Issue: 19201101

Monday, November 1, 1920
NOVEMBER 1920
5
True
97
Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Articles
cover
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0001.xml
advertisement
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2
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0002.xml
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Independent Corporation
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Independent Corporation
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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4,6
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CONTENTS
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0004.xml
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0005.xml
advertisement
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5
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0006.xml
advertisement
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6
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CHICAGO ENGINEERING WORKS
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CHICAGO ENGINEERING WORKS
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0007.xml
advertisement
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7
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EMORY J. SWEENEY, President
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EMORY J. SWEENEY, President
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0008.xml
advertisement
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8,10,12,14,16
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0009.xml
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9
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0010.xml
advertisement
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11
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ALOIS P. SWOBODA
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ALOIS P. SWOBODA
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0011.xml
advertisement
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13
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National Salesmen’s Training Association
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National Salesmen’s Training Association
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0012.xml
advertisement
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15
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0013.xml
advertisement
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17
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0014.xml
advertisement
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18
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0015.xml
advertisement
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19
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Pelton Publishing Co.
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Pelton Publishing Co.
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0016.xml
advertisement
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20
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Burlington Watch Co.
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Burlington Watch Co.
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0017.xml
article
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21,22,23,24
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Carrying Milk in Tank-Cars
The cost of milk can be reduced by transporting it in tank-cars heated by live steam from the engine
How the Present System Began
Temperature and Handling Economies
He Would Transport Milk in Heated Tank-Cars
Gravity Saves Mart-Power
How the Price is Lowered
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Joseph Brinker
UNDER average conditions, the quart of milk for which the farmer receives eight cents costs the housewife sixteen. In other words, the handling charges, plus the milk-dealer’s profits, is equal to the first cost of the product. Under present conditions the rail freight per quart of milk is one cent when the milk is collected within four hundred miles of the city where it is ultimately sold.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0018.xml
masthead
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21
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0019.xml
article
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25
MISCELLANEOUS
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Lost! $6000 Worth of Radium!
The electroscope discovered it among the ashes
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Raymond Francis Yates
SIX thousand dollars’ worth of radium was thrown into a furnace. It came out in the ashes. How it was found and recovered makes an interesting story. A nurse was removing ten tubes of radium from a patient. She lost one in doing so. Six thousand dollars’ worth of radium in a tube the size of your little finger!
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0020.xml
article
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26,27
PICTORIAL PAGES
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How It Really Happened;or,Movies in the Making
In which is shown that those film palaces are not always breath-taking thrillers of the what they appear to us to be
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0021.xml
article
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28,29,30,31
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Living Forever—Why Not?
What the scientists have discovered about the secret of perpetual youth
Our Lease on Life
Why We Die
Are We Wound Up Like Clocks?
Nature's Reason for Limiting Life
Parts of Us Are Immortal
Our Body Cells Never Die
The Battle Waged within Us
Repairing Bodies Like Clocks
Experiments on Animals
No Way Yet to Beat Nature
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Arthur Benington
ANY one of us can get from an insurance company an estimate of how long he may expect to live. He will be told that the average American white man lives sixty years and the average woman sixtyfour. That is to say, of all white children born in America, the average age at death will be sixty for males and sixty-four for females.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0022.xml
article
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32,33
PICTORIAL PAGES
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A Gunboat in War—a Merchantman in Peace
The Airplane for You and Me
A Flexible Gate Stops Automobiles
Heat Water with Steam
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THE Kilmore was a British gunboat during the war; now she is a merchantman. She was converted from one to the other in two months! The picture in the upper righthand corner shows the Kilmore in her war paint. She had a stern-shaped bow, which made it difficult for the Germans to know whether she was coming of going.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0023.xml
article
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34,35
PICTORIAL PAGES
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By Airship to the North Pole
The Peary of the future will explore the frigid zone in a floating laboratory
The “Admiral Peary”
To the Pole in a Week
To the North Pole by Dirigible Airship
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Lieutenant Clifford A. Tinker
NEWSPAPERS have always referred to the last desperate effort of .a Nansen, a Scott, or a Peary to reach his geographical goal as a “dash for the pole.” And a “dash” it is. A few dogs hauling a few sledges, one or two instruments, barely enough food to keep body and soul together —such is the equipment of the daring expedition that makes the supreme effort.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0024.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Teeth Sharpened While You Wait
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THE Wakamba dentist does not look for cavities—he makes them. He chisels and then files his patients’ teeth until each tooth ends in a sharp point. Why? So that his patients can tear raw meat with neatness and despatch. The Wakamba tribe is one of the least civilized tribes of Africa.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0025.xml
article
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Hay Forked Down Automatically
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FOR a long time inventors have been designing machines for getting hay into the hay-loft, but none of them have worried about getting it out again. George Chromy, on the contrary, has felt the need of such a mechanical hay-puller and has therefore invented one.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0027.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Fighting a Burning Coal-Mine Under a City
The battle is still being waged
The Engineers' Plan
Coal, One Dollar a Ton
A Constant Supply of Oxygen
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James Hope
THERE is a coal-mine burning under one of Pittsburgh’s most exclusive residential sections. The fire started in 1914. A few months later it spread rapidly and became a source of great danger to the community. To know that a fire is burning under the street you live on, with the possibility that it may actually extend under your home, would not add anything to your feeling of comfort and security.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0028.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Demountable Bodies Will Keep Your Truck Moving
How motor-truck failures became successes when loading and unloading time was reduced
A Saving of $16,500 a Year
Making the Motor-Truck Pay
Reducing Traffic Congestion
Double Loading Capacity
Easy Transference of Bodies
Bodies on Rollers and Nesting Bodies
The Demountable Trailer
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Joseph Brinker
AMONG the 900,000odd motor-trucks now in use there are some that do not save money in comparison with horses, if the cost per unit moved alone is considered. There are countless instances where horses are still employed because the truck apnarently cannot compete.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0029.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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This City Is a Toy
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YOU can look down upon a city in miniature and see moving street-cars, automobiles, crowds of people, and all phases of metropolitan life reproduced in a passing show before you. This is not a freak, but an actual toy, which can be used to demonstrate the interesting inventions of the day.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0030.xml
article
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Your Heart’s History
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DRINK a cup of coffee, smoke a cigarette, find a hundred-dollar bill, and your heartbeats will quicken. All of these irregular actions of the heart can now be recorded upon a moving photographic film by the electrocardiograph. It has been found that the heart, upon contraction of certain of its muscles, generates a small electric current.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0031.xml
article
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As the Crow Flies
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THE Crow is one of the world’s smallest airplanes. It dots the blue sky of England. It can carry you at a speed of sixty-five miles an hour. The British Crow weighs 220 pounds and has a wing spread of but sixteen feet. Its motor is a forty-horsepower engine, twin-cylinder, air-cooled, mounted on the front of the plane.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0032.xml
article
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It Will Revolutionize Pipe-Laying
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TWO Englishmen, Captain A. R. Mangnall and Captain Irving, have invented a machine that will revolutionize presentday pipe and cable laying. The portable apparatus weighs only thirteen hundred pounds, and consists of a hydraulic cylinder carried on trunnions in a carriage, and capable of being turned from a horizontal to a vertical position.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0033.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Another Vacuum-Cleaner Job
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VACUUM cleaners will fill pillowcasings with feathers! This kink was discovered by a husband who one day found his wife filling with feathers both a pillow-casing and the workroom. The husband took an embroidery-ring, placed it over the open end of the casing, attached the casing to the back of the cleaner, and when the cleaner was set in operation over the feathers, it sucked them into the casing.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0034.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Rescuing a Drowning Cork
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MANY’S the time you’ve pushed a cork into a bottle when trying to pull it out. Can it be fished out? Try this: Grease the inside of the bottle’s neck with vaseline and hold the bottle under the cold water for a few minutes. Spear the cork with a hatpin and draw it up into the neck of the bottle.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0035.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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First Aid to the Wheel
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A CHIPPED wheel-flange or a broken axle will hold up a freight-train and perhaps several others. But there has been invented a skid shoe that will enable any train with broken wheels to limp to a siding for repairs. The skid shoe shown below fits in front of the wheel.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0036.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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The Boy and the Binder
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IT is no wonder that the eleven-year-old boy in the picture has a broad grin on his face. Farm work to him is as easy as driving a horse and buggy. He sits on a small seat at the rear of a combination tractor and eight-foot wheat-binder, holding a pair of ropes in his hands, and feels that he is lord of all he surveys.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0037.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Seeding the Cantaloup
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SEEDING cantaloups is an art deftly performed by the natives of the regions in which they grow. The two halves of the melon are turned quickly around a stiff piece of rind, or other suitable object held between them. This motion dislodges the seeds, and they are collected in a vessel for future planting.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0038.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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The Community Grinder
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A GOOD advertising man is this dealer. He sells abrasive materials and he believes in advertising the fact. To do this he has put a large grinding-wheel on the front of his shop where the passers-by can stop and sharpen their pocketknives.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0039.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Horses Up to Their Hips in Mud
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THE horses are not sitting down to take a rest. They are trying very hard to get up. Their hind legs are under the ground, not on it. The potato-field in which the horses were working was very boggy, and, without warning, their hind legs sank. The more they try to get out, the further in they sink.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0040.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Even the Fire in the Fireplace Is Unreal
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THE .cheery glow of the fire is quite unable to rouse the listless moving-picture heroine pictured above. Perhaps it is because that cheery glow is just the concentrated effort of several powerful electric lights operated by an electrician behind the scenes.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0041.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Here’s the Parasol-Purse
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IN spite of the cool weather, the chief bather in the picture above carries her sunshade with her. But she does not put it between herself and the sun. It is the latest thing in sunshades and must not be left at home. When the sunshade is closed, it becomes a handbag!
