Issue: 19270601

Wednesday, June 1, 1927
June 1927
6
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110
Thursday, December 25, 2014

Articles
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popular Science
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0001.xml
advertisement
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The B.V. D. Company, Inc.
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The B.V. D. Company, Inc.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0002.xml
advertisement
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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CADILLAC MOTOR CAR COMPANY
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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2,3,143
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WHAT IS NEW THIS MONTH
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0004.xml
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RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA
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RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0005.xml
advertisement
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ETHYL GASOLINE CORPORATION
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ETHYL GASOLINE CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0006.xml
article
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6
LEADING ARTICLES
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A Four Square FINANCIAL PLAN for a YOUNG MARRIED COUPLE
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WALLACE AMES
THE Financial Department’s mail at the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY office contains many letters relating to interesting financial plans and problems such as everyone confronts. We are yielding to the temptation to publish one of these letters together with our reply as we believe the subject will stimulate the thoughts of every reader who is seeking a sound program for his personal finances.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0007.xml
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A Service for Readers
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THIS Financial Department is to help readers in the establishment of proper financial programs at the beginning of their usiness careers; it assists those who have accumulated money in the proper investment of it. The Editor of this Department is an authority on investment matters.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0008.xml
advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0009.xml
article
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8,13,130
LEADING ARTICLES
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What THOUSANDS DID
Who Were Buying Radio, Tools and Oil Burners
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TO AID readers in their buying problems, to determine that only reliable products were being advertised and to make POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY a still better magazine—these were the three aims the publishers had in mind in establishing the Popular Science Institute of Standards.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0010.xml
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0011.xml
advertisement
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9
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Taylor Instrument Companies
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Taylor Instrument Companies
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0012.xml
advertisement
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A. H. Grebe & Co., Inc.
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A. H. Grebe & Co., Inc.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0013.xml
article
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New Marvels of Ingenuity
A Light That Pierces Fog — Pictures on the Clouds—Other Amazing Ideas and Discoveries
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0014.xml
article
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Aviation
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A New Self-Starter for Airplanes
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Press a button, and the airplane engine roars into action! This new selfstarter for airplanes, invented by C. F. Heywood, of Detroit, Mich., makes it unnecessary for a mechanic to spin the propeller by hand. Compressed air controlled from the pilot’s cockpit turns over the engine.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0015.xml
article
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Aviation
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Strange Light Pierces Fog
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A wonderful new light designed to guide airplanes safely to their landing fields in bad weather gives off intense orange-red rays from the huge electric tube shown above. These rays, because of their long wave length, are said to penetrate heavy fog.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0016.xml
article
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Automobiles
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Turbine Drives Gearless Car
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The latest development in gearless motor cars, the recent invention of James Fraser, of Glasgow, Scotland (at the right), is based on the turbine principle. The engine has a series of revolving blades which, through the medium of a liquid, transmit the motor's power to another series of blades connected with the rear axle drive
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0017.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Power and Speed!
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This picture shows Gar Wood’s speedboat, Miss America V immediately after setting a new world’s salt water speed record of 80.46 miles an hour at Miami, Florida. The famous speedboat pilot is seen at the wheel
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0018.xml
article
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Dangles in a Basket
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To study the wonderful formation of the famous Natural Bridge at Staunton, Va., Dr. Chester A. Reeds of the American Museum of Natural History recently was let down from the top of the arch, which is fifty feet higher than Niagara Falls. At the left he is seen at a height of about 200 feet
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0019.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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Housecleaning on the Tracks
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Clear the tracks; here comes the vacuum cleaner! Walter M. Spring, research engineer, is the inventor of this strange apparatus for cleaning cinders and refuse from trap rock roadbeds. It consists of three huge suction chambers, the bases of which run close to the track bed.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0020.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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The End of a Rum Ship
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It looks like a fierce naval engagement. Actually, though, the remarkable picture in the circle shows what happened recently to the rum ship W. T. Bell at the moment Coast Guardsmen blew her up with a hundred pounds of TNT on the beach at Bayville, N. Y. With a deafening roar, showers of timbers were hurled skyward, while billows of smoke drifted out over the sea.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0021.xml
article
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Photography
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Wins a Million for Invention
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Every inventor’s dream of a million-dollar idea has just been realized by Anato1 Josepho. This young Russian photographer recently received that sum for his remarkable automatic photographer, previously described in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0022.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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The Latest—a “Zeppelin” Cruiser
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Ideas borrowed from Zeppelin construction are embodied in a revolutionary type of express cruiser built in Germany for Otto H. Kahn, prominent American financier. From stem to stern the hull is reinforced by a metal framework of the light alloys used in building airships.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0023.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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Shoots Pictures on the Clouds
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Like a naval cannon in appearance is a “gun” searchlight just perfected for use in a new form of sky-writing. Advertising matter inserted between the lenses in the barrel of the cannonlike projector is thrown in gigantic letters and pictures upon overhead clouds.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0024.xml
article
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16,17,18,19,131,132
FICTION
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Black Death
A Naval Officer's Vivid Story Revealing Inside Workings of a Submarine
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FITZHUGH GREEN
THERE was a touch of mystery to the scene: two ships at a dead stop in the center of an otherwise empty ocean; weather clear as a bell; fresh breeze out of the north’rd; sea sparkling in the June morning sunshine and flecked with whitecaps. The kind of day when ships should be about their business.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0025.xml
article
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LEADING ARTICLES
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Car Makes 207 Miles an Hour
Giant 1,000-H.P.Auto Demonstrates New Racing Principles
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H. C. DAVIS
“I WAS going so fast I couldn’t look at the speedometer! To guide the car, I had to focus my eyes half a mile ahead. If I had looked at the dial for an instant I might have lost control. I didn’t know the car had made 200 until after the run.” The British speed king, Major H.O.D. Segrave, was describing his recent experience in driving his mammoth Sunbeam racer, the Mystery S,over the sands of Daytona Beach, Fla., for a world's record of 207.01 miles an hour.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0026.xml
article
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Science Reveals
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Secrets of “Cold Light”
Studies of Luminous Insects, Fish and Bacteria May Yield Key to More Efficient Lighting of Our Homes
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ELLSWORTH BENNETT
SCIENTISTS are on the verge of far-reaching discoveries which eventually may make the incandescent electric light as out-ofdate as the old-fashioned kerosene lamp. They are learning the secrets of a lighting system used by Nature for ages, yet always a mystery to man—the production of light without heat.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0027.xml
article
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LEADING ARTICLES
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New Plane Stops Like an Auto
“Sea Hawk” Rivals the Birds in Speed Range and Control
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ONLY six feet of air separate the plane from the ground. Motor roaring, it flirts with the earth. Gracefully, lazily, it skims closer, throttled so slow that a fast motor car could outdistance it. It touches—rises again, wheels spinning from the contact—and airily circles the field.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0028.xml
article
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24,25,140
LEADING ARTICLES
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City Populations Predicted from Study of Flies
Experiments with Pumpkins, Teast and Rats Make Possible Forecasts of Cities’ Growths
How Your City Will Grow
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MYRON M. STEARNS
THEY were weighing a rat in one of the research laboratories of Johns Hopkins University at Baltimore. Weighing it with particular care, for a strange reason—to find out what the population of New York City would be in 2000 A.D.! The study of a rat’s growth came in the course of an investigation by Dr. Raymond Pearl, Director of the Institute of Biological Research, at Johns Hopkins, by means of which he has demonstrated that the increase in population in a given region or country over a particular period of time can be foretold with almost unbelievable accuracy.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0029.xml
article
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Laboratory Discoveries
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Invents Amazing Electric Relay
Engineer's New Control Tube Runs on a Billionth-Watt
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A GOLD watch lay on a plush-covered table in a New York hotel. Near by was a small glass bulb. A man extended his hand to the watch; but even before he could touch it, an electric alarm rang. A lighted match was held between the thin wires connected with the bulb.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0030.xml
article
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New Processes and Inventions
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Longest Power Transmission Near
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CHEAPER electricity for all of us, because it can be transmitted economically thousands of miles where only hundreds have heretofore been possible, may be one of the results of a new system of handling electricity perfected by Frank G. Baum, San Francisco engineer.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0031.xml
article
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27,28,138
LEADING ARTICLES
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Forty-Niners of 1927
Motor Cars, Airplanes and Modern Machinery Mark Latest Stampede for Gold in Nevada
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EDWIN KETCHUM
EARLY this spring two nineteen-year-old boys, prospecting in the barren hills of Esmeralda county, southwestern Nevada, ran upon a badger hole. They dug into the hole. At the bottom, instead of a badger, they found a ledge of rocks shot with streaks of gold.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0032.xml
article
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LEADING ARTICLES
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An Amazing Vision of the Future
Scientist Foresees a World Run by Radio
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ROBERT E. MARTIN
"THE present is only the very beginning of an age of diseovery—and the next century will mark the greatest advance of civilization in the world’s history.” So says Prof. A. M. Low in his new book, “The Future,” a tale of wonders such as no fairy tale ever presented, of the marvels science has in store for the future.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0033.xml
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30,31
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The Progress of Aviation
Californian Builds Propellerless Dirigible—Latest German Super-Ship—Ninety-Mile Beacon for France—Other Advances
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0034.xml
article
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32,33,141,142,143
LEADING ARTICLES
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How Sea Flying Was Made Safe
The first hydroaeroplane—Ship-to-shore flights—Other triumphs of Glenn Curtiss, air pioneer
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FRANK PARKER STOCKBRIDGE
ENTHUSIASTIC delegations met Glenn Curtiss at the pier when he returned from Europe. His victory at the first international aviation meet in France had fixed him as a national hero. All America now wanted to see him fly. Scores wanted him to build flying machines for them.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0035.xml
article
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34,139
LEADING ARTICLES
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Facts Everyone Should Know
These Fifty-Eight Questions Offer a New Way to Test Your Stock of Useful Information
Terms of Applied Science
Inventors and Inventions
Mental Measuring Stick
Application of Measurements
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HOW large is your stock of useful information? Have you learned the secret of selecting valuable facts and figures from the general run of information, and of sorting them in mental pigeonholes for future reference? Or have you allowed knowledge, once gained in school or elsewhere, to escape you through neglect or disuse?
