Issue: 19211101

Tuesday, November 1, 1921
NOVEMBER 1921
5
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99
Friday, December 5, 2014

Articles
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0001.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0002.xml
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INDEPENDENT CORPORATION
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INDEPENDENT CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0003.xml
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2
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Southern Cypress Mfrs. Association
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Southern Cypress Mfrs. Association
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0004.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0005.xml
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National Salesmen’s Training Association
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National Salesmen’s Training Association
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0006.xml
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ITHEO AUDEL & CO.
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ITHEO AUDEL & CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0007.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0008.xml
tableOfContents
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0009.xml
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6,8,10,12,13,14,15,16,17,18
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0010.xml
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PELTON PUBLISHING COMPANY
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PELTON PUBLISHING COMPANY
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0011.xml
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G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
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G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0012.xml
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0013.xml
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FREDERICK J. DRAKE & CO.
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FREDERICK J. DRAKE & CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0014.xml
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American Commerce Association
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American Commerce Association
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0015.xml
article
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NERVE EXHAUSTION
The Prevention of Colds
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PAUL VON BOECKMANN
THERE is but one malady more terrible than Nerve Exhaustion, and that is its kin, Insanity. Only those who have passed through a siege of Nerve Exhaustion can understand the true meaning of this statement. It is HELL; no other word can express it.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0016.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0017.xml
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CHIGAGO ENGINEERING WORK
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CHIGAGO ENGINEERING WORK
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0018.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0019.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0020.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0021.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0022.xml
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AMERICAN SCHOOL
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AMERICAN SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0023.xml
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University of Applied Science
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University of Applied Science
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0024.xml
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Advertisements
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THE SIMON & SKIDMORE MANUFACTURING CO.
SQUARE
THE SIMON & SKIDMORE MANUFACTURING CO.
ACUTE MITER
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0025.xml
article
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21,22,23,102,103
Special Features
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How I Listen In on the World by Radio
New, low-priced receiving-sets now bring amazing wireless adventures to every home
Wireless Wonders of Today and Tomorrow
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Armstrong Perry
UP to the instant when I thrust a wire into the air and pulled down somebody’s jazz, I thought wireless was something like a fire extinguisher or a lifeboat—an emergency apparatus for a ship to use in case of accident, but of no immediate use to ordinary folks like myself.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0026.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Pneumatic Gun Lines Tunnel with Concrete
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A CONCRETE lining nine inches thick was shot into place on the overhead arch of the Caribou (California) hydroelectric tunnel by a pneumatic gun which placed eighteen cubic feet of concrete a minute. The tunnel was ten feet in diameter, and the maximum advance in twenty-four hours was 156 linear feet of arch, while an average of a hundred and five linear feet was maintained over a period of twenty-five days.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0027.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Wing-Shaped Fuselage Helps to Lift Plane
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NEARLY as broad as a barge, the fuselage of the Remington-Burnelli biplane, which has been flown at Curtiss field, carries thirty-two passengers. The machine was designed for cross-country passenger service. It has a wing spread of seventy feet and is driven by two 385-horsepower Liberty motors, at a maximum speed of 110 miles an hour and with a sustained-flight ability of eight hours.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0028.xml
article
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A Silent Electric Motor for Phonographs
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A NOISELESS electric phonograph motor recently invented by Chester I. Hall, of Fort Wayne, Indiana, promises to solve the long-standing problem of replacing the spring motor with some sort of electrical drive. Most electric motors produce a certain amount of noise which has been difficult to eliminate, particularly since the motor is usually suspended just above the sound-chamber.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0029.xml
article
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Pipes Thawed from the Inside
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FOUR times in thirty-six hours the operator was compelled to thaw out the suction end of this isolated pump with a gasoline blowtorch. Variations of river level made it impractical to insulate the pipe on the outside, and as the pump was operated only ten minutes in each hour, the water was continually freezing.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0030.xml
article
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Hand Truck also Acts as Elevator
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THIS one-man hand truck, for use in shipping-offices and freightstations, makes possible conveying and loading in one operation. It tips up like the ordinary hand truck, so that it may be shoved under heavy boxes, bales, or barrels. A hand crank then elevates the load platform to a horizontal position.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0031.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Line-Throwing Rifle Adopted for Use on English Lifeboats
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IN the past, during time of storm, when called upon to pass a life-line from the beach to a foundering vessel not far from shore, lifesavers along the English coast have used the conventional life-line mortar. In reality this mortar is nothing more than a squat cannon of modified design, and when firing it the men employed the methods and usually the discipline of the artillery.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0032.xml
article
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27,28,29,30
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Is It Really Safe to Junk Our Battleships?
Expert reveals new problems of naval policy confronting America on eve of disarmament conference
Planes or Battleship—Which?
Could Have Floated for Days
No Direct Hits Made
Sunk after Two Days
Airplane Still Essential
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Graser Schornstheimer
WHAT are the real lessons of the famous bombing tests off the Virginia Capes, when the Oestfriesland was sunk by air bombs? Did these tests actually prove, as we have been repeatedly told ever since, that the battleship’s day is over—that we can junk our dread-naughts and protect our shores with fleets of aerial bombers?
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0033.xml
article
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28,29
Special Features
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First Picture of Japan’s New Super-Dreadnaughts, Naval Monsters which Surpass America’s Mightiest
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Wilfred S. Ogden
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY publishes herewith the first picture of one of the two largest and most powerful war-ships the world has ever known. They are the new Japanese battleships Kaga and Tosa. Built in the private dockyards of the Kawasaki Company at Kobe and of the Mitsubishi Company at Nagasaki, these naval monsters—being launched this fall— are units of Japan’s 1918-1919 naval program.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0034.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Telegraph Cable Laid by Airplane
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A SUCCESSFUL attempt was made recently in Sweden to lay telegraph and telephone wires from an airplane. Ten kilometers, or slightly over six miles, of cable was laid between two stations separated by woods and rough country. Telegraph communication was established in the incredible time of eight minutes, six of which were consumed in laying the cable.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0035.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
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College Teaches Ideal Farm Layouts with Model Homestead
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THE Nebraska College of Agriculture has constructed a model farmstead to teach its students the proper relation and arrangement of farm buildings. The plan has been tried with great success on farms in several counties of Nebraska. In the model, the various buildings have been laid out so that the farmer walks around the circle in doing his chores, never retracing his steps.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0036.xml
article
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Special Features
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Metallic Steam to Increase Central Station Efficiency
Unique boiler, using mercury instead of water, forecasts radical changes in power-house design
Special Boiler Used
Leakage Peril Minimized
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A DISTINCT departure from long established power-plant practice has been made by W. R. L. Emmet in his mercury boiler, which generates mercury vapor instead of steam for turbine and steam-engine propulsion. The efficiency of any heat engine depends upon the range of temperature through which it works—that is, the difference between the temperature of the steam in the boiler and that of the water in the condenser.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0037.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Testing the Accuracy of Ammunition with the Mann Rest
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THE small boy with his rifle, the target expert, and the outdoor sportsman who appreciate alike any increase in accuracy of firearms, will be interested in the Mann rest, a device recently adopted by the United States government for the testing of ammunition.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0038.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Continuous Machine Prints, Develops, and Dries Blueprints
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CONTINUOUS printing is the latest improvement in the making of blueprints. A long strip of sensitized paper moves steadily through the machine and is printed, developed, and dried at the uniform rate of five feet a minute. One operator can handle the apparatus.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0039.xml
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Special Features
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Why I Believe You Should Buy a Used Car
It costs less in the long run than a new model and gives greater power and riding comfort
Small New Car
Large Used Car
One Example of a Used Car Owned by the Writer
Additional Advantages—Power and Good Looks
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Harold F. Blanchard
I AM in favor of the used car. I can get more for my money by investing it in a used car than I can by investing it in a new one. I have owned seven cars, for which I paid amounts varying from $300 to $2000. With two exceptions, I bought used cars and still feel that the used car is the better buy.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0040.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Odd Items of Science from the News of the Month
Swarms of Migrating Mosquitoes Capture Ocean Liner
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OVERWHELMED by vast clouds of vicious mosquitoes that drove blinded passengers and crew from the decks, the steamship Spokane is said to have had one of the oddest maritime adventures in history during a recent trip from Skagway to Seattle.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0041.xml
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MISCELLANY
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If New York and Pennsylvania Were Burned Flat—
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SUCH a calamity would be called the most disastrous conflagration in the history of the United States. Yet this is the area of American forests devastated by fires in the past four years. The great war deprived Germany of 21,547,520 acres of land.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0042.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Shifting Sand Covers Farms and Railroad
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AFTER fighting night and day to keep their tracks free from windblown sand, two railroads running along the banks of the Columbia River, near Wallula, Washington, have given up the struggle and are soon to move their roadbeds to the top of the bluffs, out of reach of the sand.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0043.xml
article
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Special Features
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Science Aided by Machinery Makes Pearl Buttons From Mussel Shells
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0044.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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How Caribou Meat Obtained by Airplane Would Increase World Food Supply
Three million head of “Arctic cattle” might be annual kill of aerial hunters
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SOME twenty-five or thirty million caribou are roaming the plains beyond the sixtieth parallel of latitude in northern Canada, while a few degrees to the south, millions of people are demanding cheaper meat. What would be more logical than to bring together this seemingly inexhaustible supply and this equally insatiable demand?
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0045.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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My Three Years’ Struggle to Perfect a Micrometer
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John Bath
FOR the most part I believe that practical inventions rarely result from inspiration. I have been a mechanic all my life, and have always been troubled with the problem of measuring holes by micrometer, and the success that it brought me came as a result of long experience, hard work, and deep thought.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0046.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Enlargements of Handwriting Sure Way to Expose Forgeries
French police perfect method to detect work of clever “freehand” forgers
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OF all methods of forgery those of the "freehand" experts have been the most difficult to detect. But a system lately developed by Doctor Locard, Director of the Laboratory of Police Technique at Lyons, France, reveals the work of “freehand” artists conclusively enough to satisfy any jury.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0047.xml
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MISCELLANY
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What Puts the “Pop” in Pop-Corn?
Science explores the inside structure of the kernel
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DO you marvel at the action of popcorn? Have you often wondered what causes the “pop”? In the many years that pop-corn has been used as a food and a confection this question has never been answered until a short time ago when science set out to study pop-corn and its inside structure.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0048.xml
article
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RAILWAYS
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The Oldest Ship that Sails the Sea
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A CURIOUS assemblage of ghosts might walk the decks of the little three-masted vessel, Success, at present making a tour of the world. She was launched in 1790, at Moulmein, British India. Princes, nabobs of the Orient, and rich merchants of India, miserable convicts doomed to years of torture, and finally the royal personages who have visited the hulk in recent years, would constitute the phantom crowd.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0049.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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How Hot Is the Ash of Your Favorite Cigar?
