, some of whom have developed a fine skill.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0147.xml
article
80
80,94,114,115,116
Models
[no value]
Rigging the Mayflower
How to Prepare the Spars for Our New Ship Model—Setting Up the Masts—The Third Article
[no value]
[no value]
E. ARMITAGE MCCANN
THOSE who are building our model of the Mayflower and have followed the instructions given in the April and May issues will realize by this time that she is becoming a beautiful little ship and will be eager to fit her with spars, rigging, and sails.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0148.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
CLAYTON & LAMBERT MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0149.xml
article
82
82
For the Home Owner
[no value]
How to Paint a Breakfast Set
Five Ways to Finish Tables and Chairs in Bright, Cheerful Colors —The Use of Stencils and Art Transfers
[no value]
[no value]
BERTON ELLIOT
BREAKFAST room furniture is sold unpainted today in almost every furniture store, and countless families are buying complete five-piece sets and decorating them at home. There are also many who buy simply a table, to be used with odd chairs already on hand, or who desire to make use of an old kitchen table and unmatched chairs.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0150.xml
advertisement
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
MILLERS FALLS COMPANY
[no value]
MILLERS FALLS COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0151.xml
article
84
84,101,102,103
BETTER SHOP METHODS
[no value]
Hints on Using Portable Tools
How They Lighten Work in the Shop if Utilized to Full Capacity—Keeping Them in Order
[no value]
[no value]
H. L. WHEELER
"SHALL we take the tool to the job, or take the job to the tool?" is a question often asked in machine shops, now that portable tools have come into general use in all lines of industry. The task of transferring a heavy job to some machine for a simple operation may often be saved by using a portable drill, grinder, tapper, buffer, or other motor-driven tool.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0152.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0153.xml
article
86
86
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Small Planer Does Heavy Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE M. GILBERT
THE foreman looked at the casting on the floor in disgust. An error had been made in the pattern shop or the foundry, he did not care where, and there was four inches too much iron on the bottom of a huge cast-iron press frame. The casting was twelve feet high, almost four feet square on the bottom, and weighed about eight tons.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0154.xml
article
86
86
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Worn-Out Milling Cutter Used for Light Shaping
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MUCH is said about the versatility of the lathe, but some of our other friends among the familiar machine tools possess much of that quality. How an ordinary hand miller can be employed for light shaping with the use of an old, worn-out, or damaged milling cutter is shown in the accompanying illustration.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0155.xml
article
86
86
Hints for the Mechanic
[no value]
Spring Improves Old Grinder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN THE accompanying illustration is shown an easy and accurate way of grinding the side of a piece of work on a surface grinder without the chattering that often happens when a spindle is worn. An arm of 1/32-in. spring brass presses a ball bearing against the center of the spindle with sufficient force to take up the end play.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0156.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
MICROMETER CALIPER No. 8
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
SCREW PITCH GAUGE No. 630
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0157.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
PECK, STOW & WILCOX CO
[no value]
PECK, STOW & WILCOX CO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0158.xml
article
88
88
Models
[no value]
Rubber-Driven Toy Tugboat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DICK HIXON
THIS realistic little tugboat is driven by the simplest of all power plants—a rubber band motor. it is, therefore, easy to build and inexpensive. Clear white pine is the best material for the hull, although any other soft, close grained wood will do.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0159.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
J. D. Wallace & Co.
[no value]
J. D. Wallace & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0160.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
Clemson Brothers, Inc.
[no value]
Clemson Brothers, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0161.xml
article
90
90,92,93
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Concave and Convex Turning
Hints for the Woodworker Who Has a Lathe—Beading—Chisel Handles and Mallets
[no value]
[no value]
HERMAN HJORTH
AS SOON as the a m a t e u r wood turner has learned how to turn a cylinder and make shoulder and taper cuts, he is ready to undertake work that requires concave and convex cuts. To practice making concave cuts, first turn a cylinder 1½ in.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0162.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
THORDARSON ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
THORDARSON ELECTRIC MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0163.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
TRIMONT MFG. CO.
[no value]
TRIMONT MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0164.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0165.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0166.xml
article
95
95
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Book Ends Embellished with Inlaid Designs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BOOK ends always make a welcome gift, especially if they are dovetailed, inlaid and finished with the best craftsmanship the home worker can apply. A design for book ends of this type is illustrated, but it can be modified in many ways by the maker, if he prefers to work out an original scheme.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0167.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
THE PALMOLIVE-PEET COMPANY
[no value]
THE PALMOLIVE-PEET COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0168.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Larus & Brother Company
[no value]
Larus & Brother Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0169.xml
article
96
96,97
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Our Boy Rides the Air Mail
THE toy plane he uses cost less than four dollars to buildIs pedal driven and has wings and everything
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN P. DUNN
COMPARED with the fun our boy has had with the auto-plane illustrated and the pleasure I had making it for him, the actual cost was very small-two dollars for wheels, sixty cents for iron, and not over one dollar for all other materials, including lumber, bolts, screws, and paint.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0170.xml
advertisement
96a
96a
[no value]
[no value]
Elgin National Watch Company
[no value]
Elgin National Watch Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0171.xml
advertisement
96b
96b
[no value]
[no value]
LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO.