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0036.xml
article
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35,36
LEADING ARTICLES
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Is There a Human Speed Limit?
Noted British scientist's remarkable experiments with athletes have revealed many amazing new facts about the mechanics and chemistry of running
NEXT MONTH!
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ARTHUR GRAHAME
WHEN Charles W. Paddock, the California sprinter famous as “the fastest human,” not so long ago ran 100 yards in 9 5-10 seconds, he established a new American record, clipping one tenth of a second off the mark set by Arthur Duffy a quarter of a century ago.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0037.xml
article
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Astronomy
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Sun’s Next Eclipse on June 29
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ASTRONOMERS from all over the world are gathering in Norway to view the total eclipse of the sun that will occur early in the morning of June 29. The United States, where memories are still vivid of the eclipse of January 24, 1925, is to send at least one party to study the eclipse, the McCormick-Chaloner expedition from the University of Virginia.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0038.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Great Hudson Tunnel Undergoes Health Tests
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THE ventilating system installed in the new Hudson River vehicular tunnel connecting New York and New Jersey has been, perhaps, the most important of the stupendous problems involved in this great engineering feat. If the ventilation is not adequate in a tunnel designed to carry motor vehicles, there is a possibility of serious injury to the health of drivers using the tunnel.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0039.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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No “Criminal Type," Survey Shows
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THERE is no such thing as a “criminal type,” we are now told. The average criminal is a normally intelligent individual, and consequently our methods of punishment, which are based on the theory that he is a “type” and not an individual, are doomed to failure.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0040.xml
article
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The World’s Progress in Science
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Relics of Ice Age Americans—?
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ARCHAEOLOGISTS, digging into the soil of America, have recently come upon fascinating evidence that men lived on this continent far earlier than has been generally believed—perhaps a million years ago! This evidence, gathered by J. D. Figgins and Harold J. Cook of the Colorado Museum of Natural History at Denver, consists of arrowheads and other implements found buried with the fossil bones of extinct animals in ancient geological deposits in Oklahoma, Texas and New Mexico.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0041.xml
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Health and Hygiene
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New Anaesthetic Tested
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DISCOVERY of a new anaesthetic, said to have important advantages over ether or chloroform, is claimed by German surgeons. Known as “107,” it has proved successful in 300 tests, according to Dr. Ernst Unruh, of Berlin. Under its influence, pulse and blood pressure of patients are said to remain normal, disagreeable after-effects and danger to heart, lungs or nerves eliminated, and operations possible even in severe cases of pneumonia and advanced tuberculosis.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0042.xml
article
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Laboratory Discoveries
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Rubber Chemistry Magic
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WE SHOULD find it hard to get along today without rubber; yet its countless uses would have been impossible without the ceaseless work of chemists. Dr. W. C. Geer, one of America's foremost rubber experts, recently stated that the world owes a billion dollars a year to chemistry in the rubber industry alone.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0043.xml
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High Wages Boost Inventions
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INVENTION of labor-saving devices in industry is being more than ever stimulated by the decrease in the supply of “cheap labor” in this country, says Prof. Robert D. Ward, of Harvard University. “From one end of the country to the other, reports of new labor-saving machinery are coming in almost daily.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0044.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Twins Alike Even in Unlikeness
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NO TWO things in the world are exactly alike, we are often told. A close approach to duplication, however, is found in the case of “identical" twins; that is, twins believed to have grown from the sanae fertilized egg cell, as distinguished from ordinary or “fraternal” twins.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0045.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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How Dances Burn Us Up
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SCIENTISTS at the University of Helsingfors, Finland, have just completed interesting measurements of tlie energy Consumed in dancing, in terms of heat units. The fast mazurka consumed the most fuel—10.87
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0046.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Science and Conservation
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REGARDING future development of natural resources, Secretary of the Interior Hubert Work says: “Science can help us find new wealth in materials trodden under foot as worthless.” A dirty yellow mineral found on barren slopes of Colorado proved to be radium, boon to the suffering.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0047.xml
article
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Health and Hygiene
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Blood Has Daily Tide
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IN THE blood stream. pumped from the heart to give us life, there are daily tides, like the ebb and flow of the tides of the sea. Dr. A. F. Bernard Shaw, of Newcastle, England, recently made this discovery while studying the white corpuscles of the blood.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0048.xml
article
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Health and Hygiene
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Alcoholic Rats and Heredity
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JUST because a person is descended from hard-drinking ancestors is no sign that he can “hold his liquor” better than others; nor does it mean he is more likely to turn into a drunkard. Such are the conclusions of Prof. Frank B. Hanson and Miss Florence Hays of Washington University, St. Louis, Mo., after staging a series of drinking tests with rats.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0049.xml
article
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Radio
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More Antennas, Weaker Signals
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AN INTERESTING new fact about radio broadcasting has been revealed by R. H. Barfield of the English Radio Research Board. It is this: The strength of a signal received on your set depends materially on the number of other radio listeners tuned in.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0050.xml
article
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40,41,42,133,134,135,136
FICTION
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Bare Hands
Science and Ingenuity Put to the Supreme Test
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HAWTHORNE DANIEL
CRUISING among the Aleutian Islands, four Seattle yachtsmen—Parker and Thornton, partners in an engineering firm; Williams, a young naval architect, and Kelly, a deck hand—were captured and imprisoned in their own yawl by Kiska Joe, murderous half-breed seal poacher.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0051.xml
article
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43,44,140
LEADING ARTICLES
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A Wonderland of Science
Amazing machines seen at Popular Science Institute of Standards that guard you in buying tools and radio equipment
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ALDEN P. ARMAGNAC
TWO thousand men pull ing on a hammer handle! Corrugated with massive gears, a huge wheel turns slowly, almost imperceptibly, but with inexorable force! A mechanical hand two thousand times stronger than mine—pulling on the handle of a hammer the claws of which clutch the head of a heavy wire nail.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0052.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Ingenious New Community Building
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COMBINING under one roof a town’s entire shopping, business and theater district, a novel “community building” is proposed by Joseph Falk, of New Brunswick, N. J. Under the plan, a town could transplant its “Main Street” to the inside of this structure and build an attractive residential section around it.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0053.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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World’s Largest Lock Gate
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MORE like a skyscraper in appearance than a gate, this mighty structure is one of the leaves of the lock gate that soon will close the river entrance to Liverpool’s new dry dock. When completed, the dock of the great English port will be one of the finest in the world, and this lock gate the largest in existence.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0054.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Russia’s Superpower Project
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RUSSIA will have the largest hydroelectric plant in Europe if plans recently announced are realized. Built on the banks of the Dnieper River, the plant will have a capacity of 630,000 horsepower, surpassed in this country only by Niagara.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0055.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Beating the Housing Shortage
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APLOT of ground in France—at least in Paris—costs more than an old pontoon boat and the same area of water —so a Paris workman built this neat two-room bungalow, pictured at the right, for his small family on an old boat abandoned along the Seine River.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0056.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Touring the Country in a Tree Trunk
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WITHIN the giant, hollowed-out trunk of a Douglas fir, mounted on a motor truck, Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Wade and their son, of California, are touring the country. Their novel temporary home is a modern two-room apartment that contains all the comforts of home—built-in breakfast nook, cupboard, wardrobe, even electric light and an oil stove for cooking.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0057.xml
article
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Laboratory Discoveries
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New Element Isolated
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AFTER a difficult refining process, Drs. Walter and Ida Noddack of Berlin, Germany, discoverers of the new chemical element rhenium, have succeeded in obtaining and testing two milligrams — seven one-hundred-thousandths of an ounce—of the precious substance.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0058.xml
article
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Laboratory Discoveries
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Science Weighs a Mountain
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SEEKING to discover the mysterious forces that hurl molten lava from the crater of Mauna Loa, in the Hawaiian Islands, scientists now propose to weigh the entire mountain! It is impossible, of course, to devise scales to weigh a mountain peak which reaches down some three miles under the sea.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0059.xml
article
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Unusual Facts and Ideas
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Railway Train Built from a Flivver