This test of its temperature reveals its quality
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OF all the qualities that are essential in a good cigar, none is as important as the “burn.” This term includes many points, the most important being evenness of burn, color, firmness, and coherence of ash, and fire-holding capacity. Chlorides in the tobacco tend to prevent complete combustion and the forming of products injurious to the flavor and aroma.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0050.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Thirty-five Hundred Varieties of Human Hearing
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LACK of good hearing is often due to lack of ear education. Many people who do not hear easily may educate their ears. With the use of the apparatus here shown, it has been found that human hearing is divided into thirtyfive hundred classes.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0051.xml
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RAILWAYS
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Inside Workings of the Battleship “New Mexico” The World’s First Electrically Driven Fighting Ship
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WITH the formal acceptance of the New Mexico, the United States navy has the honor of possessing the first electrically propelled battleship in the world. Added to this distinction and making it one of the most formidable fighting units in service, are its heavier guns, wider cruising radius, and greater maneuvering ability.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0052.xml
article
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Picture News of Science Oddities from All Over the World
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Two-Headed Snake Travels Both Ways
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THE zoological freak shown above is a native of South America. It is a snake without a tail. Not only has it a perfectly developed head at each end of its body, but it can, and does, travel either backward or forward at choice. The specimen is on display at the London Zoological Gardens and every day a large crowd collects and waits to see what will happen when the snake sees something good to eat in both directions at once and starts a tug of war with itself.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0053.xml
article
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Picture News of Science Oddities from All Over the World
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Automobile Takes the Sky Line
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STRAIGHT and narrow was the path followed by Harry Piel when he drove his car across two metal bars that connected the roofs of two seven-story buildings. Had he wavered, he and the car would have crashed to the street. AMERICANS eat twelve times as much salt as they need, but the excess does little harm.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0054.xml
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Picture News of Science Oddities from All Over the World
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Keep Small Screws in a Salt-Shaker
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USE a salt-shaker for small screws and tacks. Above, you see an old glass salt-shaker that is partly loaded with small screws. When the owner wants a few screws, he shakes the shaker and out they roll. This is much easier than the usual process of hunting through a box of assorted screws.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0055.xml
article
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Picture News of Science Oddities from All Over the World
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Cheetahs Are Trained to Hunt in India
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IN India and Ceylon the cheetah is used for hunting, just as some breeds of dogs are used for the same purpose in the United States and elsewhere. In fact, while the cheetah resembles the leopard in many respects, he really belongs to the dog family.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0056.xml
article
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Picture News of Science Oddities from All Over the World
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Lobsters Caught Fresh from the Sea
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PICTURED below is a boatload of lobsters, fresh caught and lively. There are over a thousand in the heap, and if the next lobster-pot is as full as the last, there will be no room aboard for the crew. Notice the heavy gloves worn to protect the hands in lifting the lobsters out of the pots in which they are caught.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0057.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Lamp Lights as a Signal to the Waiter
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NOTHING more nor less than a life-saver is this little lighthouse. Every one knows that after the dinner is over, the waiter vanishes, and one waits in vain for the check. With this lamp you can signal him by pushing a button. There is no need to whistle as loudly as you dare, or accidentally drop a fork, or glare about, until one of the waiters finally notices that something is wrong, and comes to see what it is.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0058.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Europe Going in for Skyscrapers
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BERLIN is the city that will give Europe her first real skyscraper. It is to be twenty-two stories high, and, as the illustration shows, will be an impressive building, of typical American construction. Although this skyscraper’s chief reason for existence is to house a railway station, the building will be used also for offices, a moving-picture palace, and restaurants.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0059.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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She Is Testing the Perfume of Flowers
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IN botany classes where the student is trying to distinguish the perfume of one flower or plant from another it is advisable to eliminate all other odors. It requires intense concentration to do this without the help of the simple device shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0060.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Dwarf Automobile Moves Punch and Judy Show
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ONE of the favorite amusements of English children is the Punch and Judy show. A Londoner is the father of the modern Punch and Judy on wheels. He has set up his theater on the hood of a tiny five-horsepower automobile, and tours the country districts of England, giving a performance by the roadside wherever a crowd collects.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0061.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Was This the Start of the Trailer Idea?
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THE village bus-driver of Sodus, New York, developed the first trailer to be used in this country, according to the claim of his fellow citizens. He started the idea over twenty years ago and used it successfully to carry baggage. The trailer shown in the picture was used by its originator’s successor.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0062.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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74,000 Candlepower Searchlight for Night Surveying
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A MODIFICATION of the surveying searchlight has been designed by E. G. Fischer of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey. This instrument is used to mark the triangulation points in surveying triangles the sides of which are from ten to one hundred miles in length.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0063.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Pocket Extractor Pulls Buried Nails with Ease
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NO matter how far the head of a nail may have been driven below the surface of the board, this pocket-size nail-puller gets it out without fuss or delay. Set its claws over the nail, and tap the top of the puller with a hammer until the claws take hold.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0064.xml
article
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RAILWAYS
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Magnetic Crane Shunts and Unloads Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the problems the plant superintendent had to solve was how to Unload cars of sheet bars and steel plates at scattered points in a large plant. The magnetic crane was the most efficient method. But to-day a car must be unloaded at one end of the plant, and tomorrow at another, a mile or more away.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0065.xml
article
46
46
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Portable Wash-Basin Folds into Smal Space
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RATHER than take a chance with the cleanliness of the hotel lavatories encountered in his travels about the country, a resident of New Jersey has invented a portable lavatory that can be folded up into a space no larger than a magazine. The lavatory consists of a piece of waterproof material stretched loosely between an oval frame so as to form a shallow basin.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0066.xml
article
46
46
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
Twin Propeller Permits Larger Engines in Small Ships
[no value]
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[no value]
THE inventor of the double propeller, P. J. Griffin, of Boston, Massachusetts, claims he has made a distinct improvement in design, since its diameter is only two thirds that of an ordinary propeller of equal propulsive force. It will permit the use of a more powerful engine on small boats without danger of “belling,” and may be used on any form of marine craft.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0067.xml
article
47
47
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Magnet Salvages Nails from Ocean Bottom
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PICTURE, if you can, the endless task of picking up a million nails from the bottom of the ocean. There is no way in which it could be done other than the method used—by electromagnet. Some of the casks containing the nails in the sunken cargo were broken wide open and their contents spread over the mud under many feet of water, but the magnet got them all.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0068.xml
article
47
47
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Sand-Slinger Does Work of Eight Men
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[no value]
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IN large foundries a considerable force of men is needed to ram the sand into the flasks. But before being rammed, the sand must be riddled and all the pieces of scrap taken out. An electrically drawn sand-slinger does all this work and does it eight times faster than a man could do it.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0069.xml
article
47
47
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
New Caterpillar Tractor Travels Thirty Miles an Hour
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OF course, we have known that a caterpillar tractor can go anywhere, but we never expected it to go there very fast. We thought a man driving a tractor ran about as much risk of arrest for speeding as his brother in a steam-roller. But this tractor will do thirty-one miles an hour, in spite of the weight of the gun and its load of passengers.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0070.xml
article
47
47
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Scoreboard Describes Football Plays to Spectators
[no value]
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FOOTBALL, the game of many rules and many happenings, is no longer the puzzle to the inexpert spectator that it once was. This cover-all scoreboard now comes to his aid in practically all of the large college stadia of the country, reporting the game play by play.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0071.xml
article
47
47
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Brief-Case Acquires an Extra Handle
[no value]
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THE handle of a brief-case is the part that wears out first. A manufacturer recognized this fact and has brought out a special handle that makes replacements easy. A simple harmless hook on each end of the grip with a sheath to protect the hands from the metal comprises the new product.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0072.xml
article
48
48
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Wheels Open Garage Doors Automatically without the Driver Leaving the Car
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BY setting an iron plate in the driveway leading to his garage door, and connecting it with the latch, an ingenious automobile owner opens the door without leaving his seat. Nothing could be simpler than the method of operation. The doors are held shut normally by a spring lock, but there is always a tendency for them to swing open, caused by powerful springs on each side.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0073.xml
article
48
48
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Pavement-Breaker for Starting Pipe-Trenches
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ENGINEERS of the Board of Water Commissioners in Detroit have designed a machine for breaking pavements that will cut trenches for water-pipes through a ten-inch concrete pavement base with a great saving in labor cost. The machine is practically a small pile-driver mounted on two short crawler tractors.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0074.xml
article
48
48
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Wellesley Has Formaldehyde Closet for Sneezers
[no value]
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SNEEZING is a warning of a cold. At Wellesley College there is a little white, zinc-lined room that is guaranteed to make one sneezeless and snuffleless provided one seeks it in time. When the twitching nose is first felt, a trip to the “coryza closet” is immediately made.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0075.xml
article
48
48
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
An Electric Generator for the Motorcycle
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[no value]
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A MAKER of motorcycles has appeared on the market with an electric machine that includes in its equipment magneto ignition and a generator furnishing current for headlight and taillight. The generator is swung low between the gear-box and the rear wheel and is driven from the engine by an endless leather belt.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0076.xml
article
48
48
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
Drydocking Big Ships by Telephone
[no value]
[no value]
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AN ocean liner must be held precisely over the center line of the dry dock until the supporting blocks are put in place under the keel. Guiding the ship into position is the duty of the dockmaster, who stands at one end with a sighting vane which he alines on the ship’s masts.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0077.xml
article
49
49
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Chemicals Render Zoological Specimens Transparent
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MEDICAL students would have less difficulty in learning anatomy if it were possible to render an organ, such as the heart, transparent, so that all the veins and muscles in the interior could be seen in their natural position. Now M. Jezequel, for forty years a zoologist at the Sorbonne, has perfected a method by which flesh can be made transparent.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0078.xml
article
49
49
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
A Three-Horsepower Motor Drives Ferryboat
[no value]
[no value]
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ON the Peedee River in North Carolina there is an electrically operated ferryboat that is controlled by a motor on board. The motor, which is of three horsepower, two hundred and twenty volts, is connected by a series of sprockets with a cable-drive that enables the boat to cover a distance of seven hundred feet in two and a half minutes.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0079.xml
article
49
49
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Census Returns Are Sorted with a Magnet
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THE first step in tabulating census returns is to sort the miscellaneous information obtained in the field into its main headings. This would be an almost endless task if done by hand, but a magnetic sorting machine will handle 15,000 cards an hour, and never make a mistake.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0080.xml
article
49
49
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Plumber Turns Surgeon to Save Workman’s Life
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WHILE repairing an elevator, a workman in England was struck by a steel rod which entered at his shoulder and left by his knee, pinning him to the floor. After the man was freed by cutting the bar with a hacksaw, it was found that he had three and a half feet of steel tubing in his body.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0081.xml
article
49
49
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Sidecar Takes on Novel Shape to Advertise Shoe-Store
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MOST Americans think that the rest of the world follows after them when it comes to advertising, and in the main it is true, but the picture above shows what our British cousins can do in that line. A certain shoe-repair store owner in England utilized his sidecar for advertising purposes by having it built in the shape of a huge shoe with his name painted on.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0082.xml
article
49
49
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Testing Depth Bombs with a Pile-Driver
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EXPLODING depth bombs in the woods is the latest experiment tried by the United States navy. The bomb is placed between two trees to which a pile-driving outfit is attached in the manner shown below. The weight at the top is dropped on the bomb and it has the same effect on the bomb as water of a corresponding depth.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0083.xml
article
50
50,51
Special Features
[no value]
How Your New Automatic Telephone Will Work
Nearly every home in America is going to be its own exchange
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[no value]
Raymond Francis Yates
WITHIN operators a will few be years as telephone scarce horse-car drivers. With automatic telephony, you have only manipulate a dial at the base of the telephone. All kinds of little “jiggers” at the telephone exchange dance around rapidly, going about their task of connecting your line with the number you are calling.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0084.xml
article
52
52
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Famous Character Expert Analyzes Composite Portrait of America’s Great Scientists
If your brow is narrow, head broad, eyes blue, and chin long, you have the typical features of the inventor
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THE composite photograph of famous American scientists and engineers, shown on the opposite page, has been analyzed for Popular Science Monthly by Katherine M. H. Blackford, M. D., expert in character reading. The significant features characterizing the inventive genius are the prominent, well modeled nose, the strong jaw, and the peculiar shape and breadth of the head (noticeable in the individual portrait of Thomas Edison).
