Issue: 19201201

Wednesday, December 1, 1920
DECEMBER 1920
6
True
97
Friday, December 12, 2014

Articles
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0001.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement: MURAD
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MURAD
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0002.xml
advertisement
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1
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Champion Spark Plug Company: Champion
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Champion Spark Plug Company
Champion
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0003.xml
advertisement
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2
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Southern Cypress Manufacturers’ Association
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Southern Cypress Manufacturers’ Association
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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2,4,6
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CONTENTS
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0005.xml
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2
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Modern Publishing Company
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Modern Publishing Company
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0006.xml
advertisement
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3
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Independent Corporation
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Independent Corporation
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0007.xml
advertisement
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4
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Chicago Technical College
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Chicago Technical College
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0008.xml
advertisement
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5
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0009.xml
advertisement
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6
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CHICAGO ENGINEERING WORKS
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CHICAGO ENGINEERING WORKS
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0010.xml
advertisement
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7
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EMORY J. SWEENEY
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EMORY J. SWEENEY
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0011.xml
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8,10,12,14,16
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0012.xml
advertisement
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9
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Burlington Watch Co.
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Burlington Watch Co.
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0013.xml
advertisement
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11
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ALOIS P. SWOBODA
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ALOIS P. SWOBODA
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0014.xml
advertisement
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13
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Pelton Publishing Company
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Pelton Publishing Company
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0015.xml
advertisement
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15
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National Salesmen’s Training Association
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National Salesmen’s Training Association
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0016.xml
advertisement
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16
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American Commerce Association
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American Commerce Association
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0017.xml
advertisement
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17
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American Technical Society
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American Technical Society
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0018.xml
advertisement
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18
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0019.xml
advertisement
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19
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0020.xml
advertisement
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20
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The Boss Manufacturing Co.
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The Boss Manufacturing Co.
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0021.xml
article
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21,22,23
AERONAUTICS
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Five Miles High in a Tank
Showing how lack of oxygen produces aviators’ brain fag
Brain Fag Breeds Indifference
The Value of the Oxygen Tank.
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Walter Bannard
ACROSS-EYED, one-legged man of sixty may be a good sea-captain; but a twenty-five-year-old dyspeptic will be a failure as an airpilot. Because a man has flown a few times he is no more fitted to be an air-pilot than a fourteen-year-old girl who has taken a few piano lessons is justified in competing with Hofmann.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0022.xml
article
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24,25,26
MISCELLANY
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Trapped in a Sunken Submarine
How I drilled through steel for eight hours to save the crew of the S-5
An Inverted Submarine
How the Submarine Sank
How They Saved the Trapped Crew of the S-5
Trying to Drill to Daylight
Could It Have Been Avoided?
The “Alanthus” to the Rescue
We Break Through
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William G. Grace
THE bell in the engineroom rang with the signal to stand by, which meant that I was wanted on deck. When I got there, I found the captain looking hard at a ship that was standing off on our starboard side. To men familiar with the sea, a ship is just a ship, but this one had something strange about her.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0023.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Here Are Some New Jobs for the Automobile Jack
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0024.xml
article
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27
MISCELLANY
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New York’s Machine-Gun for Mobs
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Captain E. C. Crossman
ANEAT little gun, weighing onlyseven pounds altogether and measuring two feet in length, is the latest acquisition of New York’s police department. The little terror spouts forth huge .45-caliber bullets at the rate of fifteen hundred a minute as long as the magazine holds out.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0025.xml
article
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28,29
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Twins, Triplets, Quadruplets—Why?
Heredity, which plays a very important part in our lives, also affects our birth
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HAS environment or heredity the controlling interest in the lives of twins? Let us consider twins in general. There are two kinds—identical twins and fraternal twins. Identical twins come from one single cell, which in the process of development happened to break in two and continued to develop in two separate halves.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0026.xml
article
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29,30
MISCELLANY
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Making the Railroad Crossing Safe
Wireless Guides the Aviator through Fogs
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GRADE crossings of railway lines and automobile roads are dangerous enough in daytime and clear weather, but at night and in foggy weather the customary means of protection (bars and light signals) are often insufficient to prevent serious accidents caused by human carelessness.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0027.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Wireless as an Aid to the Airplane
Both Depend on Radio
The Direction-Finder as a Compass
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John Stuart
WERE you ever lost in an airplane, at sea, in a forest, or on the streets of a strange city? If so, you know there are just two ways of finding out where you are. One is to figure it out for yourself by noting the direction of two landmarks, and the other is to ask somebody else to tell you.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0028.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Turn Your Car Over with One Hand
Working on automobiles in comfort means better repairing
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NO longer is it necessary to get out and crawl under the automobile to repair it. With one hand you can turn your automobile over! Here is a device that has a track and a small windlass to pull the automobile from the floor to the track. It is equipped with simple appliances to hold the machine so firmly that when it is overturned there will be no strain on the chassis.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0029.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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How Furs Are Made into Garments
They're hard to sew and hard to clean
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0030.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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How the Big Searchlights Are Tested
Light is measured by a “photometer”: these pictures show what it is and does
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0031.xml
article
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34,35
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Man of the “One Best Way”
How Frank Gilbreth studies men and their ways
Finding the One Best Way
The Great Inertia of Habit
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Fred C. Kelly
UNTIL I talked with Frank B. Gilbreth, I never suspected that the ordinary motions we make in going about our every-day affairs could become a subject of fascinating interest. “All human activity,” says Gilbreth, “is a matter of motions and decisions.”
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0032.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Fountain Principle as Applied to a Brush
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HERE’S a new fountain brush which feeds like a fountain pen. It can be used for cleaning clothes, blacking and oiling shoes, blacking stoves, cleaning typewriters and typeforms, veneering furniture, and many other uses also fall within the scope of this serviceable fountain brush, the handle of which is filled with the polishing liquid.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0033.xml
article
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36
MISCELLANY
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Hitch Dobbin by His Own Right Leg
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NO longer need the driver of a restive horse carry a heavy weight around with him to fasten to the bridle when he leaves his horse standing. The photograph below shows a method of hitching which is both simple and effective. A strap of the right length is attached to the shafts or tongue of the vehicle and is snapped to a shorter strap, which passes around one of the front legs of the horse.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0034.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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And All to Photograph a Factory from on High
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SOMETIMES airplanes have been employed to fly over industrial plants to obtain suitable bird’s-eye views; remarkable kites have been built to take a camera up over a factory for the purpose of getting the “whole thing” in the picture; but this is a tall tower erected to permit a photographer to mount his camera in such an elevated position that just the desired point of view of a certain group of manufacturing buildings can be pictured.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0035.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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All the Keys Cleaned at One Fell Swoop
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AN invention for cleaning the keys of a typewriter, adding-machine, and other forms of key-actuated machines, has been patented by James W. Pennewill, of Silver City, New Mexico. It consists of a piece of heavy cloth cut lengthwise through the middle portion into eight strips, each about a half inch in width, and separated from each other by a space of about a quarter inch.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0036.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Riding a Bicycle Over a Railroad Track
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FRANCE has produced an ingenious inventor who decided to make use of the railroad-tracks when strikes put the trains out of commission. With the aid of a specially contrived frame and three small wheels he has converted his bicycle into a vehicle that will run on the smooth steel rails, thus giving him the advantages of considerable speed and small expenditure of energy.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0037.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Scraping Paint by Machine
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A FTER a summer of hard rain the paint on most automobiles looks dull and dead; whereupon the owners often send them to the factory to be repainted. But, before a new coat of paint is baked on, the old one must be removed. Until recently this has been a long, tedious job.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0038.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A Safety Wrench for Drop Doors
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THE workman who releases the heavy drop-bottom door of a freight-car with an ordinary wrench is always in danger of having the wrench swing back at him and break his wrist. But there is now a new wrench — shown above — in which this dangerous feature has been eliminated.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0039.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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A Dearth of Pullman Cars
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IN the days of plenty, before the war, even Pullman cars were numerous. Between the years 1905 and 1915 there was an increase of seventy-six per cent in their number, with a smaller increase of forty-four per cent in the number of passengers carried.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0040.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Put the Wind to Work Generating Electric Power
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MOST of our power is obtained from fuel today. But fuel—coal, gasoline, wood, alcohol—is becoming scarce. A French inventor has suggested that we return to the use of wind for motive power. He has invented a new type of windmill for the purpose.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0041.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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“Get Up!” Says the Record
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“BREAKFAST is ready!” You grow very tired of saying that, year after year, to the various members of your family. Why not let the talking-machine say it for you? There is now a clock that, instead of ringing an alarm bell when it is set, will release the phonograph lever.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0042.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Posts that Tighten Fences
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CRANKING up is all that is needed in order to tighten wire fences when posts like the one above are used. Ten holes are drilled in the post and the fence wire is run through them. The post can turn, but it is held fast by means of a ratchet. Should the wire sag in the course of time, the post can be cranked up to the next notch at one jerk.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0043.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Shakespeare vs. Los Angeles
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HUGE volumes weighing several hundred pounds each are here shown. They are filled with nothing but names. Names of what, you ask? Names of people who visit Los Angeles every year. The Chamber of Commerce of that city claims that over five hundred thousand tourists visit their city every year.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0044.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Illumination Makes Visible Some Comparisons
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RECOURSE to illuminated graphs as a means of presenting its case to the public was taken by a Chicago electric-light company. On a big electric sign over the entrance to its officebuilding, the changes in cost of food and clothing, fuel, taxes, and electricity since 1896 are compared, to the great advantage of the last named commodity.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0045.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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An Old Water-Tower Becomes a Home
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THIS man lives high, but he has defeated the high cost of renting. There was an old water-tower that had not been in use for years near the farm on which he lived. He decided to buy the place and fix it up to live in. The picture shows what a good job he made of it.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0046.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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One Good Bath Deserves Another
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IT is necessary to wade through this pool before you can walk up the stairs. People who bathe in the ocean always carry part of the beach with them into the bathing-house. A Western bathhouse owner had trouble keeping his place clean, and he hit upon the idea of placing a small pool outside the door in which the bathhouse patrons could take a final wash before entering to dress.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0047.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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It’s a Water-Escape Ladder Provided for Deer