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THIS odd locomotive starts with a crank. Once a flivver but now, with flanged wheels, a one-car train, it runs on the regular tracks of the Tabor and Northern Railroad between Malvern and Tabor, Iowa. Only rarely, when traffic is unusually heavy, is it replaced by a steam train.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0060.xml
article
47
47
Astronomy
[no value]
How the Moon Affects Quakes
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[no value]
[no value]
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THE moon exerts a direct influence on earthquakes, points out Prof. H. F. Reid of Johns Hopkins University, as a result of recent investigations. Just as it pulls on the sea to form the tides, the moon strains on the earth. Should a “fault" or slipping of rock be about to occur for any reason, in a given direction, the moon in one position would hasten it; in another, it would delay it.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0061.xml
article
47
47
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Device Takes Telephone Messages
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOON it may no longer be necessary to stay at home in order to receive telephone messages. A new Swedish invention answers the phone, takes the message, and repeats it to you when you return! The apparatus has been under test for several months and is now reported to have passed all tests.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0062.xml
article
47
47
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Aluminum Made from Clay
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COMMON clay now is to yield aluminum, in Germany, by a new process made commercially practicable by the phenomenal increase in the use of aluminum throughout the world. In the process the aluminum compounds are dissolved from the clay by means of powerful acids—a process made economically remunerative since the discovery that silica, a by-product of the new process, is valuable in many industries as a catalyst in the form obtained when aluminum is isolated.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0063.xml
article
47
47
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Leviathan Gets a New Dress
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THERE is more to a great ocean liner than generally meets the eye—witness this unusual photo of the Leviathan, taken recently at South Boston, Mass, Put in dry dock for a fresh coat of paint, the ocean monster lies with the whole of its enormous hulk exposed.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0064.xml
article
47
47
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Wool Made from Pine Needles
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHEMICALLY treated pine needles are being made to yield a useful substitute for wool in Germany. In the process the resin is chemically removed from the needles, leaving a “pine wool” of fine strong fibers resembling hemp. This wool is woven into heavy fabrics.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0065.xml
article
47
47
Aviation
[no value]
An Air Fleet Goes to War
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[no value]
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LIKE dragon flies on a floating piece of driftwood, twenty-five planes perched on the upper deck of the aircraft carrier Langley, pictured at the left, as it cruised along the California coast to take part in the fleet's recent battle maneuvers.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0066.xml
article
48
48
Aviation
[no value]
A 10,000-Watt Sun for Airplane Landings
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GENERATING such terrific heat, when lighted, that a special glass had to be developed, huge 10,000-watt incandescent lamps are being made by the Westinghouse Company to light airplane landing fields at night. A single bulb, inclosedin a device similar to a lighthouse lens, is said to be sufficient to illuminate an airport runway 2,000 feet long.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0067.xml
article
48
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New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Now—Ball-Bearing Trains
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[no value]
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A STANDARD size Pullman car so frictionless that two men can pull it along the level rails, is the marvel made possible by new roller bearings for car wheels, replacing the present friction bearings. After a try-out on the Chicago, Milwaukee and St. Paul Railway, the bearings are being placed on more than a hundred cars—the first time that complete sets of passenger trains have been equipped with roller bearings.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0068.xml
article
48
48
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
A 20-Inch Cigarette Holder
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[no value]
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IONG-RANGE smoking is possible with the novelty cigarette holder below. Twenty inches long when extended, it telescopes to four inches to slip into a pocket. There's no danger of getting fumes in the eyes, either.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0069.xml
article
48
48
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
You’ll Soon Be Phoning This Way!
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWENTY million telephone receivers and transmitters now in use in the United States are gradually to be replaced by a new type of telephone, pictured above, combining receiver and mouthpiece in one. Patterned after the European-type phone, the instrument is the product of experiments by the Bell Telephone Company, and is said to be an improvement on the Continental type.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0070.xml
article
48
48
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Corner Subways for Pedestrians
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[no value]
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[no value]
PICTURED above is the entrance to one of thirty-nine tunnels that the city of Los Angeles, Calif., has built at its most dangerous street crossings, to make it possible for persons on foot to cross the street in safety. Children on their way to school, in particular, are protected from the growing streams of motor vehicles that make the crossings perilous; and where these tunnels are built, the “stop crossings” usually provided for school children are eliminated.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0071.xml
article
48
48
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Airplane Engine Fits in Pocket
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BABY brother of the giant motors that drive great planes, this remarkable motor—and it actually runs—would fit in a capacious overcoat pocket. A two-cycle engine, it develops a quarter to half a horsepower to drive a small-scale propeller that air-cools it.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0072.xml
article
49
49
Automobiles
[no value]
Handy New Aids for Autoists
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0073.xml
article
50
50
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Thinner Buildings, Wider Streets, for Future City
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FUTURE urban buildings must be taller and thinner and occupy, relatively, less space as compared with streets, in the opinion of a New York architect, Raymond Hood. He would solve traffic problems of great cities by allowing six times as much space on the ground to streets as to buildings.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0074.xml
article
50
50
Automobiles
[no value]
KNOW YOUR CAR
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SAFETY in driving an auto at night depends largely on your headlights, when you get away from the brilliantly illuminated city streets. If your headlights should go out at a critical moment, perhaps going around a sharp turn, almost anything in the way of a serious accident might happen.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0075.xml
article
50
50
Astronomy
[no value]
Sunspots Cause of Wars?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PERHAPS astrologers of old were not completely wrong in their belief that the course of human life depended on the stars. Prof. A. L. Tchijevsky of the Moscow Astronomical Observatory recently predicted “great human activity of the highest importance which may change the political chart of the world,” as a result of the expected three-year period of intense sun spot activity that commenced this year.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0076.xml
article
50
50
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
A Noted Golfer “Tests Himself”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIE MACFARLANE, former U. S. open golf champion, ran up against a brand-new set of hazards when he recently tried out the psychological tests at Columbia University. One series of tests ranged from estimating the length of two bars to picking out circles and triangles from a printed jumble.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0077.xml
article
50
50
Exceptional People
[no value]
Wisconsin’s Champ Whittler
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[no value]
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[no value]
OUT of a single piece of wood, Fred Heiser, of Patteville, Wis., carved each of the intricate pieces spread on the table before him. Chains, pulley blocks and linked figures are among them, all of them designed by himself.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0078.xml
article
50
50
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Canadian Police Signal System
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN Montreal's chief of police wishes to speak to a policeman or detective anywhere in the city, all he has to do is give a word to his desk operator. A moment later flashing lights on top of all the poles of the policeman's beat summon him to a phone, or give him orders through a unique numbered code.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0079.xml
article
51
51
Explorations
[no value]
Pygmy Hunter Back with Trophies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BACK from the wilds of Dutch New Guinea, Prof. Matthew W. Sterling, of Berkeley, Calif., leader of the Smithsonian Pygmy expedition, recently returned to report the discovery of a new race of pygmies. Strange ornaments and implements of the tribe, a few of which are shown above, were brought back.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0080.xml
article
51
51
Exceptional People
[no value]
Violin Maker's Fackknife Art
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH no other tool than a knife, Moise Potvin, expert violin maker, carved out of wood this remarkable detailed picture of a scene in his workshop. Like the familiar Swiss wood pictures, carved and framed in much the same fashion, the charm of this work lies largely in its faithful reproduction of such homely detail as an umbrella, coat and hat, and pictures on the wall.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0081.xml
article
51
51
Exceptional People
[no value]
12 Years Old, Runs Radio Station
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOUNGEST licensed radio broadcaster in the United States, Robert Marx, of New York City, converses with Europe every evening from his station 2AZK. Only twelve years old, he reads code signals at amazing speed. His wave length is forty meters, and his call letter is familiar all over the world.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0082.xml
article
51
51
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Heartbeat Like Cannon's Boom
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO hundred medical students at the University of Pennsylvania had the startling experience the other day of hearing patients’ heartbeats, at a distance of ten feet, come to them like the booming of distant cannon. The sound was made audible by a wonderful new electric stethoscope capable of magnifying heart noises 500,000,000,000 times!
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0083.xml
article
51
51
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
New Steel Defies Nicks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW steel, said to be eight times harder than any of American manufacture, has been developed by the Fried Krupp works of Essen, Germany. Demonstrated recently in this country, it wore smooth the edges of steel files used in unsuccessful attempts to nick it.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0084.xml
article
51
51,144,145,146
[no value]
[no value]
How Much Do You Know of the World You Live In?
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[no value]
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[no value]
TEST yourself with the twelve questions below, selected from hundreds sent in by our readers. For the correct answers, turn to page 144. 1. What famous harbor occupies the crater of an extinct volcano? 2. What famous trees live only on one small peninsula?
