Issue: 19200501

Saturday, May 1, 1920
MAY, 1920
5
True
96
Friday, December 5, 2014

Articles
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1
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Victor Talking Machine Company
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Victor Talking Machine Company
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0001.xml
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2
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SOUTHERN CYPRESS MFRS’ ASSN.
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SOUTHERN CYPRESS MFRS’ ASSN.
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0002.xml
cover
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0003.xml
masthead
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2,21
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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2,4,6
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CONTENTS
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0005.xml
article
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Why My Memory Rarely Fails Me
and how the secret of a good memory may be learned in a single evening
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DAVID M. ROTH
NOTE: When I asked Mr. Roth to tell in his own words, for nation-wide publication, the remarkable story of the development of his system for the cure of bad memories, I found him reluctant to talk about himself in cold print. When I reminded him that he could do no finer service than to share his story with others—just as he is sharing his method for obtaining a better memory with thousands who are studying his famous Memory Course—he cordially agreed to my proposal.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0006.xml
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4
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0007.xml
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5
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0008.xml
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6
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0009.xml
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6
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0010.xml
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7
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Pelton Publishing Company
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Pelton Publishing Company
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0011.xml
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8,9,10,12,14,16
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0012.xml
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11
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BURLINGTON WATCH COMPANY
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BURLINGTON WATCH COMPANY
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0013.xml
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13
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Chief Draftsman Dobe
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Chief Draftsman Dobe
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0014.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0015.xml
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16
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0016.xml
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0017.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0018.xml
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19
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0019.xml
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DEPENDABLE CIGARS: WHITE OWL
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DEPENDABLE CIGARS
WHITE OWL
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0020.xml
article
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21,22,23
MISCELLANY
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Look Out for a Crash When the Crowd Gets Up
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Alfred J. Lotka
FIVE thousand tons of human flesh and blood! Such is the audience in the Yale Bowl when it is filled to the limit. Perhaps you have never thought of a crowd in these terms. But the engineer who designs a grand stand, for example, has to consider not only the dead weight of the crowd that will sit on it, but the possibility of other forces that the crowd may develop.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0021.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Saturn—It Will Not Sink
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SHOULD our eight planets suddenly be dropped into a great body of water, all except Saturn would sink like stones. Saturn, on the contrary, would float gracefully on the surface—rings and all—like a cake of much advertised soap. That is because Saturn possesses only about three quarters of the density of water.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0022.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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An Excavator that Walked Across a Stream
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WHEN it became necessary to cross the 800-foot span of the Rio Grande river, a huge 75-ton excavator took the ford and crawled with its caterpillar tractor straight across the swiftly flowing stream. Quicksand lurked in the treacherous bottom, and at any moment the great machine might have been engulfed, had not the engineers carefully considered this problem.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0023.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A Checkerboard of Artificial Daylight for Workers in Color
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CAN you distinguish tints of green and blue when you see them by artificial light furnished by the ordinary electric bulb? These colors may be distinguished from each other, but their various intensities fall by the wayside and are lost in artificial illumination, unless special provision is made to save them.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0024.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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What to Do with “Electrocuted” Gas-Pipes
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DOES the gas-pipe or the waterpipe leak? An examination of these pipes may disclose an astonishing condition. From five to ten years after new pipes are installed, one may be annoyed to find them leaking, and the cause at first may seem a mystery.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0025.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Improving the Harvesting of Sugar-Beets
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TURN on the gasoline, take charge of the steering lever, steer straight along the row of hidden sugar-beets, and see what happens. An automatic hand of metal reaches down into the ground and clutches the beets, while a knife cuts off the tops, lifts them out by the roots, and finally stacks them along neatly where they can be collected.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0026.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
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Stand Up to Plant Strawberries
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WHEN you are eating a large, juicy strawberry, think of the stringy little plant it grew upon. A new way of setting these plants has been devised by a Maryland strawberry grower. He uses a punch for making the hole in the ground, and tongs for dropping the plant in the hole.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0027.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Heating Water Without Any Fire
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SET this water-heater in a bucket of water, turn the clamp at the top, and presto !—there will be hot water in a jiffy, and neither a coal or gas flame nor electricity furnishes the heat. The principle of the chemical waterheater is simple. In the bottom of a cylinder is placed a quantity of unslacked lime, above which is an arrangement for supporting a compartment containing a weak solution of sulphuric acid.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0028.xml
article
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Is Sir Oliver Lodge Right About Atomic Energy?