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AN operator at the power house of the Hetch-Hetchy water supply, in California had an opportunity not ordinarily afforded a photographer. He had his camera ready just at the right moment to catch a deer climbing up the ladder installed across the aqueduct which carries the water to the intake power house.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0048.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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The Barracuda and the Blimp
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WHY sit on board a ship and fish blindly for hours? Perhaps there are some fish in your vicinity and perhaps there are not. In a blimp, however, you are able to see into the water and you can spot a school of fish without any trouble. Above you see some men blimp-fishing in San Pedro harbor, near San Diego, California.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0049.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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American Rivalry in Dyes
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EVEN in the matter of dyes, American manufacturers are cutting in on German monopolies. Phthalic anhydride, an important dye intermediate, is now made in America by a new process which enables manufacturers to sell it for forty-five cents a pound; Germany charges seven dollars a pound.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0050.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Bottle-Caps Do Their Bit
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THE crown bottle-cap, used by home brewers, has a rough, corrugated edge that will cut into the hardest ice. Nail a bottle-cap to the heel of each shoe, as shown below. When you reach your destination, you pull the cap off.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0051.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Photograph Yourself in a Mirror
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GO outdoors and take your camera. Place a mirror with its back to the sun and stand in front of it. Focus the camera on your image and pull the trigger. You will then have taken a picture of yourself at your best. Of course the camera will show, too.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0052.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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A Fish-Shaped Padlock
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PADLOCKS are not exciting things to make, so it is not surprising that an English locksmith—for the sake of variety—made a padlock in the shape of a fish. The keyhole is located just below the gills, and the jaws do the locking. When the fish gets lockjaw, nothing will cure it but the proper key.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0053.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Moving-Day for the Mummies
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CHICAGO’S famous Field Museum is changing its locality. Dummies, dinosaurs, butterflies, and sea-dragons were carted away in box cars, motor-trucks, and wagons. A special track connecting the old museum with the main line of the railroad was constructed so that the heavier articles could be hauled away.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0054.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Seeing Little Things of the Sea
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SOME parts of the bottom of the sea are very beautiful, as the picture below will tell you. This picture represents a small section of a sea model that has been constructed in the American Museum of Natural History, New York. The model, wonderfully made of blown glass and wax, is fifteen thousand times as large as the original small section from which it was constructed.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0055.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Straining Sewage before It Enters the River
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UP-TO-DATE cities are careful about their sewage systems. They do not let sewage pipes empty directly into the rivers—at least not in Germany. The city of Dresden has a system by which the sewage water is strained first, so that no particles larger than two millimeters are allowed to escape.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0056.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Hinged Sides and Peaked Floor Quicken Car-Unloading
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FREIGHT-TRAINS promptly unloaded would relieve the congestion in many of our large cities and would increase the number of working hours of the trains themselves. But can the work of unloading coal-trains, for instance, be speeded up? Germany has found a way—her coaltrains unload themselves.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0057.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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An Electric Lamp that Has Two Bases
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MANY rooms are equipped with but a single electric-light socket—bathrooms and bedrooms, for instance. Thus you are unable to do two electrical things in the room at the same time. The lady who wishes to curl her hair at night must perform this unattractive operation in some more unsuitable place than the bathroom or her bedroom.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0058.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Garbage-Can as a Source of Wealth
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A MODERN King Midas, by making use of chemistry, might amass a huge fortune from the waste products of our cities. In Washington, the garbage is collected in demountable wagon-bodies and conveyed by train to the place of disposal. Chemists are studying the value of recoverable products from garbage, not only fats being recovered, but also fertilizer.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0059.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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This Gasoline Engine Is Handled by a Chauffeur
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THE locomotive below has neither anengineer nor a fireman; nor does it indulge in the use of coal. It contains a sixcylinder two-hundred-horsepower gasoline engine, and is one of many gasoline coaches used where traffic is light. It can be run by any automobile driver.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0060.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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A Speed Boat that Looks Like a Whale
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BELOW the bend in the river is heard the roar of a gasoline engine working at high power. In an instant a curious object leaps into sight, and the fishermen along the river-bank are amazed to see a large boat, that resembles a whale in shape, traveling at great speed, and apparently just skimming the surface of the water.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0061.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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To Keep the Milk from Boiling Over
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A GERMAN inventor has conceived a method for preventing milk from boiling over. A metal plate, slightly convex, is placed on the bottom of the pan in which the milk is heated, with the convex side up. A chain, connecting the handle of the container with the metal plate, facilitates the removal of the disk.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0062.xml
article
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MEDICINE AND SURGERY
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Testing Dyes—A New Job for the Ultra-Violet Light
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DOES the color of your new silk dress endure the test of sunlight? If so, the probability is that the silk was tested for the fastness of its dye before it was put upon the store counter to be sold. Science has discovered that the short light-waves carry the greater part of the energy that is transmitted with light.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0063.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Monoplane Wings Support Twelve Men
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ENTERED in the recent GordonBennett Aviation Cup Race, in Paris, was a little monoplane whose wings are exceedingly strong. It was the Dayton-Wright entry. It carried a 250-horsepower motor with which a speed of more than two hundred miles an hour was attained.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0064.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Illuminating a Line of Type for the Typewriter
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THIS is a clever idea—very clever. Guess again—you are wrong. It is not simply a device with which to copy one line at a time. It is an attachment for such a device that illuminates each line. This attachment does not reflect the light directly into the stenographer’s eyes.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0065.xml
article
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42,43
MISCELLANY
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Connecting Manhattan Island with the United States
Gustav Lindenthal’s splendid bridge to span the Hudson promises to bring to reality a vision of thirty long years
The Man with the Vision
Railway Tracks on a Double Deck
A Monument to Our Age
How the Project Is to Be Financed
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PUT two million eight hundred thousand people on an island, give them houses, subways, surface cars, factories, stores, and all the equipment of a city—but fail to provide a means of reaching these people with the materials with which their factories can work, fail to give them fuel and food—and the vast population of the isolated island will perish.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0066.xml
article
44
44,45
MEDICINE AND SURGERY
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Your Four Million Pain Spots
How you can locate them by simple tests
Cold Spots Predominate
Comparisons in Body Sensitivity
Variance in Sensitivity
Some of the Experiments
Emotion Deadens Pain
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Latimer J. Wilson
SET before a blindfolded man a basin of icewater; tell him that the water is very hot, and that he must quickly dip his finger-tips in and out. He will actually believe that he has plunged his hand into hot instead of cold water. Place two needles about one-quarter of an inch apart in a piece of cardboard and lightly touch his exposed skin without permitting him to see how it is done.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0067.xml
article
45
45
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Why Aren’t We Killed by Hailstones?
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THE hailstones shown in the accompanying photograph did not break any records, and neither, so far as we can learn, did they break any heads. This leads us to propound a question that has fretted us for many a year: Why don’t these aerial bullets kill people?
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0068.xml
article
46
46
MISCELLANY
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Killing a Bear with Electricity
An adventure that might have been disastrous but for quick thinking
Outside the Window
The End of the Adventure
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C. B. Horsley
IT was a small power plant hidden away in the foothills of the western range of the Rockies. Three men ran the plant, Edwin Green, Robert Egerton, and William O’Day. O’Day was away repairing the line. Egerton had gone to a town six miles away for fresh supplies, leaving Green alone.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0069.xml
article
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49
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Homemade Kicks
And the law allows you to use them if you don’t show any after effects
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0070.xml
article
50
50
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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She's a Brute for Strength
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JUST thik eighteen straining horses a row, and you will get some idea of the power carried by this boat. It is the Maple Leaf, one of the English contestants in the recent international motor boat races.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0071.xml
article
50
50
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Electricity Stuccos the Walls
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MODERN stucco-workers discard the old method of laboriously putting on the stucco by hand. They make use of a recently devised machine, that weighs only thirty pounds, but that has a capable motor, and that can be connected with any light-socket.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0072.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A Scrap-Bucket in the Floor
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THE floor-sweeper in this machine-shop has an easy job. When he sweeps up the valuable metal scraps left by the boring-mills, lathes, and grinders, he does not have to stoop to scoop them up. He sweeps them directly into this huge bucket, which is placed in the shop floor.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0073.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The New Baby Crane
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A SMALL crane that can be rolled around a shop to pick up heavy pieces of metal or other objects has recently been invented. It gets its power from a storage battery that it carries around with it. A chain is placed around the object to be moved; then two hook-blocks, attached to the crane by cables, are hooked to the chains.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0074.xml
article
50
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
How to Thaw Frozen Pipes
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INSTEAD of running the risk of setting your house afire with a blowtorch when the pipes freeze, it is now possible to thaw them with electric power. Here is a device as simple as an electric iron, which uses just about as much current. By merely attaching it to the frozen section it soon heats the pipe sufficiently to start the flow of water.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0075.xml
article
51
51
MISCELLANY
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Don’t Tremble; This Is Not a Bomb
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NO, this is not a bomb, although it may look like one. It is a protective case used to. transport radium. The radium is placed in a hole in the center of a thick lead crucible. Why lead? Because dead does not permit the passage of the radium rays, and in this way the person in charge of the transportation of the substance is protected from injury.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0076.xml
article
51
51
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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For the Canoeist—the Gun that Folds Up
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A SHOTGUN would be much easier to carry if it could be folded. And why not fold it? The picture shows one method of doing it. The barrel and stock are hinged together and may be doubled up so that the muzzle rests against the butt-plate. The gun remains in a fixed position, however, unless a side lever is pressed.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0077.xml
article
51
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Hark to the Voice of the Thunder God
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THE giant horns arranged around the top of this speaker’s stand have loudspeaking telephone receivers at their small ends. The voice of the speaker below is directed into a special transmitter. From this point it passes through an amplifying apparatus before it reaches the receivers at the top of the stand, where the articulation is flung far and wide to the great crowd.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0078.xml
article
51
51
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A “Wordometer” for the Typewriter
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EVERY time you hit the space-bar on a typewriter you have written.a word. The little counter shown in the. picture below records the number of times you hit the space-bar, and in this way counts the number of words that you write. It is claimed that the little device never makes a mistake.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0079.xml
article
51
51
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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This Electric-Light Plug Fills a Great Need
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HAVE you ever tried to put an electric plug in the socket with a small glass shade attached to it? If you have, you will certainly be able to appreciate the usefulness of this little device which has recently made its appearance on the market.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0080.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Four Legs for the Vacuum Bottle
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SINCE nothing is to be gained by crying over spilt milk, care should be taken not to spill it at all. But if your milk is in a vacuum bottle, it is very apt to spill. That is why H. C. Downey, of Springfield, Ohio, has invented a stand for vacuum bottles.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0081.xml
article
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52
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Twine that Is Part Paper
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A HARVESTER will start across a field of wheat and in a short time leave behind it a trail of wheat stalks bound neatly in sheaves. It clips them, stacks them, binds them, and drops off the finished bundles. For the binding process the best quality of twine must be used.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0082.xml
article
52
52
MISCELLANY
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Huge Photographs for Movie Backgrounds
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WHEN the fair heroine of a motionpicture looks out of her window in the play that is being screened, she may be looking at a giant photograph instead of at a real scene. It is often less trouble and expense to obtain a photographic enlargement from a small “still” negative than to travel a distance to get a suitable background, or to have a background painted.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0083.xml
article
52
52
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Where’s the “Old Man”?
