Issue: 19200701

Thursday, July 1, 1920
JULY 1920
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97
Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Articles
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0001.xml
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TOPKIS BROTHERS COMPANY
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TOPKIS BROTHERS COMPANY
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0002.xml
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1
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Victor Talking Machine Company
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Victor Talking Machine Company
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0003.xml
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2
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Southern Cypress Manufacturers' Association
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Southern Cypress Manufacturers' Association
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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2,4,6
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Popular Science Monthly
CONTENTS
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0005.xml
masthead
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Masthead
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0006.xml
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They Dared to laugh in the Face of Death
The Whole Wonderful Story of the Gripping Heroism and Bravery of our Soldiers in France as Told by Themselves in the Stars and Stripes, the Official Newspaper of the A. E. F. All of the 71 Overseas Issues, Now Bound in One De-Luxe Volume, Form a Price-less Souvenir of the Great War
The Most Amazing Chronicle of Its Kind Ever Written
A Beautiful, Lasting Souvenir of the Great War
Limited Edition—Reserve Your Copy Now
SEND NO MONEY
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HERE is the most remarkable human document that has come out of the world war. Here is a living, breathing record of the lives of two million men in war—written by the men themselves as they fought through the devastated wastes of France. Every page of this amazing record breathes of the flaming courage and spirit of men who dared to laugh in the face of death.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0007.xml
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0008.xml
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5
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The OLIVER Typewriter Company
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The OLIVER Typewriter Company
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0009.xml
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Charles F. Haanel
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Charles F. Haanel
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0010.xml
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DEPARTMENT OF SIGNALLING
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DEPARTMENT OF SIGNALLING
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0011.xml
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UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
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UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0012.xml
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LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0013.xml
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8,9,10,12,14
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0014.xml
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Burlington Watch Co.
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Burlington Watch Co.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0015.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0016.xml
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0017.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0018.xml
article
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17,18,19,20,21,22
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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Racing for the “America’s” Cup
When sport becomes a science
Famous Contestants for the “America’s” Cup
The America
The Mischief
The British Cutter Genesta
The Scotch Cutter Thistle
The Valkyrie
The Vigilant
The Columbia
The Vanitie
The Resolute
The Shamrock IV
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Joseph Brinker
SIR THOMAS LIPTON has come to this country with one of the most remarkable and sensationally radical challengers that ever crossed the Atlantic. Yachting experts who have seen the hull of the Shamrock IV agree that she is perhaps the lightest and yet the most powerful British racing creation that has ever visited our shores.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0019.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Build Your House Out of Your Own Back Yard
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HOME seekers in Los Angeles are literally grasping at straws— and mud. Their slogan is “build your house out of its own back yard.” Due to lack of building materials, adobe clay mixed with straw, in Mexican fashion, is now being used in the construction of southern California bungalows.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0020.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Balloons Are Substitutes for Storage-Tanks
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“HOW would you carry a large volume of hydrogen gas to the distant field where it is needed to inflate a dirigible or a kite balloon?” This might seem a problem difficult to solve unless the gas, greatly compressed, could be conveyed in metal tanks.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0021.xml
article
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24,25
AERONAUTICS
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Next! The Aerial Freight Train
Will this latest project of aeronautics become a practical possibility?
Difficulties to Be Overcome
A Remote Possibility
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Adrian Van Muffling
IMAGINE a string of airplanes, or rather huge motorless gliders laden with freight, traveling over the trackless road-beds of the sky, led by a tremendous “locomotive-plane.” It’s a picture fairly staggering even to our rather sophisticated modern imagination.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0022.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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How to Test a Safe’s Strength
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A SAFE has a reputation to uphold. It is supposed to protect its contents so carefully that they will come through fire and falls unscathed. But how can you be sure of this? One safe-maker decided to prove the worth of his safes by baking one of them, dropping it thirty feet through the air, hurling a load of bricks on top of it, and then baking it again.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0023.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Sanding by Compressed Air
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CHAINS keep an automobile from skidding and sliding when the brakes are jammed on in rainy weather. A train can’t wear chains, yet it is just as susceptible when the brakes are applied and the tracks are wet. But a constant flow of sand from the locomotive to the tracks will take the place of chains.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0024.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Learning to Fight a Switchboard Fire
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IF a telephone switchboard caught fire, would you know how to put it out? Perhaps you are never left alone with a switchboard, but there are many men—watchmen, for instance—who are. For the benefit of these men the New York Telephone Company recently held a fire-fighting exhibition.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0025.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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No More Trouble with the Machine-Tool Oil-Pump
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IN cutting metals, the tools must be kept cool by means of oil in order to prevent the excessive heat generated by friction, from spoiling the edge. The oil must be pumped continuously upon the tool and the supply must be regulated to correspond with the cutting speed.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0026.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Will Peat Ever Replace Coal?
As coal grows scarcer a machine for excavating peat is invented
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0027.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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The Way They Mine Silver in Peru
They still employ the primitive methods that were in vogue in the days of Pizarro
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0028.xml
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30,31,32,33
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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The Motor-Truck Helps the Railroad
Speed up the box-car by the expedient of keeping it moving
Freight Is Stacked at Terminals
Why There Is a Car Shortage
Spending Millions Isn't the Answer
Motor-Trucks to the Rescue
Saving New York from Herself
To Make a Greater Port
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Latimer J. Wilson
IF the man whose income is but $1,300 a year knew that he is paying a tax of $80 a year, what would happen? The answer is obvious. But he does not know, and so he goes on paying $80 a year tribute to the box-car that hauls his food, clothing, and other necessities.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0029.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Hitch the Street-Sweeper to a Ford
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PUT the old horse out in the pasture and hitch the street-sweeper to a Ford, and it will save money for your city. This is the lesson taught by the motorized street-cleaning department of Albany, N. Y. Horse-drawn sweepers, and also man-power sweepers, have been supplanted by the motor-drawn apparatus.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0030.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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A Tractor for the Small Farmer
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A NEW tractor that does the work of five men or one horse is shown in the illustration pulling a cultivator and jogging along at a good speed. The belt-wheel seen in front makes it possible to use the six-horsepower engine for other power purposes than harrowing, seeding, etc.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0031.xml
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FOR THE FARMER
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It Gathers Up Stones in the Road
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WHERE large and small pebbles are collected loosely in the gravel of a road, they are usually scattered in such a way that it would be an irksome job to collect them by hand. A new stone-gathering machine is drawn by one or two horses. A series of chains dragged loosely along the road sink into the small depressions and gradually scrape together the pebbles or stones.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0032.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Stone Carvings by a Lone Hermit
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IF you believe in ghosts, then go to the island named Rotheneuf, in France. It is such a weird, unearthly place that your chances of seeing a ghost there ought to be good. A hermit has lived there for many years and he has carved hundreds of strange figures in the shelving, rocky shores.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0033.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Cable Repairs
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WHEN the submarine cable leaks, a call goes out for the big cable repair ship to repair it. Bringing the cable-ship costs considerable money. The telegraph operator at Guinayangan on the island of Luzon has trained his native crew to raise the undersea wire without its aid.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0034.xml
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MEDICINE AND SURGERY
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Hearing With the Eyes
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DEAF-MUTES, if they are not suffering from a structural defect of the organs of speech, may be taught to speak, but their instruction is difficult and its progress slow. It has been facilitated by the invention of Mr. Lindner, instructor of deaf-mutes in Leipzig, who, assisted by the Institute of Physics of Leipzig University, has evolved two instruments for visualizing the sound of human speech.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0035.xml
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FOR THE FARMER
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Scooping Up the Grasshoppers
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WHEN you go on a grasshopper hunt you can catch the bugs by the bushel with very little trouble if you copy the man in the picture. He drives a leisurely team of horses across the field and they push before them a “hopperdozer.” Into it hundreds of grasshoppers drop every minute and drown.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0036.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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Spotting an Airplane by Sound Waves
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A DEVICE has been invented for locating an airplane at night by the sound of the engine. It consists of two vibrating planes mounted at a slight angle to each other on a revolving wheel. A sound wave receiver is attached to each plane and is connected with a corresponding ear piece.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0037.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Building an Excavator on the Spot