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0085.xml
article
52
52
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Traveling Laboratory Tests Small-Town Water and Milk Supply
[no value]
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MODERN public health service is dependent on laboratory determinations for much of its effectiveness in the control of contagious disease. The testing of water and milk supplies, and the examination of blood, sputum, and throat swabs are outstanding examples.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0086.xml
article
53
53
Special Features
[no value]
The Great American Inventor
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This typical face of the American inventive genius was made by printing in registry on a single piece of sensitized paper the sixteen portraits of famous engineers that are shown around the margin. The resultant composite photograph emphasizes the characteristic features of all scientific pathfinders.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0087.xml
article
54
54
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Mine Fires Extinguished with Blast of Dead Air
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FIGHTING a fire underground with the aid of a ventilating fan is a hitherto unheard-of procedure, but the method has been adopted by a copper-mine in Arizona to control air currents while fire-fighters are quelling a subterranean blaze. The greatest difficulty and the principal danger in fighting fires in metal-mines has lain in the clouds of dense smoke and poisonous gases that prevent firemen from reaching the seat of the blaze.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0088.xml
article
54
54
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Repairing Chair-Seats while You Wait
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A PADDED chair-seat that can be purchased as a complete unit and installed in a minute’s time might well be called the upholsterer’s enemy. An inventor who lives in New York has succeeded in perfecting a chair of this description. the seat with its wooden base and its padded cover is accompanied by a crosspiece with screw-holes already provided.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0089.xml
article
54
54
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Flies Thirteen Yards in Plane Propelled by His Feet
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AFTER many attempts, several of which were almost successful, Gabriel Poulain, a Frenchman, has finally succeeded in winning the famous Peugeot prize of ten thousand francs offered to the first person who could fly a distance of ten yards in a motorless plane.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0090.xml
article
55
55
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Capillary Oiler Prolongs Life of Bearings
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THE increasing use of capillary, or “wick,” oiling devices is steadily eliminating lubrication troubles in connection with bearings of all kinds. In a device of this sort, the oil stays at rest in a comparatively large oil reservoir, and is not agitated by the motion of the bearing.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0091.xml
article
55
55
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Generates Heat and Light from Acid
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A FRONTIER post in northern Canada was faced with a shortage of coal, kerosene, and gasoline. There was no chance of getting in new supplies for four months or more, but the owner, Mr. P. d’Aigneaux, remembered that there was a large quantity of acid in store, and after a little thought and experimentation, he improvised the acid power plant shown in the sketch.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0092.xml
article
55
55
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Camera Photographs Movies on Disk and then Projects Them
[no value]
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WITH the intention of supplying a motion-picture machine to enable the amateur to take and project his own pictures at a minimum of cost, a firm in Ohio has designed a combination camera and projector, with a disk similar to a phonograph record taking the place of the usual film.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0093.xml
article
56
56
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
This Dumb Auctioneer Permits Silent Bidding
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KEEN competitive bidding marked the first butter auction to be held in Berlin since the war, but you could have heard a pin drop at any time. It was a silent auction, and the auctioneer was not a man, but a machine invented by Harry Voight. A huge dial was placed in plain sight of every bidder.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0094.xml
article
56
56
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
New Pastry-Cutter May Be Bent into Many Shapes
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WHETHER it be a convention or a child’s birthday party, this initial-cutter does its bit in making of the occasion or the person something extra special. Besides the actual initials, of course it is simple to work out all manner of designs.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0095.xml
article
56
56
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Moist Drying of Vegetables Retains Their Flavor
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BY means of the moist-air process of dehydration recently perfected, you can carry home a bushel of potatoes as easily as the evening paper and eat fresh peach-pie throughout the peachless winter months. Drying food is probably the oldest method of preserving, but in virtually all the old processes, the dehydrating factor has been warm dry air.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0096.xml
article
56
56
FOR THE FARMER
[no value]
Picks Up Thirty Pounds of Apples a Minute
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THE fruit-rancher must have a large orchard for this mechanical apple-picker, or the job of gathering the windfalls will be over before he realizes it has started. On the large ranch, it makes a task that was once a slow, backbreaking job a positive pleasure.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0097.xml
article
56
56
FOR THE FARMER
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Artificial Rain Produced by Pump on Truck
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HERE is a real rainmaker, concerning whose efficiency there can be no doubt. It provides refreshing showers for the sugar-cane plantations of Portuguese East Africa by carrying water from gigantic tanks to sprayers high above the cane.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0098.xml
article
57
57
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Workman Drives Scissors-Grinder from Bicycle
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THIS scissors-grinder decided that knives get dull in the suburbs just as rapidly as in the city, and mounted his grindstone on his bicycle so that he could cover a large territory cheaply and grind by power at the same time. He worked out the attachment himself.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0099.xml
article
57
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Displacing 150,000 Cubic Feet of Air Minute
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EVEN this twelve-foot fan will hardly produce an artificial typhoon, for in a real tropical hurricane the wind velocities are eighty miles an hour and upward. It does set up a wind that the most hardened sea-dog would admit was a “fresh breeze.”
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0100.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Mechanical “Cop” Flashes Light Eighty Times a Minute
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FLASHING eighty times a minute, day and night, this mechanical traffic policeman with its acetylene lamp guides the traffic around the busy crossing near the southeast gate of the White House in Washington. It has been found that drivers are less liable to overlook a flashing light than one that burns steadily.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0101.xml
article
57
57
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Cleaning Ice-Covered Windows by Electricity
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"WHEN icicles hang by the wall” you can be sure that they are hanging by the window too, and that the outside of the window is most likely covered with ice. How can you remove this ice while the cold weather persists? Use one of the new electric window-cleaners recently invented by A. L. Conkey, of Hartford, Michigan.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0102.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Wrist-Clamp Will Prevent Writer’s Cramp
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THE inventors of this apparatus for writing correctly say that it will also prevent writer’s cramp, so that it is as useful for the accomplished writer as for the student. The largest part of the apparatus is a wristband threaded through a circular plate, to which is screwed the adjustable steel strap that has the clip at its extreme end. It is this clip that holds the third and fourth fingers in their correct position, supporting the hand, while leaving the thumb, index, and second fingers free to hold the pen.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0103.xml
article
58
58
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Lathe Bores Six-Inch Hole in Propeller-Shaft Forging
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THIS lathe is boring a hole six inches in diameter in the center of a forging that will become a propeller-shaft for one of the newest of the United States navy’s torpedo-boat destroyers. The shaft is made hollow to save weight without sacrificing strength. A powerful pump is used to throw jets of water on the face of the boring-tool to prevent it from overheating.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0104.xml
article
58
58
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Motor-Driven Sandpaper Machine Smooths Hard-Wood Floors
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STUDY the picture carefully and note the compactness of the little machine that will polish newly laid hard-wood floors better and in less time than could possibly be done by hand. The platform supports a motor, which is attached by a chain to the wheels and by a belt to a suction pump that gathers up the sawdust and sandpaper dust.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0105.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Machine Cuts, Breaks, and Conveys Coal to Car
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WHERE the new coal-mining apparatus invented by Nils D. Levin, of Columbus, Ohio, is employed, the miner may keep his hands clean and never has to touch pick or shovel. The machine cuts the seam, breaks down the coal, and delivers it to the cars that carry it to the pithead.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0106.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
This New Blueprinting Machine Eliminates Printing-Frame
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THE inventor, Edward Hirt, is operating a device by which blueprints may be made without the use of the bulky printing-frame, even without removing the tracing from the drawing-board. Simply slip a piece of blueprint paper under the tracing, place a sheet of glass over the top, and pass the small arc over the section of the drawing you wish to reproduce.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0107.xml
article
58
58
RAILWAYS
[no value]
Foresters Test Spark-Arresters for Locomotives
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IN the past five years engine sparks have caused 12 per cent of all forest fires in the woodland reservations of Uncle Sam. The Forest Service is conducting an investigation to determine the most effective type of screen to prevent the tremendous loss resulting from six thousand blazes annually.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0108.xml
article
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59
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Road Tool Combines Drag, Planer, and Scarifier
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A NEW machine, a combination drag, planer, and scarifier, which is adapted to work on hard-surfaced roads, has recently been placed on the market. Constructed entirely of metal, it weighs three and a half tons. It may be drawn by tractor or steam-roller, being mounted on runners equipped with removable cast-iron shoes.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0109.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Floating Cover on Oil-Tank Prevents Fires
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IT is claimed that this steel roof, which fits inside an oil-tank, supported by the surface of the oil, will prevent evaporation and make the tank absolutely fireproof. The roof practically floats on the oil, as the edge is formed of a flexible element filled with gravel that conforms to the irregularities of the tank and makes it impossible for air or gas to enter.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0110.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Inexperienced Workers Can Operate Pneumatic Hoist
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IT is quicker to turn a valve than to operate a chain-hoist. Moreover, the pneumatic hoist does not waste the time of a skilled and highly paid mechanic in operations that any laborer could perform. This pneumatic hoist is absolutely positive in action and its speed of operation makes it the most economical means of handling light-and medium-weight material in factory or garage.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0111.xml
article
59
59
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Chemical Fire-Engine Trailer for Small Communities
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN rural communities the wooden buildings and the absence of fire-escapes make the danger of fire serious, but many towns cannot afford the expense of an automobile fire-engine. When a fire breaks out, horses must be driven from their work or from a livery stable to the fire-house before the alarm can be answered.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0112.xml
article
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59
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Hog Wire Used to Reenforce Concrete Highway
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ON some of the slight grades of California roads or on level stretches where the engineers believe this sort of re-enforcement to be needed, double rolls of extra heavy hog wire, heavily galvanized, are used to strengthen the roadways. The wire is laid on a special framework of pipes in order to bring it into the correct position for the concrete to be poured under and around it.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0113.xml
article
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60
MISCELLANY
[no value]
This Machine Forces Confession from Criminals
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PEOPLE may tell a lie and show no outward signs of it; but internally— through the heart and lungs —they betray themselves. We now have a machine, invented by William M. Marston, of Boston, that finds its principal use in recording the heart and lung action of suspected criminals as they are cross-examined.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0114.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Providing a Third Eye for the Airplane Pilot
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A NEW type of periscope has been invented to do away with the “blind spot” in airplanes. Without this invention, in the average plane the pilot has clear view ahead and a fair view on both sides, but cannot gaze directly earthward unless he turns and leans over the side.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0115.xml
article
61
61
Special Features
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Selling Land and Buildings from the Air
Airplane photography opens up a new medium for the real-estate salesman
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LESSONS learned in aerial photography during the war are showing results in their rapid application to commercial use. There are firms that make a specialty of taking airplane views of factories or of communities. Manufacturers have discovered that a genuine air photograph gives a more comprehensive idea of the plant, the location of the buildings, and the general layout than any number of ordinary views taken on the ground or even on a tower.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0116.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Tintography Is a Decorative Art
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ABOVE is shown an example of tintography, which is the new art of diffusive painting. One can gain a good understanding of it by calling to mind the manner in which ink spreads through a piece of blotting-paper when it is allowed to come in contact with it.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0117.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Most Daring Airplane Stunt on Record
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MAKING a head stand on top of a six-foot pole mounted on an airplane is one of the most daring stunts in the repertoire of George Plummer, aeronautical engineer and all-around daredevil. He is shown in the picture above doing this aero-acrobatic stunt over his home town, Grover Hill, Ohio.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0118.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Finger-Cuffs the Style for Criminals
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THE finger-cuff has been invented to take the place of the handcuff. It is the invention of. Abraham Cushing, a member of the police department of Concord, New Hampshire. Mr. Cushing believes that the finger-cuff is more effective than the handcuff, and we are inclined to believe him.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0119.xml
article
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62
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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New Automatic Mine-Ventilating Door
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IN coal-mines trap-doors are a necessity. They direct air currents and prevent the spread of noxious gases. The automatic door in the illustration is opened by the coal-car, which presses down the iron strip shown on the inside of the rails at either side of the door.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0120.xml
article
62
62
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Rider Is Chauffeur and Engine Too
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DR. PEASE of Plymouth, England, visits his patients in a man-power automobile, which he pedals like a bicycle. An ancient motor-car was deprived of its engine and a foot drive substituted by bolting the frame of an equally old bicycle between the seat and dashboard.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0121.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Why Do We Do These Stupid Things?