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0085.xml
article
52
52,53
[no value]
[no value]
Utility and Ingenuity in New Inventions
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0086.xml
article
54
54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Krupp Works Turn to Peace
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[no value]
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[no value]
VAST workshops that once forged guns and shells to destroy human life have now turned to peacetime products, at the giant Krupp works, in Essen, Germany. The illustration at the right shows a corner of this famous war factory as it is today, with agricultural implements lined up awaiting shipment.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0087.xml
article
54
54
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Color Piano Has 6,000 Lamps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HARMONIES of The color pianist color to accompany orchestral music ment, including are created by a remarkable “color piano" perfected by Leo Geasland, of Los Angeles, Calif. With one hand working the ten keys of his instrument’s keyboard, he creates flashing changes of purple, red and orange from 6,000 concealed electric bulbs.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0088.xml
article
54
54
Aviation
[no value]
New Giant Dirigibles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Zeppelin factory in Germany has started construction of the aluminum frame of a huge airship designed for weekly trans-Atlantic passenger service between Spain and South America. This giant liner will carry 100 passengers, crew, luggage and mails.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0089.xml
article
54
54
Radio
[no value]
Quartz Motor Run by Radio
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RUN by radio, a novel electric motor described by Dr. Alexander Meissner, German radio engineer, has as its rotating part a small plate cut from a quartz crystal. Placed in a radio circuit, the crystal vibrates and sets up air currents that cause it to spin.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0090.xml
article
54
54
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Fight Shipworms with Paraffin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WOODEN wharves, ships and houses are now being protected against shipworms by a special paraffin treatment developed by Dr. Paul Bartsch, marine biologist of the U. S. National Museum. The process consists of impregnating the wood with paraffin and two kinds of poisons, one to destroy all attacking animal life, the other, parasitic plants.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0091.xml
article
54
54
Explorations
[no value]
Navy Mapping Southern Seas
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AERIAL cameras and sound depth . finders are being used in a new survey of wide areas of seas off Central American and Cuban coasts, conducted by the Hydrographic Office of the U. S. Navy. Ships endangered by old and inaccurate charts of the ocean bottom—some dating back to the sixteenth century—will be provided with up-to-date, reliable data as a result of this expedition.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0092.xml
article
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54
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Bees Stupid, Scientist Finds
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BEES haven't any common sense at all, says a French scientist, J. G. Millet. Instead of deserving credit for their industry and wisdom, he says, they don't even know a good honey-producing flower from a bad one. Experiments have convinced him that a bee is attracted to a flower solely by its odor—it will fly as quickly to a perfumed artificial flower as to a real one.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0093.xml
article
55
55
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Hormone Makes Hearts Beat
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANNOUNCEMENT comes from Dr. Ludwig Haberlandt of the University of Innsbruck, Austria, of the discovery of a “heart hormone,” a powerful chemical compound secreted within the living heart and spurring it to action. This compound is to be classed with the secretions of the ductless glands, such as the thyroid.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0095.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Twins' Finger Prints Differ
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FINGER-PRINT identification has again been vindicated. When Prof. William Crowther of University College, England, recently asserted that George and Edward Ellis, twin brothers, had finger prints exactly alike, police authorities the world over, alarmed, appealed for information.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0096.xml
article
55
55
Astronomy
[no value]
Comet to Whiz Near on June 26
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[no value]
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[no value]
FOR the first time in a number of years a comet will be visible in the night sky a few weeks from now. The Pons-Winnecke comet, which visits us every six years, has again returned, and already astronomers are watching it through telescopes, measuring its brightness, and using the spectroscope to find what it is made of.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0097.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Baby Worth $9,333
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE fact that we live longer than did our grandfathers is bringing us billions of dollars in cash, says a great insurance company whose experts estimate that the total increase in earning power of American men and women in the present generation, or since 1901, is $3,500,000,000.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0098.xml
article
55
55
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
How Cool Should a Theater Be?
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNDER the direction of the American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers, women students from the University of Pittsburgh are being weighed and observed in novel tests to find out how a cooling system for a theater should be designed.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0099.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Maryland’s Giant Power Plant
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GREATER than Muscle Shoals and second only to Niagara's huge generators, this monster power project on the Susquehanna River in Maryland will soon be completed. Seven great water turbine generators will dispatch electricity over a 220,000-volt transmission line to Philadelphia, sixty miles away.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0100.xml
article
55
55
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Propeller Fins Speed Up Ships
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CURIOUS fins attached to the hull of a vessel near its screw propeller are used in a new English invention to increase the boat’s speed and lower fuel consumption. With the ordinary form of ship, water flows in an upward direction to the propeller.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0101.xml
article
55
55
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Edison Raising Rubber
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS A. EDISON, world-famous inventor, sees the great cotton plantations of the South transformed into producers of rubber. With Henry Ford, he has established an experimental rubber plantation at Fort Myers, Fla., where he is conducting remarkable tests with rubber that grows from a “vine” and with special machinery, including a new combination reaper-press.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0102.xml
article
56
56,57
[no value]
[no value]
Soiving Everyday Problems
Intercommunicating Phone, home Bicycle Exerciser, Self-Operating Aerial Camera and Other New Inventions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0103.xml
article
58
58
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Washing a Train “by Machine”
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRAINS on the Paris-Lyon-Mediterranean Railroad get their daily bath in what is perhaps the oddest washing machine yet developed—a huge tunnel-like structure that does the work of two hundred men. Known as a “train polisher,” it is a tunnel about the length of a passenger coach, lined with revolving brushes and powerful jets of water.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0104.xml
article
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58
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Measures Huge Volcano’s Heat
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW scientific methods are being used to measure the heat of Kilauea, giant volcano of Hawaii. Under the direction of Dr. T. A. Jaggar, director of the Hawaii Volcano Observatory, borings ten feet deep dot the solid rock at the crater at intervals of a thousand feet.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0105.xml
article
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58
[no value]
[no value]
Latest British Airplane Catapult
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW a naval seaplane takes off from a modern warship's deck, catapulted from a revolving platform, is graphically shown in the accompanying sketches. This latest catapult, now in use on England's battleships, hurls a plane from a moving platform set in motion by compressed air cylinders.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0106.xml
article
58
58
New Processes and Inventions
[no value]
Gasoline from Lignite Achieved
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO French chemists, Prudhomme and Houdry, announce that they have made gasoline from lignite in commercial quantities. Their process of distillation, now a closely guarded secret, is eventually expected to yield a quarter of a billion gallons of gasoline a year—half the gasoline consumption of France —from twenty million tons of lignite.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0107.xml
article
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58
Health and Hygiene
[no value]
Epidemics Mild or Severe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
half the gasoline consumption of France —from twenty million tons of lignite. Coarser oil is a by-product. Enough lignite, sometimes called brown coal, exists in France, experts estimate, to supply that country with oil and fuel for at least a century and a half.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0108.xml
article
58
58
Laboratory Discoveries
[no value]
Invisible Rays Solve Crime
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CRIMINALS who alter documents with any ink that contains iron can be detected by ultra-violet rays, according to Professor Brüning, Berlin scientist. Postal thieves who open letters and reseal them also are branded guilty by the rays; one kind of mucilage, for instance, glows with a fluorescent light under them, while another does not.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0109.xml
article
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59
Aviation
[no value]
Plane Carries 110 Passengers
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[no value]
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[no value]
CARRYING 110 passengers, this mammoth seaplane, just completed at Friedrichshafen, Germany, sped over Lake Constance on its trial flight at more than 120 miles an hour. A feature of its construction is the tandem four-bladed propellers, one in front of the single main plane and another just ahead of the rudders.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0110.xml
article
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59
Radio
[no value]
Magnetized Area Fine for Radio
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OWING to its large deposits of magnetized iron ore, Magnet Cove, about eleven miles from Hot Springs, Arkansas, brings in radio waves with exceptional results. Tests made with small machines set upon the large boulders of magnetized rock showed that stations were clearly heard at this point that would be received most feebly in other equally distant locations.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0111.xml
article
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59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Plant Redwoods in Virginia
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GIANT redwood trees, California’s forest monarchs, may appear in Virginia, if experiments prove successful. H. M. Sears, supervisor of the national forest at Natural Bridge, Va., is preparing a shipment of California redwood seedlings, to be planted near Natural Bridge.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0112.xml
article
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59
Aviation
[no value]
Flier’s Chief Requisite—Nerve
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHY can some men fly safely, others not? What qualities make a good airplane pilot? The School of Aviation Medicine, San Antonio, Tex., has undertaken to answer these questions. To this end they are aided by a remarkable instrument which tells the speed with which a man reacts to signals in color, light, and sound, and the speed and coordination of his movements.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0113.xml
article
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59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Why Candy Explodes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOMETIMES candy explodes, and now and then confectioners find whole shelves of chocolate creams that have burst open. The cause, according to scientists of the U. S. Bureau of Chemistry, is yeast in the sugar filling. Ordinary yeast, like that used for making bread, will not grow in sugar; but there is a special yeast that finds the sweet creamy mixture ideal.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0114.xml
article
59
59
Radio
[no value]
Radio Set for Aviators
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DISABLED seaplane drifting at sea may broadcast an appeal for help with the newest airplane radio, pictured above, designed by the U. S. Navy for just such an emergency. Small and compact, it is operated by a hand generator, and so works even when the plane’s motors are dead.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0115.xml
article
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59
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
African Bird Fades in Rain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BRIGHTLY colored when the sun shines, the feathers of an African bird recently studied by Dr. I. Krumbiegel, German biochemist, become a sad spectacle when wet by the rain. The brilliant dye of its red feathers fades to a pale pink, the leak being caused by the ammonia in rain water.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0116.xml
article
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59
Automobiles
[no value]
Paris Tries Portable Semaphores
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PORTABLE traffic semaphores are helping solve the traffic congestion problem in Paris. At specified hours of the day they are moved to street intersections where congestion is heaviest—during the business rush hours, for example—then at night they are carried to the theater districts, and on Sundays and holidays to crowded intersections near the railway stations.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0117.xml
article
60
60,61
[no value]
[no value]
Tools that Lighten Home Tasks
Two New Dish-Washing Devices, Can Opener, Faucet-Operated Cream Whipper and Other Novel Inventions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0118.xml
article
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62
Explorations
[no value]
World's Oldest Book at Last Deciphered
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AIDED by a sharp chisel, Dr. H. Lutz, of the University of California, has just finished reading the oldest book known to man. The task has taken him twenty years. The chisel was necessary because the “book” is a series of clay tablets, about the size of a pocket notebook, each incased in a baked clay sheath, which had to be chipped away by the sharp tool.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0119.xml
article
62
62
Unusual Facts and Ideas
[no value]
Winners in Our March Stomachion Contest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN OUR March issue we offered $100 in cash prizes to readers submitting the best original designs on the subject of “sports” made from the fourteen pieces of the Stomachion puzzle game of Archimedes. A number of the prize winning entries are reproduced here.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0120.xml
article
63
63
RADIO
[no value]
Why Can't I Get Distance?”