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CONVERTING a stiff-legged man into an acrobat would be a transformation scarcely more interesting than the changing of a “stiff-leg” derrick into a “drag-line” excavator. Having a mile and one half of concrete railroad embankment to build, William McIntosh, master mechanic, hit upon the idea of making use of the discarded stiff-legs from a steel derrick.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0038.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Carry Your Tools in a Suit-Case
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“A TRAVELING salesman.” That’s how you usually dub the man who carries a queer-shaped suit-case. But you may be wrong. The draftsman, for instance, now carries a queer-shaped suit-case, and in it he keeps his tools. The suit-case was the invention of a Milwaukee engineer.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0039.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Cattle Are Not Wearing Horns This Season
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“HORNS off,” is the new fashion for cattle. This is because horned cattle use their advantage over those without horns: they appropriate feed, and terrorize their defenseless companions. They are also a source of danger to attendants who feed them.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0040.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Aerial Cable Is Used for Transporting Timber
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SUSPENDED cable-ways are used in the western mining regions of the United States for conveying ore, supplies and workmen over difficult territory, across streams and valleys. In some European countries, with wild and heavily timbered areas of rugged topography and few roads or other lines of transportation, such cable-roads have made it possible to utilize the rich stores of timber and fire-wood which had previously been inaccessible.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0041.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Where Wading Is in Order
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DROPPING with a realistic shower effect from the branches of a live-oak, which conceal the pipes, the water supply for this wading pool falls first upon a cement “island” housing an aquarium of goldfish, and then cascades into the pool where Los Angeles children play.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0042.xml
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MISCELLANY
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The News in Six Inches
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"BETTER Times” is coming—this is not bad grammar, as you will see later. And it will undoubtedly assist in the Americanization of aliens. “Better Times” is a newspaper—a very small one, but a very good one. It is eight pages thick and each page measures four by six inches.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0043.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Progenitor of the Magazine Rifle
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ONE day a thousand years or so ago Chinese troops went against their enemies with a new and terrible weapon in the shape of a repeating crossbow. The weapon which was to supercede clubs, spears, and the single cross-bow, carried eight or ten small arrows in a magazine from which they dropped into the barrel to be discharged.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0044.xml
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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He Seems to Have a Grouch
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MONKEYS, like women, are not all chatterers. Some of them are quiet creatures who prefer silence to the chatter of their kind. Look at the sad and solemn monkey below. He belongs to the group called saki monkeys, known for their sweet, gentle dispositions and their silent tongues. They have white hair and beards, but are about fifty years behind the times in the way they trim their side-whiskers. And they part their long, crimped hair in the middle.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0045.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Smokeless Powder to Light Cigars
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With a cigar between his teeth and a smile on his lips, the man above calmly gets a light from a grain of smokeless powder. He knows that he won’t blow up, since the powder is not confined. He is using a powder grain that would set off a fourteen-inch gun; yet it doesn’t harm him.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0046.xml
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MISCELLANY
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The Night-Shirt of an English King
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"OFF with his head!” When the court pronounced this sentence on Charles I of England there might have been reasons other than treason. For instance, the judges might have seen him in his night-shirt. It seems to have been almost criminally unbeautiful.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0047.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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He’s Motoring on Roller-Skates
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YOU press the button and then start to roll — that’s how you operate the new electric roller-skates. But the chief disadvantage is that all you do is roll— you can’t really skate. For the volt accumulator that gives the skates their power is located between them and fastened tightly to them.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0048.xml
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SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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The “Scooter” Likes Shoals
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“LOOK out there—you’ll be on bottom!” The old river-man might have saved his breath, for the boat to which he shouted the warning slid over the shoal with never a bump, and at a high speed. It was Glenn H. Curtiss’s new boat, Scooter, driven by an airplane motor and propeller.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0049.xml
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MISCELLANY
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The Runaway Trolley-Pole Is Caught and Held
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BANG! Bang! The trolley car bumps across the railroad tracks and the pole slips off the overhead wire. The lights go out, the car stops, and a locomotive whistle sounds in the distance. What a fine setting for a smashup! However, a new pole guard, shown in the picture above, makes it impossible for power to give out even if the pole slips off the wire. This guard is a trough of woven-wire suspended over the trolley wire. Should the pole jump off, it will simply hit against the trough, which continues to supply power.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0050.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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“Hot Dogs” Kept Hot
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NEVER again need the starving ball fan keep one eye on the game and cast the other despairingly in the direction of the frankfurter—better known as the “hot dog”—stand. The Stevens fire-less frankfurter cooker will bring “hot dogs, red hot,” to the bleachers for the convenience of the fans.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0051.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Brand Your Name on Your Umbrella
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UMBRELLAS are the favorite prey of petty thieves. Even people who would shudder if their honesty were doubted, will borrow and keep umbrellas without a moral tremor. Perhaps the reason is that most umbrellas lack individuality and might be anybody’s property.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0052.xml
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MISCELLANY
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A Cider-Mill Made from an Automobile Jack
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THERE’S nothing illegal about a private cider-mill, and you will find it easy to make. All you need is an old wash-tub, a jack, and some boards. Make a small cover for the tub and erect a frame over it. Fill the tub with apples, put on the lid, then insert the jack between the lid and the frame, and start jacking.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0053.xml
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MISCELLANY
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They Are Making a Buddha for Motion Pictures
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WHEN preparations were being made recently at Universal City for the motion picture production of “The Breath of the Gods,” in which the Japanese actress, Tsuro Aoki, was to be starred, a huge Buddha, such as those found in temples of Japan, was constructed under the supervision of a noted Japanese artist, C. S. Ito.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0054.xml
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MISCELLANY
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When There Were No Lights o’ London
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IN olden times when London streets were dark it was customary for “strong-arm” men to act as paid escorts for people out late. With flaming torches they led the way through the streets, and upon arriving at the house of the person they were guiding through the dark, extinguished their torches under an iron hood attached to the tall gate.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0055.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Shooting Cigarettes from a Gun
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GOT a cigarette? Don’t ask an Englishman that question for he may pull a gun on you. He will aim it at your head and pull the trigger! When you open your eyes and find that you’re not dead, you will see sticking out of the muzzle of the gun the very cigarette you asked for.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0056.xml
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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An Entomological Crown Uneasy lies the Head—
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THE crown the German ex-Kaiser wore upon great holidays looked like the one below, which is studded with bugs instead of jewels. It was made by a disillusioned German. He traveled far and wide gathering bugs for it. Red bugs represent the rubies of the original crown, while white bugs serve for pearls.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0057.xml
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MISCELLANY
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“Home” Is a Box-Car
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STRANGE sights follow in the wake of great wars. Whole communities are disrupted, families scattered, homes destroyed, and all leave their curious mark upon the lands engaged in conflict. Hordes of homeless people must find a spot sheltered as best it can be, a spot which they can individually call “home.”
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0058.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Make Your Concrete Blocks
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INSTEAD of waiting for the expensive load of bricks delayed by the great shortage in building material, get one of these machines and make a substitute for the bricks. The concrete is poured into a mold which has a movable bottom. The workman operates a foot lever which raises up the concrete when it has set sufficiently to be removed. The block is then easily lifted off by hand. An industrious man can turn out four hundred blocks in a day without any great expenditure of energy.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0059.xml
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SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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The “Ophir” Comes Home
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THE U. S. S. Ophir, a transport that was sunk in Gibraltar Bay during the war, was raised by the United States navy and sent home under her own steam. An explosion followed by fire had caused the vessel to sink. With practically no repairs made, the badly damaged ship started bravely for home with a crew of six officers and sixty-eight men.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0060.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Horses Motor to Races in Their Own Cars
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NO longer will race-horses which are worth $10,000 or $15,000 have to be trusted to the railroads for transportation. These valuable horses do not like shrieking whistles and grinding brakes of the trains. Racing steeds are nervous animals, so the motor-trucks that have recently been devised to convey them, offer great advantages over railway trains for transporting the horses.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0061.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Dictating Letters in an Airplane by Telephone
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THE busy business man and his stenographer can turn out a number of letters in the course of an airplane trip from New York to Washington. The “click! click!” of the little typewriter is completely lost in the roar of the propeller, and the words that are dictated would also be drowned if special telephone connections between the two persons in the closed compartment were not made.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0062.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Music from a Wild Carrot Is Like That of a Flute
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AN actual music-making flute eighteen inches long by three-quarters of an inch in diameter has been made from a hollow wild carrot weed. The music which the wind whistled through the weeds, and which became instilled in them has been brought to life in the flute by the skill of the workman. He kept at his job until all the tones of the instrument were accurate.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0063.xml
article
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HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Churning Is Easy Work!