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Why do we groan about “Blue Monday”? WHEN psychological tests show that, far from being the worst day in the week for work, Monday is almost the best? Tuesday is the week’s high point of efficiency as we get down to work after the slight lassitude of Monday.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0122.xml
article
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63
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Phone for Firemen Simplifies Fire Fighting
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AT large fires there is much unnecessary confusion. This is brought about by the difficulty the firemen have with communication. They must rely mainly upon shouting. The telephone has been brought into use at fires during the past few months.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0123.xml
article
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63
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Grinder Uses Any Current
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THE use of an aluminum alloy housing and a patented pistol grip and trigger switch makes this portable grinder easy to handle and gives the operator perfect control. While it is essentially a portable machine designed to operate on either direct or alternating current, an attachment sent with the machine enables it to be converted into a bench-grinder in thirty seconds.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0124.xml
article
63
63
RAILWAYS
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Mammoth Generator Requires Special Railway-Car
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A SPECIAL freight-car had to be constructed to ship a 35,000-kilowatt turbo generator from the Westinghouse plant in East Pittsburgh to its destination in New York. The stator of this dynamo had to be shipped as a unit, and its weight of fifty tons was far too great for the ordinary railroad flatcar.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0125.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Gunstock Absorbs Recoil
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IF you say a thing “kicks like a double-barreled shotgun,” it is no longer an effective comparison. This innovation in extending gunstocks is equipped with springs that absorb about 70 per cent of the recoil of the exploding shell. By manipulating the screws shown in the illustration the shot can be given any length of variety of “drop” the shooter prefers. The anti-recoil springs are effective even when the stock is closed.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0126.xml
article
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64
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Marks 3600 Tags an Hour by Electricity
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MARKING tags to be placed on goods on the shelves is a very easy operation with a new electrically-driven tag-marker which can be set to mark 2400, 3000, or 3600 tags an hour to suit the operator. The tags are fed into the machine by hand and, by means of an endless chain of trays, carried beneath a miniature type-chase which, by downward movements, alternately comes into contact with the cards and an inking pad.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0127.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Ties Bags with Wire Loop
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BY placing a wire loop around the neck of paper or cloth bags and twisting the wire tightly with special tools supplied for that purpose, manufacturers of products that are shipped in such containers are saved a large amount of money in wasted and damaged goods.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0128.xml
article
64
64
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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Wooden Brake Holds Back Ships When Launched
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THE first problem of a shipbuilder at the launching of a vessel is to get the ship into the water. The next is to stop it within a reasonable distance, especially if the waterway is restricted. An effective device, seldom used, consists of a brake-shield made up of wooden boards joined together and braced, as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0129.xml
article
64
64
FOR THE FARMER
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Machine Separates Good Beans from Bad
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HOWARD FOGELSANGE, of Clarence, New York, is here shown operating his invention for sorting beans. The beans are placed in the hopper and fall on to two moving belts actuated by a foot-treadle. The inclined belt runs backward, toward the hopper, and flat and imperfect beans will not roll down it on to the horizontal belt in front of the sorter.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0130.xml
article
64
64
MISCELLANY
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Sun Eclipse Is Measured by Photograph and Micrometer
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A STRONOMERS have determined the diameter of the sun and the planets by mathematical calculations, and when an eclipse gives an opportunity to check these calculations by means of actual measurements every precaution is taken to have these as exact as possible.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0131.xml
article
64
64
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Call-Bell Notifies Dealer when Motorist Wants Gas
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A GARAGE at East Troy, Wisconsin, has installed an electric call-bell upon both of its gasoline fountains on the curb in front of its door. This has been found to be of great convenience, both to customers and to the firm and its employees The owner is no longer obliged to keep watch for fear some motorist may grow impatient of waiting and go elsewhere for gasoline.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0132.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Two-Man Plowing in Persia
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A PERSIAN plow looks like a rake that has teeth projecting from both sides of the backbone. Two men are needed to operate one. One of them pushes on the wooden handle to which the “plow” is fastened; the other man pulls on a rope attached to the end teeth.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0133.xml
article
65
65
MISCELLANY
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A Multi-Pocket Overcoat
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MODISH and innocent-looking as is this overcoat, it has as many tricks as a prestidigitator. It was invented by a London tailor, who got tired of unbuttoning his coat in inclement weather whenever he wanted something in an inside pocket. The greatest feature is the attachment for an umbrella.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0134.xml
article
65
65
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Movie Films Developed by Automatic Machine
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A DEVELOPING machine for the “positive” copies of moving-picture films has been invented by George K. Spoor, which will develop, wash, and dry a thousand feet of film in ten minutes, reduce cutting and splicing to the minimum, and save 70 per cent of the labor charges in the movie dark-room.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0135.xml
article
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65
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Electrical Power Today
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TO-DAY in the United States there are 275,891 manufacturing plants that rely wholly upon electricity for power. Thirty years ago there was scarcely one.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0136.xml
article
65
65
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Banyan-Tree Spreads 800 Feet
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IN the eighteenth century the seed of the banyan-tree shown above started its growth, and it has never stopped. To-day its one great trunk, over forty-two feet in girth, is the main support of numberless other aerial roots that have grown into the ground from hanging branches.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0137.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Records Traffic Vibrations
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THIS instrument demonstrates that two skyscrapers will lean toward each other when a loaded truck passes in the street between them. Only a minute fraction of an inch, of course, but enough for this machine to measure. It is designed to record the vibrations caused by modern city traffic.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0138.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Hot Baths 2784 Years Old
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ABOUT a hundred miles southwest of London, England, are the famous hot springs of Bath. Hot springs in themselves are not new nor unusual, but these are interesting because of their early history. Many hundred years before Christ, a British king discovered the springs and their healing power.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0139.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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An Evening’s Entertainment with a Piece of String
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CAT'S cradle is played by babies all around the world, from London to Korea, and among civilized peoples it is the last vestige of a pastime universally popular among savages —the string games, in which designs and figures are woven with the fingers in a loop of string about seven feet long.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0140.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
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A Simple Seed-Tester Made of Two Dinner-Plates
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TWO dinner-plates lined with cloth or blotting-paper make the homemade seed-tester suggested by the Department of Agriculture for testing clover, alfalfa, and cereal seeds at home. The units comprising the simple outfit are clearly shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0141.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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What Do You Want to Know ?
An Information Service for Readers Who Want the Facts
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Are black clothes actually warmer than white clothes?—G. B. Yes. A perfectly black surface tends to absorb all of the visible and part of the invisible radiations. A white surface, on the other hand, reflects all of the visible and part of the invisible radiations, including the infra-red or heat waves.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0142.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Special Machines Turn out Millions of Sandwiches for Noontime Lunches
One firm alone prepares twenty million annually
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0143.xml
article
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RAILWAYS
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The First and Last Word in Steam-Locomotives
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NINETY years ago the first locomotive actually built in the United States for railroad service made its maiden trip on the Charleston and Hamburg Railroad. It worked well on the outward journey, but on the way back the weight proved too much for the wheels, which collapsed and ditched the train.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0144.xml
article
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69
FOR THE FARMER
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This Wheelbarrow Folds Up for Carrying
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WHEELBARROWS are bulky things to transport. One takes up more space than it is entitled to, considering its weight and construction. It is a wonder that no one has thought previously of making the wheelbarrow so that it can be folded into a compact bundle.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0145.xml
article
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RAILWAYS
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Mechanical Stoker Produces Cleaner Fire
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THIS mechanical stoker, perfected for use on locomotives, ran eighteen consecutive trips under test over an eighty-nine-mile division, with the fire-door sealed between terminals. No inspection of the fire was possible en route, yet it was found to be in perfect condition at the end of the run, although the engine was pulling full tonnage.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0146.xml
article
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SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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A Water-Air Propeller for Use in Shallow Waters
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A COMBINATION propeller, recently patented in France, operating efficiently both in water and air, permits a flat-bottom cargo-boat carrying several tons of merchandise to be navigated on rivers heretofore considered too shallow to serve as inland waterways.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0147.xml
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Fruit-Eating Bats of Ceylon
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THE objects hanging from the limbs of this tree are neither fruit nor hornets’ nests, but flying foxes, or fruit-eating bats. These bats measure more than two feet from wing tip to wing tip and are so numerous that if they were unchecked, they would make it impossible to raise fruit in the neighborhood where they abound.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0148.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Printing-Press Is a War Veteran
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UNTIL now, Gutenberg's first press was the only one we remembered, but "Tip-Top Kelly" is a printing-press with a history and a service record. It first went into action in the German trenches, where it unsuccessfully preached the doctrine of “Deutschland über alles.”