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THE superintendent’s wanted on the ’phone!” What’s the best and quickest way to spread this news when the “old man” has lost himself in the factory? In England signaling by lights is favored; it is more “refined” than the noise system used generally in American factories.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0084.xml
article
52
52
MISCELLANY
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Cutting Uniform Slices of Bread
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IF you can slice a loaf of bread so that you don’t end up with a triangular knob, then perhaps you don’t need a bread-slicer. But most of us are not expert in the art of cutting bread. It is for the inexpert that Mr. W. H. Garlock, of Seattle, Washington, has invented the breadslicer shown above.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0085.xml
article
52
52
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Gun that Shoots Gas
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HANDS up or I’ll shoot!” You level your pistol at the astonished burglar. But suppose he failed to hold up his hands and made a dash for safety—would you really shoot him? Most people are filled with horror at the thought of killing a human being; they would rather let him escape.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0086.xml
article
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53
MISCELLANY
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A Portable Kitchenette
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TWO rooms and kitchenetter— you pay dearly for that kitchenette these days. Why hot supply your own? Here is one that comes in the form of a handsome cabinet, adding to the appearance of any diningroom. When you open it—top and front—you find on the top shelf a fireless cooker and two plain cookers, all operated by electricity supplied from a regular houseplug.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0087.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Making a Tiny Circus
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MAKING a tiny circus, complete in every detail, is the hobby of Arthur Thorpe, of St. Louis, Missouri. He is shown below in the midst of some miniature animal wagons that he has already completed. At present there are sixty of these pieces, but he intends to raise the number to eighty-five before the year 1921 is past.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0088.xml
article
53
53
MISCELLANY
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Germany’s Porcelain Money
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GERMAN marks have so depreciated in value that the silver in them is practically worth more than the coins themselves. In consequence of this, the Germans are considering the use of porcelain in future mark-making. A five-, a three-, and a two-mark porcelain coin, submitted to the German government, are shown above.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0089.xml
article
53
53
MISCELLANY
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On the Trail of a Drill
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DURING the war, the geophone, a listening instrument, made it possible for our men to determine the exact position of German mine-workers. The instrument has been used in coalmines for locating entombed miners. It can also be used for getting the exact location of a diamond bit when deep holes are drilled. When the bit has reached a depth of a few hundred feet, it is hard to tell whether it is following the exact path laid out for it.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0090.xml
article
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53
MISCELLANY
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The Hair-Cut Electrical
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THE barbers' strike and the subsequent high cost of haircutting need not worry you if you can get an electric hair-cutter. No great amount of skill is needed to operate the machine, and your wife could cut your hair for you. Unfortunately, the machine was invented in Germany, and it may be hard to get.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0091.xml
article
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53
MISCELLANY
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New York’s Volcano
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A FIRE that had all the earmarks of a volcano was raging recently in New York city. It erupted in some filled-in land near Van Cortlandt Park. Half burned coal and ashes were used as the filler and the accumulated gases underneath exploded. In spite of heavy rains, the fire continued to burn for weeks, giving off strong sulphur fumes all the time, to the mystification and alarm of passers-by and near-by flatdwellers.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0092.xml
article
54
54
MISCELLANY
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Up to Its Tubs in Ice
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A STOVE almost completely submerged in ice is a strange sight. How would you feel if you visited your summer home in winter and found your stove in such a plight? That was the experience of some people who had a cottage near Old Orchard Beach, Maine.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0093.xml
article
54
54
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Newspapers from Slot Machines
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THERE is a certain exclusive suburb which does not approve of newsboys. They’re too noisy, you know—might disturb the baby or the cat. So the exclusive residents buy their papers from slot machines placed on various corners. The required number of pennies are dropped into a slot at the side of the particular paper wanted, as is shown below.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0094.xml
article
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54
MISCELLANY
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Combining the Driveway with the Walk
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ONCE a Los Angeles man bought a new Colonial house with a small garage at the rear. There was neither a driveway leading to the garage nor steps leading to the house entrance. The house was so new that only the lawn in front had been finished. It was up to the owner to finish the job.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0095.xml
article
54
54
MISCELLANY
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Buy a Tree and Save a Forest
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“DO your share to preserve our forests,” says Mr. A. Kraft, of Oakland, California. And then he tells one way to do it —by using the combination Christmas tree, hat-rack, and clothes-rack that he has invented. Just one tree-trunk is needed for all three and it may be used for years.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0096.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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A Shoe-Shine in Your Vanity Bag
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FIRST aid to dusty shoes may now be found in vanity bags. Possessed of such aid, a woman, after crossing a dusty road, presses a button at the side of her vanity bag and out jumps a felt pad at the end of a wire spring. By bending over slightly she is able to brush off her shoes, and proceed on her way reshined.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0097.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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A Little Scent Sweetens All the Air
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HERE is a deodorizer designed to hang on the wall. In it is placed a sweetsmelling volatile liquid that continually evaporates, filling the air of the room with a pleasant odor. The liquid lasts for several days. When it is exhausted, the supply can be replenished from a bottle furnished with the deodorizer.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0098.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Here’s a Duplex Book
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A LEVER is shown at A in diagram 7.” When you read it, you start looking through the book for diagram 7. It may or it may not be on the same page. How much simpler it would be if diagrams and reading matter were always in front of you at the same time. In the new double book shown below, invented by a German engineer, this is the case.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0099.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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This Beautiful Arch Is Made of Bamboo Trees
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THE Botanical Gardens in Rio de Janeiro are the finest in the world. Not only are they very beautiful, but in them there are many strange growths of great interest to scientists. Among these interesting phenomena is a remarkable arch of bamboos.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0100.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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He Made His Own Stop-Watch
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SWIMMING champion C. J. Cooke, of Washington, D. C., wished to time his daily swims in order to see how his speed improved. But nearly every time he swam, there was no one around to hold a stop-watch. He couldn’t very well take it with him, so he invented a clock that would serve his purpose.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0101.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Chess-Playing by Wireless
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CHESS-PLAYERS aren’t the least bit sociable. If one were in Berlin and the other in The Hague, they could conduct their game just as well, provided that each knew the other’s moves. By means of a new device, two champion players tried this recently.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0102.xml
article
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56,57
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Over the Rockies on a Waterfall
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THE steam-locomotive boilers of the country generate, all told, 50,000,000 horsepower. One quarter of all the coal mined in the United States is thus consumed. This total horsepower is just about equal to the water-power that is going to waste.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0103.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Rocking Wings for the Airplane
So, Lanzius would mimic the birds!