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THIS little lady should worry if her mother tells her to run along and churn the butter. She takes her electric churn into the parlor, hitches it to an electric light socket, turns on the switch, and the churn goes to work. The machinery of the electric churn is made of spring steel which not only gives it extra strength, but great rust resisting power as well. The movement of the dash rod and paddle is that which has been used for many years in the hand-power churn.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0064.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Where Work Is a Party
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THE flax combers of Portugal are a happy people. It is the custom on the Iberian peninsula to make of work a gala function. Garbed in their best, adorned with bright gold ornaments, their garments an array of color with gay embroidery, men and women meet to carry on the ordinary daily vocations.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0065.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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He Wears a Hand Shield
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MEN who do acetylene welding often suffer from burned hands— the heat from the flame is so very intense. But a new hand shield has just been invented by Charles S. McCreery, of De Soto, Missouri. It consists of a curved plate of non-heating material and two wire loops through which the welder thrusts his middle finger.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0066.xml
article
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HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Sweeping Dark Corners by the Light of a Flash-Lamp
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“JUST look at the dust here in these corners of the room—why, you didn’t sweep these corners!” exclaimed an angry housewife when she saw how unfaithfully her dutiful spouse had performed the task set for him. “Well, I’m not supposed to sweep where it’s so dark, I can’t see what I am doing!” he retorted.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0067.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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The House of Hearts Has Heart-Shaped Furniture
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“HOME, Sweet Home” signs fade into insignificance before the home-loving outburst of Mrs. E. C. Calder who lives in Pasadena, California. Tables, chairs, doormats, in fact all the furnishings in her house are heart-shaped. Her bed, for instance, has a heart-shaped headboard, supported on both sides by bedposts carved to represent cupid’s arrows.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0068.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Meat for a Turkish Market
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CONSTANTINOPLE, the melting pot where East meets West, offers many strange sights to the traveler. “What are in those cages that the horse is carrying through the streets?” Each wire cage holds a hindquarter of beef. If the wire mesh were not so coarse it might keep out the swarming flies.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0069.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Dark Patch, Hunter of Elephants
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DARK Patch is a dog of fighting blood. His master was attracted by his pugnacity and his intelligence, and purchased Patch when on a trip to London. When only eight months old Patch went to the Congo with his master hunting elephants and buffalo.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0070.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Magnifying the Strains of a ’Cello
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CONNECT a metal tube with the ’cello and then with a large metal horn, and the faintest sounds emitted by the bow will be better heard by the audience. The principle is that employed in “talking machines.” The sound-waves passing through the column of air are intensified in the horn and are projected into the room as though emanating from the horn instead of from the ’cello.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0071.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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He Makes the Weather Pay
The industrial meteorologist advises farmers and aviators
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Lee McCrae
MANY a man lives “with his head in the clouds,” but none more literally than does Dr. Ford A. Carpenter, of Los Angeles. Yet he is a practical scientist and has been appointed industrial meteorologist of the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0072.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Grandpop Crandall—Inventor of Toys
He is probably the greatest technician of his kind in America
A Wizard With Toys
Hundreds of Inventions
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Herbert Asbury
ALMOST any afternoon in the summer-time, if you happen to be walking on a certain street in Brooklyn, you will see a veritable flock of children—boys and girls from four to eleven years old—sitting on a stoop, waiting and watching. And every little boy and little girl will have tucked under an arm the remnants of a toy—a engine with a loose wheel, a go-cart that won’t go, or a doll with a smashed head.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0073.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Why Not Make Your Automobile Do It?
The engine is ready and willing to work for you
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0074.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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What Becomes of Telephone Nickels
After you drop them in the slot their adventures are varied and interesting
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0075.xml
article
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48,49
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Preserving Food Forever with Gas
How a woman discovered a way of asphyxiating the bacteria that cause decay and thus gave the world a marvelous process for keeping meat, milk, fruit, and all other food for centuries
Boiling Doesn't Always Kill Bacteria in Food
Suffocating Bacteria to Preserve Food
Carbon Dioxide Is Fatal When Breathed by Bacteria
The Importance of Preserving the Vitamines
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Waldemar Kaempffert
IT was the great Pasteur who taught us that food decays because of the action of invisible, destructive bacteria. Kill the bacteria and you prevent food from rotting. But how are they to be killed, or at least prevented from propagating? There are bacteria everywhere—billions and billions of them in the freshest lungful of air or mouthful of food—and they reproduce their own species with astonishing rapidity by the simple process of self-division.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0076.xml
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MEDICINE AND SURGERY
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Treating Patients at “Mr. Dooley’s” Hospital for Pets
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IS your bird sick? Then take him to Mr. Dooley. This “Mr. Dooley” runs one of the best bird and animal hospitals in existence. And who is he? It isn’t a he at all, but two women—Miss T. M. Jenkins and Miss A. F. Thompson—who are well skilled in the care of animals, and who do business under the firm name of “Mr. Dooley.”
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0077.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Ready-made Holes Are On the Market Now
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HERETOFORE you have had screw holes made to order, but now you can buy them ready made. A pointed brass tube is threaded on the inside to receive the screw. You hammer this tube into the wood securely, and its threaded interior serves as a screw hole.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0078.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Using X-Rays to Reveal Flaws in Sheets of Mica
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CHIPS of mica, or isin-glass are sent from the mines to be made into sheets that are used for insulation in various electrical devices. In building commutators for direct current generators and motors thin sheets of mica separate the copper parts and prevent short-circuits which would do great damage to the machines.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0079.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Pumping Out the Water Faster than It Pours in
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When the ship is leaking badly, and is rapidly sinking after a collision with an iceberg, or other catastrophe at sea, the new centrifugal pump may save her and the lives of all on board. It is designed for use in just such emergencies, when water is rushing into the hold faster than it can be driven out with an ordinary pump and where other pumps may be rendered useless It has a working energy each minute equal to the combined effort of twenty-six horses, when operating in the depths of a large steamship, like the one pictured, where the water must be lifted to a height of 90 feet to be discharged.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0080.xml
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52,53
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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How Science Settles Disputes for the Business Man
Solving manufacturing problems and adjusting economical differences in the Bureau of Standards
New Standards are Investigated
Heating Values of Gas
The Sugar Content of Molasses
Important Work the Bureau Has Done
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S. R. Winters
THE government Bureau of Standards is a busy referee. It settles disputes between employer and employee; between producer and consumer, between representatives of various kinds of business, between importers and exporters, municipalities public-utility corporations, states and cities; and between nations, when it is called upon to do so.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0081.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Camping Out for Lack of a Home
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PEOPLE who find that moving day has arrived and they have no place to move into, are driven to a quick make-shift for a house. If they are fortunate enough to own a lot, a temporary structure is sometimes hurriedly built; or a garage does duty until the home is constructed.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0082.xml
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MISCELLANY
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A Castle Built in Miniature
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“MAN wants but little here below,” but he must not want it too long, too high, too wide, nor with too many frills on it. This is evidently the idea of the man who built a miniature castle for a house. The entire building occupies no more than 20 by 20 feet of space.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0083.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Safety First and Second in This Machine
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A POWERFUL motor-operated side press protected with a special safety device, the press being used to make another safety device, illustrates to what extent the “safety first” idea is penetrating modern industry. Here a steel box is being stamped, the box being intended as a safety covering for electric switches.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0084.xml
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MISCELLANY
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The Pen Clings to the Desk Magnet
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ARE you always losing your pen? Hang it on a magnet. Then hang the magnet on your desk lamp. The outstanding feature of a magnet is its power to attract steel and iron. Since a penholder is usually made of light stuff it will dangle indefinitely at the end of its pen point when the pen point is in the clutches of a magnet.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0085.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Testing Drinks for the “Kick”
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WHEN it was found that some of the 2.75 per cent beer had apparently developed a higher per cent of alcohol after having been stored, a rapid means of testing for the “kick” was devised. It was also necessary to have a means of investigating the nature of near-beer which looked and tasted exactly like real beer.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0086.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Making Sharp Pictures through a Telescope
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THERE are several ways to focus a camera to obtain sharp pictures but one of the best is that which employs a telescope of small size. The lens of the telescope has the same focal distance as the lens of the camera so that when the photographer looks at the ground glass at the eye-end of the telescope he sees the same field of view as is shown on the ground glass of the camera.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0087.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Wind-Shields Insure Warm Hands at High Speed
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POLICE Sergeant McCormick is the star motorcycle driver of Washington and he escorts many distinguished visitors around the city. In the winter time he has found that in spite of his fur-lined gloves his hands are often numbed by the cutting wind.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0088.xml
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MISCELLANY
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The Oldest Clock in America Discovered in Atlanta
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ANTIQUARIANS recently discovered at the home of Mrs. P. H. Mell, in Atlanta, Georgia, what is believed to be the oldest clock in America. The plainness of the design and the use of cherry wood both indicate early construction as the first use of mahogany was in 1729.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0089.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Paving an English Road with German Helmets
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TEN miles south of London Bridge in the township of Croydon is the most remarkable road in the world. It is not walled-in with a long row of spikes upon which are gruesomely displayed the skulls of defeated enemies, in the manner one might find in uncivilized portions of the world.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0090.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Use Coat-Hangers on Moving Day