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0042.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Hens Out Walking with Their Keeper
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HENS are so scarce in Germany that they are never allowed to run around loose any more. They are closely watched and kept in captivity. Every day they are taken out for a walk, but they travel at the end of a string all the time. At night various members of the family to which they belong take turns at playing watchman.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0043.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Painting Traffic Lines
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PAINTING traffic lines is a quick and easy job when you use a painting machine like this one. The machine resembles the whitewashing machines used for marking lines on a tennis-court, but its action is entirely different. The paint does not drip upon the pavement
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0044.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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The Rat that Was Electrocuted by Motor
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EVERY little while you hear of a rat jumping off the stairs and breaking its neck or leaping into a pail of water and drowning. Here is the sad case of a rat that electrocuted itself in true Sing Sing style. It stepped unknowingly on the electrical terminals of a high-powered English car, short-circuiting the current through its body.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0045.xml
article
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47
MISCELLANEOUS
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Eating the Greedy Camel
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AT the present price of grain, a camel is an expensive pet to keep. He will eat three dollars’ worth of food a day, whereas a boa constrictor is satisfied with one rabbit a month. When two exhibitors exchanged pets, the new camel-owner couldn’t stand the expense.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0046.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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These Telegraph-Poles Are Getting a Creosote Bath
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LONGER life for telegraph-poles is made possible by alternating hot and cold baths. The number of poles that can be treated at one time varies with the size of the treatment tanks. The fibrous inner bark is removed from the end of the pole that goes into the ground; then the end is lowered into a tank filled with creosote heated to a temperature of 212° Fahrenheit.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0047.xml
article
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48
MISCELLANEOUS
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Salted Peanuts Roasted in the Shell
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IT is no longer necessary to shell peanuts before they can be salted. They are now soaked in a strong brine, drained, and placed in this special roaster. Before the process of roasting, an air pressure is applied that forces the brine through the fibrous shell of the nut, imparting a delicate flavor to the kernel.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0048.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Separating Seeds by Their Shape
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A NOVEL seed-separator divides round seed from those that are egg-shaped, elongated, flat, three-cornered, or whatever shape a seed may be. It consists of two series of spiral channels through which the seeds are passed. The inner spirals are lower than the outer series.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0049.xml
article
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48
MISCELLANEOUS
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Polishing Brass Buttons without Injuring the Coat
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KNOWING the fascinating power that brass buttons have on the gentler sex, it behooves all officers to make their buttons shine brightly. But how can brass polish be applied to buttons without the risk of getting it on the cloth beneath? A New York patrolman’s wife solved the problem by inventing a glass shield that is placed around the button.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0050.xml
article
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When in Need of Coal, Why Not Use Sawdust?
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WITH coal at fourteen dollars a ton, the use of sawdust as fuel will interest many people who have to heat homes this winter. An officer in the British army has invented a small stove that uses sawdust as fuel. He claims that it will keep two rooms comfortably heated in the coldest weather.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0051.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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The Easiest Way to Fly
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TAKE a seat in a chair behind the painted airplane shown in the photograph. You will appear to be suspended in the air in flight. To make the picture more humorous, the proportions of passengers and airplane can be disregarded. Thus the photograph will show a large-sized image of yourself and friends and the flying-machine will appear ridiculously small.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0052.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Washing Photograph Prints
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WHEN a lot of prints are placed in a flat tray to be washed, great care must be taken to prevent them from sticking together in such a way that some are imperfectly cleared of hypo. Here is a device that assures perfect wáshing, and chapped hands are avoided.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0053.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Keep Your Small Metal Fares on a Safety-Pin
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SINCE there is no coin between the nickel and the dime, railway companies that have raised their fare to an intermediate amount are constantly troubled with making change. It is not only difficult to obtain enough pennies to go round, but the conductors find their work more complicated.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0054.xml
article
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A Maple-Tree that Braced Itself
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THREE surgeons sometimes find it necessary to brace branches together with bolts and chains to give them strength to withstand the ravages of storms. It is unusual to find a tree that performs this feat itself. The illustration shows a red maple in which two separate branches grew into one, forming a natural brace.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0055.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Making Roquefort Cheese
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ALMOST every one likes cheese— especially good sharp cheese. Roquefort cheese is a delicacy that has heretofore been manufactured only in parts of Europe where it was asserted the proper conditions for ripening existed. It was also asserted that goat’s milk was necessary for its manufacture.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0056.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Let the Screwdriver Hold the Screw
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EXPERT workmen can practically complete the operation of driving a screw with one hand. Most amateurs need both hands and even then they do not get the screw in straight. For the benefit of amateurs and those who have but one arm the new screwdriver has been invented.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0057.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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An Automatic Steam Siphon
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A SUMP hole in a mill building was drained by a siphon located in the engine-room. The engineer was a forgetful chap and often neglected to stop the siphon. As a result, the basement of the mill was continually flooded. The trouble was overcome by making an automatic system.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0058.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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A Balloon Hydrogen-Generator that Goes on Wheels
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HYDROGEN is extensively used for filling balloons as well as for other scientific and commercial purposes. It is true that helium, being incombustible and inexplosible, offers a distinct advantage over hydrogen, but it is a great deal more expensive and difficult to obtain in large quantities.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0059.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Enter, the Movable Electric Furnace
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CHINA that is not hand painted— how does it get its pattern? In an oven, we find; the pattern is baked on. An electric furnace that can be used for this purpose is shown herewith. It is small, but very strongly built. The oven is mounted on steel casing, and its walls and door are thoroughly insulated, thus preventing loss of heat from radiation.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0060.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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How the Blind May Read with Their Ears
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THE optophone enables blind people to read directly from printed matter. It was invented by E. Fournier d’Albe. A thin beam of light is projected upon a letter of a word to be read. This beam is broken into five smaller beams by a revolving perforated disk, which also interrupts the individual beams.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0061.xml
article
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Converting Old War-ships into Breakwaters
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GIVE US the old discarded battleships,” say the people who live in the coast cities of England. Why do they want them? Of what use is a ship whose days as a fighter are past? From the war-ships that are no longer serviceable on the sea, all of the equipment is removed that might be still of service.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0062.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Tools that Released Men from Prison
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THREE desperate criminals escaped from the Charlestown State Prison at Boston, a few months ago, by means of an ingenious contrivance that they had manufactured in the prison shops. One of the escaping prisoners was a mulatto, and it was afterward discovered that this man possessed an almost diabolical cleverness in the handling of tools.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0063.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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The Flag that Never Wavers in the Wind
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RAILROAD accidents are usually due to improper signaling —flagging, for instance. The flag is often mounted on a stick thrust into the ground beside the tracks. The wind blows it down, and the engineer is unwarned. Alexander Currie, of Sorel, Canada, has invented a flagging signal that can’t possibly go astray.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0064.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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The Automobile with a Rotary Valve
It will eliminate all valve-grinding and many valve troubles
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Stanley Yale Beach
WHEN casting about for something interesting with which to busy himself after perfecting his process of acetylene welding, Mr. Eugene Bournonville, a Belgian, conceived the idea of using rotary valves on automobile engines. At the time, James W. Tygard was the only one, so far as the writer is aware, who had successfully applied a valve of this type to a gasoline engine, and he used a special tapered valve in a freak motor.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0065.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Gathering the Morning Coffee
Long before you drink it
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0066.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Smoking Makes the Whole World Kin
How our neighbors prefer the weed
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0067.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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It Took Nerve to Do This Job
What Washington thought of O’Hara is told in this true story of two naval radio operators
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John W. Kean
WHILE Davis was melting ice on the wireless antenna, Zeider was having a chat over the signal wire with Hoke Fitzsimmons in Washington. O’Hara, the fun-maker of the trio, was telling Davis how to do his job. “Zeider,” Davis said, “I believe our bold shipmate thinks he knows something.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0068.xml
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He Revolutionized Lumber-Drying
Harry Tiemann, who helped win the war
The Government’s Need Anticipated
Controlling the Drying Process
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Samuel J. Record
WHEN the United States joined the great fight, millions of gunstocks, thousands of artillery wheels and transport wagons, as well as the proposed super-fleet of airplanes, called immediately for lumber; and not lumber merely, but dry lumber.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0069.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Now there Is a Double-Ended Vacuum Cleaner
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NOW there is a vacuum cleaner that not only does your sweeping for you but dusts as well, without the need of any special attachments. The handle is equipped with a suction device; thus when you wish to draw the dust out of corners or from upholstered furniture, you hold the cleaner upside down and let the handle do the work, as shown in the picture above.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0070.xml
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Use a Motor-Sled in Flat Country
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UNLESS some one has been willing to drag you around, you haven’t been able to do much sledding in flat country. But now that the motor wheel has made good on bicycles and small boys’ express wagons, it is being tried out on sleds. Above you see a motorsled chugging its way across the smooth hard snow.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0071.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Light up the Trench Hat
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DON’T hang your old trench helmet in a closet where no one can see it; hang it rather from the ceiling and use it as an inverted-light fixture. You can buy a reflector that will fit inside when the lining is taken out. In place of the chin-strap you attach chains with which to fasten the hat to the ceiling.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0072.xml
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Our Ears Deceive Us in Locating Sound