In the Early Days
Varying the Angle of the Planes
Other Experiments
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Stanley Yale Beach
INSTEAD, of traveling around the earth in eighty days, it will be possible, soon to make the trip in eighty hours if airplanes are built according to the latest discovery. The practical result of the discovery that F. Handley Page has made by means of windtunnel experiments concerns the “aerofoils,” the wings and, air-surfaces of the machine, showing that these can be driven through the air more than twice as easily as heretofore with only one third the horsepower.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0104.xml
article
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59,60,61
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Thirteen Billion Suns— Living and Dead
How astronomers measure the universe
When You Look at the Stars
The Abbé Moreux, Theologian and Scientist
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Abbé Théodore Moreux
LOOK at the sky on a moonless night. There arches the Milky Way, a broad, phosphorescent ribbon that encircles the whole sky. In the telescope it appears as an accumulation of stars that defies our imagination. But, even with the naked eye, it is easy to distinguish what seems to have escaped the ancients— that the number of stars in the heavens increases as we approach the Milky Way.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0105.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Bread without Flour
The grain, robbed of its husk, is made directly into dough
How the Grain Becomes Dough
It Took Twenty Years to Perfect
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Dr. Alfred Gradenwitz
BREAD has been the staff of life for thousands of years, as the Bible testifies. But in the passage of centuries no one has attempted to change the general process of bread-making. The grain has been ground to flour and the flour has then been turned into dough.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0106.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Sharpening Drills by Machine
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THIS compressed-air forge is capable of doing the work of several blacksmiths and their helpers. The new machine is largely used in sharpening bits used in rock drilling. A short time ago this work was done by hand. Where large excavations or tunnels were being made, several blacksmiths had to be on hand to keep the bits sharp.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0107.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Paint-Sprayer that Can’t Spatter
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PAINT-GUNS and paint-sprayers are constantly being invented, and yet we continue to see the hand painter on the job, complacently drawing his large wages each fair day. Why is it that the sprayers and guns do not flourish more rapidly? One reason is loss of paint; another is the spattering on surfaces not to be painted; and, besides, the paint is apt to get a chalky consistency due to the evaporation of oils while still in the air.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0108.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Safety Caps Protect Factory Workers
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MANY of the thousands of women who went into factory work during the war are remaining because of the good wages. One look at the picture above will explain why some form of cap is necessary for every woman factory-worker. The girl in the lower picture did not wear her cap.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0109.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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New JObs for the Phonograph
It whirls other things just as easily as records
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0110.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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To See What’s Inside
Have an X-ray photograph taken
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0111.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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The Card Tells the Price
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IN order to keep the customers’ memory informed of the rising cost of milk some dealers are now using a clever device. The information is printed on a strip of cardboard in which a hole is cut at one end. When a bottle of milk is left at a house, one of the cards is slipped over the neck of the bottle. The customers have no excuse for claiming that they did not see the notice, for they must remove it from the bottle when they take it into the house.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0112.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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When an Airplane Collides with a House
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WHILE trying to get into the air after a stop at Omaha, Nebraska, the tall weeds in the field through which a metal airplane was “taxi-ing” acted as a brake. When the machine otherwise would have been high enough in the air to clear all near-by obstructions, a series of telephone wires and a house loomed just ahead.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0113.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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A Headlight for the Walking-Stick
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ANY man who walks along a dark country road at night needs both a stick and a flash-lamp. The man who rides in taxicabs or on the top of buses needs a light when he looks for change to pay his fare. Here is a walking-stick that combines its natural advantages with those of a light.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0114.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A Self-Closing Two-Way Gate
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HERE is a gate that swings on a central post which has a short iron rod inserted at top and bottom, the top rod passing through the lintel of the gateway, the bottom rod working freely in a block set in the ground. The gate is hung by two chains to the lintel, the fastenings being on each side of the center post of the gate.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0115.xml
article
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66
MISCELLANY
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He Makes His Rounds on Skates
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MAKING the round of inspecting fire hydrants, the policeman who has to cover a long beat may find himself slipping on his job when the streets are covered with ice. A policeman in Columbus, Ohio, got around the difficulty by directing his slipping to a purpose.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0116.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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How the Thrust of a Propeller Is Measured
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THE air-screw or propeller of the airplane, while far from being in an experimental stage, is still subject to scrutiny by inventors. Not only are improved methods of manufacture being studied, but the shape and power of the propellers are also being examined and tested, in the hope of reaching greater efficiency.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0117.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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A Penholder Support for the Beginner
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HERE you see a penholder support that teaches you the proper way to hold a pen. It is made of spring wire and has a loop at each end. One loop fits over the little finger which rests on the table, and the other fits over the holder. The length of the wire between them is sufficient to keep your fingers from becoming cramped.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0118.xml
article
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67
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Irrigation by Horsepower in the Holy Land
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DAMASCUS, one of the oldest cities in the world, is far behind the smallest American desert town in the matter of irrigation. Instead of using a pump for raising the water from the river, a team of horses aided by a windlass does the work. A leather bag is lowered into the river, where it takes on a load of water.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0119.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Down Comes the Steeple to Thrill “Movie Audiences”
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LIGHTNING has always been a great enemy of church steeples. A glance at this picture would tend to make one believe that the airplane will also do its share in destroying steeples. Not so, however, since this picture is of another “movie” thriller.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0120.xml
article
67
67
MISCELLANY
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Neatly Bringing a Soft Collar Together
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MORE and more do men wear soft collars the year round. The soft ones are comfortable, easy to put on—but they do not look as well as the stiff ones. Some people object to buttons and buttonholes that hold down the ends. There is now a slip-on fastener that clasps both ends firmly and holds them down close to the neckband.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0121.xml
article
67
67
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
An Automobile Made of Luggage
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STAND a hatbox on its side and it looks not unlike one of the disk wheels with which some cars are adorned. Then there is the trunk with the curved top; does it not resemble the hood of an automobile? The proprietor of a Berlin leather goods store noticed these similarities, and decided to build an automobile out of his wares.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0122.xml
article
68
68
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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A Motor Snow-Plow for Sidewalks
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EVERY one is familiar with the small gasoline - engine lawn - mower as it speedily travels around the large lawns of city parks in summer. We may wonder why such a device has not before been adapted as a snow-plow to clear the sidewalks after a winter storm.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0123.xml
article
68
68
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Rover Makes a Clever Caddie
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AN Airedale will make a very capable caddie if he is trained to carry the golf-sticks and to “stick” around. Golf is such a leisurely played game at times that one’s caddie may stray away and not be at hand when most needed. A dog is more likely to stay close to his master, and as the burden of sticks is not a heavy one, the animal will not be inhumanely treated if he is required to make himself useful instead of merely lazily present.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0124.xml
article
68
68
MISCELLANY
[no value]
One of Our Bird Veterans of the War
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CARRIER pigeons won distinction by heroic service in the great war. Some of the bird members of the pigeon section of the Signal Corps were killed or wounded. In charge of the twelve thousand pigeons were twenty officers and 542 enlisted men.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0125.xml
article
68
68
MISCELLANY
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The Wood Used to Make a Sunday Paper
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THE principal cause of the present paper shortage is the fact that no satisfactory substitute has ever been found for spruce wood. It is said that one great New York newspaper devastates ninety acres of spruce timber every day. Ten years ago the United States produced all its paper pulp.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0126.xml
article
68
68
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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A Headlong Flying Leap on Skates
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LAKE PLACID, in the Adirondacks, holds a peculiar charm for the winter sportsman. The hills afford an opportunity for skiing and skijoring, while the smooth surface of the frozen lake invites such games as curling and hockey. But skating meets the all-round popular demand, and to Lake Placid in midwinter come the world’s champion ice-skaters.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0127.xml
article
68
68
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Good Tops Make Good Barrels
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DID you ever try to get a barrel-top off without making kindling-wood of the barrel? It is a trick that most people cannot do with an ordinary barrel. With the barrel shown below it is different. It is not necessary to use a sledgehammer on a barrel with a wedge top.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0128.xml
article
69
69
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Setting Small Jewels in a Watch
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WHEN it is necessary to use a magnifying-glass to see distinctly the tiny jewels that every good watch contains, one is naturally curious to know how such minute objects are set properly in their places. These tiny jewels must be ground in precise geometrical forms and exactly set, to be useful.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0129.xml
article
69
69
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Messrs. Winter and Water, Nature Sculptors
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DURING the cold weather a water-main broke and sent up a spout of water about eighty feet in the air. Of course, the water had to come down. It fell and quickly froze in beautiful festoons along the limbs and branches of the trees in the neighborhood, making grotesque shapes of silvery whiteness.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0130.xml
article
69
69
MISCELLANY
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A Clock that Literally Tells the Time
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HAVING studied the matter for sixteen months, Vincent Pinto and his son Joseph, of Philadelphia, invented a clock that talks. The old saying that “time will tell” is now a reality. The clock speaks the time instead of striking the time at certain intervals.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0131.xml
article
69
69
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Rubber Tire Patches Make Good Rubber Heels
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MAKE your own rubber heels and toes from tire patches. All you have to do is cut down the patches to fit, and glue them firmly to your shoe, and they are all ready for service. You will probably never want to use the patches on your inner tubes, anyway —it is so much easier to pay a quarter or a half dollar to have a tube patched at a garage than to do the job yourself.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0132.xml
article
69
69
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Now Is the Time to Make Your Own Ice
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A TRESTLE carrying a device similar to a lawn-sprinkler, so that the water is sprayed across its top, makes a satisfactory midwinter ice-machine. The water will freeze in successive layers as it trickles over. When ice may be properly stored, there is no better way to take advantage of winter to obtain a fresh, clean supply of it.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0133.xml
article
70
70
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Steel Punch and Bender
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THE man who would punch holes in a steel bar, or who would bend strips of metal, needs a machine that has great strength of construction, and that can be easily manipulated. Here is a steel punch and bender that can be changed from one to the other without loss of time.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0134.xml
article
70
70
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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A Sled that Is Propelled by Hand