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0149.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Mercury Column Protects the Electric Motor
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AN electric motor operating in cold weather can with stand a much greater amount of overloading than the same motor on hot summer days. This fact has been taken into consideration in the manufacture of a new protective device for electric motors.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0150.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Picture News of Recent Developments in Home and Office Devices
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0151.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Wire Mesh Used for Concrete Forms
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TIMBER is so much more expensive than concrete in Germany that even temporary houses are being built of the latter material. But the molds which form the walls and floors have to be made of wire mesh and gravel because of the cost of wood for this purpose.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0152.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Stacker Piles Wood for News Paper
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THESE twin mountains of wooden blocks will be made into newsprint for many of the editions of 1922. Such great piles are possible only by the use of the traveling belt stacker illustrated, which is moved along a temporary track after the piles have reached the height of forty feet.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0153.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Film Rewinds Itself in New Magazine
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A NEW magazine for motion-picture projectors in which the film commences to unwind from the center instead of the outside has been invented. The film is not wound in the ordinary round form, but is pulled from point to point inside the ten metal fingers in the shape of a decagon.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0154.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Paint Line on Road for Safety’s Sake
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MOTORISTS who cross the Canejo Pass near Camarillo, California, cannot conceal or deny the fact that they are hogging the road. A twelve-inch black strip has been painted in the center of the road for several miles, and constantly reminds the driver to get over on his own side.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0155.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Horse-Driven Scoop Used to Fill Truck
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AT Iowa State College they have decided that it is easier to drive a horse than to swing a shovel, so they load gravel with a scoop. A team attached to a wheel scraper strips the gravel and gathers it into piles in front of a chute. When the trucks drive up, a cable is fastened to the scraper and the horse hauls the gravel up the incline into the wagon.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0156.xml
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73
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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New Catcher’s Mask Gives Better Vision
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FRANK SNYDER, catcher of the New York Giants, is said to be highly pleased with this new mask, designed to give the backstop better vision and improved protection. The broad bars are made of composition applied over a light steel framework, and their size and slanting angles cause a foul tip to glance off the surface of the mask with far less danger of injury to the player than was the case with the old bar type.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0157.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Twin Arc Gives Double Light at Same Current Cost
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AN Ohio manufacturer has developed a photographic arc lamp for which he claims double illumination with no increase in the cost of current consumed. The lamp consists of two arcs of high intensity so placed as to produce a better distribution of light by eliminating the harsh shadows that frequently accompany the use of single arcs.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0158.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Sixty Feet of Alcohol Propaganda
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THE long white strip, of which only about forty feet shows in the photograph, is a list of medicines in the preparation of which good grain alcohol is a necessity. There are 3600 of them, and written on a typewriter in single space the list is sixty feet long.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0159.xml
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MISCELLANY
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These Binoculars Steal Photographs
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A COMBINATION camera-stereo scope, looking like a pair of field-glasses, is a Frenchman’s invention to enable a photographer to snap-shot unsuspecting persons to the right or left of him. The glasses do not “look” ahead. The photographer apparently looks straight ahead, but a prismatic arrangement reflects the view to the right or left of him.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0160.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Mail-Bags Are Cleaned by Means of Tumbling-Barrel
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THE Post Office maintains a special department for the cleaning and renovating of mail-bags. In their rapid journey around the country the bags acquire an incredible amount of dust and grime which must be removed before any repairs are made.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0161.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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How Fast Does Your Mind Work? Test It!
Puzzles will do for your brain what sports do for your body
Twenty-Five Dollars in Prizes
Try Your Hand at Surveying and Help These Miners Fence Their Land
How Would You Patch This Roof if You Were Given the Job ?
How Far Did the Car Go?
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EDUCATORS say that puzzle-solving is the best kind of mind-training—best, because it comes as sport instead of drudgery. As proof of this, consider the fact that Sam Loyd’s most faithful puzzle fans have been inventors, engineers, and business men.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0162.xml
article
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Special Features
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Five “Other Uses” for the Hand Drill
Beginning a series of pictures showing how to
Make the Most of Your Tools
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0163.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Rubber Suit Keeps Jockey Down to Weight
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THE man or woman who wants to reduce can borrow many a valuable tip from the racing-track, for in order to keep their weight down to the minimum, the jockeys undergo a course of training as rigorous as that of the pugilist. Even when they diet and exercise to the point of physical suffering, they frequently find themselves too heavy.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0164.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
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Homemade Spraying Outfit Runs on Ranch Railroad
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BECAUSE the spraying outfits supplied him were not big enough to take care of the immense farms under his direction, the foreman of a large Western ranch went ahead and assembled this spraying-train according to his own ideas. An old motor-truck engine was transferred to the homemade locomotive, and made to do double duty in driving the outfit and operating the pump.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0165.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Fuelizer Preheats Gas for Easy Starting
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ANOTHER step forward has been made in the better combustion of present-day automobile engine fuels by L. M. Woolson, a Detroit engineer, who has perfected a device called the fuelizer, to heat the incoming fuel when the engine is starting and idling, and to automatically become inoperative when the engine is able to supply its own heat.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0166.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Valve Admits Gas Kerosene, or Air
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PRIMING the engine, cleaning the cylinders, and an auxiliary air-control are all possible with a new auto accessory attached to the instrument board and connected with the intake manifold by a small copper pipe. A piston consisting of four disks inside the cylinder forms a three-way valve having one, two, and three small outlet holes in the respective compartments.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0167.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Water Supply on Auto Heated by Exhaust
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UTILIZING the heat of the exhaust gases to sup ply pure hot water in large quantities is the purpose of the latest accessory to be attached to automobiles and motor-boats. The advantage of the invention is that the water produced is pure—clean enough to use for bathing or even for making tea.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0168.xml
article
76
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Oil Shock-Absorber for the Automobile
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GREAT wearing qualities are claimed for a new shock-absorber which works in oil on the principle of a big gun-recoil chamber. The action is entirely vertical, for although the plunger is fastened solidly to the car frame, it is attached to the spring by means of a cable which accommodates itself to lateral movements.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0169.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Gasoline Flow Meter Records Effect of Road Condition on Car-Operation Cost
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A FLOW meter which records the rate of gasoline consumption of an automobile engine at each instant of operation or point of travel has been developed by the Iowa Engineering Experiment Station to determine the effect of the condition of the surface of a road upon the cost of operation of motor-cars.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0170.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Needle-Valve Control for Fords Saves Gasoline
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THE operating expenses of the average Ford car could be reduced if the driver had the gasoline control within sight and reach. This is the case with the more expensive cars, but on the Ford the driver must reach in back of the instrument board before he can adjust the carburetor needle-valve.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0171.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Picture News of Recent Developments in the Motor World
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0172.xml
article
79
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When You Want Expert Advice About Your Car
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IN these pages of ideas about automobiles and motor-trucks the Popular Science Monthly endeavors to help its readers solve problems of maintenance and repair. But there must be special cases that are not covered, and we invite you to write to the Automobile Editor and let him advise you.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0173.xml
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Special Features
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This Electric Automobile Has Sixty-Mile Radius with Low Operating Cost
May revolutionize transportation around town for family of moderate means
Not a Big Cars Competitor
Repair Costs Are Insignificant
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This new electric has capacity for two passengers, and a cruising radius of sixty miles at fifteen miles an hour, with a maximum speed considerably higher. It has a wheelbase of sixty-five inches and a tread of thirty-five inches; the tires are twenty-eight by three inches.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0174.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Write to Us About Your Motor Troubles
If you have a motor-truck or automobile problem, let the Automobile Editor solve it
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Do Tires Require Exercise? Q.—Is there anything in the claim that tires require hard exercise to keep them in the best of condition?—H. W. C., Austin, Texas. A.—Some experienced motorists and some tire men claim that tires stand up best when subjected to hard and frequent service, lasting much longer under this treatment than they do when used gently.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0175.xml
article
82
82
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Why Some Tires Wear Out So Rapidly
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FARMER JONES found his young neighbor Brown closely examining the right front tire on his light truck. Noting his perplexed look, he asked, “What’s the trouble here?” “This tire seems to be wearing faster than it ought and I’m wondering if the wheel can be out of alinement,” replied Brown.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0176.xml
article
82
82
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Ball-Bearing Stationary Jacks for the Garage
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ONE of the most desirable features of garage equipment is a means of hoisting either the forward or rear ends of the car enough to bring the wheels 2 ft. above the floor. This permits of the periodical repair of the chassis and makes it possible to get underneath readily for cleaning, greasing, and inspection, which work is neglected where the owner is obliged to get down on the cold dirty garage floor.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0177.xml
article
82
82
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Several Different Ways of Cleaning Ink-Bottles
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INK-BOTTLES invariably become coated on the inside with dried ink, which adheres firmly to the glass and does not yield to water. There are several methods of cleaning such bottles and they depend for their success on the nature of the ink.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0178.xml
article
82
82
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Improve the Screwdriver with a Valve-Wheel
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BY adding a valve-wheel, as shown in the illustration, to the blade of the screwdriver, the work of twisting the screw is less tiring and the work progresses more rapidly. A wire-rim wheel is preferable, as this affords a good gripping surface for the hand; however, a cast-iron or wooden rim will improve the screwdriver if either of these is available.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0179.xml
article
83
83
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Saving the Body Finish of the Automobile
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IN spite of a good paint job and exceptional care, a car does sometimes undergo a little rough treatment and the result is a chipped-off place or two on the lustrous finish of the body. Once a chip has been loosened, water soon forms rust between the paint coats and the metal of the base.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0180.xml
article
83
83
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Blinker Signaling with the Car’s Lamps
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MEMBERS of automobile parties are sometimes separated by lakes or streams too wide for the human voice to cross, and without telephone service. With automobile lamps and a card showing the international Morse code, conversation can be carried on without difficulty.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0181.xml
article
83
83
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Horn Motor Converted into a Grinder
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THE motor part of an automobile horn can be converted to a small high-speed grinder for use in the private garage in sharpening small tools, drills, knives, chisels, grinding coil contact points and similar work. The funnel of the horn or bell is removed and in place of the ratchet disk a sleeve is driven over the armature shaft and riveted on.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0182.xml
article
83
83
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Danger Due to Loss of Ford Front-Spring Center Bolt
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SHOULD the clips of the Ford front spring get loose enough for the center bolt to be pulled apart or sheared, it is dangerous to drive the car. The only connection between the front axle and frame when spring clips are loose is the center bolt. Without this the frame can shift sidewise, and in doing this the steering-arm will lock and possibly ditch the car.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0183.xml