Your set or your location may be to blame—What to do for best results
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN CARR
IT'S all very well for people who live in big cities to claim that radio fans no longer want to listen to distant stations, but the fact remains that a large percentage of radio listeners in this country must either bring in faraway stations in a satisfactory manner or else go without radio entertainment altogether.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0121.xml
article
64
64
[no value]
[no value]
New Ideas for Radio Fans
How to Get C-Current from B-Eliminator, Cut Out “Motorboating,' Decide Correct Antenna Length, and Other Hints
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE popularity of the B-battery eliminator, coupled with the growing use of one of the power type tubes in the last audio amplifying stage of the radio set, has brought up the question of what to do about the C-battery. Power tubes require from nine to forty volts of C-battery.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0122.xml
article
64
64
Radio
[no value]
Don’t Burn Wiring
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN WIRING a radio set you are sure to run into places where it is almost impossible to get the soldering iron in contact with the wires you want to solder without pressing the hot body of the iron against the spaghetti tubing or other insulation on adjacent wires.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0123.xml
article
64
64
Radio
[no value]
How to Stop “Motorboating”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIFFICULTY often is experienced in operating a set equipped with a resistance coupled type of audio amplifier by means of a standard B-battery eliminator. Either the quality is poor or there is that peculiar “put-put-put” effect nicknamed “motorboating.”
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0124.xml
article
64
64,65
Radio
[no value]
Light for Your Dials
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY types of commercial receivers are now made with special arrangements for illuminating the dials. Special dials with lights built in are available to the home constructor of radio sets. In addition, there are several styles of panel lights that can be applied to sets already constructed to obtain the same effect.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0125.xml
article
65
65
Radio
[no value]
Wire Skinning Pliers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DURING the days when bare bus wire was most popular for wiring radio sets, any type of pliers was satisfactory. The fashion now is to use insulated wire. Consequently time must be spent scraping the insulation from the end of the wire at each joint or connection.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0126.xml
article
65
65
Radio
[no value]
Try This to Improve Tone
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOMETIMES a worth while improvement in tone quality can be obtained by connecting a fixed condenser across the loudspeaker terminals as shown in Fig. 6. Capacity at this point in the radio circuit tends to reduce the strength of the audible tones at the upper end of the scale.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0127.xml
article
65
65
Radio
[no value]
Cutting Out Electrical Interference
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE question as to whether anything can be done about eliminating scratching and hissing noises produced by local electrical machinery depends upon the nature and location of the machinery causing the disturbance. The general impression is that reducing the length of the antenna or using a loop will improve matters, but this is not true in all instances.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0128.xml
article
65
65
Radio
[no value]
To Increase Selectivity
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANOTHER use for small fixed condensers is to increase the selectivity if you find difficulty in separating stations on adjacent wave lengths. The simplest way to connect a condenser at this point is shown in Fig. 8, and this illustration as well as the one in Fig. 6 shows the correct way to hold a small fixed condenser while soldering a wire to one of the lugs.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0129.xml
article
66
66
RADIO
[no value]
A Compact Radio Set
Where neighbors are close and space is limited, try this outfit
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN E. LODGE
“IF SOMEBODY doesn't murder that bird pretty quick, I’m going to do it myself!” shouted the irate occupant of the third floor back. The rest of the boarders unanimously agreed that violence was called for—the sooner, the better. Meanwhile the cause of the impromptu indignation meeting was lolling back in his armchair enjoying the hideous wails and thumpings of a fourth-rate jazz orchestra rumbling forth from an antiquated tin horn type loudspeaker.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0130.xml
article
67
67,139
Sam Loyd’s New Puzzles
[no value]
How Fast Can You Think?
Seven Brain-Teasers to Check Your Abilities
Have You Imagination?
Can You Analyze Facts?
Are You Quick at Figures?
One for Mental Bookkeepers
Are You Observing?
A Test of Vocabulary
Have You Keen Sense of Form?
The Tree Riddle
Dividing the Apples
The Zulu Battle Flag
The Beheaded Words
An Elfish Equation
Counting the Votes
How the Sisters Shopped
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“A hundred and fifty when joined to a tree Makes afine garment to warm you or me." That couplet fits the picture above and poses a riddle. What cozy-sounding garment is suggested by the sketch? Rebuses and riddles are a test of your wit and imagination.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0131.xml
article
68
68,69,137
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
What It Costs to Build
Facts and Figures about Materials and Labor That Will Help When You Plan to Construct Your House
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN R. McMAHON
MY TAILOR is building a house. The other day he asked what I would think of him if, when I asked when a suit would be ready and what it would cost, he replied: “Maybe in a few weeks, maybe some time next fall. I never promise any time. Don't know the cost exactly, fifty or seventy-five dollars, perhaps.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0132.xml
article
70
70
[no value]
[no value]
Useful Ideas for Your Car
Air Moistener, Battery Handle, and Other Ingenious Kinks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNLESS you are equipped with a special jack designed low enough so that it can be placed under the axle when a balloon tire goes flat, you may find it extremely difficult to change tires. If you get stuck this way, your spare tire may solve the problem.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0133.xml
article
70
70
Automobiles
[no value]
Saving Your Springs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE the best possible insurance against spring breakage is a set of properly adjusted recoil snubbers, you will find that fabric belts clamped around the axle and the frame as shown in Fig. 2 are worth while. The belts will not interfere with the free action of the spring when a bump is encountered, but when the car starts to bounce too high, they will prevent bending the springs the wrong way so far that they break.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0134.xml
article
70
70
Automobiles
[no value]
Old Rim As Hose Rack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE short piece of hose that you keep in the garage to wash the car can be kept in good condition, handy and yet out of the way, by bolting an old rim to the wall near the water tap as shown in Fig. 3. Almost any old rim will provide ample space for the short piece of hose that is ordinarily used in the home garage.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0135.xml
article
70
70
Automobiles
[no value]
Simple Battery Handle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIGURE I shows you how to make a simple handle that will fit almost any storage battery. It is made from a stout piece of wood, such as an old shovel handle or fork handle, and the end links are from an old cross chain. After the holes are drilled at each end, two links are straightened out and passed through the holes.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0136.xml
article
70
70
Automobiles
[no value]
Turnbuckle Compresses Rim
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOUR car is fitted with rims on which the lugs are part of the rim, a good sized turnbuckle can be used to compress the rim and allow you to take off a tire even if it is badly rusted. While it is better to use a large turnbuckle, a small one will do if you piece out from the turnbuckle eyes to the lugs by means of hooks of the proper length.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0137.xml
article
70
70
Automobiles
[no value]
To Close Piston Rings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF YOU find it necessary to fit new, stiff rings and you have no ring compressor, a string arranged as shown in Fig. 6 will permit you to do the job without trouble. Tie the end of the string to any convenient bolt, pass it around the ring and pull on the handle.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0138.xml
article
70
70
Automobiles
[no value]
Air Moistener
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the objections to the ordinary way of building a moistener for the air that goes into the manifold of your motor is that there is a chance, when the car goes over a bump, of the water’s splashing up and being drawn into the manifold in the liquid state.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0139.xml
article
71
71,72
LEADING ARTICLES
[no value]
How to Save Money on Tires
Under-Inflation and Neglect Cost You Miles and Dollars
What Was Wrong with Markin’s Car?