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IN some parts of Europe farmers use spikes to provide a means of motive power for crude sleds. The spikes are dug into the ice and thus a man can propel himself over the smooth surface of the ice. The device is a simple application of that now employed by arctic explorers in motor-driven sleds.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0135.xml
article
70
70
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Safety First for the Man Who Oils the Machinery
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DID you ever hear about the man who tried to oil machinery while it was running, and who stood upon the top of a stepladder to do it? Well, the ambulance got him first, and then the undertaker came for him. The ladder slipped on the oily floor and the machinery did the rest of a disastrous job.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0136.xml
article
70
70
MISCELLANY
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The Coal-Stove Unadorned
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A COAL-STOVE should be as plain as possible. Isinglass windows and nickel-plated trimmings simply admit air through the joints. As the air seeps through the joints and cracks, the heat within the stove is decreased. A coal-stove, chosen at random, was tested by one of the members of the American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers for the amount of carbondioxide directly over the flame and in the chimney.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0137.xml
article
70
70
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Spring Hanger for Clothes
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A NEW metal clothes-hanger upon which one can quickly dispose of the garments in a closet has been invented by John L. Lyman, of Easthampton, Massachusetts. This hanger differs from the ordinary clothes-hook in that it embodies a device by which the article placed upon it is held in a spring grip.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0138.xml
article
70
70
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Bobsledding When There’s No Snow
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IN Switzerland many people have put wheels on their sleds and enjoy all the thrills of coasting down hills even though no snow has fallen. In fact, many sleds are made originally with wheels instead of runners. The chief objection to snowless coasting is the danger of spilling.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0139.xml
article
71
71
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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No Fire on This Locomotive
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"AN odd-looking locomotive,” you will say. It is a locomotive without a fire. How does it run? By steam, of course. The steam is not generated on the locomotive, but in a separate boiler located, in the yard. The boiler of the little locomotive is used only in storing steam.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0140.xml
article
71
71
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Hercules in the Locomotive Shop
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WHEN locomotives are repaired, it is no longer a case of getting out and getting under. That is too much trouble. The modern method is to raise the locomotive. Hydraulic pressure is used in lifting the locomotive from the floor of the shop.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0141.xml
article
71
71
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A New Tower for the Man Who Repairs Overhead Wires
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HERE is a new way to get into the air to repair overhead wires for trolleycars. This tower is comparatively light in weight, but it is so constructed that several men may work on the platform without danger of it collapsing. It is trussed in the manner of a bridge.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0142.xml
article
71
71
MISCELLANY
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A World’s Champion
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LOOK above and you will see the world’s fastest typist. She has copied one hundred and fifty-one words in one minute. This is a speed of more than two and one half words a second. Attention must be given to details to attain such a record. For instance, the typewriter should be fastened securely to the desk without the drop-bed feature. The drop-bed tends to increase vibration, and this interferes with high speed.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0143.xml
article
71
71
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
This Is a Busy Little Car
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THE car pictured below is used in a great chemical plant. It is kept busy measuring out large quantities of the different ingredients that enter into the process. It is driven electrically and runs about the yard measuring out so much of this and so much of that.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0144.xml
article
72
72,73
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Fighting the H. C. L. at the Cellar Furnace
By exercising a little a few hours to home other ways of reducing
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0145.xml
article
74
74,75,76
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Fresh Fish from Sea to Door by Motor-Truck
To make the motor-truck serve your business efficiently make a study of the handling and transportation problem
A Truck Must Give Double Service
The Difference between HorseWagons and Motor-Trucks
Study the Loading Problem First
Various Ways to Speed Up -Loading
Where the Motor-Truck Is Valuable
Truck Bodies in Fishing-Smacks Save Time in Handling
Carrying Fish from the Sea to the Housewife
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Brinker
MOTOR-TRUCK transportation is so new, as compared to the other forms of rail and water transportation, that the prudent business man will do well to make a thorough study of his transportation problem before he installs trucks in place of horses, or substitutes highway for rail or water shipments.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0146.xml
article
77
77
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A Pulverizer Plant More than One Hundred Feet High
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ACID phosphate fertilizer is one of the essentials of modern agriculture. The designers of the gigantic mill shown in the picture below decided to employ gravity to convey the pulverized phosphate rock through the last step in the process of producing acid phosphate by lifting the powdered rock up through the pipes to the “cyclone collector,” which is more than one hundred feet above the ground.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0147.xml
article
77
77
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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An Under-Water Water-Pipe
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JERSEY CITY’S water-pipe line lies twentysix feet below the surface of the Passaic river. The submerged pipe has an inside diameter of six feet and is more than four hundred and fifty feet long. It weighs about a ton a foot. How did it get there?
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0148.xml
article
77
77
MISCELLANY
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The Telephonic Eye Betrays the Burglar
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THE newest foiler of burglars is the “telephonic eye,” invented by Dr. Oscar Hannach. What makes the telephonic eye so sensitive and efficient is the fact that no mechanical agency is required to operate the apparatus. The faintest beam of light is sufficient to set it working.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0149.xml
article
78
78
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Housekeeping Made Easy
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0150.xml
article
79
79,80
MISCELLANY
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Keeping Up with the March of Science
Facts for the man who wants to know
How Airmen Use Oxygen
Flowers that Serve as Food
Have You Euphoria?
A Rival of Acetylene
What New York Eats
Coal-Mine Explosions
Keeping the Subway Dry
Earthquakes in Panama
Tin, an Abused Word
The Poisons of Animals
Making Garbage Profitable
Oil from Corn
How Lightning Kills
Making Soles of Rubber
Noxious Gas in Mines
Are There Other Universes?
Fruit Butter by Vacuum
The Crows in Oklahoma
On Which Side Do You Sleep?
A Prehistoric Niagara?
[no value]
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WHEN an airman ascends to heights greater than twenty thousand feet, he is sure to use oxygen. He carries it in liquid form in a vacuum tank provided with a mechanism to control the evaporation. The liquid may be electrically heated to accelerate evaporation; or a heated rod of copper or aluminum in the liquid may be used; or the liquid may be siphoned out into an evaporating chamber from which the gas is conducted through tubes to the airman’s mouth.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0151.xml
article
81
81
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Multiplying Man’s Power by Machinery
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0152.xml
article
82
82,83
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Do You Own a Car? Find New Ideas Here
There is always something everywhere inventors are new in the automobile field; contributing novel features
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0153.xml
article
84
84
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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An Emergency Reamer
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EVERY automobile repairman has a demand for a portable tool with which crankshaft bearings may be trued up in an emergency in the car or on the bench. Truing up a set of crankshaft bearings by turning on a lathe is a more costly and slower method.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0154.xml
article
84
84
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Watermarking the Radiator
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AMONG the newest innovations in the marking of automobiles for identification is a “watermarked” radiator. The process by which the watermarking is accomplished was invented and patented by L. G. Hanmer, of New York city. The watermarking is done by increasing the size of certain predetermined cells in the radiator by an expansion process after the cell structure has been assembled ready to be dipped into solder.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0155.xml
article
84
84
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Saving Time in Coupling Tractors and Trailers
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IN the four-wheeled trailer the entire trailer load is carried on the four trailer wheels, with none of the trailer load supported on the framework of the pulling vehicle, as is the case with the two-wheeled semi-trailer. The loss of time in connecting the four-wheeled trailer has occurred in backing the truck up to the trailer, so that the bolt or jaws of the connecting drawbar might fall or lock into place.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0156.xml
article
85
85
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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This Oil-Cup Works Automatically
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ONE of the latest designs in oil-cups is automatic in operation and yet occupies no more space than the ordinary greaseor oil-cup. The cap is hinged, not to the side of the cup, as might be expected, but to a central valve inserted in a cup-shaped piston.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0157.xml
article
85
85
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
The Paving Machine with Caterpillar Traction
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THE latest adaptation of the caterpillar type of creeping tread to a commercial product is on a streetpaving machine. Because the creeping tread is interchangeable with the ordinary wheel traction, the machine takes on a dual purpose in that it can be used in countries having alternate dry and wet periods.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0158.xml
article
85
85
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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A Convertible Automobile Body
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A PROMINENT English aviation expert has developed a unique type of convertible automobile body. This body is simplicity itself. Aside from a folding top, the rear quarters of which are closed, it has a three-section glass part that completely encloses the sides of the body, when unfolded.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0159.xml
article
85
85
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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The Tool that Tightens Anti-Skid Chains
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SOMETIMES, when a motorist has put his anti-skid chains on the tires of his car, he finds it a most difficult matter to close the two ends of the chain without getting out every screwdriver or pair of pliers he has in his toolbox. This is because the chain must be stretched evenly around the tire and fitted fairly snugly before the snap fastener can be closed.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0160.xml
article
86
86
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Trapping Fires Automatically
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AGES ago primitive man worshiped fire. In the world to-day there are the remnants of a fireworshiping race, but to the civilized world fire is both a blessing and a curse. When it gets beyond the control of man, it is a demon of destruction. Ten thousand lives and $250,000,000 in property are annually sacrificed to the fire demon in the United States.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0161.xml
article
86
86
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Insulator in the Dark—Conductor in the Light
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AN insulator is a substance that will not permit the passage of an appreciable amount of electric current. A few substances are perfect insulators in the dark, but when light falls upon them, their electrical resistance changes rapidly.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0162.xml
article
86
86
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Harnessed to His Car, He Won’t Fall Off
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IF you are a trolley-car traveler, you will appreciate the hardships and risks of a conductor’s lot. He must climb around a step full of people to collect his fares, hold on by one hand, and constantly run the risk of being thrown off. But John Udall, of Weston, Ontario, has invented a protective harness that should do away with the dangers of a conductor’s job.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0163.xml
advertisement
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
[no value]
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0164.xml
article
88
88,90,92,94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Build an Icemobile
Make your iceboat independent of the fitful power of the wind
The Backbone
Engine-Bed and Power Plant
Controls
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[no value]
L. B. Robbins
THE ice-yacht is in its element in a brisk wind; when the air is calm it has to remain at a standstill. That is the one disadvantage of sail-propelled boats operating upon either water or ice. But for the man who can procure a small engine, the freakishness of the elements can be discounted, and high speed attained upon the ice—“blow high, blow low.”
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0165.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Co.
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0166.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
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HENDEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
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HENDEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0167.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
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Western Electric Company
[no value]
Western Electric Company
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0168.xml
advertisement
93
93
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US ARMY
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US ARMY
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0169.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
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P. H. HANES KNITTING CO.