article
83
83
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How to Make a Rain-Visor for Your Car
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HERE is a rain-visor that is made of galvanized iron, can be flattened and stowed away when not in use, and can be placed in position quickly when a sudden shower comes up. Secure a sheet of galvanized iron 2 ft. long and about 16 in. wide. With a pair of sharp tin snips cut out a section similar to that shown in the picture below.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0184.xml
article
84
84
The Home Workshop
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How to Run the Furnace Economically
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O. E. Ruhoff
THE relation between chemistry and the economical burning of fuel has been discussed often, but little, if any, attention has been given to the chemistry of the elimination of dust and smoke as applied to hot-air furnaces. A definite quantity of air is necessary to properly and economically burn the particular amount of fuel needed under certain weather conditions.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0185.xml
article
84
84
The Home Workshop
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To Etch and Frost Electric-Light Bulbs
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ETCHING or frosting glass is by no means difficult to do if proper care is taken. Even an electric-light bulb can be frosted. The materials necessary for etching on glass consist of a lead dish, powdered calcium fluoride, concentrated sulphuric acid, a glass rod, and some paraffin.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0186.xml
article
85
85
The Home Workshop
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Methods for Removing Various Stains from Cotton, Wool, and Silk
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MOST stains can be removed if they are given the proper treatment as soon as they occur. However, different stains demand different treatment. If, for example, you apply hot water to milk, egg, meat, or other albuminous stains, it will do more harm than good; yet this same hot water will easily remove fresh fruit stains.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0187.xml
article
85
85
The Home Workshop
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Invisible Lines Etched on Blackboards in Classrooms
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INVISIBLE lines etched on the blackboard horizontally and cross sectionally will guide the pupil in keeping on line and aid both pupil and teacher in neat spacing and drawing of curves. The lines are etched by means of acid and are almost entirely invisible from the pupils’ seats, but are easily seen by a person standing close to the blackboard.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0188.xml
article
85
85
The Home Workshop
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No Slipping on This Kind of Walk
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OUT to build a concrete walk around my home, it occurred to me that I could use up my old tires. With a sharp knife I cut them up so that the pieces were about in. square. Instead of laying the concrete in the usual manner, I constructed a wooden mold into which I could pour my concrete and formed a slab 3 ft.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0189.xml
article
85
85
The Home Workshop
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To Light a Safety Match without a Box
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TO light a safety match without its box, it should be rubbed with a long quick sweep on a smooth window-glass. To do this successfully the movement must be a long and rapid one and the match so held between the thumb and fingers that the head will not break off.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0190.xml
article
86
86
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Electric Heaters and Furnaces Built at Home
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H. H. Parker
SEVERAL ways of constructing a small electric heater or furnace for the house, laboratory, or home workshop are described herewith. The best way to obtain a heater coil is to purchase one of those sold as spares for the parabolic copper reflector heaters, or a discarded one may be easily rewound if the core is not broken.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0191.xml
article
86
86
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Improvise a Hydrostatic Level for Rough Work
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RUSSELL CRING
IF you have to level the ground in your garden or on your farm, or lay out ditches for drainage, you need a leveling instrument of some kind. Such instruments, even of the simplest type, are costly, far too much so for the average gardener or farmer who uses them only on rare occasions.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0192.xml
article
86
86
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Do You Number Your Motor-Driven Machines?
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F. M. WESTON
NUMBER stencils and a pot of white paint will save a lot of confusion in a shop operating motor-driven machines. A large white number painted on the machine and the same number on the switchbox on the wall of the shop will tell the workmen what is what without there being need for guessing.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0193.xml
article
87
87
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Making a Static Machine for Experimental Work
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Ernest Bade
ABOUT 1800, Professor Volta, of Paris, experimented with a substance known as the “vital fluid,” a name given to electricity by Galvani, professor of anatomy, at Bologna, Italy, in 1790, who found to his surprise, while accidentally touching the hind legs of some frogs that hung on a copper hook with an iron nail, that they were drawn up with a singular convulsive movement.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0194.xml
article
87
87
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This Ford Starting Motor Pumps Water
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MARION O. SWENSON
I HAVE made use of an old Ford starting motor by attaching it to a 32-volt lighting plant and I use it for pumping water at the well in place of a gasoline engine. I use it for pumping water for about 100 head of stock and it proves to be very effective.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0195.xml
article
88
88
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Useful Things to Do at Home
Hints that will help you in doing odd jobs around the house, saving time, temper, and money
Don’t Throw Away Any Screen-Wire Scraps
Preserving Varnish Brushes for Future Use
Warped Stove-Plates Are Easily Straightened
Disinfecting Books without Injuring Them
Use Copper Wire when You Hang Pictures
Kerosene Has Many Uses in the Household
How to Foretell the Weather without a Barometer
Always Keep Charcoal In Your Medicine-Chest
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AROUND the home or workshop one occasionally has need of some very small pieces of thin iron or steel wire, for instance, to wrap the threads of a bolt, which from wear or other cause has become too loose in the nut. One or two layers of small wire—wrapped tightly in the bottom of the thread groove—are sufficient, in most cases, to tighten the nut and prevent its working loose.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0196.xml
advertisement
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0197.xml
article
90
90
The Home Workshop
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New Prize Contest “How I Made Money with My Tools”
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HAVE you ever made extra money with your tools? If you have, we want to know just how you did the trick. If you constructed something, describe it. If there is a particular job that you do, let us know what it is. For instance, we have heard of a chap who mends furniture in his neighborhood during his spare time.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0198.xml
article
90
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The Home Workshop
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This Rabbet-Plane May Be Improvised
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E. A. MCCANN
TO make an impromptu rabbet-plane, cut a block of hard wood to the size of about 9 in. by 3½in. by 1¼ in., and with a brace and bit bore a hole ¾ in. in diameter, not more than 1 in. deep through it, as shown in the illustration. Then, with a tenon-saw, cut a wedge-shaped slot of the same depth.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0199.xml
advertisement
90
90
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0200.xml
advertisement
90
90
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JEAN TIRE CO.
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JEAN TIRE CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0201.xml
article
91
91
The Home Workshop
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Keep the Rooster’s Comb in Prize Condition
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E. BADE
ROOSTERS with abnormally large combs are sometimes very valuable. But this value is considerably diminished when the combs lean to one side or hang downward, giving even the best-appearing fowl a forlorn appearance. Such roosters cannot be placed on exhibition with any degree of success unless this drooping comb is raised.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0202.xml
article
91
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The Home Workshop
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Get Your Skates Ready for the Winter
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THE little device for sharpening skates shown in the illustration is made from a block of wood about 1½in. square by 3 in. long. The oblong hole in the side is cut with a ¼-in. bit by boring four holes close together and then cutting them through with a knife or chisel and filing smooth with a rasp.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0203.xml
advertisement
91
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THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
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THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0204.xml
article
92
92
The Home Workshop
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The Home Workshop Department Offers $75 in Prizes Each Month for the Best New Ideas
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A FIRST prize of $50 and a second prize of $25 will be awarded every month to the authors of the two best articles appearing in this department. Every article submitted will be considered as a possible prize-winner. Those which do not win prizes may be purchased at space rates.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0205.xml
article
92
92
The Home Workshop
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One Way to Help Relieve the Paper Famine
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F. E. Brimmer
IF all the available pulp lumber in the United States were cut to-morrow, it would supply our demand for white paper just about one year. So estimates the New York State Forestry College. If everybody would save his waste paper, it would save one billion feet of this lumber each year.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0206.xml
advertisement
92
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THE IVES MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
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THE IVES MANUFACTURING CORPORATION
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0207.xml
article
93
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The Home Workshop
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How to Fix the Broken Rung of a Chair
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E. G. Gettins
FIXING a broken rung in a chair, or putting in a new one without taking the whole chair apart, is not such an easy-job as it appears. The accompanying sketch shows how it can be done with very little trouble. Sometimes the rung will break off even with the chair leg on one side; in that case saw it off close to the leg at the unbroken end.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0208.xml
article
93
93
The Home Workshop
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Make a Door-Bumper from an Auto Spring
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TO prevent doors from striking the wall, breaking the glass, or doing damage to stucco, brick, or woodwork, make a bumper from an old auto spring, heated and cut in the center. Punch two ½-in. holes near the heavy end while hot, and bend to form as shown.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0209.xml
advertisement
93
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0210.xml
article
94
94
The Home Workshop
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Safety-Razor Sharpener Run by Foot-Power
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FROM a small piece of broom-handle. with the ends of a regular sewing-machine bobbin driven into its ends and some soft leather (such as tops of old shoes) wrapped spirally around it, a good stropper for safety-razor blades may be made. It is placed in the bobbin-winding attachment, and the sewing-machine operated just as though you were winding bobbins.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0211.xml
article
94
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The Home Workshop
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Portable Crane for Use in Yard or Shop
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G. A. LUERS
PRACTICALLY one of the simplest types of portable cranes that can be rigged up for use about the shop or shop-yard consists of a tripod support. The material used in this construction consists only of three lengths of wroughtiron pipe threaded at one end and screwed into a pipe T.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0212.xml
article
94
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The Home Workshop
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An Efficient Shop Stove of Pipe and Fitting
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CHARLES N. SHAW
THIS space-saving stove will give enough heat to warm a fairly large shop, and the only tools needed are such as are found around any machine-shop. Most of the work is done with the welding-torch and a drill. The materials necessary are one piece of 12 in. or 14 in. iron pipe 5 ft. long; one coupling to fit; one reducing bushing to reduce to 5 in.; enough 5-in. iron pipe to reach beyond the roof; 2 ft. of 1-in. pipe for legs, small pipe for grates, and a pair of 3-in. butt-hinges.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0213.xml
article
94
94
The Home Workshop
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Making Blotter-Pads from Old Magazines
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OLD magazines, newspapers, and books of all kinds are readily transformed into blotting-pads by boiling them in water with a handful of soda. Any old tin of suitable size may be used for the purpose. Begin by putting in the magazines as they are—binding and all— and cover them well with water before throwing in the soda.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0214.xml
advertisement
94
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Vi-Rex Rays
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Vi-Rex Rays
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0215.xml
article
95
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The Home Workshop
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To Make an Adjustable Pipe Railing
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WHENEVER a ditch is dug in the streets, the contractor usually builds a temporary wooden railing to prevent any one from falling in. One contractor improvised from pipes and standard fittings a barrier that was more easily set up and moved than the old wooden fence.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0216.xml
article
95
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The Home Workshop
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How Sewer-Gas May Get into Your House
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SEWER-GAS sometimes escapes into dwellings through well constructed traps which, normally, offer complete protection from that danger. In nearly every case it was found that the traps did not function because they did not contain enough water to seal the pipe connecting the trap with the sewer against the invasion of the poisonous gas. This was caused by accumulations ofthreads,strings, and strips of cloth in the trap in the position shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0217.xml
advertisement
95
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P. H. HANES KNITTING CO.