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Sir Oliver Lodge says that if the atomic en ergy in an ounce of matter could be utilized it would be sufficient to raise the German ships sunk in the Scapa Flow and pile them on top of the Scottish mountains. "I think," he adds, "we are on the brink of a great discovery"
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0029.xml
article
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27,28
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Dare We Use This Power?
Sir Oliver Lodge says atomic energy will supplant coal
Everything Is Made Up of Atoms
Active Radium Particles
Were the Old Alchemists Right?
Heat Given Off by Radium
Terrific Speed of Electrons
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E. F. Richards
SIR OLIVER LODGE thinks that man is not yet civilized enough to use the energy hidden in ordinary matter. “The time will come when atomic energy will take the place of coal as a source of power.” The man who spoke thus before the Royal Society of Arts in London was Sir Oliver Lodge—one of the towering figures in modern science, a man who has devoted the better part of his life to the study and interpretation of the atom.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0030.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Fingerprinting the Chimpanzee
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NO wonder that Joe, the chimpanzee, looks worried. They are taking his fingerprints. And while they do it Joe thinks of all the deadly deeds in his past, and tries to determine which one they’re following up. ’Tis true, his keeper is petting him while Maurice W. Fitzgerald, a government fingerprint expert, does the work; but Joe puts no faith in that.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0031.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Saving $50,000 by Welding
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WHEN the huge army transport Northern Pacific ran aground in a fog and sustained a fracture in the giant steel stern-post, to avoid delay and an expense exceeding $50,000 in making a new casting, the officials in charge decided to resort to a thermit wela.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0032.xml
article
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30,31
PICTORIAL PAGES
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What Happens When a Great City Suddenly Turns on Two Million Lights to Meet a Storm
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When two million lights are suddenly switched on during the time when the greatest amount of power is being demanded by the city, the New York Edison Company is prepared. The approach of the dark clouds is announced by an ingenious device, the “wireless stormannouncer.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0033.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Music on the Typewriter
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LETTERS, numbers, and figures are not the only things that can be registered on the typewriter: it can also register music, as Signor Luigi Fortoni has proved. He has invented a rapid music writer and is shown here using the machine. There are but ten keys on the music keyboard, yet with them it is possible to print with precision all the different characters, together with their alphabetical letters, in two sizes.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0034.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Wetting the Air
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YOUR hands feel hot and dry if you sit in a room where there is not sufficient moisture. True, you can place a pan of water on the radiator, but the water does not evaporate rapidly enough. Ralph J. Patterson, of Berlin, N. H., has invented an electric humidifier.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0035.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Use This Glamp on Those Warped Boards
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THIS is a story of how suppressed irritation finally exploded and in so doing produced a floor-layer’s clamp. They were a good bunch of fellows—a volunteer crowd—and they were putting in their spare time repairing and redecorating the little Presbyterian church.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0036.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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The Folding Flagpole
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IN the picture above, the Stars and Stripes is flying on a flagpole only two feet high. The pole is one of the collapsible flagpoles recently invented by Fred Lindstaedt, of Fairmont, Minn. The flagpole tapers from a broad base to a pointed top.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0037.xml
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FOR THE FARMER
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A Hose Watering-Pot
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WHEN the gentle rain from heaven fails to drop, you get out your wateringcan—if you happen to own a garden—and fill it with water. To do this you hold it under á faucet and-turn on the water. Your hand moves slightly, the water hits the guard on top of the pot instead of going in, shoots off at an angle, and lands on you. You are drenched and angry.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0038.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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An Alligator in His Mail
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No wonder the mail service is what it is! It is no longer confined to modest letters with little red stamps in the corners. You can send almost anything by mail — alligators, for instance. Nearly everyone who goes South for the winter sends a dear little baby alligator to some unfortunate relative up North—it’s so useful!