[no value]
P. H. HANES KNITTING CO.
[no value]
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0170.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Clean a Clogged Fountain-Pen
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A SELF-FILLING fountain-pen is often filled with ink that is not absolutely free from sediment. An occasional rinsing of the reservoir will aid in preventing the clogging of the feed duct to the pen, but the small duct into the barrel of the pen very often becomes clogged.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0171.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Compressing Piston-Rings to Enter a Cylinder
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THE illustration shows a simple and very satisfactory way of compressing piston-rings so that they will enter an engine cylinder easily. The piston is slipped into the cylinder as far as the first ring. Some sashcord is fastened to one of the cylinder head studs, wrapped around the piston-ring, and pulled up tight.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0172.xml
advertisement
95
95
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[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Sears, Roebuck and co.
MODEL R ADAM PERIOD
Sears, Roebuck and co.
MODEL H LOUIS XVI PERIOD
[no value]
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0173.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
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Westfied Manufacturing Co.: Columbia BICYCLES
[no value]
Westfied Manufacturing Co.
Columbia BICYCLES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0174.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
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DUPLEX MFG. CO.
[no value]
DUPLEX MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0175.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Clean Valve-Stems on the Automobile
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WHEN the time has come to remove the accumulation of carbon from the cylinders of the automobile engine and to grind in the valves, particular attention should be paid to the valve-stems. These, too, should be carefully freed from carbon and other foreign matter that would interfere with the free movement of the valvestems in the guides.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0176.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Mixing Acid and Water for the Battery
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IF the storage battery requires a new solution, it should be mixed outside and then poured in the battery tank. Chemically pure sulphuric acid has a gravity around 1.84, and to obtain the required gravity, 1.300, before putting it into the cells, it has to be mixed with water.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0177.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
MECCANO COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
MECCANO COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0178.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
L. E. Waterman Company
[no value]
L. E. Waterman Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0179.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0180.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0181.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Choraleon Phonograph Co.
[no value]
Choraleon Phonograph Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0182.xml
article
98
98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Leveling Liquids with an Automatic Siphon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ERNEST BADE
IT is often very convenient to have an automatic siphon that will remove liquids to a certain level and maintain that level although more liquids should subsequently be added. Such a siphon consists of a lead tube about 10 in. long bent as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0183.xml
article
98
98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Experiment for the Flash-Light Photographer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PHILIP A. WALL
THIS experiment requires practically no apparatus and gives immediate and startling results. It is simply short-circuiting the 110-volt house current with a piece of No. 36 wire. This does not blow a fuse, because the current blows the smallest wire in the entire circuit.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0184.xml
article
98
98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Setting Machine Screws in Thin Metal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are many cases where it is desirable to tap a machine screw into thin sheet metal with some assurance that the screw will hold, though the metal is too thin to take sufficient thread to be of any practical use. The desired end is easily accomplished.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0185.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
The Ives Manufacturing Corporation
[no value]
The Ives Manufacturing Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0186.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
KOKOMO RUBBER COMPANY
[no value]
KOKOMO RUBBER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0187.xml
article
100
100,101
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Things I Made that Reduced the H. C. of L.
How some readers of the Popular Science Monthly sought to solve the vexing problem
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is highly significant that the overwhelming majority of the answers received from readers of the Popular Science Monthly in the prize contest “How to Beat the H. C. of L.,” launched early in the year described mechanical appliances for heating the air in rooms, shops, or houses, or for providing hot water for domestic purposes.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0188.xml
article
101
101
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Here Is the Standard Scale of Tire Inflation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is no use worrying about the small discrepancies in the inflation pressure tables of the different tire manufacturers. They are all near enough for all practical purposes. Some of the manufacturers will tell you to put 60 pounds in a 30-by-3½inch tire, whereas others will vary this to 55 or even 50 pounds in some instances.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0189.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN RUSSELL CUTLERY CO.
[no value]
JOHN RUSSELL CUTLERY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0190.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
IVER JOHNSON’S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
[no value]
IVER JOHNSON’S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0191.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
SOLDERALL CO.
[no value]
SOLDERALL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0192.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
HOOSIER INSTITUTE.
[no value]
HOOSIER INSTITUTE.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0193.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Mead Cycle Company
[no value]
Mead Cycle Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0194.xml
article
102
102,103
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Make Cardboard Models of Engines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK HARTH
MOST designers of machinery find that to lay out the movement of the device is to invite a good deal of work with a considerable loss of time. This is true of all classes of designing, whether the device is just ordinarily complex or very intricate, or whether it is a monster engine to be used on an ocean greyhound, or merely a small model of such an engine.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0195.xml
article
103
103
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Watch Your Storage Battery in Cold Weather
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOTORISTS who use their cars all winter should be careful to see that their batteries are kept properly charged. A battery that is allowed to deteriorate or become even partially discharged is far more likely to freeze than one that is kept in good condition, as may be readily realized by comparing the following freezingpoints:
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0196.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
ENDERS SALES COMPANY
[no value]
ENDERS SALES COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0197.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0198.xml
article
104
104,105
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Secret Marks Aid the Identification of Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY R. THAYER
IT is believed that at least one automobile out of every dozen manufactured and sold is stolen. How many stolen machines are ever recovered by their rightful owners, is another question. Good locking devices, or thief signals, are not to be despised.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0199.xml
article
105
105
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Using a Dial Indicator as a Sweep Tester
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. H. PARKER
THE common practice of attaching a pointed sweep to the spindle of a drill-press or lathe to test the trueness of the table or faceplate has the disadvantage that it is rather difficult to see by eye whether the point is actually touching; in fact, it may be just clearing or pressing with considerable force.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0200.xml
article
105
105
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Home Soldering Made Easy with a Good Flux
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DOES your wash-boiler leak? Close the leak with solder. Small soldering sets are sold for a trifle and are very useful in the house. A solution of sal ammoniac and borax makes a good soldering fluid, particularly for copper and brass. For tin the resinous flux supplied with the solderingset may be used.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0201.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
[no value]
THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0202.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0203.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0204.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0205.xml
article
106
106,107,108
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Combined Burglar Alarm and Keyhole Lighter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERON P. FOOTE
IF you are at home and any one attempts to turn the knob of your front or back door, a bell will ring. If you come home late in the evening, turn the knob yourself and a flashlight appears from the interior, displaying brightly the location of the keyhole.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0206.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY J. RAHE
[no value]
HENRY J. RAHE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0207.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0208.xml
article
108
108
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Attachment to Prevent Door-Slamming
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS extemporized door attachment was quickly rigged up by a mechanic and applied to a lockless inner door. The form of the spring permitted it to slide past the door-frame and move forward again, holding the door closed by pressure against the strip as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0209.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
[no value]
MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0210.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0211.xml
article
110
110,111
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Construct a Small Farm Tractor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CLIFFORD A. BUTTERWORTH
A SMALL tractor that can be built in the farm shop is shown in the illustrations. It can be constructed mostly of parts of old farm machinery and other scrap material. It is driven by a 12-hp. motorcycle engine. It can do all the work that could be done by one horse, such as plowing with one plow, harrowing, cultivating, and pulling fairly heavy loads.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0212.xml
article
111
111,112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Winter Weather Is Very Hard on Tires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WINTER-TIME is a hard period for automobile tires. Because of changing temperatures, standing in the freezing cold part of the time and kept in a warm garage at others, even tiny cuts in the tread are more apt to develop into big holes than in summer.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0213.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
Chief Draftsman Dobe
[no value]
Chief Draftsman Dobe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0214.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
THE PUCKETT METHOD CORPORATION
[no value]
THE PUCKETT METHOD CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0215.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0216.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make an Overflow for the Drain-Pipe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASIMPLE and effective overflow which removes the lower bad water without discharging the upper fresh water can easily be installed. It consists of the usual drainpipe reaching to the level at which it is desired to keep the water. Over this pipe a larger pipe is fitted which extends a short distance above the overflow.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0217.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Case-Harden Small Articles Quickly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMALL articles, like expander pins, etc., can be quickly case-hardened by plunging them, at bright-cherry heat, into a box containing cyanide of potassium crystals, and then quenching the pieces at a dull-red heat. Cyanide of potassium is a deadly poison and should be handled with great caution.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0218.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0219.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0220.xml
article
114
114
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Adjustable Handle for a Small Mirror
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
THE illustration shows a novel arrangement for holding a small mirror securely. It is designed to be carried in the pocket and is invaluable for shop use. The handle is made of a piece of ordinary brass tubing. A small pin clamps the mirror at the top as shown.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0221.xml
article
114
114
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make Rings of Equal Areas
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DIVIDING a disk into a number of rings all having equal areas can be accomplished by a long and tedious mathematical process—if one knows how. But it can be done just as accurately and a great deal faster with a ruler and a pair of compasses. Lay out the circle and draw a radius line— that is, a line from the center to the circumference.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0222.xml
article
115
115
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Inexpensive Aquarium Air-Pump
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ERNEST BADE
WHEN animals are kept in a saltwater aquarium it is absolutely essential to aerate the water thoroughly, to make it possible for the fish to live in it. For this purpose some kind of an apparatus must be procured. But these devices are all expensive and quite intricate in design.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0223.xml
article
115
115,116
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Graduated T-Square for Section Lining
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. EDWARD WHITE
IN drafting or engineering drawing, the process of section lining is very tiresome, especially as care must be taken that the lines are equally spaced. For the beginner especially is this a difficult task. A very simple yet efficient method of maintaining accuracy in the spacing of section lines is to graduate the upper edge of the T-square to correspond with the desired spacing, as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0224.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
THE 1900 WASHER CO.