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MOVING day, afoot, required lugging many drawings, sheets of drawing paper and miscellaneous materials tied to a drawing board so wide that carried at the side under one arm, the fingers barely reached its lower edge. An ordinary coat hanger solved the problem of carrying it.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0091.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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Customs Officers Look for Smugglers of the Air
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IN Europe the airplane has become such a common vehicle of travel that countries are guarding against smugglers who might use the air highways. Airways would seem to be ideal for the smuggler. But landing-places are watched, and when a pilot descends the contents of his luggage are examined for contraband material.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0092.xml
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HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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The Baby’s Carriage—with Variations
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BABY carriages in Germany get plenty of wear. In most cases they are bed and carriage combined. Behold the nursemaid above. When she came in from her walk she found that baby was fast asleep. And so she simply lifted out the body of the carriage, carried it indoors, and placed it gently on the floor.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0093.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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This Horse Eats No Oats
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A HOBBY-HORSE must have been the favorite toy of Charles Johnson, of San Diego, California, for as soon as he reached the age of invention he patented a motor-driven horse on wheels. It is a full-sized metal one and its body is loaded with gears, chains, rods, and batteries.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0094.xml
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MISCELLANY
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You Can Buy Your Stamps at the Mail-Box
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"GOT a stamp?” That is one of the eternal questions. There are plenty of mail-boxes but comparatively few places where you can buy stamps. On Sundays there are almost none. But in Toronto, Canada, you can get your stamps at the mail-box. Just above the metal flap marked “letters” there is a slot machine.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0095.xml
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MISCELLANY
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An Elk Is His Trusty Steed
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BUCK McKEE, is the rider, and he raised the elk himself, and broke him to the saddle. But Buck was once a Texas ranger, and breaking wild steeds is easy for him. The elk is not shod like horses, but wears sandals devised by his owner to protect his feet on hard pavements; for Buck sometimes rides his elk into town, when, needless to say, he creates a sensation.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0096.xml
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MISCELLANY
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At the Bottom of the File
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PAPERS at the bottom of the file are hard to get at. Those above must all come off, if tearing is to be avoided. But not if you use the new type of spindle file here pictured. The spindle has a curving branch near the lower end off which the bottom paper may be slipped when the hollow spindle is lifted from its support.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0097.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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Hanging by the Neck from an Airplane
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EVEN when the day is totally devoid of wind and scarcely a breath of air stirs among the leaves, a gale blows where the airplane cuts its way. The hurricane churned up by the propellers as well as the resistance offered by the machine creates a violent wind which beats in changing directions across the persons in the fuselage if their position is exposed.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0098.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Sheets of Glue in a Glue Book
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GLUE has always come in tubes or bottles, but now it comes in books that are very much like stamp books, with which you are familiar. The glue is smeared on thin sheets of paper that can be torn out of the book when they are needed. Both sides of each sheet are smeared.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0099.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Water, Water Everywhere
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GERMANY’S rivers have, in many places, welled up and flooded the land. Even the much-loved Rhine has joined the ranks. At Coblenz everything that isn’t fastened down is floating. The American army trucks that were standing in the automobile park at the time of the flood are now almost completely hidden.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0100.xml
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The Wireless Alarm-Bell for Danger at Sea
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Just as a burglar-alarm summons help, so the new wireless alarm-bell summons aid from ships within a radius of a hundred miles. The wireless operator of the doomed ship presses a special key and a continuous call goes out automatically. This key actuates a special receiver on all the ships similarly equipped, and an alarm-bell rings in the wireless cabin of each ship.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0101.xml
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SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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Ringing Alarm Bells Across Miles of Sea
No longer need the wireless operator be constantly on watch at sea
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THE persistent clanging of a bell arouses the wireless operator from his sleep. In a moment he is at his instruments: “Gigantic answering. Ready for message.” The purring radio sends the response out in rapid repetition. There is a pause for answer.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0102.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Finding the Range in Miniature
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"UP 50!” calls the officer. “Down 20!” he shouts again. He is not gazing toward the open sea, but is merely looking down the deck toward a miniature target at which imaginary shots are being fired. Officers in charge of a battery must be trained in the difficult art of range-finding.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0103.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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New Jobs for Old Photographic Plates
After you have washed off the emulsion they are ready to start
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0104.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Keeping Up with the March of Science
Facts for the man who wants to know
Solving the Paper Shortage
On Shoes and Feet
The Slump in Mice
Wanted: A Map
Living Five Hundred Years
Filtering with Spun Glass
No More “Listening In”
Folding Wings for Airplanes
What Became of the Bison
Left Over from the War
The Elephant’s Future
About a Roomful of Air
A New Use for Ticket-Holders
In Praise of the Peanut
The Carnage of Peace
Air Studies of the Ocean
Mixing Paint by Air
Keeping Fruit Fresh a Year
Bad for Rats
Gassing the Criminal
Read Your Own Meter
Why Timber Roofs Rot
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WHEN cotton is ginned to remove the seed, linters are obtained—seventy five pounds of linters to a ton of seed. Germany used to buy from us half a million bales of linters for the making of explosives. Our own uses for the material were more peaceful—stuffing mattresses, cushions, horse-collars, and upholstery.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0105.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Mail Bags in the Making
They’re fashioned so stoutly so that letters can’t escape
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0106.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Grain-Dust Explosive? Watch It Flare
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IF you do not think that grain-dust is an explosive, or rather a combustible mixture, just come and witness the demonstration given by the United States Department of Agriculture. A miniature and portable grain elevator has been constructed to illustrate how grain-dust explosions can take place in elevators where dust has been allowed to accumulate.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0107.xml
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This Telescope Is Built to Discover Comets
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COMETS appear suddenly out of the obscure depths of the night and the observer who first catches sight of a new comet is quick to telegraph the news and claim the discovery. There are astronomers who on every clear night search the heavens patiently, hoping to add one of these erratic wanderers to their list of discoveries.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0108.xml
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65,66,67
MISCELLANY
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What Is There in Telepathy?
Let us consider the evidence for thought transference
Accepting Things on Faith
Mrs. Green's Strange Dream
Picking the Right Card
Scientifically Conducted Experiments
Chance or Telepathy?
The Thompson-Gifford Paintings
Dead Artist's Work Duplicated
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A. J. Lorraine
YOU do not believe in telepathy? These lines that you are reading —I have written them. You understand their meaning. Then, it seems, I have been successful in transmitting thought from my mind to yours, have I not? Ah, you say, that is different.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0109.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Clamping Down Cloth
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THE old method of holding a number of layers of cloth to be cut was to put heavy iron weights upon them. There is now an invention that not only holds the cloth firmly but also counts the layers. A metal base is clamped to the cutting table, and upright brackets on each end carry each an arm which holds a connecting rod and a blade to which are attached plungers that firmly hold the cloth.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0110.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Use a Vacuum Cleaner
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DID you ever try to clean a typewriter? You get along beautifully as you dust off the top, but when you try to go beneath the surface your troubles begin. Your brush, be it long and thin or short and fat, won’t reach all the hidden corners. A vacuum cleaner will help you out. It will suck up all the dust and bits of paper that cling so persistently. The best attachment to use for this purpose is the thin flat one known as the mattress attachment.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0111.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Poor Butterfly!
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THE bards do sing of poor Butterfly, the Japanese maiden, but none of them think of singing about the poor butterflies above. Their lives were sacrificed just to decorate some fair lady’s serving tray. The butterfly wings are placed under the glass top and are practically airtight. But should the tray receive rough treatment, the wings would crumble and the entire effect be ruined. Insect decoration becomes more and more popular. Recently a German made a crown of bugs.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0112.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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A Gasoline Broncho
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IN a horse and stock show held in Denver, Col., an automobile was used as an added attraction in the hurdle-jumping contests. Much to the surprise of the horsemen, it showed extraordinary jumping powers. With the greatest ease the car leaped eighteen feet through the air, clearing the five-foot hurdle like a bird.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0113.xml
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[no value]
A Mastodon Souvenir
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE ancestor of the elephant, the mastodon, ages ago roamed wild through the forests of Kentucky; it is certain that he did, for once in a while his bones are dug up. The latest and largest “find” is a huge tusk of solid ivory, a fossil, weighing 156 pounds and 9 ounces.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0114.xml
article
68
68
MISCELLANY
[no value]
New Typewriter Clamps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE typewriter below looks like an ordinary typewriter, but it isn’t. It is equipped with vastly improved paper clamps “which are mounted slidably with relation to the scale bars at the side front of the platen”—so the patent paper tells us.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0115.xml
article
69
69
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Training Aviators With Terra Cotta Bombs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BOMBS of low explosive force, made of terra cotta, and loaded with black powder and shotgun ammunition, have recently been brought into service at Rockwell Aviation Field, San Diego, Cal., for training United States military aviators.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0116.xml
article
69
69
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Here Is Still Another Way to Fool the Fish
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“HOW delicious that looks!” Mr. Fish remarks when he sees an attractive object floating by. Indeed, it almost looks like another fish, one just the right size for a good meal. So Mr. Fish makes a lively leap toward his victim. He takes a big gulp, and lo! he is caught upon the metal hook that dangles below the colored body of the “fish.”