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CAN we judge the direction of lojad and soft sounds of different pitch with equal accuracy? Experiments have shown that we can not. Blindfold a man and mark off a circle in ten-degree divisions around him. Start a sound in a certain part of this circle, but vary its intensity.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0073.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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A Pair of Trouble Gloves for the Automobile Driver
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YOU wear high rubber boots when you wish to plow through heavy snow, why not wear long gloves when you have to dig through the mud and grease that accumulate on your car? You never know when you may have to change a tire, or adjust your carburetor, or tend to any other of the many ills that cars are heir to.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0074.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Ski-Sailing for Two in Modern Norway
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SPEED—that’s the secret of many sports. Take skiing, for instance. Even though skis carry you across the snow at a terrific rate of speed, many skiers are not satisfied. They want to go faster. How can it be done? By wearing a sail. Above you see some people starting on a ski-sail in Norway.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0075.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Shaving with a Side Motion
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THERE is a razor whose blade moves from side to side as you draw it across your face. This double motion doubles the speed and accuracy with which each individual hair is chopped off. Thus it should not be necessary to scrape your face more than once when you shave.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0076.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Providing a Street-Car with Stilts to Keep People Dry
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WHEN the floods from the Ohio river inundated some of the streets of Cincinnati, a unique arrangement was made to keep the high water from reaching the exposed parts of the street-car motors. The car which held the motive apparatus was mounted higher above the wheels, thus elevating the motor out of reach of the water.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0077.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Lamps Under the Chair Keep Him Warm
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BAD boys in Sunday supplements and movie villains are always building fires under other people’s chairs. But none of them had anything to do with the two lighted lanterns that blaze away beneath the ticket-chopper at the Times Square, New York, subway station, whose picture is shown here.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0078.xml
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A Champion Among Goldfish
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OLD Black Joe has a namesake—a German-born goldfish that has been living in this country seventeen years. He was given that name because of his coal black color; but, strange to relate, when the United States entered the war with Germany, his color changed to red, white, and blue.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0079.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Hitch Your Skis to a Motorcycle and Travel Fast
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SKIING is a thrilling sport at the least attempt, but when it is connected with various other motive sports it surpasses the mere sensation of thrills and enters the realm of real danger. One of the least dangerous is the celebrated sport of the hills of Sweden and Norway.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0080.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Looking at the Ocean’s Floor
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THE bottom of the sea is undiscovered country to most of us who are not deepsea divers. Now, however, there is a sea telescope that makes it possible for us to see clearly from the deck of a boat, objects a hundred feet below in clear water. It was invented specially for fishermen and salvage workers.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0081.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Banana Skins Can Be Used for Cleaning Shoes
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BANANA skin has a bad name, owing to its unpleasant habit of making people slip. But it is really quite useful. For example, it will clean and polish your shoes just as effectively as a regular shoe-polish. You rub the inside of the skin on your shoe and the sticky substance there will absorb all the dirt.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0082.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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A Tool for Manipulating Cotter-Pins
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THE legs of cotter-pins are often hard to open and close; but there is now a tool to attend to this. There are two handles, pivoted together as in the case of a pair of scissors. One handle has a hole grooved out near the end, and the other terminates in a pyramid-shaped point that fits in the hole.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0083.xml
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An Automatic Fire-Door
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SAFETY curtains, fire-doors, and all other devices for preventing the spread of fire, should be made to work automatically. In the confusion and excitement that accompany fires these devices are often overlooked. In the picture below is shown a new automatic release attached to a fire-door in a factory.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0084.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Removing Old Paint Quickly
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REMOVING old paint with a gasoline blow-torch is a tiresome job. Such work is made more pleasant and rapid with this new torch that burns acetylene gas. The gas is supplied from the dissolvedacetylene tank which rests on the ground. It is connected with the blowpipe by means of a flexible hose of sufficient length to allow the operator freedom in his work.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0085.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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It Keeps the Low Shoes from Slipping Up and Down
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NO matter how well your low shoes fit, they are likely to slip up and down on your heel when you walk. It isn’t the shoes’ fault; they simply are not as flexible as your feet. What will give then this flexibility? A strip of elastic. Y ou fit it inside the shoe and fasten it at each side of your heel.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0086.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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A Speedometer for a Buggy
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SHOULD you see what looks like a speedometer attached to the axle of a buggy, like as not the vehicle is being employed by the Soil Bureau of the United States Department of Agriculture. When thus employed, the principle of the speedometer is converted into an “odometer.”
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0087.xml
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Steel Teeth to Cut the Ice
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AN engine which can push a steel-chisel ice-cutter serves well to keep open winter transportation. The sharp-pointed chisel-teeth dig deeply into the hard surface of ice, or the compact coating of frozen snow, and shove aside the broken pieces to clear the right of way.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0088.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Focusing from Above with an Unusual “Tripod”
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GET up into the air with your camera if you wish to take a photograph of merchandise for catalogue use. This camera “tripod” was built especially for this purpose. Pictures can be taken quickly without the trouble of pinning the objects to the wall.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0089.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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A Hard Helmet to Crack
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MINERS, structural steel-workers, and others who jeopardize their heads by working in places where rock, coal, or pieces of iron frequently fall, can find protection in the new “hard-boiled” cap which serves the purpose of a helmet.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0090.xml
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Carrying Gasoline on the Farm
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WHEN one’s tractor or gas engine is in use a mile or so from the house, and the “gas” gives out, it is not always easy to carry the supply across the plowed fields. To meet this need of farmers a new form of tender has been placed on the market. On two light but strong metal wheels are mounted steel drums in which to store gasoline, water, lubricating oil, etc.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0091.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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A Little Tank with a Big Job
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IF you think this little tank is a toy, you are mistaken. It is a real worker—a hard worker. It is well constructed, has plenty of power, and, although a little slow, like the snail it finally gets there, even though pulling a heavy load. It has a gasoline motor, tractors, and everything.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0092.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Elaborately Carved Human Interest Sign-Posts
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EVEN in their sign-posts the Germans display their love of elaborateness. Instead of having plain wooden or metal posts with arrows pointing to the various towns, highly carved tree-stumps are used. They are fashioned to represent human beings with extended arms— the arms pointing to the various towns, and having the distances written on them.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0093.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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The Muff on the Carriage Handle
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BABY must have plenty of good fresh air. In the wintertime a mother’s hands get very cold on the handle of the perambulator. A humane inventor—very probably an experienced father—has invented a handle which will accommodate a muff so that the hands may be kept comfortably warm while little son or daughter is enjoying the fresh air.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0094.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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How Babies Advertise Milk
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THERE is no better advertisement for milk than a healthy one-year-old consumer. That’s why a London dairyman put four strapping young milk-drinkers in his show-window. If people will stop to look at puppies in a window, surely they will look at babies with a much greater interest.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0095.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Protecting the Traffic Man with a Windshield
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PHILADELPHIA comes to the front with a humane device to protect traffic policemen. Exposed to the bitter winds of winter, the traffic regulator has to keep a sharp lookout for offenders who do not obey his orders. When the wind, full of ice-crystals, cuts into the corners of his eyelids, it is not an easy matter to keep a clear vision.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0096.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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This Cork Cannot Escape Its Fate
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WHERE is that cork?” you ask, after you open a bottle and the cork slips out of your hands. The little wire handcuff on this cork keeps it where it belongs—attached to the bottle. It is very simple. A single piece of smallgage wire which has several bends does the trick.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0097.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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The Trunk Bandit
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THERE is always a great trunk mystery raging as the history of crime goes on. One of the recent trunk affairs involves a burglar who had himself locked in a trunk by his confederates and shipped to a vault in a large storage company. In the dead of night he planned to creep out and take his pick of the valuable jewels and furs around him.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0098.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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The Return of the Four Bronze Horses of Venice
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BEFORE the war, when you could tour Europe for a few hundred dollars, your guide would invariably lead you to the entrance of the church of St. Mark in Venice and point grandly at the four bronze horses at the entrance. But during the war the famous four disappeared—they were removed to Rome for safekeeping.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0099.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Gloves that Were Struck by Lightning
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DON’T open your umbrella in a heavy thunderstorm, even though it will mean ruining a new hat. Umbrellas attract lightning and may lead to injury or sudden death. Above you see a mutilated pair of gloves that were worn by a woman who was holding an umbrella when lightning came her way.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0100.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Ostrich Eggs for Luncheon
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AN ostrich-egg omelet was prepared especially for the thirty-two guests of a film star at a luncheon recently given by her at a fashionable hotel in Santa Barbara, California. In arranging the menu, it was decided to have something in the way of a novelty to offer the guests.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0101.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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What You Can Do with Old Corks
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0102.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Keeping Up with the March of Science
Facts for the man who wants to know
Dyed Sugar Just as Sweet
The Power in a Tree
Tobacco Leads
American Houses for France
A Dearth of Golf-Balls
Recognizing Real Mahogany
How Carbon Black Is Made
Rivaling the Sun
The Average Hair Crop
How to Sleep
Seal Flippers Produce Glue
Radiotelephony on the Farm
Wood Absorbs Explosives
Heat Reflection in the City
Whitewash Wood for Safety
Nettle Fabric for Linen
Preserving Explosives
Fireproofing a Thresher
Sodium Instead of Copper
Weeding Out the Unfit
Bacteria for Sausage Skins
Can You Hear Colors?
Metal that Lubricates Itself
Must the Cat Go?