[no value]
THE 1900 WASHER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0225.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0226.xml
article
116
116,117
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Improvising a Simple Level on the Job
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. F. DASHIELL
OFTEN a rough leveling of some surface is needed when a large level is not available. The writer has often used the following scheme for leveling and found it to be as accurate as that obtained with a spirit level. Take two pieces of wood about 4 ft. long and nail to a short piece of plank, such as the two pieces D and E, and nail to the piece G. Nail a crosspiece F between the two legs as shown.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0227.xml
article
117
117
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Old Materials Made This Useful Forge
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. D. SHULTIS
THE man who made the forge shown below uses it often on his ranch, where he does all his own blacksmithing. The forge is made entirely of old materials. The fire-pan was made from the bottom of an old cookstove. Two legs 30 in. long, made of 2 by 2 in. lumber (rescued from the kindlingpile), and two legs 42 in. long, made from 2 by 4 in. stuff, are securely braced.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0228.xml
article
117
117,118
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Mirror Aids in Placing New Phonograph Needles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VARIOUS makes of phonographs on the market are so built that the reproducer cannot, be turned around and up so the operator can see to put in a new needle. Instead, he has to feel underneath for the needle socket and put the new one in by that means.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0229.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
W.L.Douglas Shoe Co.
[no value]
W.L.Douglas Shoe Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0230.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
LIBERTY TOP & TIRE CO.
[no value]
LIBERTY TOP & TIRE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0231.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
THE EDWARDS MFG. CO.
[no value]
THE EDWARDS MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0232.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
George Frost Co.
[no value]
George Frost Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0233.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0234.xml
article
118
118
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Sacking Device that One Man Can Operate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANEW device for holding sacks during filling should save backs and a lot of useless adjectives for one compelled to work alone. It consists of half a pickle barrel with the end knocked out, and attached to the side of the bin or granary where most convenient with a small block of wood.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0235.xml
article
119
119
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Automobile Jack that Is Quick Acting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
IT is possible to prolong the life of automobile tires if the car is jacked up as often as possible when not in use. During the night, and at other times when the car is in the garage, which usually represents more than half of the time, the car might just as well be raised from the floor, saving that much weight on the tires.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0236.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Sloan's
[no value]
[no value]
Sloan's
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0237.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
THE MORLEY CO.
[no value]
THE MORLEY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0238.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL
[no value]
COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0239.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
J.J.Adams Co.
[no value]
J.J.Adams Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0240.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0241.xml
article
120
120
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Throw Lines Over High Objects
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
RECENTLY, in line construction, workmen had occasion to get a very small line over high wires. The line which was to be sent over was, of necessity, very light, and some means was necessary to get it over without breaking. The thread attached to a stone, if thrown over, might injure the glass windows on either side, and so the job was done in the following fashion:
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0242.xml
article
120
120
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Make a Safety Spark-Plug Carrier Box
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW often has the motorist carried his spare plugs in the tool-box rolled loosely in an old cloth, only to find in an emergency on the road that the spark-plugs have shifted about in the tool-box with wrenches, etc., and every one has a broken porcelain insulator?
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0243.xml
article
121
121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Lard-Can May Be Used to Dry Fruit in
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. F. GRINSTEAD
THE common 50-lb. lard-can, which may be bought at almost any grocery for forty cents, can with a very little work be converted into a cookstove evaporator for the drying of fruits and vegetables. With three circular trays that fit inside, it has a capacity of 10 lbs. or more at one filling, and when a steady fire is kept in the stove, the drying will be completed in five or six hours.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0244.xml
article
121
121,122
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Quick Way of Tightening Loose Flywheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
IT is common practice for the mechanic who undertakes the job of tightening a loose flywheel, in instances where the flange of the crankshaft is bolted to the flywheel web, to ream holes in the flange and fit larger bolts. Instead, he could save time by reaming this flange with a quick taper reamer, trimming a bushing for each bolt, and boring to fit the old bolt with the outside of the same taper as the reamer.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0245.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
PARKS BROS. & ROGERS, INC.
[no value]
PARKS BROS. & ROGERS, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0246.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
THE FLORSHEIM SHOE COMPANY
[no value]
THE FLORSHEIM SHOE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0247.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0248.xml
article
122
122
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Roll Your Ladder Instead of Carrying It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT is the use of carrying a long ladder on your shoulder or dragging it through the streets when two small wheels fastened to the legs near the base will make it a wheelbarrow? The illustration shows how a painter put to further use the rear wheels of a worn-out express wagon, originally belonging to his young son.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0249.xml
article
122
122,123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Protect Automobile Tires and Tubes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
THE automobile tire and its accompanying inner tube are the vital parts to be considered on a long tour or in the usual day’s run. To keep them for use in emergency cases on the road is a thing to be appreciated by all owners and drivers. A few suggestions are well worth considering, inasmuch as they are offered from practical experience.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0250.xml
article
123
123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Polishing and Weatherproofing Brass Surfaces
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR quickly scouring and polishing and, at the same time, weatherproofing brass a preparation is recommended, which is composed of three parts of oxalic acid dissolved in forty parts of hot water, to which are added 100 parts of powdered pumice-stone, two parts of oil of turpentine, twelve parts of soft soap, and twelve parts of fat oil.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0251.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
American School of Correspondence
[no value]
American School of Correspondence
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0252.xml
advertisement
124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0253.xml
article
124
124
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Refinishing Shoe Toes that Are Cracked or Worn
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the “boxed” toes of shoes get scratched or scuffed so that the ordinary polishing will not restore the original appearance, a great improvement can be made by applying shellac. Rub the shellac on with a rag and rub it off again, so that there will not be a thick coat.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0254.xml
article
124
124
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Brass Tools for the Making of Fillets
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN making patterns for castings an important point is to make all inside angles rounded or “filleted” in order to avoid the tendency to start a break at a sharp angle. An excellent way to make these fillets is to use a mixture of putty and shellac pressed into the corners and smoothed off to the required radius.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0255.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Discovering Worn Insulation in Automobile Wiring
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RONALD L. PRINDLE
THERE are some very simple devices that one may make at home that greatly simplify the locating of short circuits, open circuits, “grounds” in the various wires on the automobile. The device here with consists of a pair of ordinary awls, a wire loop, and a test lamp.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0256.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Easy Way to Take Bitter Medicine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MEDICINE that is disagreeable to take can be swallowed with a minimu of unpleasantness by using the simple apparatus shown in the accompanying illustration. A piece of glass tubing, corked at one end, is suspended by a wire in an ordinary glass.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0257.xml
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125
125
[no value]
[no value]
LIONEL STRONGFORT
[no value]
LIONEL STRONGFORT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0258.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0259.xml
article
126
126,127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Microphone Will Enable You to Hear a Fly Walk
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH a tramp, tramp, like the footfalls of a regiment of soldiers, a fly goes walking along; with a roar like the shouting of some mighty giant, the faint murmur of a human voice is reproduced; far away from the scene a person listens to the plans of a secret conference.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0260.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cutting Large Holes in Metal Plates
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TIME can be saved when large holes have to be cut in metal plates by using a very large drill. The usual method of drilling a large number of small holes along the outline and then cutting away with a chisel entails the loss of too much time in the drilling.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0261.xml
article
127
127,128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Do You Know this SurfaceGage Wrinkle?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN exceedingly fine adjustment is often required in working with a surface gage, and it is not always easy to obtain just the right setting in the usual way. There is a very simple method, however, that is as satisfactory as it is easy. The scriber is slightly bent.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0262.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0263.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0264.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Safety Clip for Your SpectacleCase
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
HOW many times have you carried your spectacle-case in an outside pocket, only to have it fall out and break the glasses when you bent over? This is a very costly habit and one that can easily be avoided if you will adopt the following idea: Obtain a pencil clip, one of the ordinary kind will do, and flatten it out with a hammer.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0265.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Novel Way of Locking a Garage Door
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A LOCAL automobile dealer utilized the angle-iron on the edge of his garage door to form part of the locking arrangement. The hasp was fastened . on the inside of the door and in locking was pushed through a slot in the angle-iron. The padlock was then secured as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0266.xml
article
129
129
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making It Easy to Work with Limit Gages
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. C. RIDGELY
WHEN using the gage shown in the illustration, the mechanic need not know the dimensions to which he is working, and often does not. He is told to make his work sufficiently small to pass one of the limits and too large to pass the other. He may not care what the real value of the dimensions is, and yet the system of gaging has proved remarkably accurate and resulted in greater speed of production than when the attempt is made to work to a single known dimension.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0267.xml
article
129
129
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Don’t Perfume Your Artificial Ivory
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LADIES are attracted to the beautiful imitation ivory toiletware now sold extensively for toilettable accessories. Unfortunately, perfumes have their place also on toilet-tables. Perfumes contain a high percentage of alcohol, In order to avoid mental anguish over the marring of her beautiful hairbrushes, mirror-backs, combs, hairreceivers, and so on, she should understand that alcohol is destructive to the surface of her “ivory” toiletware.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0268.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
University of Applied Science
[no value]
University of Applied Science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0269.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Iowa State Auto & Tractor School
[no value]
Iowa State Auto & Tractor School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0270.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
American School of Correspondence
[no value]
American School of Correspondence
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0271.xml
article
130
130
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Have You a Step-Saving House?