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0039.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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From Wheels to Runners
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IN Petrograd, when snow begins to fall, it is often convenient to put wheeled vehicles, on runners. By means of an ingenious arrangement an ambulance is rapidly adjusted to the severe conditions of travel brought about by sudden changes in the weather.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0040.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Taking the Air in a Street-Car
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TIMOROUS folk who have vowed that they never will ride in the propeller-driven airplane may retract enough to take a trip in the propeller-driven street-car. In the city of Burbank, Cal., a steel and aluminum car, built to accommodate fifty-six people, hangs from a single track along which it runs supported by overhead wheels.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0041.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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It Does Away with the Services of the Caddie
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A NEW golf-club holder invented by Edward Vogel, of San Francisco, is threatening the caddie business. It is much lighter than the usual golf-club bag, and it can be carried by the player himself. It consists of several tubes—one for each club—fastened together at the top.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0042.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
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A Yard of Corn
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“IT can’t be real!” says the man above, as he looks at the monster ear of corn towering up in front of him. And he is right. It is not a real ear, but a very cleverly constructed one. It is made up of the largest kernels brought forth by more than one hundred real ears, fastened to an imitation cob.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0043.xml
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MISCELLANY
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The New Collar-Button
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YOU’RE not the only man who growls at collar-buttons. Robert V. Sampson, of Denver, grew so enraged at one that he took it and the collar it had torn to his work-bench, and sat down and glowered at them. Before he got up he had planned an entirely new collar-button.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0044.xml
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34,35
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Watching the Heart-Beats of a Plant
Sir Jagadis Chunder Bose, a Hindu scientist, has discovered a secret of nature
He Reads the Thoughts of Plants
Explaining the Mysterious Mimosa
Did You Know that Plants Sleep?
Reading the Life of a Leaf
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Latimer J. Wilson
ATTACH a pen to a leaf and place a sheet of paper where the pen can move upon it freely. Then watch the leaf write in plain terms the most minute details of its passing sensations! Substitute a delicate magnetic apparatus for the mere crudity of a pen and the fact is accomplished: the dumb leaf will open its confidences to the eyes of man and indicate exactly how it responds to the influence of outside happenings.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0045.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Again the Traveling Players
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IN the days of Shakespeare traveling players went from town to town, carrying their costumes in a bag, and playing their plays in any old barn they could get. Today we again have traveling players, but they travel in state. The War Camp Community Service of the District of Columbia manages them.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0046.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
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Armor for Plants
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TO protect young plants against cutting insects and other injurious pests, a shield of “armor” has been invented for the growing plant. A piece of metal or flexible material rolled into a cylindrical form is cut at the top so that strips can be curled outward and offered as an obstruction to the army of insects that advance from the ground.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0047.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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The Strawberry Barrel
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STRAWBERRIES, fifteen cents a quart,” shouts the peddler in the street. You get out your fifteen cents and buy a box because they are so cheap. But they are not nearly so cheap as they would be if you grew your own—and you don’t even need a garden to grow them in.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0048.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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What Lovely Tresses!
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WHEN the wind doesn’t blow too hard, the ball team of the House of David —a religious order at Benton Harbor, Mich.— will hold its own against any team. But on windy days the long tresses of the players blow into their bearded faces and they are greatly handicapped.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0049.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Riding the Ostrich
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AN ostrich may be foolish enough to put its head in the sand when it is being chased and think it is safe; but when a man actually jumps on its back, it runs—and runs swiftly. At an ostrich farm in Florida you can ride an ostrich around the racetrack for the small sum of fifty cents—provided you don’t weigh more than one hundred and fifty pounds.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0050.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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The Baggage-Room of an Airplane
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THE baggage-room of a railway train is a dark and gloomy place. Many a passenger has wept at the thought of putting her pet dog in it. But the baggagecoach of an airplane is not by any means a cold, gloomy place. In fact, it is apt to be very warm, since it is often located near the engine.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0051.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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She’s a Truck-Driver
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BE careful what you say about truckdrivers in general, hereafter. They are not all huge persons with large swearing vocabularies. Here is one, for instance, who is both charming and soft-speaking. Her name is Luella Bates and she lives in Clintonville, Wis.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0052.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Throwing Light from New York to Philadelphia
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IN trying out a new portable searchlight it was found that a dazzling beam of light can be thrown from New York to Philadelphia, a distance of ninety miles. The source of light is a carbon arc drawing a current of 150 amperes at a pressure of 75 volts.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0053.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A Smoke-House that Will Not Burn
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A SMOKE-HOUSE built of slabs of concrete instead of logs, and having an underground channel through which the smoke can be drawn from a fire built outside, is an innovation in smoke-houses, constructed by Mr. Fred Traub, of Doon, Ia. The heat from the fire is partly lost in the passage of the smoke through the underneath vent, an advantage in smoking meat, because otherwise the temperature might be high enough for the fats to drip.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0054.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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The Senators’ Subway
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DID you know that the senators at Washington have their own electric subway to take them from the Senate Office Building to the Capitol? The subway train looks very much like the scenic railway trains you see at amusement parks. But of course the senators don’t need to be strapped in.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0055.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
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An Improvised Hothouse