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P. H. HANES KNITTING CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0218.xml
advertisement
95
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RADIO SERVICE & MFG. CO.
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RADIO SERVICE & MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0219.xml
advertisement
95
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0220.xml
advertisement
96
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0221.xml
article
96
96
The Home Workshop
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Device for Locating Splinters in the Hand
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J. B. MORAN
THE box shown will make a good addition to any safety-first equipment. A strong electric light is placed inside a box after the inside has been painted white to obtain maximum reflection. A hole is drilled in the box into which an electriclight socket is forced.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0222.xml
article
96
96
The Home Workshop
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Save Time by Drying Dishes with Heat
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AFTER the dishes are washed, place them on a tray and put it into the oven. Use a small flame to give a moderate heat. In a few minutes the dishes will be dried by the heat. Extinguish the flame and allow the dishes to cool. This saves the trouble of wiping the dishes and is more sanitary and effective.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0223.xml
article
96
96
The Home Workshop
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Straighten Bent Umbrella Ribs without Breaking Them
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WHEN a rib of an umbrella is bent, any attempt to straighten it usually results in a broken rib and a ruined umbrella. I fixed one some time ago and it seems stronger than when new. Straighten the kink with the hands as much as possible, using pliers lightly so as not to dent it at another place.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0224.xml
article
97
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The Home Workshop
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An Efficient Homemade Bunsen Burner
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YOU may make a neat and practical Bunsen burner for home use or the laboratory in the manner here described. Heat a glass tube about 3/16 in. in diameter, draw it to shape, as shown in the picture, and cut off with the edge of a file at the two points indicated.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0225.xml
article
97
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The Home Workshop
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Lifting Wagon Bodies without Special Tackle
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SHOWN in the illustration is a simple method of handling a wagon body or a truck body where no special tackle is available. This consists of running the wagon or truck underneath some overhead support, The method suggested here is primitive, but will serve its purpose if no lifting-crane is available such as a ceiling beam in the barn.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0226.xml
advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0227.xml
article
98
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The Home Workshop
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One Method of Making a Quick Belt Repair
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C. A. BLACK
IF a small driving-belt, or a leather strap of the harness should break or become unfastened, an emergency repair can easily be made by using an old harness-buckle and two or three wire brads of adequate length. Punch small holes through the leather near the ends of the strap or belt and push the brads through these holes as shown in the accompanying illustration.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0228.xml
article
98
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The Home Workshop
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You Can Prevent Faucets from Splashing
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B. F. DASHIELL
SOME faucets will splash very badly and especially so when the water pressure is excessive. A simple and effective means of preventing this splashing is as follows: Bend a piece of thin spring brass or phosphor bronze, ¾ in. in width and thin enough to be easily bent into position to the shape shown in the picture.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0229.xml
article
98
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The Home Workshop
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To Prolong the Life and Efficiency of a Broom
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B. Fox
WHEN using a new broom, the straw is easily broken because of its length, strewing the floor with the broken pieces as well as shortening the life of the broom. A piece of string tied around a new broom about 6 in. from the bottom will hold the straws together and prevent them from breaking, thereby increasing the life of the broom.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0230.xml
advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0231.xml
article
99
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The Home Workshop
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To Determine Clearance for New Piston-Rings
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IN placing new rings on the pistons of the automobile or tractor, care must be taken to allow sufficient clearance at the lap of the ring to account for the expansion when in operation. Otherwise the ring will scrape the cylinder walls and possibly score the surface and soon stop the motor.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0232.xml
article
99
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The Home Workshop
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Illuminated Window-Sign Is a Good Advertisement
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HERE is an illuminated window-sign that advertises at night at no cost for upkeep and small initial cost. Remove the window-shades and unroll them on a piece of cardboard. Draw the desired name or design on the shades so that they will read correctly from the street.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0233.xml
advertisement
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RENULIFE ELECTRIC CO.
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RENULIFE ELECTRIC CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0234.xml
article
100
100
The Home Workshop
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Improvising a Watch-Chain from Safety-Pins
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SAFETY-PINS have been used in cases of emergency for so many different purposes that they may be considered a dangerous rival of the ubiquitous hairpin. The accompanying illustration shows how a fairly safe and serviceable watch-chain may be made from a number of safety-pins.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0235.xml
article
100
100
The Home Workshop
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Method of Giving Electric Bell Signals
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INSTEAD of the ordinary push-button a latchstring is pulled. This pulls a piece of springy brass strip forward, which makes contact with a screwhead. This completes the circuit and rings the bell. The little circuit-maker is very simple, consisting of a brass strip held down at one end with a brass bolt.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0236.xml
article
100
100
The Home Workshop
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Chemists Will Find This a Useful Aid
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WHEN mixing compounds it is often necessary to add a certain amount of a liquid frequently. The graduations of the measuring glasses are very fine and accurate measuring requires much time. By placing a rubber band at the level wanted, it is possible to quickly pour the liquid to that point, as rubber is easier to see than the graduations would be.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0237.xml
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100
100
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0238.xml
article
101
101
The Home Workshop
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Heat Can Be Blown where It Is Needed
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MOST houses are insufficiently heated. The heat supplied by fireplace, furnace, or stove seems insufficient because it is not forced where it is most wanted. Since heat rises, whether it comes from an open fire, a gas log, or a steam radiator, the heat waves curve directly upward unless deflected in some way.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0239.xml
article
101
101
The Home Workshop
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Improvising a Practical Funnel for an Emergency
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CHARLES A. GODDARD
THERE are times when you need a funnel for filling a tank or vessel. From a near-by trash-heap, or possibly from your baggage-kit, a practical substitute can easily be secured. A bottle, the neck of which will fit into the opening of the tank or vessel to be filled, will serve as a satisfactory funnel if the bottom is broken off
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0240.xml
advertisement
101
101
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The Nagel-Chase Mfg. Co.
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The Nagel-Chase Mfg. Co.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0241.xml
advertisement
101
101
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L.W.SWEET INC.
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L.W.SWEET INC.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0242.xml
advertisement
101
101
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Larkin Co.
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Larkin Co.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0243.xml
advertisement
102
102
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AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
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AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0244.xml
article
103
103
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How to Make Improved Spark-Plug Brush
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THE handy spark-plug cleaning-brush can be made much handier by cutting a narrow slot in the end of the handle with a hacksaw and inserting an old pocket-knife blade. The knife blade is ready to use in an instant for scraping out heavy carbon deposits from inside the spark-plug shell that the brush can not reach.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0245.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0246.xml
article
104
104
The Home Workshop
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Various Uses for the Handy Safety-Pin
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A. SCHAAL
BESIDES its original intent, the safety-pin has other uses. It is an excellent substitute for the more expensive film clip to hang up and dry films. The point of the pin is pushed through the film and, the pin left open, the curve of the catch thus forming a natural hook by which it is hung on the suspended cord.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0247.xml
article
104
104
The Home Workshop
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Drawer-Knobs Evolved from Glass Bottles
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SMALL old glass bottles make excellent knobs for use in home joinery, as is shown in the picture below. I have taken a number of them to reknob kitchen furniture. I took a dozen empty small drawing-ink bottles, filled each one with a paste of plaster of Paris in which I embedded a wood-screw hammered flat near its head, as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0248.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0249.xml
article
105
105
The Home Workshop
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A Glue-Pot Fashioned from a Tin Can
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THE glue-pot shown in the illustration consists of two tin cans, one a large tomato can, and the other a smaller milkcan. The top is cut off with the aid of shears, and the edges are filed off smooth. Then holes, ⅛ in. in diameter, are drilled as near to the top of each can as practical.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0250.xml
article
105
105
The Home Workshop
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Prevents Wheelbarrow from Tipping Over
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SOMETIMES a loaded wheelbarrow will tip over and deposit its contents upon the ground. This often happens upon tilled ground or soft earth. Here is a way to prevent it: Cut two triangular pieces of strong board the height of the wheelbarrow leg and about 8 in. wide at the base.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0251.xml
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105
105
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IVER JOHNSON’S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
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IVER JOHNSON’S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0252.xml
advertisement
105
105
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THE FLORSHEIM SHOE CO.
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THE FLORSHEIM SHOE CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0253.xml
article
106
106
The Home Workshop
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An Ice-Scraper Made from Tin Bottle-Caps
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METAL caps on grape-juice, soda, and other bottles should be saved, and when enough are accumulated, a good ice-scraper can be made. The caps can be nailed to the bottom of an old broom, when the hair is all gone. A few small nails through each cap will hold it.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0254.xml
article
106
106
The Home Workshop
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Use Up Old Rags for This Shoe-Brush
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A GOOD substitute for a shoe-brush can be made from some old cotton or flannel rags as shown in the illustration herewith. First the wooden frame is made and the middle piece cut with a jack-knife to form a convenient handle. The rags are tacked to the end pieces as shown.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0255.xml
article
106
106
The Home Workshop
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Flashlight on Rifle for Night Shooting
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OFTEN it is necessary to use a rifle at night, especially where coyotes and nocturnal prowlers are troublesome. Without some kind of light it is next to impossible to score a hit. This difficulty may be overcome by attaching a large flashlight to the rifle barrel with clamps, as shown in the accompanying illustration. When you are ready to use the rifle, turn on the flashlight and you may pick a vulnerable spot and bring down the intruder with one well-aimed shot.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0256.xml
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106
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0257.xml
article
107
107
The Home Workshop
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When Tracing from Old Drawings or Prints
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THE draftsman who has occasion to trace from blueprints knows what a strain it is to the eyes. Likewise copying drawings from old tracings that are worn and faded is a difficult matter. Much time may be saved and much labor and eyestrain avoided if the draftsman uses a case with a glass top for the drawing-board.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0258.xml
article
107
107
The Home Workshop
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Safety Oiling Device for Machine Shafting
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THE accompanying illustration shows a safety and labor-saving device for oiling shafting. To fill the cylinder the thumb is inserted into the hook and the plunger withdrawn from the cylinder. The wing-nut is then loosened so that the plunger may be swung to the side and the cylinder filled.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0259.xml
advertisement
107
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VICTOR J. EVAN S & CO.