[no value]
LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0172.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
THE BLACK & DECKER MFG. CO.
[no value]
THE BLACK & DECKER MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0173.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
THE CELOTEX COMPANY
[no value]
THE CELOTEX COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0174.xml
article
98
98
For the Home Owner
[no value]
"Tuckaway" Shelf Serves as Table
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR a small house or apartment, this simple “tuckaway” shelf is an obviously convenient contrivance. It may be made any desired size and of any moderately hard wood, whitewood for example, to fit at the end of a passage or to be fastened to any wall where it will be of the most use.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0175.xml
article
98
98
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Amusing Jumping Jack Has Clothespin for Body
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. Clarke Hughes
ALL young children like to play with jumping jacks. The one illustrated is an old and familiar type of the toy and can be made easily. A clothespin is used for the body, while the legs and arms are shaped as shown from very thin wood. The legs and arms are connected to the body with rivets made from thin wire as indicated in one of the details.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0176.xml
article
98
98
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Dish-Mop Buffing Wheel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. W.
A RAG dish-mop, commonly sold for five cents, has been found to make a good buffing wheel when fixed to a polishing head driven by a motor. The mop is cut off just back of the cotton strings and then bored to fit the spindle of the polishing head upon which it is to be screwed.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0177.xml
article
99
99
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Blueprints for Your Home Workshop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANY ONE of the blueprints listed - below can be obtained for 25 cents. The blueprints are complete in themselves, but if you wish the corresponding back issue of the magazine in which the project was described in detail, it can be had for 25 cents additional so long as copies are available.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0178.xml
advertisement
99
99
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[no value]
Western Electric
[no value]
Western Electric
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0179.xml
article
100
100
For the Home Owner
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Colorful Craft -Work Novelties
How to Convert Scraps of Wood into Ornamental Desk Sets~ Clock Cases and Candle Sconces
[no value]
[no value]
DICK HUTCHINSON
THE popular brushing lacquer finishes have opened up a new field of craft work in wood. It is now easy to make colorful and beautiful novelties such as those illustrated. And it is not necessary to own a woodworking shop to turn out a few of these pieces. Many can be made with a few hand tools and, at most, a small lathe.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0180.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
THE STUDEBAKER CORPORATION OF AMERICA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0181.xml
advertisement
102
102
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[no value]
INGERSOLL WATCH CO., Inc.
[no value]
INGERSOLL WATCH CO., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0182.xml
article
103
103
Hints for the Mechanic
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How to Stamp Index Arrows
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[no value]
F. W. B.
THE letters Y and V of any stencil set can be utilized to make neat and symmetrical arrow or index marks. The V, which makes the point or head, is followed by one or more impressions of the Y. Stamping an end of an O or the loop of a U in the V makes the head a bit more artistic.—F. W. B.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0183.xml
article
103
103
Hints for the Mechanic
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Fitting Keys Quickly
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[no value]
H. W.
THE fitting of keys in the hubs of pulleys and gears may be speeded up by using a piece of key stock about four times the length of the key with a hook bent at one end to provide means for tapping the key in and out. The extra stock is cut off and saved.—H. W.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0184.xml
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103
103
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[no value]
B. V. D. Company, Inc.
[no value]
B. V. D. Company, Inc.
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0185.xml
advertisement
104
104
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BOSTON VARNISH COMPANY
[no value]
BOSTON VARNISH COMPANY
[no value]
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0186.xml
article
104
104,105,107,108,109
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Tools for Metal Working
The Outfit You Need for Hammering Copper and Brass and Making Jewelry and Models
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD THATCHER
MUCH work—hammered decorative metal copper and brass, jewelry and models—can be made at the bench with the tools shown in the accompanying illustrations. Some of these you may already have, particularly if you do radio or model work. While some of the special tools must be purchased at a jewelers’ tool supply house, others may be obtained from any well-stocked hardware store or large mail-order firm.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0187.xml
advertisement
105
105
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[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0188.xml
article
106
106
Keeping Your Home Shipshape
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Closet Door Hooks and Shoe Rack
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WHO has lived in an apartment house, a dormitory, a cottage, or in any close quarters and not longed for more hanging space for wearing apparel and a place where shoes and slippers might be placed off the floor and safely out of the way? Often a hook or two or a few nails are driven into the inside of a closet door, but the things hung thereon are always swinging between the edge of the door and the door jamb and are more or less of a nuisance.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0189.xml
article
106
106
Keeping Your Home Shipshape
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Simple Folding Cot for Emergencies
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H. S.