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THE appearance of “rainbow” sugar has brought about an investigation by the United States Bureau of Chemistry. Harmless dyes were found to have been used in producing the various tints. But the Department of Agriculture intends to keep a sharp lookout for the appearance of other than harmless colors.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0103.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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A Crane with a Code Is Soon Started
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0104.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Five Thousand Pigeons in a Race
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FROM towns within a radius of five hundred miles of St. Louis, Missouri, five thousand homing pigeons were released in one of the most remarkable races of its kind ever held in this country. At the speed of a mile a minute these feathered lettercarriers competed for prizes, the winners being the pigeons that first arrived home and registered inside their loft compartment.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0105.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Voting by Machine
One way to insure an honest election
The Integrity of the Voting-Machine
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Raymond Francis Yates
THE average American feels very important when he goes into the election booth to cast his vote, understanding, as he does, that he is discharging one of his most sacred duties as a citizen. Yet while an election officer is unfolding the ballots, he may “accidentally” tear a few.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0106.xml
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His Master’s Voice—Loud and Deep
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THE superintendent of a large American electrical plant was called into a Conference. While waiting for it to start, he gazed out of the window at the busy yards a Short distance away. Suddenly he noticed a load of material coming down the track.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0107.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Hauling in 2000 Barrels of Fish
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DETACHED and disjointed, the sections of a gigantic fish-trap can be put together in half an hour. When complete, it measures 60 feet in diameter. The hoops which hold the net are 15 feet apart and 10 feet deep. Though the dimensions of the trap are large, it is easily manipulated, a crew of only six men being sufficient to handle it.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0108.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Fifth Avenue Twenty Years After
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0109.xml
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Regulating an Electric Railroad’s Power
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THERE is a new automatic power limiting and indicating system for electric railroads. The system is based on the desire to prevent excessive peak loads which might cause serious voltage variations. It accurately records at one place and on one meter the total power supplied to the railroad’s transmission lines at a number of points.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0110.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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What the X-Rays Reveal about Matter
The atom has a skeleton and the. X-rays show its structure
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WHEN the X-rays were first discovered, scientists were not quite certain whether or not they were light. Light, as every one knows, is a wave motion of the ether. X-rays have waves ten thousand times smaller than ordinary light waves. The ordinary prism or diffraction grating could not resolve an X-ray into a spectrum.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0111.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Down Came Eight Hundred and Fifty Tons of Brick
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0112.xml
article
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MISCELLANEOUS
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A French Machine that Bottles and Labels
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FROM France there comes a new quickaction wine-bottling machine. Frenchmen have plenty of use for it. They drink a bottle of wine with nearly every meal! The machine interests us only theoretically. The wine is poured into a tank which looks like our orangeade tanks.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0113.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Cracking Nuts with a Stick
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WOULD you like to know a new way to crack nuts? This is not a joke, but a serious question. If you are out in the woods gathering nuts some day, and have no nutcracker with you, make one. You take a stick and cut a notch in it. The notch should be about two thirds as deep as the average nut, and a little wider.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0114.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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The Table that Collapses
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A NEW folding table has been invented by Vernon M. Gay, of Danbury, Connecticut. Opened up, it has an attractive circular top whose leaves barely give a hint that they are not built to be permanently spread. Presto! The sliding clamp along the main support is moved, and down come certain sections of the leaves, making the table-top a perfect Maltese cross.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0115.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Worms that Spin Silk in Every Color
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THE silkworm has no taste for color, for which reason its silk is drab and must be dyed before it is woven. By feeding the worm certain leaves it can be made to spin its silk in various beautiful colors. Dr. Vartan K. Osigian, an Armenian, has developed this process, and the silkworms spin silk in eighteen different shades.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0116.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Mittens for the Athlete’s Feet
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ON each hand there are four fingers and a thumb; and on each foot there are five toes. We Americans do not usually put our big toes in a class by themselves, as we do our thumbs. Thus the toe of our stocking is all in one, and so is the toe of our shoe.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0117.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Weighing the “Lift” of a Balloon
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FREE balloons of small size are used by the United States Weather Bureau to help in determining the conditions of the atmosphere and to aid the forecasts which are so valuable to aviation. The drift of free balloons and the motion of the clouds are the weather-vanes of the upper levels.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0118.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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Hair-Dressing Styles for Cattle
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LONG-HAIRED breeds of cattle, such as Hereford, Galloway, or Angus, are carefully “frizzed up” before they are taken into the show ring of the exhibition. Sponge baths and daily scrubbings with soap and water, and much brushing, get the hair in condition for final treatment.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0119.xml
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MISCELLANEOUS
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A Pile-Driver that Does Not Drive
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IF machines like this one are used, the “bump, bump, bump” of the pile-driver will no longer be necessary. This driver screws steel piles into the earth. It works silently but efficiently, putting a steel pile in place as quickly as the ordinary pile-driver.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0120.xml
article
75
75
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Roll Your Umbrella by Tube
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EVER try to roll an umbrella smoothly so it will not bag in the center? The man who knows takes from his pocket a small aluminum cylinder lined with leather and having upon it a gold monogram. Into the end of the cylinder he places the point of the umbrella, holding the cylinder in his left hand.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0121.xml
article
75
75
MISCELLANEOUS
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Farmers Become Experts at Grading Grain
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WHAT is the quality of your lot of grain?” is a question that must be answered. The mass must be probed and a sample taken out to be graded. It is necessary to obtain equal portions of this sample. The Department of Agriculture has put forth an invention which any one can make.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0122.xml
article
75
75
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No Bugs in the Movies
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THOUSANDS of dollars’ worth of damage has been done by moths spotting the films during the making of movingpictures at night. A special trap has been invented by F. S. Mills and Clyde Ewing of the Hollywood Lasky Film Studio. The device consists of a wide box opening, a carbon arc, two 100-candlepower lamps, a funnel made of an ordinary milk-can, a suction fan, and a large net receptacle in which the moths are trapped.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0123.xml
article
76
76
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
Carrying Heat in the Coat Pocket
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WITH one of these little hand-warmers in your pocket, you need not fear the biting winter cold which threatens to benumb your fingers. Take the hand-warmer, a cylindrical box of nickel, out of your pocket, remove the cover, strike a match, and light the wick soaked with the benzine with which the box is filled.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0124.xml
article
76
76
[no value]
[no value]
Primitive Styles in Automobiles
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IN the early days of the automobile, each new type was larger and more complicated than its predecessor. Electric-lighting systems, new kinds of steering devices, ammeters, oil-gages—one by one, they were added. And now, after twenty years of automobiling, we find the small, simple car in vogue again.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0125.xml
article
76
76
SHIPS AND SHIPPING
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She’s Practically Unsinkable
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THE Brude is the latest approach to an unsinkable lifeboat which combines the capacity advantage of a raft. Forty-four people, twenty on the deck and twenty-four on the continuous seat running around its sides, can be accommodated. In a compartment beneath the deck water ballast is carried, while buoyancy tanks are arranged around the boat under the continuous seat.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0126.xml
article
76
76
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
Washing-Block for the One-Armed
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HAVE you ever wondered how you would manage if you had only one arm? The accompanying picture shows a German invention. It is a washingblock for the one-armed. It may be fastened to the wall of the washroom or clamped to any convenient piece of furniture when traveling.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0127.xml
article
76
76
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
No Stakes or Nails Needed Here
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ANY place is home-sweet-home to this fence. There has always been a great need for a fence of this nature and at last an enterprising inventor of Palo Alto, California, set about the task of developing one. The result of his labors is shown.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0128.xml
article
77
77
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
Is This a Street-Car or Is It a Cage?
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HERE is a street-car that looks something like the monkey-cage at the zoo. In fact, this car would make a very suitable vehicle in which to transport monkeys. Few changes in its construction would be necessary. This car is one of many equipped in the same way for protective purposes.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0129.xml
article
77
77
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
To Warn of Unseen Danger
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THERE is a new danger-signal that warns you whether a monkey-wrench may fall upon you from above, or a manhole cover blow up and hit you from below. The signal is provided with an arm that points either up or down toward the source of possible danger.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0130.xml
article
77
77
MISCELLANEOUS
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It Pays to Advertise
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[no value]
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I SCENT which pays the best, an’ then, go into it bald-headed.” So saith the poet, James Russell Lowell. The same sentiment was held by the bald-headed man above; he scented advertising. Whereupon the words, “Venez ce soir au Café du Nord” (Come this evening to the Café du Nord), were painted on his bald head and he sat every evening on a boulevard in Paris near the café.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0131.xml
article
77
77
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
Water, Only Five Cents a Glass
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YOU who let the water drip for days because you are too lazy, or busy, to repair a broken washer, take note. In Constantinople folks must pay five cents for a glass of water! Above you see an army officer getting his nickel’s worth. The water supply in Constantinople, however, is gradually being increased.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0132.xml
article
77
77
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
A Most Extraordinary Clock
[no value]
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PLAIN and simple as this clock looks, it is really very complicated. Not only does it tell the time of its own home town, Aurora, Illinois, but upon request will tell the time of places all over the world. It also gives astronomical and atmospherical readings, and has thermometer and micrometer attachments.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0133.xml
article
78
78
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
This Tool Shakes Scale from Boiler Tubes
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IF boiler tubes are made to vibrate at a high frequency, they will shed their scale as a duck’s back sheds water. This little tool climbs into a boiler tube, carrying its flexible feed-pipe after it. It obtains its power from steam or compressed air.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0134.xml
article
78
78
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
A One-Handled Knife and Fork
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A KNIFE and fork that folds up like a jackknife has been invented by Rudolf Stroppel of West Branch, Iowa. The inventor tells us that it is intended for people with one hand and “campers, or others in like situation.” By this, we judge, he means travelers of all kinds who may desire a quick meal on the road.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0135.xml
article
78
78
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
Through Wood with X-Rays
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RONTGEN rays penetrate wood with the. greatest ease, and it is possible to detect imperfections so small that they ordinarily would escape notice. Samples of wood from which airplane spars are to be made are planed perfectly smooth, and the grain is seen to be straight and even.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0136.xml
article
78
78
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
Paper-Lined Cars Are Frostproof
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HOW can potatoes be shipped by railroad in cold weather without their freezing? Experts in the Department of Agriculture’s Bureau of Markets considered the subject and came to the conclusion that paper would do the job as well as anything.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0137.xml
article
78
78
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
Make the Shovel Into a Hoe
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WHY not combine the hoe and shovel into one tool? The hoe digs down and the shovel digs up; thus one blade will serve both purposes if its direction can be adjusted and its shape can be modified to suit both operations. Mr. Joseph Szabo of Newcastle, Pennsylvania, has invented just such a tool.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0138.xml
article
79
79
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
A Pattern that’s Already Laid
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AS the high cost of clothing is due largely to the high cost of labor, any laborsaving machine is welcome. Above you see an electric pattern-marking machine that does the work of many skilled men. When a certain pattern is decided upon and laid out so that the least possible amount of goods will be used, the new marking-machine traces this pattern on a sheet of chemically prepared paper.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0139.xml
article
79
79
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
How You Can Tell if Cement Is Waterproof