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0117.xml
article
69
69
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Sliding Down the Neck of Dog’s Head Rock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SNOW is unknown in western Australia, but the boys of Albany, a seaport on the southern end of Australia’s most westerly state, have in their town a slide and natural curiosity combined which helps make up for the lack. It is a huge rock, called Dog’s Head from its remarkable resemblance to the head of a great mastiff.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0118.xml
article
69
69
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Bidding by Push-Buttons at Auctions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE bustle and noise attending an auction do not meet the approval of the easy-going Dutchman, so in Holland there is a quiet electrical method of conducting auctions. Every bidder receives a number, and must take a seat marked with the same number.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0119.xml
article
69
69
MISCELLANY
[no value]
It Pays to Advertise—Proved Again
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANYONE who doubts the value of advertising, take heed! A German who owned a cigar store found business very dull; whereupon he covered the entire front of his store with cigar-boxes. Immediately his business increased enormously. He had to hire extra help in order to handle the crowd.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0120.xml
article
70
70
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Its Edges All Curve
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW type of violin has been invented which has only rounded or curved edges. While generally conforming to the dimensions of an ordinary instrument, the novel violin is made so that the top and bottom come into direct contact by a curve at the sides.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0121.xml
article
70
70
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Short Telephone Booths
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY time you telephone from booth you feel sorry for Aida, who suffocated so nobly with her lover. But there has been invented a booth in which you do not suffocate; neither do your words get out. The booth reaches just below your waistline.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0122.xml
article
70
70
MISCELLANY
[no value]
This Bank Lends Radium
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RADIUM is very precious, since it is both scarce and expensive. Yet it is greatly needed in hospitals for the treatment of cancer and similar diseases. There has recently been established a radium bank, which will be conducted just as if it were a regular bank. Radium is deposited in it, and lent to doctors or hospitals at a regular rate. The first deposit of radium is shown in the picture. It is valued at five hundred thousand dollars.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0123.xml
article
70
70,73
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
When the Drydock “Goes to Drydock”
How “Wired Wireless" Works
Wireless Messages by Wire
Sending Many Messages Along a Single Wire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DRYDOCK’S life is nothing but one repair after another. It is always taking in crippled ships and making them whole again. After years of this sort of work, the drydock is all worn out and needs repair itself. Then it visits another, larger drydock, and for a while receives the care and attention it had always given to others.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0124.xml
article
74
74
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
Everything to Make Housekeeping Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0125.xml
article
75
75
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
Do That Hard Work with Tools and Machines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0126.xml
article
76
76
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Garaging Cars Without Damage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MORE dented fenders and more scratched bodies, besides lost time and temper, are caused by attempting to back automobiles into their stalls in public garages than in other service done in such garages. This is caused by the fact that the storage space is so valuable in even the smallest garage in our large cities, that every inch of floor space must be utilized.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0127.xml
article
76
76
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
The Latest Idea in Flexible Metal Tubing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE considerable use of both large and small sizes of flexible metal tubing for carrying oil. fuel and hot air on airplanes has resulted in an improved type which is now coming into more general use on passenger cars and motor trucks. In ordinary tubing, the flexibility is secured through the sliding action of one strip of metal on that next to it.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0128.xml
article
76
76
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
An Airless Automobile Tire that Will Not Puncture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is no question about the easy riding qualities of the pneumatic tire for all sorts of vehicles. Unfortunately, pneumatic tire casings blow out and inner tubes puncture. Inventors have been working since the inception of the pneumatic tire to produce a type of tire or wheel which would give the same degree of ease in riding as the pneumatic but have none of its puncture or blow-out draw-backs.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0129.xml
article
77
77
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Change the Speed with Your Foot
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A RESIDENT of Brooklyn, Charles A. Marston, has patented a selective gear control with but one pedal for all speeds, including reverse and service brakes. It is designed to eliminate the objectional features existing at the present time in the Ford arrangement of three pedals close together.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0130.xml
article
77
77
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
To Catch Automobile Thieves
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN California, automobile thefts have become so common that special thief-catching stations like the one shown herewith are being erected on the outskirts of San Francisco. Each station will be connected with the head-quarters police station by telephone and as soon as an automobile theft is reported, details of the car’s make and style will be furnished to the men in charge.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0131.xml
article
77
77
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Loads à la Carte from a Motor-Truck Body
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the greatest items of cost in laying concrete highways is the cost of the manaul labor in handling the sand and crushed stone from the points where they are dumped to the chute of the concrete mixer. Because these materials are usually dumped on the ground as near as possible to the mixer, wheelbarrows must be used to carry them to the mixer chute.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0132.xml
article
78
78,79
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
Why Don’t You Buy Something New for Your Automobile?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0133.xml
article
80
80
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Keep an Automatic Fireman Under the Hood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT last the idea of the fire prevention sprinkler system which has achieved such wide use in all forms of buildings, has been applied to the automobile and motor-truck by the development of a small sprinkler bottle which is placed under the engine hood and automatically empties its contents over the engine when the heat becomes sufficient to melt the fuse forming the cork of the bottle.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0134.xml
article
80
80
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
This Self-Reliant Truck Is Its Own Body Booster
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONLY when a motor-truck is moving is it earning profits. No number of $5-a-day shovelers will keep a truck moving. Of the usual causes which prevent a motor-truck from being continually in motion from morning till night, that time taken for loading and unloading is perhaps the most important.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0135.xml
article
81
81
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
To Keep a Ford Engine from Racing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OF particular interest to those Ford-owners who operate converted passenger-car models or Ford one-ton trucks, the Ford governor shown in the accompanying views is not among those governors which do not govern. This one actually does govern the Ford engine speed because it automatically cuts out the ignition when the predetermined speed has been reached.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0136.xml
article
81
81
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
How to Straighten Bent Fenders
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BENT and dented automobile fenders have always been an eyesore which motorists have allowed to remain because of the difficulty of straightening them out without taking them off and subsequently repainting them. But now the garage-man is able to make a business of straightening fenders, and a profitable one too.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0137.xml
article
81
81
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Hauling the Tractor to the Farmer Saves Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the great West and Northwest, where the largest number of the newer automobile-like farm tractors are in use, the problem of demonstrating them on the prospective purchasers’ farms and later delivering them when sold has become very important.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0138.xml
article
82
82
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Reaching the Heights of Art in an Elevator
Without one few would visit the museum on the hill
[no value]
[no value]
John L. Von Blon
WOULD you climb a small hill to see a wonderful painting? You may think that’s a foolish question, but the sad fact has been proved that there are thousands of people in Los Angeles who never visited the Southwest Museum simply because it is perched on a hill.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0139.xml
article
83
83,84
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Cutting Down Operating Expenses
A little care and attention every so often will do wonders to your car
[no value]
[no value]
Fred Gilman Jopp
ARE you one of those motorists who are afraid to take long trips for fear that something will happen to your car that you won’t know how to repair? You needn’t be for all we know about motor vehicles has been gained by observation. Some fellows seem to be always having engine trouble, while others are constantly fooling with their tires.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0140.xml
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85
85
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN CHAIN COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICAN CHAIN COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0141.xml
article
86
86
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Extra Gasoline for Hill Climbing
How the little Ford can be made to ascend a hill however steep
How a Motorcycle Motor is Started
[no value]
[no value]
J. S. Chapman
FORD owners who travel in mountainous districts will call to mind many hills that can be climbed only when the gas tank is full. Occasionally one meets a grade that must be climbed wrong end first, in order to keep the gas in the carburetor. As these hills occur most frequently on unmade roads, this method of going up in reverse is not only difficult but dangerous.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0142.xml
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87
87
[no value]
[no value]
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.
[no value]
The Goodyear Tire & Rubber Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0143.xml
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88
88
[no value]
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0144.xml
article
88
88
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Things to Know About Lathe Tools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Ronald L. Prindle
IN the making of high-speed steel tools for use in a lathe, the tools are heated to a point where their tips begin to melt. When a tool is so heated, it is immediately plunged into oil, or else buried in common salt until thoroughly cool. It is not generally known that carbon steel gives the best results when heated to a dull red and plunged into oil.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0145.xml
article
88
88
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Experiment in Perpetual Motion
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. Swenson
THIS is an interesting example of the transformation of infinitesimal amounts of heat into motion. When first viewed it seems to be the long-sought-for perpetual motion. The experiment can be performed without any special apparatus and requires only a small amount of aniline, which is inexpensive and easily obtainable.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0146.xml
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89
89
[no value]
[no value]
THE B.V.D. COMPANY
[no value]
THE B.V.D. COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0147.xml
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90
90,91
[no value]
[no value]
Scheffer & Rossum Company
[no value]
Scheffer & Rossum Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0148.xml
article
92
92
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Six Methods of Automatically Stopping an Engine or Motor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Windsor Crowell
WHILE there are many schemes for automatically stopping a gas engine or electric motor, the methods here described will be found to serve nearly every practical purpose. They will be found advantageous in cases where the engine cannot be closely watched and tended, as in pumping water at a distance, shutting off when a certain pressure has been reached, etc.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0149.xml
article
92
92
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Scraper Shaped to Work in Square Corners
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Henry Simon
DO you want to save many hours of exasperating work? Then grind at least one of your hand-scrapers as shown in the illustration. The blade as it comes from the factory has four straight edges. The theory is that any of the four edges may be used.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0150.xml
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93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Champion Spark Plug Company
[no value]
Champion Spark Plug Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0151.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
Western Electric Company
[no value]
Western Electric Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0152.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Make a Star-Shaped Flower Bed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK W. BENTLEY
THE outline of a flower bed has, of course, as much to do with the appearance of the flowers as the selection and coloring of the flowers themselves. The illustration shows how a star-shaped bed can be built and outlined with thirty bricks and but very little labor. Five points with six bricks to an arm give a bed of medium and attractive size for the lawn. The bricks are separated a trifle and held with a mixture of cement and sand. When firmly set, the bricks should be given one or two heavy coats of white paint.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0153.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Improvement on the Ford Running-Board
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOWARD GREENE
THE appearance of a low-priced car may be greatly improved by putting a brass binding on the outer edge of the running-board. It is a simple thing to do. Take ordinary angle-brass with the flanges about five eighths of an inch wide, and screw it to the edge of the board, one flange flat on the board and the other vertical on the edge.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0154.xml
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95
95
[no value]
[no value]
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY
[no value]
THE PALMOLIVE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0155.xml
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96
96
[no value]
[no value]
TUBULAR WOVEN FABRIC CO.