[no value]
[no value]
MARTIN BUNN
"OLD BURR sure has a permanent cramp in his pocketbook,” grinned Joe Clark to his partner, Gus Wilson, as their departing customer let in the clutch and drove away from the Model Garage. “He’s penny-wise and pound-foolish,” observed Gus. “Our prices on tires are reasonable and we don't palm off stale stock.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0140.xml
advertisement
73
73
[no value]
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
THE CARBORUNDUM COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0141.xml
advertisement
74
74
[no value]
[no value]
INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS
[no value]
INSTITUTE OF STANDARDS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0142.xml
article
75
75,106
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
How to Build a Canvas Camp
Semiportable Summer House Offers Many Comforts—Has Substantial Floor and Frame
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY S. LARABY
CAMPERS who have picked a pleasant location to which they return year after year—and their number becomes larger each season—will find many advantages in constructing a semiportable canvas house of the type illustrated above. The sides, top and ends can be transported easily by car.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0143.xml
article
76
76,77
THE HOME WORKSHOP
[no value]
A Table for Your Bench Lathe
How to Make a Neat and Convenient Stand for Small Machine Tools—Reduces Noise and Vibration
[no value]
[no value]
COLIN L. BLAIR
WHEN the writer purchased a small screw cutting bench lathe, he was confronted with the problem of constructing a satisfactory table arranged for its motor drive. The usual method of driving small lathes seems to involve the use of an overhead countershaft, and this was not desired.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0144.xml
article
77
77
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
A New Way to Hide Wallboard Joints
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN fiber wallboard is to be covered with wall paper or with the easily applied plastic paints that are now so popular, the average home worker is puzzled as to the best way to make sure the joints will not crack open in the course of time and disfigure the walls.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0145.xml
article
77
77
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Turning Wooden Segments
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN TURNING a wooden article which is composed of two or more segments, it is difficult, if not impossible, to turn the piece first and afterward split it up. That is especially true if an odd number of segments are required and the object must still retain a perfect circular cross section.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0146.xml
article
78
78
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
The Latest in Block Puzzles
For all members of the family—A novel, fascinating pastime
[no value]
[no value]
ARTHUR L. SMITH
PUZZLES of the flat moving block type, which are now so popular, are always of absorbing interest until solved. The one here illustrated should retain its interest longer than the ordinary puzzles because it assumes the form of a fascinating game.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0147.xml
advertisement
79
79
[no value]
[no value]
MILLERS FALLS COMPANY
[no value]
MILLERS FALLS COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0148.xml
article
80
80,92,93
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
New Fishing Rods for Old
How to Repair, Rewind and Refinish Split Bamboo
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT PAGE LINCOLN
TRULY can it be said that a fishing rod is as good as the care you have given it. Even a cheap machine-made bamboo rod, if kept in good repair, will be equal eventually to a high priced rod that has been neglected. A rod may be in a good, indifferent or bad condition when you go about repairing it.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0149.xml
advertisement
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0150.xml
article
82
82,111,112
BETTER SHOP METHODS
[no value]
A Job Too Big for a Lathe
Yet Old Bill Had to Turn the Mill Shaft Quickly—How He Did It May Help Y ou Solve Similar Problems
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES ELLIS
OLD BILL went to meet the office man, who was hurrying through the shop toward him. “What now?” he asked. “The Binklers want you to come out to their saw mill as soon as you can. The shaft on the band mill is scored badly because it ran hot, and they can't get the wheel off so they can send the shaft to the shop.”
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0151.xml
advertisement
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0152.xml
article
84
84
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
How to Replace an Old Electric Light Bracket with a Sconce
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE A. WILLOUGHBY
ARTISTIC electric wall sconces can easily be installed in place of old-fashioned brackets which have become defective, shabby or otherwise unsuitable. The first step before starting this or any other type of repair or replacement work is to open the main house switch.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0153.xml
advertisement
84
84
[no value]
[no value]
TWINPLEX SALES CO.
[no value]
TWINPLEX SALES CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0154.xml
advertisement
85
85
[no value]
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS
[no value]
MINIATURE SHIP MODELS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0155.xml
article
86
86,87
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
A Circular Saw Attachment for Your Tool Grinder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD THATCHER
FOR the home shop not fitted with a power driven saw, the hand operated circular saw illustrated will be found most handy. The whole cost of the one shown was $3.86, which included the grinder and two circular saws, one for ripping and the other for crosscutting.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0156.xml
advertisement
86
86
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0157.xml
article
87
87
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
How to Hold a Spokeshave Blade for Sharpening
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. A. MELROSE
WHEN sharpening a spokeshave blade, there is some danger of grinding one’s fingers unless some sort of a holder is used. A safe and easy way to hold the blade is with a small hand screw.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0158.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0159.xml
advertisement
88
88
[no value]
[no value]
TRIMONT MFG. CO.: TRIMO Monkey Wrench
[no value]
TRIMONT MFG. CO.
TRIMO Monkey Wrench
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0160.xml
article
88
88,89
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
How to Refinish Your Floors
Shellac and Wax—Clear and Dark Varnishes—Brushing Lacquer
[no value]
[no value]
RALPH G. WARING
HOW home? shall Which I finish is the better, floors shellac of my or varnish? Are brushing lacquers serviceable for floors? These and similar questions are asked endlessly in every paint store. Let us, therefore, review the various finishes.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0161.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
THE PALMOLIVE-PEET COMPANY
[no value]
THE PALMOLIVE-PEET COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0162.xml
article
90
90
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Neat Bookcase Joints
How to fasten furniture cases together without using nails or screws—Dovetail-dado construction
[no value]
[no value]
EMANUEL E. ERICSON
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0163.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0164.xml
article
91
91
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Rubber Band Tractor Is Amusing Toy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. CLARKE HUGHES
THIS month’s “comicull" is a rubber band tractor, which will please the children because it will run. The materials needed are a cardboard box in. or less in diameter, a large rubber band, a stiff wire, two disks of soap or paraffin, and a small spool or other round object for the rear roller.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0165.xml
article
91
91
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Builds Wavelike Stand for Galleon Model
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER building a Spanish galleon from plans published in POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, Floyd E. Freeman of Philadelphia designed the stand illustrated, which differs considerably from those ordinarily used for decorative models. It has the advantage that it does not interrupt the flowing, graceful lines of the hull.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0166.xml
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91
91
[no value]
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0167.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
PRENTISS VISE CO.
[no value]
PRENTISS VISE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0168.xml
article
93
93
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Clamps for Wood-Turning Lathe Save Stooping
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO CLAMP the tailstock and tool rest on a wood-turning lathe of the type illustrated, the workman ordinarily must reach underneath the lathe. Adjustments may be made more conveniently if the clamping device is rearranged so that the handle is above the lathe bed.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0169.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
CLEMSON BROTHERS, INC.
[no value]
CLEMSON BROTHERS, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0170.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
BOSTON VARNISH CO.
[no value]
BOSTON VARNISH CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0171.xml
article
94
94,95,97
The SHIPSHAPE HOME
[no value]
Pointers on Brushing Lacquers
How to Prepare the Surfaces—The Undercoats—Straightening Out Rough Spots and Laps
[no value]
[no value]
BERTON ELLIOT
MRS. ANDREWS, who lives across the street from us, was on the phone. “I've got a fine idea!” she announced, with her usual enthusiasm. “Some of the ladies in our card club have been finishing things with the new brushing lacquers. I guess I started them; anyway, it’s quite the popular thing now.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0172.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE CO.
[no value]
NICHOLSON FILE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0173.xml
advertisement
96
96,96-A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0174.xml
advertisement
96-B
96-B
[no value]
[no value]
The HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR COMPANY
[no value]
The HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0175.xml
article
97
97
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
“Dustless” Door Mat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UPON returning from the garage or cellar workshop, one is apt to leave footprints of concrete dust upon waxed or polished floors. Wiping the feet hastily upon a mat at the door will not always remove the white dust. If, however, the mat is impregnated with a teaspoon of light machine oil in a pint of gasoline, the very act of walking over it will be sufficient to dust clean the soles of one’s shoes.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0176.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
The Pompeian Company
[no value]
The Pompeian Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0177.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
THE PECK, STOW & WILCOX COMPANY: PEXTO Tools
[no value]
THE PECK, STOW & WILCOX COMPANY
PEXTO Tools
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0178.xml
article
98
98,99,100
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
You Can Build a Viking Ship
Our Blueprints Will Assure Your Success in Making a Highly Picturesque Model
[no value]
[no value]
CAPT. E. ARAIITAGE McCANN
OLAF TRYGGVASON’S “long serpent" had thirty oars a side; one of Canute the Great’s ships had sixty. The Viking ship model we are building is a sextensesse, with sixteen a side, which means that her prototype had sixty-four rowers and a crew of from seventy to eighty.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0179.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
Indian Motocycle Co.
[no value]
Indian Motocycle Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0180.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
SMOOTH-ON MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0181.xml
article
100
100
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Toy “Sub” Dives and Rises
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HI SIBLEY
THIS bathtub submarine, properly balanced, will perform amazing feats. When released on the surface with planes set for submerging, it starts under with a whirr and gurgle, and a stream of bubbles from the air outlet back of the conning tower marks its course.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0182.xml
article
101
101
Ideas for the Handy Man
[no value]
Blueprints for Your Home Workshop
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ANY ONE of the blueprints listed below can be obtained for 25 cents. The blueprints are complete in themselves, but if you wish the corresponding back issue of the magazine, in which the project was described in detail, it can be had for 25 cents additional so long as copies are available. The Editor will be glad to answer any specific questions relative to tools, material, or equipment.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0183.xml
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101
101
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0184.xml
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101
101
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0185.xml
advertisement
101
101
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Crosman Arms Co.: CROSMAN PNEUMATIC .22 RIFLE
[no value]
Crosman Arms Co.