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FROM a drying-drum upon which miles of motion-picture films have been dried, to become the framework of a hothouse is a big jump of adventure. Perhaps hundreds of feet of film, picturing scenes in which heroes, heroines, and flowers figured, once were spun around the wooden drying-frame.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0056.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
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The Lever Potato-Fork
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SAYS the farmer to his helper: “Fork up those potatoes,” and the helper picks up his fork. On the handle, down near the prongs, is a clamp that holds in place a swinging metal rod. When the man starts to dig up the potatoes, he thrusts the rod into the ground, and it acts as a fulcrum for the fork, making his work much easier.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0057.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
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Provide Crutches for Weak Tomato Plants
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TOMATO plants cannot stand on their own roots, and this is also true of many other plants. They have to be artificially supported throughout their lives. Such plants are usually tied to upright stakes. Yet as they grow taller they must continually be retied.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0058.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Echoes from the Bottom of the Sea
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SOUND travels Through still air of a certain density at the rate of about 1,100 feet a second. Making use of this principle, a device has been tried that promises success in finding the depth of the sea-bottom in any locality. A small amount of explosive material is discharged at the side of a vessel, and the reflected sound from the sea-bottom is caught in a microphone suitably attached to the vessel.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0059.xml
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FOR THE FARMER
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Umbrellas for Chickens
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“HOW outrageous is the glare of sunlight here in the poultry yard!” is probably what all the chickens are talking about in their peculiar manner when the midday sun beats fiercely down. Mr. L. S. Fisher has solved their problem to the complete satisfaction of his valuable chickens. The family umbrella, firmly secured so that a sudden gust cannot whisk it away, was promptly appreciated by the crowd of White Leghorns that flocked under it for shelter.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0060.xml
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FOR THE FARMER
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Weeding Made Easy
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WHEN the weeds grow up overnight there is a way to eliminate them promptly in the morning. Mr. Lewis Inman has invented a simple arrangement for bringing genuine disaster to the bolshevik weeds that spring up in the garden’s orderly plot. He merely shoves a handle somewhat like that on a lawnmower, and a wheel guides some knives over the ground, digging under the weeds with blades that are rounded so they can be worked close to the roots of plants not to be dislodged.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0061.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Taking the Strain off the Flag-Pole
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HANGING out the flag and drawing it in again puts a certain strain upon the staunch flag-pole and the support that holds it in a fixed position. The sudden jerk caused by a gust of wind throws additional weight upon the bracket that holds the pole, and unless it is strong there is an added danger of its breaking.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0062.xml
article
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HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Chop Cabbage in Circles
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IF you sharpen the edge of your biscuitcutter you can use it as a choppingknife. According to the rules of geometry, its circular edge will cut more than three times as much as would a straight blade having the length of its diameter. Behold the busy housewife below, chopping cabbage.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0063.xml
article
39
39
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Barber's Hobby-Horse
[no value]
[no value]
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“JOHNNY got a hair-cut!” All the hoodlums in the neighborhood yell this after Johnny every time he comes from the barber’s. No wonder he weeps when his mother drags him there. But in one of New York’s large department-stores the barbers have no trouble.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0064.xml
article
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[no value]
[no value]
Where the High Cost of Baby-Carriages Doesn’t Trouble
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WHEN an American mother goes marketing she puts her baby in a rubber-tired carriage, wraps him up in blue ribbons and lace, and starts out, proudly wheeling him before her. But when a Moro mother goes marketing with her children she’s not so fussy.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0065.xml
article
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39
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Protect Your Eyes When Shucking Oysters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“LOOK out for the splinters!” a stranger would exclaim if he gave expression to his thoughts when he sees an “oyster-shucker” professional in the act of hammering open oyster-shells. The bits of flying shell sometimes dart in the direction of the worker’s eyes, and there is danger of losing one’s sight if a well directed blow sends back a sharp bit.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0066.xml
article
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HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Make Stirring Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“STIR constantly,” says the recipe. And there has recently been invented a stirrer. It consists of a long metal handle with a flat swinging disk at the end. Suppose you are frying potatoes. A spoon or fork will not scrape them from the bottom of the pan, but the new stirrer will do it thoroughly.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0067.xml
article
40
40,41
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Fighting a Fire with Brains
The cub electrician remembers a lesson and saves the power plant
Then the Big Crash Came
Chemical Extinguishers to the Rescue
What Johnny Had Done
Just in Time, He Remembered the Field Switch
[no value]
[no value]
Charles Magee Adams
OVERHEAD lightning crackled an arriving sharply flash across of the horn-gap arresters. But down on the floor of the power-house, in front of No. 3 unit’s panel in the main switchboard, little Bob Fitzgerald, the chief engineer, continued to frown up at his new attendant.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0068.xml
article
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42
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
Feeding Films to the Magic Lantern
A reel of them is much smaller and lighter than glass
[no value]
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0069.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
Food from Above
Lunch is served on a string where apartments are high
[no value]
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0070.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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What a Pasty Face!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
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FACE powder isn’t effective enough to give the Macua woman that whitewashed look she admires so much in her pale-faced sisters. Her natural hue being a rich, dark brown, powder simply turns it yellow. The Macua tribe lives in South Africa.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0071.xml
article
44
44
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Where Directories Hang on Corner Posts
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DID you ever go from house to house, trying to find out where John Smith lived? And when he lives in a small town he is more careless than ever about giving you the name of his street and his number. But in a Western city the improvement club has hung directories on many of the guide-posts throughout the town.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0072.xml
article
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44
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
How Did It Happen?