[no value]
TUBULAR WOVEN FABRIC CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0156.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
When the Thermometer Liquid Separates
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT sometimes happens that the liquid in thermometers, particularly in those not using mercury, splits up into two or more parts inside the glass. This can generally be remedied by placing the lower end of the thermometer and bulb in hot water, at the same time giving the instrument a slight jar. This will cause the lower end of the liquid strip to expand and connect with the broken away portions.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0157.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Winding the Wall Clock from the Floor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
A SHORT time ago in a hardware store, I saw the floor manager winding a clock high up on the wall with a flexible winding rod like the one pictured. He had utilized two emergency brake rods from a Ford. One rod was cut off about a foot from a clevis and the sawed end was split up a short distance and driven over the flat clock-key handle and riveted there.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0158.xml
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97
97
[no value]
[no value]
WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.
[no value]
WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0159.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Goblin Soap
[no value]
[no value]
Goblin Soap
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0160.xml
article
98
98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Quick Way to Babbitt
How to Anneal Aluminum without Breaking It
[no value]
[no value]
R. C. Leibe
THERE are many ways and means of re-lining cast-iron boxes with babbitt metal and the common ways are well known to mechanics; but herewith will be shown a new way which has merit in both speed and perfect fitting. The common way may be described as babbitting one-half of the bearing at a time; then by means of paste-board liners between the halves, making the other half complete.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0161.xml
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99
99
[no value]
[no value]
Radium Luminous Material Corporation
[no value]
Radium Luminous Material Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0162.xml
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100
100
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0163.xml
article
100
100
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Pair of Automatic Forceps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Frank W. Harth
ILLUSTRATED by the accompanying diagram is a device which will be found handy for picking up and holding small articles, such as screws, bolts, nuts, etc. It may be constructed from scrap material. The handle of the instrument can be made from a discarded metal pocket pencil from which the cap and interior have been removed.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0164.xml
article
100
100
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Curling-Iron as a Kitchen Utensil
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MINNIE ALICE OSBERG
THE other day my grocer failed to send the wire key which always accompanies a can of sardines. My guests had already arrived so a substitute had to be found immediately. There happened to be an old curling-iron in my bureau drawer so I used that instead of telephoning for a key. It not only served the purpose, but did the work better than a key does IT.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0165.xml
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101
101
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.
[no value]
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0166.xml
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102
102
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0167.xml
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102
102
[no value]
[no value]
GREER COLLEGE
[no value]
GREER COLLEGE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0168.xml
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102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0169.xml
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102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0170.xml
article
102
102
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Obtaining Speed in a Machine Shop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. C. RIDGELY
RATHER a complicated piece of work for a thirty-three-seconds job is shown in the accompanying illustration. It was done in this time, however, and two of the pieces were made in double this time. Many others were made continuously on schedule time.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0171.xml
article
102
102,103
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Control the Lighting Switch through the Window
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. HAGERTY
THE underwriters’ rules now require a lighting switch, and further that it be on the outside of the building. Opening and shutting the window every time I used my set was some trouble, so I devised the following switch and found it very satisfactory.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0172.xml
article
103
103
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Use Tracing Cloth to Focus Your Camera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK W. HARTH
EVERY photographer knows that the only sure way of focusing a picture is by using a ground glass. All other methods are more or less guess work, particularly when the details of an object are to be clearly shown. This can be done with the usual type of plate camera but not with the small swing back type of hand camera such as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0173.xml
article
103
103,104
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Light the Inside of Your Touring Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIMOUSINES have inside illumination. Why not have a light inside a touring car? There are many occasions when a light would be a great convenience for those getting in or out, and at times it may be a necessity. A small light can be easily installed as the accompanying sketch illustrates.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0174.xml
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103
103
[no value]
[no value]
UNITED STATES SAND PAPER COMPANY
[no value]
UNITED STATES SAND PAPER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0175.xml
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104
104
[no value]
[no value]
THE DAVIS SEWING MACHINE CO.
[no value]
THE DAVIS SEWING MACHINE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0176.xml
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104
104
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE FROST CO.
[no value]
GEORGE FROST CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0177.xml
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104
104
[no value]
[no value]
ANDERSON STEAM VULCANIZER CO.
[no value]
ANDERSON STEAM VULCANIZER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0178.xml
article
104
104
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Make a Space-Saving Cupboard
[no value]
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IN many kitchens the chimney is not built up from the ground but is supported by a bracket strongly built against the wall. The triangular space under the shelf can be utilized as a cupboard for keeping cloths and brushes for use about the stove.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0179.xml
article
105
105
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Simply Constructed Plate-Holder for Loose Films
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E. BADE
IT often happens that one has a few unexposed films in a pack which, under ordinary circumstances, would be thrown away, since they can not be placed in the camera. A special holder for such films can be easily made. It consists of a piece of tin—the back of a film-pack holder will serve this purpose.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0180.xml
article
105
105
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Preventing Matches from Getting Wet
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HAVE you ever gone camping, and tried to light a fire with matches that had become damp? Of course you have, and from experience you know that it can’t be done. Then why not waterproof your matches so that rain or water cannot injure their firing abilities? Here is the way to do it: Melt some paraffin in a pan and dip the match head into it.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0181.xml
article
105
105
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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To Remove the Nut from a Broken Bolt
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WHEN the end of a bolt or stud breaks off at the nut and you have no other nuts of that size handy, the broken piece can be removed and the nut recovered for use by the method shown in the illustration. Take two pieces of scrap steel slightly smaller than the diameter of the bolt and clamp the broken stud between them in the jaws of a vise.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0182.xml
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105
105
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United States Rubber Company
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United States Rubber Company
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0183.xml
advertisement
106
106
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The Ives Mfg. Corporation
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The Ives Mfg. Corporation
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0184.xml
article
106
106
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Wooden Pedestal for a Bench Machine
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H. H. Parker
A SMALL bench drill-press, or similar machine, could frequently be accommodated to better advantage somewhere else than on the bench. At the same time a regular floor type machine would be too expensive. The illustration shows the construction of a wooden pedestal which is neat in appearance, heavy and substantial and requires little floor space.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0185.xml
article
106
106
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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To Make an Electric Cigar Lighter
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Thomas W. Benson
THE cigar lighter described works on the principle of an arc, differing from the usual type in which a coil of wire is heated to the glowing point. Referring to the large illustration the body of the lighter will be seen. It consists of a fibre shell taken from a large cartridge fuse.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0186.xml
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107
107
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Advertisement: Coca-Cola
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Coca-Cola
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0187.xml
advertisement
108
108
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AMERICAN EVER READY WORKS
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AMERICAN EVER READY WORKS
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0188.xml
advertisement
108
108
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[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0189.xml
advertisement
108
108
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[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0190.xml
article
108
108
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Bench Anvil Made from a Flatiron
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AN old flatiron can be made to serve a good purpose by its conversion into a small bench anvil. A way to do this is shown in Fig. 1. The handle is sawed off and the top surface smoothed off in a lathe or grinder. A hole may be drilled up through the bottom and tapped for a bolt to hold the casting against the lathe face plate during the facing off process.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0191.xml
article
108
108
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Here’s a Way to Utilize Odd Cuff-Links
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JAMES M. KANE
WHEN a single button of a cuff link is lost the set becomes practically useless. The accompanying illustration shows a method by which the two parts of the remaining cuff button can be used again. Solder a diminutive safety-pin on the back of each part as in Fig. 1, but don’t solder the spring of the pin.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0192.xml
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109
109
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HENDEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
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HENDEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0193.xml
advertisement
110
110
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0194.xml
article
110
110,111
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Make a Jazzolin from a Broomstick
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FRANK W. VROOM
THIS instrument is a source of great amusement to the music lover and is one that can be easily played by anyone as it embodies only one string. Frets or marks may be made at the proper intervals on the fingerboard to guide the novice in placing his fingers.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0195.xml
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111
111
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HENRY J. RAHE
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HENRY J. RAHE
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0196.xml
advertisement
112
112
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0197.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Grinding a Drill Correctly Is an Art
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NO matter how hard the material of a drill, the cutting edges eventually become dull and must be reground. To the novice, this grinding operation may seem a mere matter of holding the tool against a rotating grind-stone, but skill is required to sharpen the cutting edges satisfactorily.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0198.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Door Handle Made from a Shovel Handle
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WHEN you have a door without a knob or handle and a shovel without a blade the two can be made to serve each other. Saw through the shovel handle just below the rivet under the handle opening. Bore a hole through the remaining portion, as indicated in the drawing, and a similar hole through the door where the handle is wanted.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0199.xml
article
113
113
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Prolong the Life of Expensive Shirts
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C. NYE
UNDOUBTEDLY the greatest wear in a man’s shirt occurs where the stiff lower edges of the starched collar rub the fabric with every movement of the head. Many expensive shirts are discarded, prematurely just because of wear and tear around the frontal half of the collar.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0200.xml
article
113
113
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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To Remove Spindle Bolts Easily
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ROY C. BRADBURY
WISHING to put in a new set of spindle bolts and bushings in my Ford, I was disagreeably surprised to find that it required an 18-in. pipe wrench, and an old, discarded pump barrel slipped over the end to lengthen it, to unscrew these bolts. Not caring to use these makeshifts again, I procured a small can of flake graphite to which was added enough cylinder oil to form a thick paste; then, when the bushings were fitted and the parts assembled, the threaded ends of the spindle bolts and the threads in the lower part of the axle were coated with this mixture, and the bolts screwed up tight.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0201.xml
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113
113
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0202.xml
advertisement
114
114
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0203.xml
advertisement
114
114
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General Asbestos & Rubber Co.