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SOME cement is waterproof, and some is not. But you can’t tell by looking at them which is which. If you wish to find out, sprinkle some of the cement on top of a glass of water and then thrust your finger into the water. If the cement contains the proper amount of waterproofing material, your finger will be dry when you pull it out of the water.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0140.xml
article
79
79
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
A New Use for Talc
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BARIUM sulphate, like many other things, is very scarce. It has always been used as a filler in paint and now a substitute must be found. Many paint manufacturers have decided to try using a talc which belongs remotely to the same family as the talcum powder you use.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0141.xml
article
79
79
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
Lifting Men with Kites
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WHENEVER you have an irresistible desire to go up in the air, try kiting; that is, ascending by the aid of manbearing kites. You will be sure to find it a decidedly exciting and exhilarating sport. Kiting of that kind is a favorite pastime in France and there are numerous clubs devoted to this sport, which have formed a general organization, known as Union Cerfvoliste de France, the headquarters of which are at Issy les Moulineaux, on the outskirts of Paris.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0142.xml
article
79
79
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
The Box that Won’t Come Off
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GREIG’S “Morning Mood.” That’s the name you see on the box. You take out the music-roll, adjust it in place in the player-piano, and start working the pedals. But the first bar or two tells you that “you’ve come to the end of a perfect day.” Of course it’s a mistake.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0143.xml
article
79
79
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
A Tooth-Brush that Twirls as It Cleanses
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IF you brush your teeth regularly three times a day and do it thoroughly, you need not fear the dentist’s chair. But what kind of brush is best for teeth? Owing to their peculiar irregular formation, it is difficult to construct a brush that will reach all the hidden corners and crevices.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0144.xml
article
80
80
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Do It with Tools and Machines
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0145.xml
article
81
81
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Housekeeping Made Easy
Here are various devices to save energy and obtain better results
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0146.xml
article
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
To Mount Heavy Truck Wheels
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THE problem of mounting and dismounting heavy motor-truck wheels has become more and more serious to the motor-truck owner as the size of his fleet increased, making the operation more often necessary for re-tiring the wheels or greasing the bearings.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0147.xml
article
82
82
[no value]
[no value]
Protect Your Garage Air Hose
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BECAUSE all motorists are human, and therefore often negligent about coiling up an air hose so that it will not be run over by other motor vehicles, walked upon, and eventually made to leak, the Standard Oil Company of California has developed an underground counterweight system of hose protection at one of its service stations in San Diego, California.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0148.xml
article
82
82
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
From Vineyard to Bottling-Plant
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HERE is a truck that is not used in the country of prohibition, but that marks a new step in highway transportation in France, where it has displaced the hand-cart, the oxteam, and the small wagon for collecting wine from the vineyards and carrying it to the bottling-plants.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0149.xml
article
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
An Automobile Radiator Shreds the Air
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A NEW principle in the construction of automobile radiators shows the air passing through the radiator core shredded or broken up into a multiplicity of small currents. The purpose of this division of the air-stream passing through the radiator is to bring the greatest possible volume of air into contact with some portion of the core and thereby absorb a greater amount of heat from the water to be cooled.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0150.xml
article
83
83
MISCELLANEOUS
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What Fatigue Poisoning Does to Us
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WHEN Gaston Chevrolet swept across the finish-line, winner of the five-hundred-mile International Sweepstakes automobile race at Indianapolis last May, the spectators cheered wildly and marveled at the endurance of the plucky little driver who had sat at the wheel for six solid hours.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0151.xml
article
83
83
[no value]
[no value]
Getting Their Goats with a Truck
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IT is not every day that a motortruck can act the role of a goatgetter, although this is exactly what the truck shown in the accompanying illustration does. Just how this came about dates way back to the early days of the eighteenth century when the old Spanish Mission padres searched the Pacific coast for converts.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0152.xml
article
84
84,85
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Doing Things Mechanically in the Automobile Garage
The less handwork in the garage the more money in your purse
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0153.xml
article
86
86
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Carrying a Railroad to Alaska
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ALASKA has been greatly in need of railroads. It was unable to build its own roads, owing to lack of facilities in the shape of steel-mills, car-shops, etc. But now the railroad system of Alaska is being gradually built up. The rolling stock and other materials are manufactured in the United States and sent north by water.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0154.xml
article
86
86
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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His Oxygen Tank Useless at 27,000 Feet Altitude
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PROGIN, a Swiss military aviator, decided to try to break the world’s altitude record. He rose higher and higher, until finally his airplane was no longer visible to the people watching him from below. When he had reached a height of twenty-seven thousand feet, and had been forced to use his oxygen tank, one of the connections suddenly broke.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0155.xml
article
86
86
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How One Man Lifts a Ton
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ONE man with a pull of only eighty pounds can lift this oneton block two feet from the ground in half a minute. One man can do the work of five in moving heavy weights, and he need not be a “strong man.” He pulls upon a chain attached to a new “spur-geared” chain-block, and lifts the weight.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0156.xml
article
86
86
MISCELLANEOUS
[no value]
The Long-Tailed Fowl of Japan
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IN the Uyeno Park Museum, in Tokio, Japan, there are three fowls with tail-feathers from thirteen to fifteen feet long. Only the cocks have feathers of such startling length. The hens are rather commonplace in appearance. The long-tailed fowls settled in Japan before the Christian era.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0157.xml
article
87
87
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Learn to Interpret the Engine’s Knock
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[no value]
[no value]
Floyd L. Darrow
WHAT makes your motor “knock”? If you know, you are unique among men. There is more misinformation current among the owners of automobiles regarding the causes of this very common ailment than of all other motor ills combined. The carbon knock, recognized by a regular succession of distinct, almost metallic, sounds, as of blows on an anvil, is by far the most important knock that afflicts the gasoline motor.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0158.xml
article
87
87
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Neat Repair on an Old Table
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TWO valuable old stand-tables, heirlooms, with very heavy marble tops, were brought to me to be repaired. The work was to be done without showing any marks of repair. The heavy tops had caused the legs to give way, allowing the solid walnut center to touch the floor.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0159.xml
article
88
88
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Disk-Grinding on the Lathe
A Grinder from Boiler Plate
Guarding Against Blow-Holes
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[no value]
H. H. Parker
WHETHER equipped with an abrasive cloth disk for surfacing small metal parts or with a sandpaper disk for finishing wood patterns, mitered frames, and other articles, the small disk-grinder is an extremely useful piece of apparatus in the hands of the small-shop or home-shop man.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0160.xml
article
88
88
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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The Government’s Recipe for Whitewash
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HERE is the United States Government’s standard recipe for whitewash. Slack one half bushel of unslacked lime in boiling water, keeping it covered during the process. Strain, and add a peck of salt dissolved in warm water. Add also three pounds of ground rice boiled to a thin paste and one pound of Spanish whiting.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0161.xml
article
88
88
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Here’s an Easy Way to Set Inside Calipers
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TO set an inside caliper to size is not as easy as one would imagine, especially by the regular method. Here is the way I overcame the trouble. I made two blocks, as shown in the illustration, to fit my scale. Through each block I placed a binding-screw.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0162.xml
article
88
88
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Developing the Leg Muscles of Children
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES C. WAGNER
A TEETER-BOARD is probably one of the oldest amusement devices known and is always popular with children. The rocker teeter is a great improvement over the old device, as it is smoother in action and prevents the jar as the child’s feet touch the ground.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0163.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
UNITED STATES SAND PAPER CO.
[no value]
UNITED STATES SAND PAPER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0164.xml
article
90
90
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Ingenuity Shown in an Electric Arc-Lamp
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[no value]
[no value]
Theron P.Foote
WITH a few odds and ends of gaspipe, an old iron box bell, and a mica insulating-j oint such as electricians use on combination gas and electric fixtures, I have constructed a very serviceable homemade arclamp. The accompanying illustration shows in detail the ½-in.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0165.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.: KEYHOLES
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.
KEYHOLES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0166.xml
article
91
91
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Make It Easier to Remove the Ashes
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[no value]
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A DEVICE for the removal of furnace ashes is shown in the two illustrations. A car with an ashcan is drawn up an enclosed incline from beneath the furnace to a point outside the building. A trapdoor in the floor of the ashpit and over the can is opened by means of a rod at the side of the furnace.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0167.xml
article
91
91,92
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Protecting Sliding Wagon Wheels from Wear
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. M. JORDAN
BEFORE descending a steep hill, it is a common practice to lock a rear wheel of a heavily loaded wagon which is not provided with the usual service brakes. This protects the wagon and its load, and also prevents the wagon running over the animals.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0168.xml
advertisement
91
91
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[no value]
Advertisement: Emders SAFETY Ranger
[no value]
[no value]
Emders SAFETY Ranger
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0169.xml
article
92
92,93
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Heating the Automobile’s Front Seat
[no value]
[no value]
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MOST flow-heaters for automobiles seem to be designed for the rear compartment and not for the front seat. The heater shown in the illustration is designed for runabouts, roadsters, and particularly the type of automobile that affords no protection for the driver against cold, such as taxicabs, town cars and limousines.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0170.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Goblin Soap
[no value]
[no value]
Goblin Soap
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0171.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
NEWSKIN COMPANY
[no value]
NEWSKIN COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0172.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
HAMMOND TYPEWRITER CO.
[no value]
HAMMOND TYPEWRITER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0173.xml
advertisement
92
92
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[no value]
Advertisement
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0174.xml
article
93
93
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Holding Paint-Pail Bail to One Side
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE good old-fashioned way to paint small buildings is to get the ladder and hang thereon the pail of paint while the brush is shifted from one hand to the other, as the arms tire. But the nail sometimes bends under its load of lead, and spills its two or three dollars’ worth of contents upon the ground.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0175.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Western Electric Company
[no value]
Western Electric Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0176.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Properly Fit Bearing-Shims
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[no value]
RONALD L. PRINDLE
THE removal of bearing-shims to compensate for wear in connectingrods of an engine that has not seen much service is not difficult, even with those of limited experience in this line. With an old engine this is not so simple. The connecting-rod bearings are provided with a thick metal shim and some smaller ones, and in the old engine it is advisable to file down this thick shim slightly after the bearings have worn down farther than is provided for by the removal of these thinner shims.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0177.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Here Is Shown a Novel Centering-Drill
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A CENTERING-DRILL that makes a beautifully smooth seat for the lathe center is made from a piece of steel with the end formed exactly like a lathe center. A slit is cut, as in the drawing. The length of the slit is about twice the length of the tapered portion of the tool.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0178.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Non-Burning Handle for a Soldering-Iron
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AFTER considerable use the wooden handle of a solderingiron becomes charred and burnt from continued contact with heat. A nonburning handle can be made in the following way: Remove the ferrule and handle and raise several sharp barbs along the end of the shank with a cold chisel.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0179.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Filling the Kitchen Sink with Water
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. ALEXANDER
OFTENTIMES the dishpan is too small, so we decide to fill the kitchen sink with water. This we cannot do because there is no way to stop the outlet. A convenient way to do this is to use a lead weight. To make this weight, select a can lid slightly smaller in diameter than the metallic colander outlet of the sink.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0180.xml
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94
94
[no value]
[no value]
American Commerce Association
[no value]
American Commerce Association
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0181.xml
article
95
95
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Extra Base for the Automobile Jack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
T. HALLETT
WHEN jacking up the car in the mud or sand, it is the usual thing for the bottom of the jack to sink gradually out of sight and subsequently lower the wheel until it again touches the ground. To do away with this annoyance why not carry a supplementary base to support the jack in such soft foundation?