The Popular Science Monthly will pay ninety dollars for the best answers
Rules Governing the Contest
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[no value]
[no value]
HOW do you save steps in your home? What arrangements or what appliances have you made that save time and reduce work that would otherwise have to be done by hand? The Popular Science Monthly wants to know just what practical and useful things can be constructed to make every house a step-saving house.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0272.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Light-Reflector from a Tin Can
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a reflector is wanted in a hurry for use with an incandescent light, one that will serve the purpose very well can be made from an old tomato can. In fact, the result is rather surprisingly good if the can is bright and clean inside. Simply split the can down one side, cut out one end, and in the other end make a hole into which the lamp socket will fit tightly.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0273.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Finding the Right Key Made Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. J. LANKES
SOME time ago I was put to the daily necessity of using two latch keys to reach and enter my room. It happened that there was no light near either door, and as there was but little difference in the keys it was very annoying at times to find after infinite trouble that the wrong key had been inserted in the fugitive keyhole.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0274.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0275.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0276.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0277.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
CHAS. H. JOHNSTON
[no value]
CHAS. H. JOHNSTON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0278.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0279.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How and When to Cut Your Canary’s Claws
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ERNEST BADE
IF the cage of a canary is supplied with thin resting-sticks, the birds will often develop various infections of the foot. Such sticks do not give the bird a safe resting-place. They should be removed and replaced by larger, oval, not rounded, twigs which the bird cannot encircle with its claws.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0280.xml
article
132
132,133
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Circular-Saw Attachment to Hasten Production
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERON P. FOOTE
A STOCK authorization order called for about 1000 whitewood boards from 6 to 10 in. wide and about 2 ft. long, but only ¼ in. thick. These boards had to have a ⅛in. slot all the way around the edge and be about ¼ in. deep. At first it was a problem, as many of the boards were green or warped, and many, as the slot was cut, had a tendency to curve a trifle and break off or cut through the remaining 1/16-in. side wall.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0281.xml
article
133
133
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Electrifying the Ford Tailand Dash-Lamps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ingenious arrangement for electric dashand tail-lights, for which current is delivered from the magneto, is shown in the illustration. It is important to use lamps of the correct voltage. Examine the headlight bulbs and use lamps of the same voltage for the dashand tail-lights.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0282.xml
article
133
133,134
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Glass Drill Made from a Three-Cornered File
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PAUL J. KORDES
A DRILL for the purpose of drilling holes in plate or window glass is made in a very short time from an old three-cornered file. The file, which may be 4 in. long, or of any suitable size, is ground down on the flat surfaces on an emery-wheel so that it has a rounded head and a blunt point in the center.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0283.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
SARGENT & COMPANY
[no value]
SARGENT & COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0284.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0285.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0286.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0287.xml
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134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Smith & Hemenway Co., Inc.
[no value]
Smith & Hemenway Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0288.xml
article
134
134
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Flexible Pipe Made of Inner Tube
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FLEXIBLE tube or hose for conducting water can be made of an inner tube with the aid of a piece of spring wire wound into a spiral. Wind the wire about a spindle a trifle larger than the inside of the tube. It should take the form of a large spiral spring.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0289.xml
article
134
134,135
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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The Most Efficient Part of an Automobile
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[no value]
[no value]
H. A. TARANTOUS
THERE are hundreds of moving parts on an automobile or motortruck, but none works so hard and so efficiently as a universal joint. Such a joint is necessary on the propeller shaft extending from the clutch to transmission and from the transmission to the rear axle, as the case may be.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0290.xml
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134
134
[no value]
[no value]
LOFTIS BROS. & CO.
[no value]
LOFTIS BROS. & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0291.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Gibson MandolinGuitar Co.
[no value]
Gibson MandolinGuitar Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0292.xml
article
135
135
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Repairing a Broken Lug with a Washer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE L. LUERS
AN emergency repair for a lug broken in tightening up an outlet water connection for an automobile, is shown in the accompanying illustration. These connections are usually cast iron, and in putting in the bolts an extra twist will frequently crack them.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0293.xml
article
135
135
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Double Center Punch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
THE writer had a lot of machine pieces given him to center punch. The holes were all the same distance apart, so to save laying them all out, and probably making them inaccurately, he invented the double punch shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0294.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
OTTAWA MFG. COMPANY
[no value]
OTTAWA MFG. COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0295.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0296.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0297.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE
[no value]
NATIONAL RADIO INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0298.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0299.xml
article
136
136
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
When the Wind-Shield Rubber Wears Off
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. E. MENDE
WHEN the rubber on the windshield wears off or is lost, you will find it very convenient to replace it with a piece of rubber tubing about ⅜in. diameter with as heavy a wall as you can purchase. As shown in the illustration, it will be necessary to cut it down the length of the tube to open it.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0300.xml
article
136
136
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Combining a Flagpole with an Advertising Sign
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
APATRIOTIC and ingenious merchant decided to make the flagpole in front of his establishment serve a triple purpose. The pole was a length of iron pipe that ran down into the cement walk which served to hold it securely. The merchant cut this pole in half with a hacksaw, threaded the cut portions, and screwed on a pipe-T.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0301.xml
article
136
136,137
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Vacuum Cleaner in a New Rôle
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[no value]
[no value]
F. G. J.
IHAD occasion to scrape the carbon out of my automobile cylinders recently, and discovered a way to speed up a tiresome piece of work. I connected a vacuum cleaner to one of the sockets in the garage, bent a piece of 1-in. pipe at an angle of about thirty degrees, and inserted the pipe in one of the valve-caps while I scraped through the other.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0302.xml
article
137
137
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Evenly Space and Ink Lines in a Hurry
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHERE the mechanical draftsman has been given a job which necessitates ruling many evenly spaced lines in a hurry, the little cardboard attachment shown in the illustration will be found to expedite the work. First cut a piece of cardboard the shape shown and attach it to the end of the T-square with thumbtacks.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0303.xml
article
137
137
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Adjustable Centers for Small Lathe-Work
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE most difficult thing to finish in the lathe is a tube. To do the work right, a mandrel should be fitted, but this takes time and the mandrel costs more than the job is worth in the end. The writer has found that it pays to keep a goodly supply of threadspools on hand.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0304.xml
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137
137
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0305.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0306.xml
article
138
138
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Best Way to Drill a Triangular Hole
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
CAN you drill a hole iarger at the bottom than at the top? In answer to this question we say “Yes,” provided you use the ingenious device illustrated here. The shank of the tool has a slot cut in it to which is attached a slanting blade. This blade is about ⅛ in. thick and is pivoted with a pin to the shank of the tool.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0307.xml
article
138
138
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Increasing the Usefulness of a Wagon Wrench
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
BEFORE the advent of the automobile this type of wrench was very common. It fitted two sizes of nuts, and there its use ended. I find that a few cuts of a hacksaw will extend its sphere of usefulness. Two sections are cut out of the end, as in Fig. 1.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0308.xml
article
138
138,139
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Copying Idea for the Photographer
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[no value]
[no value]
FRANCIS M. WESTON
HAVING a 5-by-7 camera and desiring to make full-sized copies of a batch of old 5-by-7 prints, nothing seemed easier than to set up and shoot. But right then my troubles started—the camera was fitted with a lens of 8½-in. focal length, while the bellows extension was only 12 in.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0309.xml
article
139
139
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Way to Remove Stubborn Nuts Quickly
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[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
WHEN a nut becomes rusted, it is a very difficult job getting it off the bolt or stud on which it is set. To use a hammer and chisel usually results in the nut being made worthless. Being up against such a proposition and wishing to save the nut, which was a special thread, we made a novel wrench as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0310.xml
article
139
139,140
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How Street Curbing Injures the Tires
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is one bit of carelessness of which nearly all motorists are guilty at times, and which, unfortunately, is almost a habit with many. That is the practice of driving the tires against street curbs—most commonly in backing the car—so that the side walls and the fabric are bent.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0311.xml
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139
139
[no value]
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0312.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0313.xml
article
140
140
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Holder for Varnishing Casting Patterns
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PATTERNS for castings are varnished all over with shellac varnish. The parts that are to be reproduced in metal are finished with black shellac and the coreprints, which make the recesses in which the cores are placed, are finished in orange shellac.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0314.xml
article
140
140
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Protect the Handle of Your Percolator
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[no value]
[no value]
H. E. MENDE
THE wooden handle on your coffee percolator can easily be protected from burning off at the bottom by attaching this small protector, which deflects the heat from the bottom of the handle. A small piece of aluminum, brass, or copper will answer the purpose if bent into the shape shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0315.xml
article
140
140,141
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
What the Small Vise Will Do
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NO owner who does any repairing or tinkering with his car should be without a small vise. Next to such indispensable tools as screwdriver, wrenches, and pliers comes a small metal vise.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0316.xml
article
141
141
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Another Use for the Old Inner Tube
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WINDSOR CROWELL
IN the summer hot air is apt to arise from around the pedals of an automobile, and in the winter it it is liable to be decidedly chilly. To be able to exclude these disagreeable gusts of air may not seem easy, but here’s the way to do it. Cut out a section of old inner tube and make a slit down the middle long enough to allow the pedal to be worked its full distance.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0317.xml
article
141
141
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Select Speedometer Gear Sizes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN you change from normal size to oversize tires, it will be necessary to change the speedometer gear if you want the instrument to read absolutely accurately. The rule to follow is that the number of teeth in the large speedometer gear—the one attached to the road wheel—must be twice the diameter of the tire in inches.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0318.xml
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141
141
[no value]
[no value]
SIMONDS MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
SIMONDS MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0319.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0320.xml
article
142
142
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Knurling on the Small Lathe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. H. Parker
THE amateur sometimes is unable to finish small parts of his homebuilt apparatus in a workmanlike manner because he lacks the proper equipment to knurl the edges of small adjusting screws and nuts, the handles of tools and other pieces of brass or steel.
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0321.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY
[no value]
THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0322.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0323.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Jobbers Over All Co., Inc.
[no value]
Jobbers Over All Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0324.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Company
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201201_0097_006_0325.xml