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General Asbestos & Rubber Co.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0204.xml
advertisement
114
114
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HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS
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HIGH SCHOOL PUPILS
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0205.xml
article
114
114
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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This Switch Mechanism Will Prevent Accidents
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Philip G. Bernhotz
TO prevent the recurrence of a serious accident, the switch-interlocking apparatus, shown in Fig. 2, was devised. Switches A and B are ammeterphase switches which must never both be closed at the same time. On the board these switches were arranged without a thought of an interlocking apparatus.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0206.xml
article
114
114
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A Simple Way to Make a File More Efficient
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JAMES M. KANE
A FILE-HOLDER in common use has the disadvantage of being made of cast-iron. When a break occurs, the clamp is usually left intact. Likewise the handle of a small pipe-wrench outlasts the movable jaw, but it goes to the junk-pile with it. With the unbroken members of the two tools, the file-holder and wrench, the writer constructed a file-holder that was just as convenient as the original one and very much stronger.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0207.xml
article
114
114
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Safety Caster for the Stock-Room Ladder
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WILLIAM FARRELL
JIG tool, and pattern storage-rooms are usually provided with 4and 6-ft. ladders, which often shift when in use, sometimes causing serious falls. The illustration shows a caster that has all the advantages of the roller step-ladder, and that at the same time becomes firm and stationary when a weight is set upon it.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0208.xml
article
115
115
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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To Recut the Valve Seats on an Old Engine
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P. P. AVERY
WHEN overhauling an old engine it will generally be found that the valves have worn down their seats, leaving a shoulder around the edge which hinders the passage of the gas and also causes the valve to catch and not seat properly. Make a tool, for cutting down the shoulder and for refacing the valve seat, of an old valve the size used in steel about ½ in. long.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0209.xml
article
115
115
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Make a Tapered Rope End
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MORRIS G. MILLER
THE proper way to finish a rope end so that it will go easily through an eyelet is shown in the illustration. First untwist two or three inches of the rope and cut the strands to half their present thickness. Then rewind the rope again, keeping each strand well twisted up in the original direction.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0210.xml
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115
115
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CYCLE TRADES OF AMERICA, Inc.
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CYCLE TRADES OF AMERICA, Inc.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0211.xml
advertisement
116
116
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HAMMOND TYPEWRITER CO.
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HAMMOND TYPEWRITER CO.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0212.xml
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116
116
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THE EDWARDS MFG. CO.
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THE EDWARDS MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0213.xml
advertisement
116
116
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0214.xml
advertisement
116
116
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0215.xml
advertisement
117
117
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0216.xml
advertisement
118
118
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0217.xml
article
118
118
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Convenient and Effective Knife-Sharpener
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JOHN A. WEAVER
FOR several reasons, many electricians consider it useless to carry an oil-stone in their tool-bag. It seldom lasts for any length of time, owing to the abuse to which it is subjected, and moreover, it is not suited to the main purpose for which it is carried, that of keeping the knife in good shape for skinning wires and cutting “loom.”
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0218.xml
article
118
118,119
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Make an Extensible Bit-Extension
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HENRY SIMON
THE very fact that a bit-extension is intended to lengthen the reach of an auger-bit often makes it desirable that the extension itself be capable of being extended. While occasions calling for this adjustment are comparatively rare with the ordinary carpenter, they are quite frequent with bridge carpenters, well-rig builders, and other mechanics working on heavy construction jobs.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0219.xml
article
119
119
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Putting the Crippled Gas-Stove Back to Work
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FRANK W. HARTH
BROKEN cast iron is difficult to repair in the ordinary way, and is, as a rule, not worth the expense of a welding operation. The gas stove shown in the accompanying photograph was broken by a fall, which smashed its foot into small pieces. The foot was replaced by a substantial and lasting repair, which consisted of ⅝-in.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0220.xml
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119
119
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COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF DRAFTING
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COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF DRAFTING
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0221.xml
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120
120
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0222.xml
article
120
120
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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An Electric Light for the Lawn-Mower
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L. B. ROBBINS
FOR the man who gets home late at night and wants to mow the lawn some sort of a light may be necessary to facilitate his work. A common bicycle searchlight is just the thing and can be attached to the handle of the mower. Set a pipe flange on the top surface of the handle about half way up. Screw a 6 inch nipple into that and an elbow on the top of the nipple, pointing back towards the end of the handle. Then set a horizontal piece of pipe in the elbow about 12 in. long.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0223.xml
article
120
120,121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Device for Distributing Potatoes and Corn Evenly
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A SIMPLE marker to be used for spacing rows for corn, potatoes, etc., can be made from parts found around the average farm. The diagram shows the construction in detail. The cross-bar A is made from a stick of wood 4 in. by 4 in. To take the shafts 2-in. holes are drilled at B These shafts can be made from young trees, for these have the necessary taper and are much more flexible than straight sticks. A large nail, driven as shown; will hold each shaft in place.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0224.xml
article
121
121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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This Cement Saw-Buck Promotes Efficiency
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JAMES P. LEWIS
CEMENT has many advantages over wood in the construction of a saw-buck, or block for holding logs while sawing them into stove lengths. This substance is heavy enough to stand solidly under all stresses, it never wears out, and it is neat and attractive. The form for casting is merely a rectangular box that can be easily dismantled. The triangular groove in the top of the finished contrivance is produced by nailing two short pieces of wide board together to form a V-trough, and laying it in place when casting.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0225.xml
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121
121
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American Technical Society
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American Technical Society
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0226.xml
advertisement
122
122
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Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0227.xml
article
122
122
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Lathe with a Change Speed Power Plant
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P. P. Avery
A VERY serviceable and accurate lathe may be built of scrap parts, and a novel means of speed change may be obtained from an old automobile transmission and engine flywheel. The lathe is made from two pieces of L iron, 2 by 5 in. for the bed frame with the legs of ½ by 3 in.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0228.xml
article
122
122
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Steadying a Ladder Against a Slanting Roof
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L. B. ROBBINS
A LADDER placed against the gable edge of a slanting roof is always wabbly and dangerous. To overcome this is an attachment which fits the ladder and can be adjusted to meet the height and pitch of the roof where the ladder touches. A loose clamp is made in the shape shown, and fitted around one leg of the ladder, where it will slide up and down.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0229.xml
article
123
123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Clip for Holding Photos and Drawings
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[no value]
F. W. HARTH
THE usual method of holding drawings or photos for copying is by fastening them with thumb tacks or similar means to a board. The device illustrated will not mar the drawing as would a thumb tack and will hold it firmly in any position. It is composed of two arms, one arm inflexible and the other springy.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0230.xml
article
123
123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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When a Broom Is a Shoe-Cleaner
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S. R. WINTERS
WHEN the bootblack is charging ten cents plus the tax of a healthy “tip” for each pair of shoes cleaned and polished, why not duplicate the example of J. H. Vaughan, of Texas, who has found economical use of a discarded broom as a shoe and boot cleaner? Of course, the handmade device is not capable of administering the shining fluid but a thorough cleaning of the leather is the big end of the job.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0231.xml
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123
123
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[no value]
THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
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THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
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[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0232.xml
advertisement
124
124
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0233.xml
article
124
124,125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How the Mechanic Can Keep His Tools Bright
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[no value]
W. S. STANDIFORD
THE machinist or other metal-worker who uses steel rules, squares, bevel-protractors and other instruments that are graduated in inches and fractions, finds that they soon acquire a slight coating of rust upon their surfaces, which makes it difficult to read the markings.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0234.xml
article
125
125,126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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When the Motor-Truck Engine Balked
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ED. HENRY
ONE cool morning a certain farmer accompanied by his son was bowling merrily over the road with a good-sized motor-truck load of produce he was taking to a city market. They came to a fairly steep hill and started up when the engine suddenly began to sputter and miss, and finally balked.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0235.xml
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125
125
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THE JOHNSON MOTOR WHEEL COMPANY
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THE JOHNSON MOTOR WHEEL COMPANY
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[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0236.xml
advertisement
125
125
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[no value]
LUCKY 13 PHONOGRAPH COMPANY
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LUCKY 13 PHONOGRAPH COMPANY
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[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0237.xml
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125
125
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[no value]
HARRY A. SMITH
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HARRY A. SMITH
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[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0238.xml
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125
125
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[no value]
Haywood Tire & Equipment Co.