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0182.xml
article
95
95,96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Pipe-Fittings Make a Very Good Muffler
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MUFFLER that gives good results, is easily made, and costs very little, can be put together from the commonest kind of pipe-fittings, nothing being required but seven tees and six short nipples. Screw a tee on the end of the exhaust pipe, and in each branch screw a nipple. Put on two tees, one on each end of the first, screwing them on the nipples.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0183.xml
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95
95
[no value]
[no value]
WASHER COMPANY
[no value]
WASHER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0184.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
V-Blocks Made of a Piece of Pipe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SMALL set of V-blocks can be easily made for bench use by utilizing pipe fittings in the manner shown. First get a sufficiently large flange and bolt it to the bench in a convenient position. Then thread a short other. File away any unevenness and try to get the cuts the same size and shape, so a round rod, reaching across, will fit in the cuts without any chance of wabbling.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0185.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
No Light Can Get into This Darkroom
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CORA HAMILTON
A DEALER in photographic supplies was often asked for the loan of his darkroom, and several times people had opened the door, not knowing the room was in use. Of course this spoiled the plates and films then being developed. The photographer was exceedingly annoyed by this, so he figured a way by which it couldn’t happen again.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0186.xml
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96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0187.xml
article
97
97
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Expanding Screwdriver Made at Home
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. E. MENDE
ANY instrument maker, addingmachine assembler, typewriter repairman, etc., will appreciate this expanding screwdriver, which is very efficient and practical. When you have to replace a screw in an almost enclosed corner, where you cannot use your fingers, all you have to do with this improved screwdriver is to pinch the tongues together and press it into the slot of screw, which it will hold firmly and not drop, as would be the case with a magnetized screwdriver.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0188.xml
article
97
97,98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Save Coal with This Simple Draft-Gage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANCIS DASHIELL
THE production of draft in a chimney and the satisfactory operation of the boiler connected with the chimney depend upon the pressure difference between the heated gases in the chimney and the outside air pressure. To operate the boiler to its maximum advantage, especially in house-heating (for which this article is intended), it is necessary that there be some visible means of knowing this pressure difference or draft.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0189.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
TUBULAR WOVEN FABRIC CO.: DURACORD
[no value]
TUBULAR WOVEN FABRIC CO.
DURACORD
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0190.xml
article
98
98,99
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Clamp that Holds the Lamp in Position
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. H. CASPER.
IF working at a vise, it is not only necessary to have enough light, but also to have it where it is wanted. The usual type of electric lamp gives sufficient light, but is unsatisfactory because if too high, it throws a shadow of the worker on his work, and if too low, it is a hindrance.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0191.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0192.xml
article
99
99
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Keep the Typist's Papers in Order
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M.A. OSBERG
WHEN typing multiple copies of a letter the stenographer is usually annoyed by the sheets and carbon paper curling up. Try as she will she cannot keep them flat. Whenever this occurs in our office we attach a paper clip to the end of the top sheet, which weights the other copies down and permits us to continue the work without further trouble.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0193.xml
article
99
99
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Way to Mill Keys from Flat Stock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHOULD a number of keys have to be made all alike, they can be made on the milling machine, using a thin cutter or a metal slitting-saw. The tapers can be set off on the dividing scale of the machine, so that they all will be alike. By arranging the cuts so that the keys will come “heads and tails,” there will be a minimum of waste material.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0194.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
P.H. HANES KNITTING CO.
[no value]
P.H. HANES KNITTING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0195.xml
article
100
100
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Tap-and-Drill Table in a Metal Soap-Box
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Theron P. Foote
EVERY man who shaves himself has his own particular make of soap. I have been using the twentyfive-cent size shaving-stick, and when I finished with the box I always gave it to the baby to play with. The other day I found one on the floor and, putting it in his box of toys, noticed that he had eight similar boxes.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0196.xml
article
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Protect Your Garage and Car from Fire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN spite of every precaution, gasoline is sometimes spilled in the garage or shed in which an automobile is housed and it is not always due to carelessness that the spilled gasoline is ignited. An extinguisher of the squirt-gun type, and filled with carbon tetrachloride or trichlorethylene, should be in every garage.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0197.xml
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100
100
[no value]
[no value]
DEPARTMENT OF SIGNALLING
[no value]
DEPARTMENT OF SIGNALLING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0198.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
University of Applied Science
[no value]
University of Applied Science
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0199.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0200.xml
article
102
102,104
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Battery-Charging Apparatus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Francis Raymond
MANY more owners of automobiles would equip their cars with storage batteries for lighting purposes if it were not for the expense and trouble necessary in taking the battery out of the car and having it recharged at the service station. This is particularly true of Ford cars not provided with a storage battery for lighting, and the following method of making a device that may be used in the cellar of the house, or garage, will help solve this trouble for many owners.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0201.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
ROYAL DIAMOND WATCH CO
[no value]
ROYAL DIAMOND WATCH CO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0202.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
MECCANO COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
MECCANO COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0203.xml
article
104
104
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Notch Sectors on an Ordinary Lathe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TOOTHED sector is easily notched out on an ordinary lathe, Mark off the tooth positions on the edge of the sector. Mount a milling cutter of the desired form on a mandrel in the usual way. Bolt the sector to the tool carriage, using a bolt that passes snugly through the hole in the hub with the head in the tool-post slot.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0204.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0205.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0206.xml
article
105
105
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Envelope Trick, or the Mysterious Message
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE “gentleman from the audience” being shown an apparently empty envelope, is asked to place a message inside it, then seal the envelope. This he does, and is amazed to see the performer immediately tear open the envelope and draw .out a return message which has, in some mysterious manner, replaced the original note.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0207.xml
article
105
105
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making Machine Screws from Rivets
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN an emergency, a very respectable machine screw can be made from a round-headed rivet, either brass or iron. All that is necessary is to thread the shank with the stock and die, and with the hacksaw make a slot in the head. A convenie nt way to hold a short rivet for threading is to place it between two blocks of wood and put the blocks in the vise, pressing the rivet head into the wood with as much force as is necessary to prevent it from turning.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0208.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
[no value]
THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0209.xml
article
106
106
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Harvesters Can Be Made on the Farm
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CORN is one of America’s big crops, and its magnitude alone would suggest the difficulty -of the task in harvesting the immense acreage. Moreover, corn-harvesting is limited to a few days if the feeding value of the fodder is to be completely realized.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0210.xml
article
106
106
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Good Boring-Bar from Steel Tubing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AVERY simple and satisfactory boring-bar can be made from a piece of steel tubing, 2 plugs, a long bolt, and a piece of steel for the cutter. A slot is cut at any desired place in the tube to hold the cutter, the slot being just large enough to allow the steel to pass through.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0211.xml
article
106
106
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Emergency Spark-Gap for a Weak Cylinder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a certain cylinder misses regularly, it is an easy thing to locate, but when every cylinder misses, then one is very apt to use harsh language. The illustration shows how to make a cheap spark-gap which can be applied to each of the spark-plugs.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0212.xml
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106
106
[no value]
[no value]
LaSalle Extension University
[no value]
LaSalle Extension University
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0213.xml
article
107
107
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Square of the Distance Explained by Geometry
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. C. RIDGELY
IF the rays from a single source of light are allowed to fall upon screens as indicated in the illustration, the amount of light which the first screen receives would cover the surface of four screens of the same size placed at double the distance.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0214.xml
article
107
107,108
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Square a Timber by Reflection
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are times when one wishes to square a timber and has no square at hand. To take chances on squaring by the eye alone is risky, but here is a way that it may be squared by the eye and still run a good chance of making the cut square enough for all practical purposes.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0215.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
THE REFINITE CO.
[no value]
THE REFINITE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0216.xml
article
108
108,109
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
First Aid for the FlashLight Battery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN one is in most urgent need of an emergency light, it often happens that the old flashlight is “dead.” The following first-aid treatment has often saved such a situation : Remove the battery and slip the individual cells out of the cardboard tube.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0217.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0218.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
The Musterole Co.
[no value]
The Musterole Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0219.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Motor Institute, Inc.