CROSMAN PNEUMATIC .22 RIFLE
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0186.xml
advertisement
102
102
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0187.xml
article
102
102
Ideas for the Handy Man
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How to Repair Amber Rim Eye Glasses
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IMITATION amber used in so-called amber rim glasses is a form of celluloid, which often can he repaired satisfactorily by using celluloid cement. One of the easiest repairs to execute is the replacement of a small piece of celluloid on the nose piece of nose glasses (Fig. 1).
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0188.xml
article
103
103
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Fret-Sawed Plant Sticks Enliven a Garden
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C.A.K.
THESE plant sticks are excellent projects for those who find pleasure in simple woodwork. They are made with a coping saw, painted in bright enamel colors, and mounted on sticks ⅛ in. scpiare and about 36 in. long, or long enough to bring them in their natural relation to the foliage.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0189.xml
article
103
103
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Easily Made Baseball Game for Young Children
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A BASEBALL game for amusing small children can be made as shown below. A baseball diamond is laid out on a piece of wallboard 3 by 4 ft. (or smaller) and holes slightly larger than the marble to be used are bored in the positions indicated. This is glued on a foundation made of wood or wallboard. Then 1½-in. wire brads are driven in where shown, and a spring arranged to “bat” the marble.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0190.xml
article
103
103
Ideas for the Handy Man
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LIFE IS NOT WORTH LIVING
—Without Sound Nerves
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YOUR nerves govern your life — your efficiency, your happiness,your health. If your nerves are depleted, you cannot concentrate or think clearly; you have not the “pep” and spirit to enjoy your pleasures and sports; you have not the physical comfort and well-being without which happiness is impossible.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0191.xml
article
104
104
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Play Arbor Keeps Boys Happily Busy
Has Work, Bench, Tool Chest, and Tank for Toy Boats
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HI SIBLEY
MOTHER'S problem is to keep the children interested outside the house; father's is to keep the yard looking something more like residence property than a junk yard. And the problems are complicated if one lives in an apartment or bungalow court, where the back yard, if any, is very restricted—especially as boys will be boys, including the neighbors’.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0192.xml
article
105
105
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Home Workshop Chemistry
Simple Formulas that Will Save Time and Money
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SHELLAC can be purified to such an extent that it makes a perfectly clear solution in alcohol. It then becomes much more valuable to the home worker than the common commercial grades of shellac. It can be used for protecting pictures and other delicately marked or colored surfaces; it also can be used as a finishing varnish on woodwork with the great advantage that it will not turn white in spots, as ordinary shellac is apt to do when affected by moisture.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0193.xml
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105
105
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SIMONDS SAW AND STEEL CO.
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SIMONDS SAW AND STEEL CO.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0194.xml
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105
105
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The Parks Woodworking Machine Co.: PARKS WOODWORKING MACHINES
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The Parks Woodworking Machine Co.
PARKS WOODWORKING MACHINES
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0195.xml
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105
105
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CHISEL - EDGE - CLAW HAMMER
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Chisel-Edge Claw Hammer Co.
CHISEL - EDGE - CLAW HAMMER
[no value]
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0196.xml
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106
106
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E. C. ATKINS & CO.
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E. C. ATKINS & CO.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0197.xml
article
107
107
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Wooden Monkey Performs Balancing Stunts
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A REMARKABLE acrobat is this wooden monkey. It can balance on heels or toes in the most grotesque and apparently impossible positions and do all sorts of weird, rhythmic dances. The monkey acrobat hanging by his toes This novel toy, which is a favorite in India, usually is made of teakwood, but it can be whittled from any hard, tough wood.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0198.xml
article
107
107
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Applying Lacquer to Metal
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W. J. E.
A TOOL for applying lacquer to flat metal surfaces, which is in some respects superior to the camel's-hair brush usually employed, is nothing more than a paddle shaped piece of cigar box wood, about 1 in. wide at the end, around which a piece of velvet is glued.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0199.xml
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107
107
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0200.xml
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108
108
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Standard Laboratories, Inc.
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Standard Laboratories, Inc.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0201.xml
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108
108
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LOCKWOOD MOTOR COMPANY
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LOCKWOOD MOTOR COMPANY
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0202.xml
article
108
108
Ideas for the Handy Man
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A Ball Bearing Merry-Go-Round
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D. H. RUST
WITH a few pieces of lumber left over from building a house, an iron post, two discarded automobile hearings and some canvas, W. E. Robertson of Pelican. La., built the merry-go-round illustrated. A 2-in. iron post 7 ft. long was set in the ground and fixed rigidly upright with concrete.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0203.xml
article
108
108
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Footstool Made in Form of Old Treasure Chest
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A GROCERY box, some tan canvas from an old army tent, a piece of leather belting, a discarded cushion, a few brass headed upholstery nails and various odds and ends were converted into the treasure chest footstool illustrated. The box was turned upside down, padded with the cushion and covered with canvas.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0204.xml
article
108
108
Ideas for the Handy Man
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How to Make a Wooden Joint Water-Tight
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WOODEN tanks, pipes, decks, floors, partitions, and silos can he made watertight or practically so if the joints are prepared as indicated in the accompanying diagram. The edges are grooved by compressing, not removing, the wood, as at A, Fig. 1.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0205.xml
article
109
109,110
Hints for the Mechanic
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Quick Way to Draw Screw Threads
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HENRY SIMON
WE THINK of the simplest things last. This is perhaps the reason why it never occurred to the writer until recently to make thread templets like that shown in the illustration. Nothing could he simpler or more effective and reliable than to use the cross section of a screw in making a drawing of that screw.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0206.xml
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109
109
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0207.xml
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109
109
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WHITING-ADAMS
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WHITING-ADAMS
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0208.xml
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109
109
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BUESCHER BAND INSTRUMENT CO.
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BUESCHER BAND INSTRUMENT CO.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0209.xml
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109
109
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W. B. & J. E. Boice: Boice-Crane Bench Band Saws
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W. B. & J. E. Boice
Boice-Crane Bench Band Saws
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0210.xml
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110
110
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0211.xml
article
110
110
Hints for the Mechanic
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Using a Shaper to Cut Internal Key Seats
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J. E.
WHILE the larger shops do their keyseating of pulleys or gears on special machines and the lone mechanic in a factory repair shop must cut his with a chisel, there is a stage where neither method is exactly suitable. Small shops frequently do such work on the shaper.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0212.xml
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111
111
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0213.xml
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112
112
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SEAVER-WILLIAMS CO.: BINOCULARS
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SEAVER-WILLIAMS CO.
BINOCULARS
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0214.xml
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112
112
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ADDISON-LESL1E Co.
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ADDISON-LESL1E Co.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0215.xml
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112
112
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0216.xml
article
112
112
Hints for the Mechanic
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Assembling Pipe Wrench with Aid of Paper Wad
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IN ASSEMBLING the type of pipe wrench shown in the illustration, it is difficult to hold the nut in the frame, and at the same time keep the nut guards in place. A trick to make the guards behave is to put a wad of paper between them in the nut. When the jaw enters the nut, the wad of paper is pushed out.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0217.xml
article
112
112
Hints for the Mechanic
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Rubber Band Acts as “Keeper” for Set of Steel Numbers
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FRANK W. BENTLEY
SMALL steel punches for stamping numbers on metal are easily lost. To hold them in the usual wooden case, merely stretch a rubber band around the protruding ends, as shown. BEFORE being babbitted, cast iron bearings should be heated to about 450 deg. F.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0218.xml
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113
113
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0219.xml
article
113
113
Hints for the Mechanic
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Controlling Searchlight from Motor Boat Cabin
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A MOTOR boat searchlight can he controlled in rainy or cold weather without opening the pilot house window, if it is mounted as shown. The standard is a piece of 1-in. pipe 5 ft. long with a T fitting at the upper end. A 10-in. length of pipe, an elbow, and another piece 8 in.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0220.xml
article
113
113
Hints for the Mechanic
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Small Soldering and Glue Kit
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SOLDERING iron and gluepot are household essentials. To keep them ready for instant service, I make use of the stand illustrated. The pipe that supports the soldering iron or gluepot is screwed tightly into a bole in the center of the wooden base block.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0221.xml
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114
114
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0222.xml
article
114
114
Hints for the Mechanic
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V-Rest on Micrometer Holds Small Work
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H. S.
HOLDING small, slender work in a micrometer is a hard thing when the piece is so short and at the same time so thin that there is not room enough for the thumb and forefinger between the anvil and the spindle. If such work has to be measured continually, as when the product of a screw machine has to be cheeked, the task becomes one that is more than merely difficult—it becomes nerve racking.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0223.xml
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115
115
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0224.xml
article
115
115
Hints for the Mechanic
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Welded Steel Bracket Replaces Casting
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IN AN industrial plant well away from shops and foundries there was a duplex steam pump to feed the boilers. A piece of pipe fell on it one day and shattered the valve gear bracket so badly that it was even beyond welding. This did not stump the ingenious plant mechanic.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0225.xml
article
115
115
Hints for the Mechanic
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Tool with Sliding Hammer Removes Gib Head Keys
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ANTON ZUPANCIC
GIB head keys are much easier to remove than those without heads, provided one is able to drive against the head. However, when the key is in a webbed pulley or gear, there is no opportunity to drive them out in the usual manner. To take care of such conditions we made the key puller illustrated.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0226.xml
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116
116
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M. Hohner, Inc.