WHEN visitors compel one to find extra sleeping quarters, a comfortable “Pullman berth” can be fitted up on the back porch, or even in a crowded laundry. The writer started making one at three in the afternoon and was sleeping on it at nine that evening.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0190.xml
article
106
106
Keeping Your Home Shipshape
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Neat Trellis Supports Porch Flower Box
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A. E. ANDERSON
IN PLACING a porch flower box, it was found necessary to support the outer edge of the box. As simple props would have emphasized the height and bareness of the wall, a support was made in the form of a trellis, as illustrated.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0191.xml
article
106
106
Keeping Your Home Shipshape
[no value]
How to Fit Drawer Locks Expertly
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THE first step in fitting an ordinary drawer lock of the type shown, regardless of the size, is to lay off distance X of the lock from the top edge of the drawer front, adding a trifle, say 1\64 in.—just enough so that the face of the lock will set below the edge of the drawer to allow planing if necessary.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0192.xml
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107
107
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[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
[no value]
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0193.xml
advertisement
108
108
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SIMONDS SAW AND STEEL COMPANY
[no value]
SIMONDS SAW AND STEEL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0194.xml
advertisement
108
108
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Loftis Bros. & Co.
[no value]
Loftis Bros. & Co.
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0195.xml
advertisement
108
108
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CHEMICAL TOILET CORP.
[no value]
CHEMICAL TOILET CORP.
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0196.xml
advertisement
109
109
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E. C. ATKINS & CO.
[no value]
E. C. ATKINS & CO.
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0197.xml
advertisement
110
110
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0198.xml
advertisement
110
110
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0199.xml
article
110
110
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Stepping the Mast of a Canoe
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J. V. Hazzard
FOR the canoeist who enjoys sailing, yet desires to keep his craft clear of entangling gear, the mast step presents a problem. The solution illustrated has several advantages. The crosspiece or thwart which supports the mast is easily made, solid in use, fair to look upon, and quickly removable.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0200.xml
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111
111
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The SHALER Company
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The SHALER Company
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0201.xml
advertisement
112
112
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0202.xml
advertisement
113
113
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J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0203.xml
advertisement
113
113
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DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
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DELTA SPECIALTY CO.
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0204.xml
advertisement
114
114
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0205.xml
advertisement
115
115
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0206.xml
article
116
116
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Books on Woodworking
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READERS who have taken up woodworking as a hobby but did not have the benefit of manual training instruction at school when they were boys, often ask for a general handbook on woodworking. They say that they are sometimes puzzled by questions which they could answer themselves if they could consult a good reference book.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0207.xml
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116
116
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0208.xml
article
117
117
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Home Workshop Chemistry
Simple Formulas that Will Save Time and Money
Glycerin C3H5(OH)3
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[no value]
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GLYCERIN ÍS a thick, viscous fluid, sweet to the taste and soluble in all proportions in water and alcohol. It is almost always found in the family medicine chest because it relieves chapped hands. But it has other uses. It dissolves alum, ammonium chloride, ammonium carbonate, benzoic acid, lead acetate, iodine, copper sulphate, sodium bicarbonate, oxalic acid, and other chemicals.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0209.xml
advertisement
117
117
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[no value]
BEMIS & CALL CO.
[no value]
BEMIS & CALL CO.
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0210.xml
advertisement
117
117
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JOHNSON MOTOR COMPANY
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JOHNSON MOTOR COMPANY
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0211.xml
article
118
118
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Paper Strip Indicates Moisture in the Air
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E. N. MUSGRAVE
IT IS often desirable to know the relative moisture in the air in order to be able to determine approximately the time necessary to dry photographic prints and, no doubt, for many other purposes. I have found that the very simple homemade hygrometer illustrated is a trustworthy indicator in this connection.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0212.xml
article
118
118
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Repairing Loose Chair Rungs
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[no value]
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WHEN the rung of a chair has become so loose that regluing is not sufficient to make it hold securely, a repair can be made by inserting a nail or a piece of wire through the tenon of the rung as shown. Drill a hole through the tenon as near the end as possible.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0213.xml
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118
118
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0214.xml
article
119
119
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Homemade Vise Has Guide Bars Made of Pipes
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WILSON G. WALTERS
A STRONG vise is a necessity in any home workshop. In the accompanying illustrations is shown how I constructed an exceptionally substantial vise with a framework of pipe and pipe fittings. First one should obtain two hard, closegrained blocks of wood for the vise jaws.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0215.xml
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119
119
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WACO TOOL WORKS, Inc.