[no value]
Motor Institute, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0220.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0221.xml
article
109
109
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Right Way to Plane a Curved Surface
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PIECE of wood can be planed with a surface curved lengthwise, using a straight plane, if the trick is known, and if the wood is thin enough to be somewhat flexible. Simply fasten the wood down to the bench with a support under it so that the under side will have the curve that is required on the top.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0222.xml
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109
109
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0223.xml
article
110
110,111
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Efficient Method of Grinding Lawn-Mowers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EARLY fall is the time that the lawn-mower should be cleaned, sharpened, and oiled to be put away for the coming season. At this time, too, the average small machinist is crowded with work along that line and perhaps finds it hard to keep up with the demand, especially at the fag end of the summer season.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0224.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0225.xml
article
111
111
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Electric Lamp as a Cooking Device
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN egg can be electrically fried and other small cooking done with the aid of an ordinary lightingbulb—the bigger the better—and a tin can. Put the bulb in the can, as shown in the illustration, and set the cooking utensil on top, and wait for the result.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0226.xml
article
111
111,112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Measuring Distances byMeans of a Wheel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT takes two men to stretch a tapeline when measuring land, but one man can do the job quicker and better with an old buggy wheel rigged up properly. Make two shafts out of 3-in. scantling about 6 ft. long. They are attached to the wheel-hub with an axle made of a long bolt.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0227.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0228.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Testing-Rod Indicating Live Cables
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO make sure that wires are absolutely “dead” before working upon them a Rochester, New York, railroad and lighting company is using a cable-tester. This instrument consists of. a condenser and a Geisler tube mounted on a long rod.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0229.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Worn-Out Saws Still Have Their Uses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the large manufacturing concerns uses old band-saws, which were formerly thrown on the scrap-pile, for lining flumes for sand and gravel. The old blades have been found so well adapted to this use, owing to their hardness, that the manufacturers referred to not only use up their own old saws, but purchase blades discarded by other concerns. They last three or four times as long as bands of the average structural steel.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0230.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0231.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0232.xml
article
114
114
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Mirror to View the Inside of Elevated Objects
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR inspecting the condition of inverted lights, high shafting, house gutters, or any object at considerable height which is in such a position that it cannot be viewed from the ground, the mirror herein described will be found useful. Procure a round automobile mirror of the style shown.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0233.xml
article
114
114,115
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Rain Visor for Your Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN it rains against the windshield the view of the road is uncertain and chances of accident are increased. Windshield cleaners are good, but they keep one working. This visor has been devised to prevent the elements from striking the glass at all and is a great help to drivers in stormy weather.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0234.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0235.xml
article
115
115
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Numerous Uses for the Electric Iron
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE electric iron used by the housewife is like the electric fan—it has many other valuable uses than that for which it was intended. The writer, returning from an automobile trip, found a large gap the size of a silver dollar cut in one of the tires.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0236.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
Rahe School
[no value]
Rahe School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0237.xml
article
116
116
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Short Cut to the Circle’s Circumference
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK W. HARTH
HOW often have you wished that you could get fairly accurately the circumference of a circle quickly without a lot of figuring? The following short cut is especially valuable to the sheet-metal worker and to others as well. Suppose we were laying out a sheet-metal duct of circular construction and had drawn a circle to denote the cross-section.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0238.xml
article
116
116,117
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Electrocuting Four-Footed Chicken-Thieves
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. W. FLETCHER
COUNTING my flock of chickens every night for a week I found that fifty had utterly disappeared from the henyard in that time. This yard had a five-foot fence all around it, but I noticed that it was slightly bent down on the side away from the house.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0239.xml
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116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0240.xml
article
117
117
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Enlarging the Bore of a Reamer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MACHINIST recently showed me a trick with a reamer that may be useful to others. He desired to ream out a hole in steel to a certain diameter, but the reamer nearest the size desired fell short a small fraction of an inch. To make chis reamer sufficiently oversize to meet the situation, he resorted to the following expedient:
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0241.xml
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117
117
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0242.xml
article
118
118
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Concrete Supports for Work Under the Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE R. VAN HORN
THOUSANDS of car-owners take their cars to the garage and pay for little jobs that they themselves could do at home. But the thought of sliding under a chassis with a twelveinch clearance and attempting to make satisfactory repairs keeps them from trying it.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0243.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0244.xml
article
119
119
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Cutter for Making Large Holes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CUTTING large holes in sheet metal is sometimes quite a problem when the metal is too heavy to work with shears, or the hole is not large enough. A highly satisfactory tool can be made for the purpose in the following way: Take a piece of brass or steel tubing of a diameter about 1/16 in.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0245.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0246.xml
article
120
120
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make Your Own Cabinet Clamps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CABINET-MAKER’S clamp suitable for the amateur’s workbench can be made of a section of channel iron and a discarded bolt as follows: Cut out a section of heavy channel iron about 1 in. wide. The width of the iron between sides should be enough to furnish jaws of sufficient opening.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0247.xml
article
120
120,121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Check Up the Alinement of a Connecting-Rod
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RONALD L. PRINDLE
A PART of an old discarded crankshaft used in conjunction witn an old face-plate and square, is a reliable means of checking up the connectingrod alinement of a motor vehicle. The crankshaft must be cut just forward of the connecting-rod bearing, and the flywheel flange used as a base to bolt the dummy crank thus formed to the faceplate.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0248.xml
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120
120
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0249.xml
article
121
121,122
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Some Ways of Arranging Machine Belting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
THE amateur machinist is not always aware that belting can be arranged to drive a wheel or countershaft in any other way than by the direct method employed in all ordinary power transmission. A man having his own little power plant in the basement, attic, or in any small, confined quarters, can, by clever manipulation of belting, greatly increase the machine capacity of his limited space.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0250.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
THE FLORSHEIM SHOE COMPANY
[no value]
THE FLORSHEIM SHOE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0251.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
Federal School of Applied Cartooning
[no value]
Federal School of Applied Cartooning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0252.xml
article
122
122
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A New Lubrication Idea for a Milling Cutter
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[no value]
J. W. MOORE
IT is a well known fact that if a milling cutter is well lubricated while it is cutting, it will perform quicker and better work. Acting on that assumption, here is what the writer did: In place of the ordinary single pipe which fed the lubricant to the cutter, a long pipe was made with a series of holes in it similar to those in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0253.xml
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122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0254.xml
article
123
123,124
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Supplying Moisture for the Automobile Engine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALMOST every man who owns or has run an automobile has noticed that his engine actually runs better in the very early morning or late at night, just after the dew has fallen. This is due to the amount of moisture in the air. Why contend with the frequent skipping of the engine and the loss of power due to the hot dry air of a summer day, when with a few hours’ time and a little expense you can manufacture an apparatus which will give you the moist cold air that gives life to your engine?
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0255.xml
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123
123
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0256.xml
article
124
124,125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Using Stumpwood for Lime-Burning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES F. HIGGS
FIREWOOD is becoming scarce and expensive. This has made the burning of lime more costly than in former years. It requires about 30 cords of wood to fire a kiln containing about 1500 bushels of lime. Owing to the increased value of the wood, we see very few of the old limekilns in operation nowadays.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0257.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0258.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Reference Tables Passed Along by a Trolley-Line
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[no value]
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THIS idea, which illustrates how one drafting-room eliminates waste of time, is so adaptable to other lines as to merit attention. In order to speed up the work of passing various reference tables from one draftsman to another, a trolleywire was erected as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0259.xml
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125
125
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[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0260.xml
article
126
126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Have You a Step-Saving House?
The Popular Science Monthly will pay ninety dollars for the best answers
Rules Governing the Contest
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[no value]
[no value]
HOW do you save steps in your home? What arrangements or what appliances have you made that save time and reduce work that would otherwise have to be done by hand? The Popular Science Monthly wants to know just what practical and useful things can be constructed to make every house a step-saving house.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0261.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Jason Weiler & Sons
[no value]
Jason Weiler & Sons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0262.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Choraleon Phonograph Co.
[no value]
Choraleon Phonograph Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0263.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
[no value]
LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0264.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cooling the Shelves of the Kitchen Closet
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CURRENT of cool air can be made to circulate through the shelves of a kitchen closet by cutting holes at the top and bottom through the flooring and walls and by using “icebox” shelves made of perforated iron. The air can be kept cooler and cleaner if a length of sheet-iron furnace pipe is run from the hole in the closet floor down into the cellar below, so that the open end of the pipe is but a few inches from the cellar floor.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0265.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Apply Gold Leaf to Uneven Surfaces
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[no value]
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[no value]
WHILE patented gold leaf is the handiest to apply to flat, even surfaces, it is not so easy to use on depressed or uneven surfaces, especially if the depressions are of some little depth. Nevertheless it sometimes happens that it is the only kind on hand.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0266.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS &. Co.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS &. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0267.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Simple Wood Insert for Cement Fence-Posts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOST of the difficulty with cement fence-posts comes in supplying a suitable method of tacking the wires to them. This is easily overcome by the method described. A strip of wood, wider on one side than the other, is embedded in each concrete post, in the casting, with the narrower side flush with the surface of the post.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0268.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Get Your Chicken Dinner with a Lasso
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[no value]
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OF course Miss Chicken may object to being roped in, as it were; but by using a lasso you are absolutely sure of having her for dinner. Scatter the corn as you always do when feeding the chickens, placing a cord lasso in a loop about it. Have plenty of slack to the end of the twine so as to stand back far enough in order not to frighten the fowl that you have your eye upon.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0269.xml
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128
128
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0270.xml
article
129
129
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Picking Up Threads Is No Easy Task
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[no value]
H. E. MENDE
THE thread-picker as shown in the illustration was found to be very useful in picking thread or hair from the floor. If this is done before you use your vacuum cleaner or carpetsweeper, it will prevent the brushes from becoming entangled with the thread or hair.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0271.xml
article
129
129
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Something to Know about Line-Shading
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IN heavy line-shading—as in a Patent Office drawing—there is a tendency for the ink to flow under the triangle and cause a blot. The accompanying illustration shows a device useful in such cases. On the triangle B (Fig. 1) small triangular lugs are cemented on each corner.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0272.xml
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129
129
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0273.xml
article
130
130
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Tool for Removing Spindle Bushings
[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
PARTS of machines such as spindle bushings are often difficult to drive out. With a tool like the one herein described, however, the job becomes much easier. Get a piece of round tool steel a trifle smaller than the spindle’s inside diameter.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0274.xml
article
130
130
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Making a Trestle that Can Be Folded Easily
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. C. WAGNER
A COLLAPSIBLE trestle is easily constructed and can be conveniently stored when not in use, or easily transferred from place to place, as occasion may require. It can be made from as heavy material as the work requires. The legs, instead of being nailed permanently to the heavy timber used to hold them together, are attached by hinges. The legs may also be spliced by gate-hinges.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0275.xml
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130
130
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0276.xml
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130
130
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Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0277.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Electric-Light Bulbs Make Good Clothes-Sprinklers
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[no value]
[no value]
A. GOLDENBAUM
MANY women sprinkle their clothes by hand, and many more go to the trouble of purchasing a clothes-sprinkler when they could easily make one at home. Here is a way of making your own clothessprinkler that will do the work as efficiently as any factory-made article.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0278.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Did the Telephone Company Know About It?