[no value]
Haywood Tire & Equipment Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0239.xml
advertisement
126
126
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0240.xml
article
126
126,127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Make a Draftsman’s Centering Instrument
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A HANDY draftsman’s center that will not injure the drawing is illustrated in the accompanying picture. It is simple, and can be made in a minute or two of time. A triangular shaped piece of heavy paper or bristol-board is used and a notch is cut on a previously drawn center line.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0241.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Clothes-Pins Arranged to Serve as a Tool-Rack
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[no value]
TO keep the small tools hung up and out of the way is not always an easy problem but if you can find some old clothes-pins and a board, a rack for holding tools like screwdrivers, files, chisels, etc., can be quickly made, and will prove a handy asset for the work shop.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0242.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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An Old Film Will Make an Excellent Duplicator
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VICTOR H. TODD
AN old photographic plate or film, either exposed or unexposed, will make an excellent duplicating device capable of making twenty to thirty copies of typewritten or hand-written originals. Obtain an old plate or film and soak it for several minutes in lukewarm water. Then lay on a flat surface and remove the excess water by using several pieces of newspaper as a blotter. When the surface has become sticky so the paper peals off, then lay the previously prepared copy face down on the plate and smooth it gently by rubbing the back with your hand.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0243.xml
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127
127
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[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0244.xml
advertisement
128
128
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0245.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Bench-Clamp for the Amateur Carpenter
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[no value]
[no value]
C. H. WILLEY
THE bench-clamp is a simple tool to make, yet it is a very excellent device. It is made from odd bar stock; the old square axle of a light buggy furnishes excellent material. The leg is bent at right angles. The section passing through the bench is 2 ft. long, and the section to which the U-piece is riveted is 10 in.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0246.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Lock Your Tool-Box Securely
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ERNEST SCHWARTZ
THE accompanying illustration shows a combination lock for a tool-box provided with a drawer. A door-bolt here takes the place of a second lock. The door-latch is screwed to the inside wall of the tool-box, the bolt passing through a hole in the bottom of the base.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0247.xml
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129
129
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0248.xml
article
129
129
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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An Inexpensive Typewriter Cleaner
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ROY C. BRADBURY
WHEN the typewriter keys begin to work with difficulty,it is a sure sign that the old oil on the delicate bearings of the type bars has become gummy, and no amount of re-oiling will do any good; unless, of course, the bearings are first thoroughly cleaned.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0249.xml
article
130
130
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY
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Forest Trees Come to Aid of Radio Men
The forest ranger has a valuable ally in the new radio-telephone
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LAST year, the Federal Forest Service thoroughly tested the radio-telephone in the western national forests, and ascertained that under average conditions in those regions, the wireless method of communication was more satisfactory and much cheaper than the installation and operation of the ordinary telephone system.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0250.xml
article
130
130
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY
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Two Radio Records
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J. W. K.
TWO long-distance radio records are arousing special interest among operators of low-powered stations. They were made by the sister ships Colombia and Venezuela, of the Pacific Mail Steamship Company, while on their way home from Asia, working with the Inglewood Navy Radio Station which is located near Los Angeles.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0251.xml
article
131
131,132
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY
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What’s Happening to the Amateur’s Decrement?
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TEN BROEKE
THE answer to this question is that his decrement is vanishing. Many amateurs are now using continuous wave sets which involve vacuum tubes. Some are using quenched gaps and are sending out wave trains that are very nearly steady. Each wave is only a little weaker than the preceding, that is the decrement is small, and the interference is not nearly so troublesome as it was with the old spark sets.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0252.xml
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131
131
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0253.xml
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132
132
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0254.xml
article
132
132,133,134
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY
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How to Use Your Wave Meter
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O. C. Roos
IF you don’t want to be rated as an “etheric pirate,” to use Dr. De Forest’s phrase, you can protect yourself and your neighbors by the proper use of your wave meter. My method can be learned by an ordinary operator in a half an hour or so. First couple the primary and secondary of your transmitting set very loosely and then tune. Now couple your wave meter coil to the secondary of your transmitter. If you are not sure what loose coupling really means separate your primary and secondary coils until the antenna ammeter reads only about ten divisions.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0255.xml
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133
133
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0256.xml
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134
134
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0257.xml
article
134
134
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY
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A New Form of Wireless Aerial
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A NEW form of wireless aerial has been experimented with at Scheveningen. It is the invention of a Dutchman named Vlug. The wires for a length of from 100 to 150 metres are lightly buried in the ground. They are said to be highly sensitive, with the result that two wires are insufficient for direct communication with Bandoeng (Dutch East Indies).
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0258.xml
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135
135
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0259.xml
article
135
135,136
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY
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Telephoning to a Moving Railway Train
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SAMUEL W. BEACH
THE question of devising a suitable method by which a telephone conversation may be held with a distant, moving railroad train has lately been revived by the announcement that the War Department has apparently succeeded in so doing. The Department’s plan, however,—known as “wired wireless,”—involves a rather intricate system which is also expensive.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0260.xml
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136
136
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0261.xml
article
136
136
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY
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The Detector of a Hundred Contact Points
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A MATEURS who are still using crystal detectors instead of vacuum tubes will be interested in a design brought forth during the war by a French inventor, M. Hurn. Ten different silver wires offer ten different points of contact with the crystal.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0262.xml
article
137
137
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY
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A New Mounting for Bank-Wound Coils
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A SIMPLE mounting of the type needed for use with banked coils or those of the “honeycomb” style is shown in the illustration. A D.P.D.T. switch, such as can be bought for about half a dollar, and a little work is all that is needed. The contacts of the switch are removed and bolted in the holes that were formerly employed to take care of the lead wires.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0263.xml
article
137
137
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND TELEPHONY
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Mounting Radio Instruments on a Panel
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R. U. CLARK
THE most recent method of mounting instruments, especially those used in the receiving set, is in the form of a panel, the various units being inserted in round or square holes cut expressly for this purpose. The instruments used may be mounted on disks of fiber or bakelite, or on old phonograph records, which may be bought cheaply at second hand.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0264.xml
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137
137
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0265.xml
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137
137
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Geo. H. Jung Co.
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Geo. H. Jung Co.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0266.xml
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137
137
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Dodge’s Institute
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Dodge’s Institute
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0267.xml
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137
137
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SHUMATE RAZOR CO.
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SHUMATE RAZOR CO.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0268.xml
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138
138
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0269.xml
article
138
138,139
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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An Air-Pressure Ram for Garage Use
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THERE are numerous cases in garage work where a series of blows, or prolonged pressure, is desired to drive in or out certain parts that cannot be reached with a hammer or bar. To supply such blows or pressure the following ram, working from the air system in the shop, has been devised.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0270.xml
article
139
139,140
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Bench Light Bracket Made from Automobile Parts
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T. HALLETT
THE steering rod of a Ford, or other light car, and a pie tin may be combined to make an adjustable electric light bracket and reflector for the work bench. The steering rod should be the one fitted with ball socket joints at each end and the ball pins which fit them should also be used.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0271.xml
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139
139
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The L. S. STARRETT COMPANY
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The L. S. STARRETT COMPANY
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0272.xml
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139
139
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Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0273.xml
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139
139
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0274.xml
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139
139
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CHAS H. JOHNSTON
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CHAS H. JOHNSTON
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0275.xml
article
140
140,141
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Re-Cutting Worn Files to Renew Them
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W. S. STANDIFORD
IN these days of efficiency and high prices, every effort is made by managers of machine shops, automotive plants and other factories to keep operating costs as low as possible. The utilization of articles that were formerly regarded as waste, once they were used, is receiving the attention of various manufacturers who are saving large amounts of money yearly by reclaiming used lubricating oils, dirty waste thrown away by workmen and other articles.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0276.xml
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140
140
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0277.xml
article
141
141,142
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Cutting Thin Disks in the Lathe
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H. H. PARKER
THE amateur sometimes experiences difficulty in trying to cut large, thin washers or disks in his lathe. The best way to do this is to attach a wooden chuck to the face plate. This does not need to be round as shown in the illustration, though such a shape facilitates facing it off.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0278.xml
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141
141
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Smith & Hemenway Co., Inc.
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Smith & Hemenway Co., Inc.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0279.xml
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141
141
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J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
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J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0280.xml
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142
142
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Simonds Manufacturing Co.
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Simonds Manufacturing Co.
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0281.xml
article
142
142
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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An Accurate and Quick Way to Gage Screws
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H. BARNUM STILLMAN
IN a factory, not long ago, we had two fairly large sized boxes filled with a mixed lot of machine screws, varying in size from 6 in. by 32 in. to 5/16 in. by 18 in. To sort these and put them back in stock looked like a slow, tedious job. We saved considerable time by making a screw gage as follows: A piece of sheet steel ⅛ in. thick and 12 in. long by 6 in. wide was cut into six slots about 10½ in. long.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0282.xml
article
142
142
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The Right Way to Make Wire Cable
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DALE R. VAN HORN
A TELEPHONE line was to be run from a rural community into town, and three men were assigned to the job of putting up the poles and placing the wire. At corners it was recommended to use twisted wire cables, but since there were no cables at local markets and not the time required for a shipment to arrive, it was necessary to make them by hand.
PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0283.xml
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143
143
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0284.xml
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144
144
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S. C. JOHNSON & SON
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S. C. JOHNSON & SON
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0285.xml
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145
145
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THE CHARLES E. HIRES COMPANY
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THE CHARLES E. HIRES COMPANY
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0286.xml
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146
146
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United States Rubber Company
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United States Rubber Company
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PopularScience_19200701_0097_001_0287.xml