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VICTOR J. EVAN S & CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0260.xml
article
108
108
The Home Workshop
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Reduce Noise Over the Shop Telephone
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IN noisy shops much of the noise is transmitted over the telephone when it is used and the party at the opposite end has a difficult time hearing. This can be avoided by the use of a heavy cardboard megaphone attached to the telephone transmitter, a s shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0261.xml
article
108
108
The Home Workshop
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How to Cut Heavy Sheet Metal with Shears
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FEW amateur mechanics know how to cut heavy sheet metal with a pair of tinner’s shears. The illustration shows the best way of doing this. One handle of the shears is held in the vise and the other handle is manipulated with the hand.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0262.xml
article
108
108
The Home Workshop
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An Electric Bulb Becomes a Burglar Alarm
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WHEN an electric bulb is allowed to drop on the floor and break, there is considerable noise. This can be utilized as a burglar alarm in the manner shown in the drawing. A small shelf is placed near the door and an old bulb is placed upon the shelf.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0263.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0264.xml
article
109
109
The Home Workshop
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Oxyacetylene Cuts Steel Disks in a Drill-Press
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STEEL disks may be cut to exact diameters with an oxyacetylene flame in an ordinary drill-press in the manner shown in the illustration. The oxyacetylene cutting-tool, which is specially designed for cutting sheet metal and differs from the more common welding-tool—is secured horizontally to the chuck on the drill-spindle, which remains stationary.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0265.xml
article
109
109
The Home Workshop
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Making a Scaffolding for Laying Shingles
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WHEN it becomes necessary to shingle a dwelling or barn, a scaffolding is required strong enough to support the weight of the man or men laying the shingles. Any one who knows how to use a saw and a hammer can easily make the simple scaffolding shown in the illustration from a few pieces of narrow flooring. The dimensions of the frame should be so chosen that the frame fits between the sheathing boards. The feet of the workman rest on the heavy bottom piece as indicated in the DIAGRAM
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0266.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0267.xml
article
110
110
The Home Workshop
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A Phonograph Horn Makes a Novel Flower-Pot
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AN old morning-glory horn, such as was used with the old cylinder phonographs, and an old umbrella-stand combine to make a very pleasing flower-pot stand for a sunny window. The horn should be given a good coat of tar or black asphaltum on the inside and a coat of enamel paint on the outside to prevent rusting.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0268.xml
article
110
110
The Home Workshop
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To Straighten Curled or Twisted Gut
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THE gut with which fishhooks are snelled has always a tendency to curl and twist up after drying, making it inconvenient for the fisherman to assort or handle them. To straighten gut that has become curled, hold it stretched taut and quickly pass a lighted match under the entire length of gut so that the tip of the flame barely touches the gut.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0269.xml
article
110
110
The Home Workshop
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An Old Flatiron Made into a Bench Anvil
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A HO ME mechanic who does not have a big heavy vise will find the suggestion given here of value. An old-fashioned flatiron is held in an upright position by a wooden holder made of three pieces of heavy board. Two-inch material should be used in the construction of the holder, as the anvil is called upon to withstand a good deal of strain when in use.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0270.xml
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110
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0271.xml
article
111
111
The Home Workshop
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A Wrench or Chuck for Square-Shank Tools
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IN the illustration is shown a method of making a small tap or reamer wrench for holding square shanks. A length of steel shafting or similar stock is drilled down the center, the diameter of the hole being a trifle less than the measurement across the flats of the shank of the smallest tool to be held in the chuck.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0272.xml
article
111
111
The Home Workshop
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Cleaning Candlesticks from Wax or Paraffin
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WAX, or paraffin adhering to candlesticks can be removed easily by pouring hot water over the parts to be cleaned. The wax will loosen and fall off without any part of it remaining on the candlestick. Either the faucet or the tea-kettle may be used for the hot water.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0273.xml
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111
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0274.xml
article
112
112
The Home Workshop
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Keeps the Ink-Bottle Cap from Rolling
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DRAWING-INK bottles are usually provided with stoppers with a pin extension carrying at its lower end a quill that is submerged in the ink and serves for filling the drawing-pen. If the stopper is laid on the drawing-board, it is likely to roll on the paper if the board is tilted or jarred, and many a carefully executed drawing is ruined by smudges from the ink-laden filling-quill of the stopper.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0275.xml
article
112
112
The Home Workshop
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Prevent Sledge-Hammers from Flying off the Handle
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THIS consists merely of two wedges made of wrought iron as shown, 1½in. longer than the length of the eye in the sledge, and is ⅛ in. thick at the angle end, tapering down to nothing at the other end.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0276.xml
article
112
112
The Home Workshop
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Camouflaging a Disfiguring Crack in a Mirror
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A LARGE plate-glass mirror, used at the back of a florist’s window, was cracked by an accident. To avoid the expense of replacing the mirror, the florist adopted the following scheme for effectively camouflaging the ugly crack. A number of leaves were painted on each side of the crack with the stems just touching the crack.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0277.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0278.xml
article
113
113
The Home Workshop
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Substantial Shelving Made from Pipe Stanchions
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SHELVES of unusual strength and rigidity can readily be made from wroughtiron pipe secured at the floor and ceiling and provided with a series of holes for cross bars, as is shown in the picture. The pipe used will vary with the weight it is required to support. One-inch size is suitable for most purposes and white enamel makes this attractive.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0279.xml
article
113
113
The Home Workshop
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Put Oarlocks on a Chain to Prevent Their Loss
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MODERN rowboats are, as a rule, equipped with removable oarlocks. These are undoubtedly convenient in some cases, but they are easily pulled out of their sockets and may be lost by falling overboard.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0280.xml
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113
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NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY
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NORTHWESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0281.xml
advertisement
113
113
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AMERICAN MOTOR CYCLE CO.
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AMERICAN MOTOR CYCLE CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0282.xml
advertisement
113
113
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UNION TOOL CHEST CO.
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UNION TOOL CHEST CO.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0283.xml
advertisement
113
113
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SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
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SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0284.xml
article
114
114
The Home Workshop
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Gramophone Mechanism for Turning the Grindstone
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A CARBORUNDUM , emery, or small stone wheel attached to an old double-action spring gramophone, forms a grindstone suitable for all forms of light work. First, remove the revolving table, and cut the disk down to, say, 2 or 3 in. in diameter.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0285.xml
article
114
114
The Home Workshop
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Keep Your Ball of String in This Twine-Holder
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SHOPKEEPERS who use twine for tying parcels can easily make a holder like that shown in the illustration. It costs nothing and keeps the ball of string from unwinding. A board, 8 in. long and about 4 or 5 in. wide, forms the base, which is nailed or screwed to a shelf or the wall.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0286.xml
article
114
114
The Home Workshop
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Cuff-Buttons from a Pair of Dice
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WITH a lathe, a file, or a hacksaw, cuff-buttons of striking .appearance may be made from a pair of dice. If the dice are of ivory, so much the better, but cubes of bone, celluloid, wood, or any other material are also suitable. In making the cuts, care should be taken not to cut too deep.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0287.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0288.xml
article
115
115
The Home Workshop
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Combined Square and Angle Gage Is Useful
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A COMBINATION of a machinist’s square and angle gage is shown in the attached sketch. It consists of a slotted blade fitted into a steel bar or stock with a fixed pivot and two adjusting screws through the center of the stock. These adjustable screws permit of setting the blade at an angle or squaring it up with the stock as is required.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0289.xml
article
115
115
The Home Workshop
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How Baby’s Bathtub Can Be Placed Conveniently
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TO make a bathtub for the baby a large tin pan can be used. The pan should be provided with two heavy wire hooks at each end. The hooks rest on the edge of the bathtub and a small rubber hose may be used to fill the pan with water from the faucet.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0290.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0291.xml
advertisement
115
115
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OTTAWA Mfg. Co.
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OTTAWA Mfg. Co.
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0292.xml
article
116
116
The Home Workshop
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Marble in Inkwell Prevents Evaporation of Ink
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MORE ink evaporates from inkwells in an office than is used for writing; and the result is that that which is left for writing is always made muddy by the remaining sediment. A means of preventing ink evaporation consists in Iropping an ordinary marble over in the inkwell.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0293.xml
article
116
116
The Home Workshop
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How to Keep Library Paste in Good Condition
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LIBRARY paste ordinarily comes in small bottles having a screw top, the brush being "thrown in" Touse the paste it is necessary to unscrew the top, then use the brush, and after using make the brush dean again. "Very ofetn the brush is lost. Here is a plan that takes care of the problem.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0294.xml
article
116
116
The Home Workshop
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Increase the Holding Power of a Nail
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HERE is a simple method of increasing the holding-power of a wire-nail or spike. With a flat file remove the point of the nail as shown in the picture and then, with a hacksaw, split the nail for about one fourth of it length.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0295.xml
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116
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0296.xml
article
117
117
The Home Workshop
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For Increasing the Depth of a Hacksaw
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THE other day I encountered a job which required a saw-slot between two holes in the center of a piece of work. I found the work impossible, as the hacksaw was not of sufficient depth to reach the holes, so I quickly made the arrangement shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0297.xml
article
117
117
The Home Workshop
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Use a Motor-Truck for Pulling Posts
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THE power of any motor-truck is sufficient to perform all the chores and hard jobs about the farm if the power could but be applied in the proper directions. Here is shown one of these jobs and the device to change the direction of force to accomplish it.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0298.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0299.xml
article
118
118
The Home Workshop
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How to Measure Electrical Resistance
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W. H. Hoschke
OFTEN the amateur electrician finds it necessary to make fairly accurate determinations of electrical resistance. Many believe that a costly Wheatstone bridge must be had if resistance is to be measured. This is not so, however, since very reliable determinations of electrical resistance, accurate enough for all common purposes, can be made by the use of a voltmeter and an ammeter, together with a couple of dry cells and a switch.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0300.xml
article
118
118
The Home Workshop
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Dolls Made from Old Cut-Out Photographs
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A DOLL that will delight the small girl is made by having an enlargement made from a negative on singleweight semi-matt paper and mounting it on an extra heavy piece of cardboard. The stand is made from a 2-in. piece of pine cut in triangular shape, with a slot to hold the base of the cut-out.
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0301.xml
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[no value]
The Veeder Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Veeder Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0302.xml
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119
119
[no value]
[no value]
OTTAWA MFG. CO.
[no value]
OTTAWA MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0303.xml
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120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Meccano Company, Inc.
[no value]
Meccano Company, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0304.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
CORONA
[no value]
CORONA
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0305.xml
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122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Company
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19211101_0099_005_0306.xml