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HAVING occasion to use my telephone downstairs during the day and upstairs during the night, but believing the convenience thereby obtained did not warrant the rental required by the telephone company to install and maintain a second instrument, I purchased two telephone jacks and a plug.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0279.xml
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131
131
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[no value]
IOWA STATE AUTO & TRACTOR SCHOOL
[no value]
IOWA STATE AUTO & TRACTOR SCHOOL
[no value]
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0280.xml
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131
131
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COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL
[no value]
COLUMBIA CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOL
[no value]
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0281.xml
advertisement
131
131
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0282.xml
advertisement
131
131
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[no value]
THE PUCKETT METHOD CORPORATION
[no value]
THE PUCKETT METHOD CORPORATION
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0283.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Some Ways to Avoid the Repairman
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COMPARATIVELY few owners and drivers of automobiles are aware of the value of soap for sealing leaky joints in the gasoline system. Very frequently gasoline oozes out around the filler cap, especially when the tank is nearly full. Such a leak is objectionable because the gasoline spreads over the outside of the tank, which nowadays is usually carried at the rear of the car, collects dust and impairs the finish.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0284.xml
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132
132
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[no value]
Haywood Tire & Equipment Co.
[no value]
Haywood Tire & Equipment Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0285.xml
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132
132
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0286.xml
article
133
133
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Handy Test-Tube Holder for the Laboratory
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TEST tubes are frequently broken because they are left lying about the bench. Why not have a holder for them? That old discarded poker-chip holder so popular years ago can be utilized to good advantage for holding the extra test-tubes, as shown.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0287.xml
article
133
133,134
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Universal Joint to Be Used in Light Work
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[no value]
[no value]
HOWARD GREENE
A SATISFACTORY universal joint for light work is made as shown in the accompanying illustration, and it has the advantage of running in absolute silence. It requires no lubrication, and will not wear, provided it is not overloaded. Split the ends of the shafts to be jointed, heat the split ends to a low red, and bend the two parts in opposite directions at right angles, being careful to have them exactly at right angles.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0288.xml
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133
133
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LIONEL STRONGFORT
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LIONEL STRONGFORT
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[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0289.xml
article
134
134
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Do You Know the Proper Way to Sharpen Drills?
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RONALD L. PRINDLE
IT is surprising to learn of the small number of mechanics who can boast of knowing how to sharpen a drill. To those who would like to learn the proper method of grinding we offer this advice: The mechanic should bear in mind the following factors:
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0290.xml
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134
134
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0291.xml
article
135
135
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Making a Grooved Pulley from Barrel-Heads
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OFTENTIMES a grooved wheel of fairly large diameter is wanted for temporary or rough use. Such a pulley, built of wood, can be constructed of two barrel-heads and a third wooden disk with a flat edge. Cut the disk out of stock, the thickness of which is as wide or wider than used.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0292.xml
article
135
135
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Portable Cabinet Made from Match-Boxes
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[no value]
[no value]
MYRON DRACHMAN
TAKE six empty match - boxes. Glue them together as shown in the illustration and glue stout wrapping-paper around the whole. You now have a cabinet with six drawers that will fit comfortably in the coat pocket. Further improvements can be added in the way of index labels pasted on the front of the drawers and little knobs for pulling them out.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0293.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0294.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
The Tackard Electric Company: Wireless Telegraph Transformers
[no value]
The Tackard Electric Company
Wireless Telegraph Transformers
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0295.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
BUELL MFG. CO.: BUELL
[no value]
BUELL MFG. CO.
BUELL
[no value]
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PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0296.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
CHAS. H. JOHNSTON
[no value]
CHAS. H. JOHNSTON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0297.xml
article
136
136
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Taking the “Pop” Out of the Gas-Stove
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[no value]
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[no value]
NEARLY all gas-stoves will occasionally back-fire, or burn back in the opening where the gas is admitted, and some stoves have the habit so badly that it is a positive nuisance. This can be cured, however, by inserting a piece of fine brass or copper wire gauze in the pipe leading to the burner — between tap and burner.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0298.xml
article
136
136
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Automatic Shaft-Polishers Prevent Rust
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHAFTING in a machine-shop, which has been allowed to accumulate rust through neglect, can be kept in a clean condition by the use of the polishers shown in the sketch. Cut out several disks of heavy cardboard, felt or leather, and slip them on the shaft by spreading a cut through one side.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0299.xml
article
136
136
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Springy Cage Perches Make Healthy Canaries
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[no value]
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WHEN birds hop from branch to branch it can always be noticed that the twig gives slightly to the weight of the bird. For this reason bird-cages should be provided with springy sticks. These are attached to a piece of wire which firmly loops the stick.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0300.xml
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136
136
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[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.: Red Devil
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.
Red Devil
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0301.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0302.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS: Electricians’ Knife and Tweezers
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
Electricians’ Knife and Tweezers
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0303.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Gilson Slide Rule Co.: The Midget Slide Rule
[no value]
Gilson Slide Rule Co.
The Midget Slide Rule
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0304.xml
article
137
137
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How Rubber Hose Improves Your Pliers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOU can easily make all your pliers open automatically and stay open at all times by attaching a piece of rubber tubing or hose as shown in the illustration. It is found to be very useful for instrument makers and electricians and at the same time it makes a soft handle and a non-conductive one where live wires are to be cut.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0305.xml
article
137
137
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Keep Flower-Beds and Lawns Trimmed
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOME little time is required to edge and trim walks and flower-beds even if the person doing it is experienced. A gardener who had charge of a public park equipped his men with edging tools which he made himself. Wheels were procured from worn-out lawn-mowers, a hardwood stick four feet long, and a blade from an old carving-knife.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0306.xml
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137
137
[no value]
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
THE L. S. STARRETT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0307.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Starret Tools
[no value]
[no value]
Starret Tools
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0308.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
Hobart Brothers Co.
[no value]
Hobart Brothers Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0309.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
THE LUFKIN RULE CO.
[no value]
THE LUFKIN RULE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0310.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
SOUTH BEND LATHE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0311.xml
article
138
138,139
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Automatic Draft-Opener for the Furnace
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Thorton Hallett
WHEN the alarm goes off in the darkness of a cold morning, why not have the furnace drafts automatically opened so that by the time you have had a couple of extra naps and finally get dressed the fire will be burning briskly and heat coming into the rooms?
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0312.xml
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138
138
[no value]
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0313.xml
article
139
139
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Suggestions for Economy on the Automobile
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the brakes squeak it is usually due to dirt forced into the lining fabric when pressed against the drum. Often this dirt can be washed out with kerosene. When the lining is thoroughly impregnated with dirt, however, kerosene will not prove adequate.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0314.xml
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139
139
[no value]
[no value]
Simonds Manufacturing Co.: SIMONDS SAWS
[no value]
Simonds Manufacturing Co.
SIMONDS SAWS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0315.xml
article
140
140,141
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Easily Installed Burglar Alarm for the Home
How to Install the Alarm
[no value]
[no value]
Mortimer V. Tessier
IN these days, when our daily papers are so full of the activities of the house-breaker, many will be interested, no doubt, in anything that will insure their home against a visitor of this kind. Nothing will drive a burglar away quicker than an unusual noise of any kind while he is at work.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0316.xml
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140
140
[no value]
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0317.xml
article
141
141
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Splice a Clothesline Strongly and Easily
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN several sections of a clothesline have to be connected, or when a broken section has to be repaired, here is a simple way to do it that will prove strong: Cut off the end of the line clean and bind each one with several turns of tightly wound twine.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0318.xml
article
141
141
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Balance Ornaments that Are Top-Heavy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WE are constantly upsetting topheavy ornaments, lamps, pedestals, etc. A great many of these accidents can be remedied easily, if the bases on which these lamps or ornaments rest are made heavier. This may be done in many different ways and does not require exceptional skill.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0319.xml
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141
141
[no value]
[no value]
OTTAWA MFG. CO.: OTTAWA BUZZ SAW
[no value]
OTTAWA MFG. CO.
OTTAWA BUZZ SAW
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0320.xml
article
142
142
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Simple Automatic Signal for Garages
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Thomas W. Benson
RESIDENTS near public garages are often annoyed by motorists blowing their horns late at night when seeking admittance, and the night man is usually busy washing cars and fails to pay immediate attention to the request. A method of calling the attendant automatically is shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0321.xml
article
142
142
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Special Surface-Gage Pointer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. H. Parker
THE sketch illustrates a fine adjustment attachment to a surface gage when a direct longitudinal movement of the pointer is required. It is intended to fit into the regular clamp body in place of the regular needle and consists of a steel sleeve the diameter of the original needle, made either of small sized tubing or of a piece of rod drilled out with a long drill of small diameter and then turned on the outside to the pointer diameter.
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0322.xml
article
142
142
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Scratch the Match on Your Pocket-Knife
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MORTIMER TESSIER
THE three most essential requirements of the smoker are, first, something to smoke; second, a match; and, lastly, some place to scratch the match. As nearly all smokers carry a pocket-knife, the difficulty may be overcome by placing the knife in a vise and with a hard file make a senes of notches across the back of the knife (as shown in the illustration).
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0323.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
The Veeder Mfg. Co.: Veeder COUNTER
[no value]
The Veeder Mfg. Co.
Veeder COUNTER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0324.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY
[no value]
THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0325.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
United States Rubber Company
[no value]
United States Rubber Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0326.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.: Camel
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
Camel
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0327.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Company: Victrola
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Company
Victrola
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19201101_0097_005_0328.xml