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M. Hohner, Inc.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0227.xml
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116
116
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OLD TOWN CANOE Co.
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OLD TOWN CANOE Co.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0228.xml
article
116
116
Hints for the Mechanic
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Auxiliary Support for Work Held in Vise
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H. MOORE
WHEN there is a long piece of work to be held in a vise, the machinist sometimes piles up boxes, pulleys, or anything at hand to support the end of it. The accompanying illustration shows a support for such work that is always handy when wanted, but never in the way.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0229.xml
article
116
116
Hints for the Mechanic
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Guide for Centering Key-Seat Cutters
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G. A. LUERS
SETTING a key-seating cutter above the center of a shaft is tedious when the shaft is some odd diameter, and bothersome if the cutter is covered with oil, so a number of machinists make a practice of guessing at the location and letting it go at that.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0230.xml
article
116
116
Hints for the Mechanic
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Bending Tongs and Spring Clamps for Tin Shop
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JOSEPH C. COYLE
TWO simple devices are illustrated that have proved extremely useful in a Denver tin shop. The first is a pair of rivet heater's tongs with wide jaws. These are 4-in. strips of ½ by 1 in. iron ground to an edge from the outer sides and welded on each jaw of the tongs.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0231.xml
article
116
116
Hints for the Mechanic
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Cutting Pulley Oil Grooves
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INSTEAD of chipping oil grooves in pulleys or bushings, they can be cut by putting a properly shaped tool in a boring tool holder and working the lathe carriage hack and forth by hand while the pulley is stationary.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0232.xml
article
117
117
Hints for the Mechanic
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Simple Center Gage for Drill Points
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IN SHARPENING drills, the key to the situation is to keep the point central and of proper width. A drill with a correctly formed, central point is rarely out in any other way, because such a point is difficult to produce except by correct grinding.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0233.xml
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117
117
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0234.xml
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118
118
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0235.xml
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118
118
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CHISEL-EDGE-CLAW HAMMER COMPANY
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CHISEL-EDGE-CLAW HAMMER COMPANY
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0236.xml
article
118
118
Hints for the Mechanic
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Compensating Blocks for Wooden Bench Vise
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CHARLES M. MILLER
BENCHES in many home workshops and in the majority of manual training shops are fitted with wooden vises of either the cabinetmaker’s or carpenter's type. When a board is clamped at one end of a wooden vise, the jaw usually is twisted out of parallel with the bench top.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0237.xml
article
118
118
Hints for the Mechanic
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Redwood for Ship Model Making
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E. A. D’ARMER
FOR making blocks and deadeyes for ship models, I have found that redwood is easily worked and does not split readily. Strips cut from an old Tsquare were utilized for this purpose in my own case. The wood is of such a color that no varnish or paint is necessary.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0238.xml
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118
118
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0239.xml
article
118
118
Hints for the Mechanic
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Cleaning Device Keeps Shafting Polished
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EVERY mechanic takes pride in a shop that is clean and free from rubbish. He likes to have his tools on his workbench while in daily use or in the tool box if needed on but few occasions. While keeping the shop clean, do not forget the shafting above.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0240.xml
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119
119
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Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0241.xml
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120
120,122,123,124,125
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Money Making Opportunities
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0242.xml
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121
121
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COYNE ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
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COYNE ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0243.xml
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123
123
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O. C. Miller, Director Extension Work American School
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O. C. Miller, Director Extension Work American School
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0244.xml
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125
125
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L. G. Stransky, General Manager, J. A. Stransky Mfg. Co.
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L. G. Stransky, General Manager, J. A. Stransky Mfg. Co.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0245.xml
article
126
126
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Child’s Desk Built into a Chair
A Space Saving Toy for Small Homes
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CHARLES A. KING
CHILDREN enjoy drawing pictures and “playing school,” as they describe it. When they begin to go to school they do cheerfully a surprising amount of home study. It pays well, therefore, to provide a convenient desk for them. The one illustrated is in the form of a combination desk and chair and is designed especially for use in an apartment or small house in which there is little room for a child’s belongings.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0246.xml
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126
126
Ideas for the Handy Man
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Parrot Feathers Decorate Unique Serving Tray
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A BRILLIANT, colorful “feather mosaic” forms the striking decoration of the serving tray illustrated. It can be duplicated by anyone who has a parrot or is able to obtain a variety of bright hued feathers. In this case the feathers were moulted by a small yellowheaded Mexican bird.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0247.xml
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126
126
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RHODES MFG. CO.
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RHODES MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0248.xml
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126
126
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UNIVERSAL PLUMBING SCHOOL
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UNIVERSAL PLUMBING SCHOOL
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[no value]
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0249.xml
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126
126
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0250.xml
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126
126
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0251.xml
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127
127
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CLARENCE A. O’BRIEN
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CLARENCE A. O’BRIEN
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0252.xml
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128
128
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0253.xml
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128
128
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0254.xml
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128
128
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ADAM FISHER MFG. CO.
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ADAM FISHER MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0255.xml
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0256.xml
article
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Ideas for the Handy Man
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Wall Cabinet Has Handy Shaving Shelf
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H. A. BAILEY
WE MEN—and boys too—who make things for our home generally get less use out of such articles than do the other members of the household. Here’s a project, however, that will please everyone. It is a bathroom medicine cabinet with a special shaving outfit compartment that has a drop-door shelf.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0257.xml
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Ideas for the Handy Man
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Your Home Workshop Problems Solved by Experts
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FEW questions that arise in connection with your home workshop or such repair jobs as you do about the house have not been fully answered in past issues of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. If you had a complete file of the magazine, properly indexed, you would have an encyclopedia of extraordinary completeness.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0258.xml
article
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Ideas for the Handy Man
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Transferring Pictures on Glass and Porcelain
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ERNEST BADE
PRINTED pictures on paper may be transferred to glass for the purpose of making transparencies or even lantern slides. First thoroughly clean the glass and cover it thinly with dammar varnish or Canada balsam thinned with turpentine so that it flows freely.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0259.xml
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VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
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VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0260.xml
article
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Magic Signs of Broadway
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A WONDERLAND of colored flashing lights, Broadway continues to dazzle New Yorkers and visitors from all over the world with new and constantly changing signs. Magical effects of drifting clouds, leaping flames and surging ocean spray, are the product not only of master electricians and mechanics, but of artists as well.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0261.xml
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Flowers That Change Their Sex
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AVOCADO blossoms, the flowers that precede a crop of alligator pears, change their sex from morning to afternoon. This was the amazing discovery of Dr. A. B. Stout, of the New York Botanical Garden, seeking a reason for barren orchards planted with alligator pears. He found that certain blossoms were male during the morning and female in the after, and others vice versa.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0262.xml
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Science Advances in Spiral
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SCIENCE has developed in a sort of ascending spiral, according to Dr. J. Newton Friend, of London, England, lecturing before the Royal Institution. Scientific history repeats itself. For instance, Hero of Alexandria, a Greek physician who lived about 100 B.C., recorded what is generally known as the first steam engine.
PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0263.xml
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LANCASTER & ALLWINE
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LANCASTER & ALLWINE
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0264.xml
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RICHARD B. OWEN
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RICHARD B. OWEN
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0265.xml
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BUREAU OF INVENTIVE SCIENCE
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BUREAU OF INVENTIVE SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0266.xml
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0267.xml
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MUNN & CO.
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MUNN & CO.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0268.xml
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0269.xml
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WATSON E. COLEMAN
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WATSON E. COLEMAN
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0270.xml
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RANDOLPH & CO.
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RANDOLPH & CO.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0271.xml
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NATIONAL ELCTRICAL SCHOOL
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NATIONAL ELCTRICAL SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0272.xml
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BABY CALCULATOR SALES COMPANY
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BABY CALCULATOR SALES COMPANY
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0273.xml
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THE NATIONAL SCHOOL OF CARTOONING
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THE NATIONAL SCHOOL OF CARTOONING
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0274.xml
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0275.xml
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U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
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U. S. SCHOOL OF MUSIC
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0276.xml
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0277.xml
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National Poultry Institute
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National Poultry Institute
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0278.xml
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0279.xml
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NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE
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NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0280.xml
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137
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0281.xml
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0282.xml
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NESTLER RUBBER FUSING CO., Inc.
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NESTLER RUBBER FUSING CO., Inc.
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0283.xml
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0284.xml
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0285.xml
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MEYER BOTH COMPANY
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MEYER BOTH COMPANY
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0286.xml
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141
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0287.xml
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B. W. COOKE, Directing Engineer
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B. W. COOKE, Directing Engineer
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0288.xml
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142
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JIMMY DeFOREST BOXING COURSE
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JIMMY DeFOREST BOXING COURSE
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0289.xml
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0290.xml
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The SHALER Company
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The SHALER Company
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PopularScience_19270601_0110_006_0291.xml