[no value]
WACO TOOL WORKS, Inc.
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0216.xml
advertisement
119
119
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[no value]
OLD TOWN CANOE Co.
[no value]
OLD TOWN CANOE Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0217.xml
advertisement
119
119
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[no value]
LACQUER-WELL SPRAY CO.
[no value]
LACQUER-WELL SPRAY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0218.xml
advertisement
120
120
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Smooth-On Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Smooth-On Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0219.xml
advertisement
121
121
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[no value]
MULLINS MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
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MULLINS MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0220.xml
advertisement
121
121
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[no value]
INTERNATIONAL MILL & TIMBER CO.
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL MILL & TIMBER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0221.xml
advertisement
121
121
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[no value]
Elkhart, Ind.
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Elkhart, Ind.
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0222.xml
advertisement
121
121
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[no value]
Boys Magazine
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Boys Magazine
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0223.xml
advertisement
122
122
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AMERICAN FACE BRICK ASSOCIATION
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AMERICAN FACE BRICK ASSOCIATION
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0224.xml
advertisement
122
122
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MODEL AIRCRAFT CO.
[no value]
MODEL AIRCRAFT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0225.xml
advertisement
122
122
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[no value]
REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0226.xml
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122
122
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[no value]
MAGNO SAIES CO.
[no value]
MAGNO SAIES CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0227.xml
article
123
123
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[no value]
Indian War Temple Restored
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MUSIC, dancing, and the sacrifice of a black hog recently marked one of the strangest celebrations ever held—a jovial party in which grave scientists of the Carnegie Institution mingled with full-blooded Maya Indians. The occasion was the completion of the restored ancient Maya “temple of the warriors,” near Meridan, in the Mexican province of Yucatan, where the archeologists have finished months of work studying and restoring the temple and have dedicated it to the modern descendants of its original builders.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0228.xml
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123
123
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0229.xml
advertisement
124
124
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The Veeder Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Veeder Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0230.xml
advertisement
125
125
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0231.xml
advertisement
126
126
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0232.xml
advertisement
127
127
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0233.xml
advertisement
128
128
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ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY: PLASTIC WOOD
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ADDISON-LESLIE COMPANY
PLASTIC WOOD
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0234.xml
article
129
129
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Here Are Correct Answers to Questions on Page 60
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1. Both the Aztecs and the Mayas must have been good astronomers. The Mayas originally occupied a part of what is now Guatemala. Later they moved to Yucatan. It is probable that offshoots from the Maya civilization greatly influenced the Aztecs.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0235.xml
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129
129
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0236.xml
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130
130
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The Electro Thermal Co.
[no value]
The Electro Thermal Co.
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0237.xml
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130
130
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ARKOGRAF PEN CO.
[no value]
ARKOGRAF PEN CO.
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0238.xml
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130
130
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0239.xml
advertisement
130
130
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[no value]
Foley Saw Tool Co., Inc.
[no value]
Foley Saw Tool Co., Inc.
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0240.xml
advertisement
131
131
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WEATHERBEST STAINED SHINGLE CO.,INC.
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WEATHERBEST STAINED SHINGLE CO.,INC.
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0241.xml
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131
131
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[no value]
Rutland Fire Clay Co.
[no value]
Rutland Fire Clay Co.
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0242.xml
advertisement
131
131
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Bauer & Black
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Bauer & Black
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[no value]
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0243.xml
advertisement
132
132,133,134,135,136,137,138,139,140,141,142,143,144,145,146,147,148,149,150,151
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Money Making Opportunities
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0244.xml
article
138
138
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Letters on Telepathy That Win Awards
A Sister’s Call
Caught in the Storm
The Prospector’s Message
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IN ITS February number POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY published under the heading “ Is Telepathy All Bunk?” the conflicting discoveries of scientists on this widely discussed subject, and invited readers to write their personal experiences.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0245.xml
article
142
142
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Tesla, Wizard, Designs Air Flivver
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DR. NIKOLA TESLA, New York City electrical wizard and pioneer radio experimenter, has just taken out patents on a vertical-rising helicopter of his own design. He is certain it will fly, he says, although no model has been built. The machine, a combined airplane-helicopter, would be the ideal air flivver, Dr. Tesla says.
PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0246.xml
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152
152
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Taylor Instrument Companies
[no value]
Taylor Instrument Companies
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0247.xml
advertisement
153
153
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0248.xml
advertisement
154
154,155,156
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EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
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PopularScience_19280601_0112_006_0249.xml