[no value]
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CRASH! The limousine ran into the truck—or did the truck run into the limousine? Accidents happen so unexpectedly that it is often hard to tell who is to blame. In the traffic court at Washington, witnesses of traffic accidents do not have to tell what they saw—they demonstrate it on a small cardboard street corner.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0073.xml
article
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44
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Jewels First!
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[no value]
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GOLD and precious stones—billions of dollars’ worth—have gone down with wrecked ships for centuries. The bottom of the sea is inestimably wealthy. But its income is destined to drop off now, for there has been invented a floating safe. You put your valuables in it when you board the ship.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0074.xml
article
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44
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Bunny Wears a Muzzle
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PETER RABBIT loved to nibble—that’s what got him in trouble—and so do all of Peter’s brothers and sisters. One little brother is shown above effectively muzzled. He is the pet of a large London office, and he walks all over everyone. But, unfortunately, he nibbles.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0075.xml
article
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44
MISCELLANY
[no value]
They’re Keeping Cool on a Warm Job
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WHEN fire and sunshine enter into a combination, even the upper region where telephone cables are suspended may become a warm place. At least, that is what several repairmen thought who hurried out to the scene of damage to fix some cables burned by a near-by fire.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0076.xml
article
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45
MISCELLANY
[no value]
This French Hero's Dog Is His Motor
[no value]
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PAULO, the dog, and M. Andrivet, his master, both were wounded in the Argonne. Paulo recovered completely, but his master lost both legs. They have both returned to Paris, and may be seen any day going through the streets together. M. Andrivet sits in a tricycle, while Paulo runs alongside and acts as its motor.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0077.xml
article
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45
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Your Special Hook
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
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NURSES, cooks, maids, and housekeepers are often known to mix things up—towels, for instance. How can you be sure that your towel hasn’t changed places with somebody else’s? By using an individual towel clip like those below. When you wish to take your towel out or put it in, you simply press a button and the jaws of the clip will open.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0078.xml
article
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45
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
For Betty When She Washes the Windows
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
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TO prevent youngsters and others from tumbling out of upper-story windows, a safety-apron supported from rods mounted in brackets at the side of the window has been invented by F. R. Blankennagel, of Passaic, N. J. The window-apron is supported at an outwardly inclined angle that obstructs little of the light and air.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0079.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
No Mistakes Here
[no value]
[no value]
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AN automatic score-board, so arranged that only the right score for each player can be registered, and no mistakes can be made, is an invention of Mr. Frank A. Garbutt, vice-president of the Los Angeles Athletic Club. The size of the score-board is four by five feet.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0080.xml
article
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45
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
This Gorilla Has Solved the Servant Problem
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VISIT the home of Madame Alyse, in London, and you will see a clever gorilla whose name is “John.” He is reputed to be the only domesticated gorilla in England, and is a past master in the art of acting as valet or maid. Since the animal is so adept in training, perhaps gorillas will be taught to be serviceable as substitutes for “hired” help.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0081.xml
article
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HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Scraping the Pan
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
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WATER won’t always wash off the food that clings to pots and pans. They must be scraped. And now there is a scraper of many sides that will do the scraping. The sides are of different lengths, and there is a dent in the center of the scraper that enables you to grasp it firmly.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0082.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
Sermons by Telephone
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A FALLING rock in a mine in Wales hit Sam Pritchard, a miner, and injured him so severely that he thought it would be a long time before he could hear the sermons preached in his local Baptist church. But three friends determined that he should hear the Sunday service, though he was unable to go to the church.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0083.xml
article
46
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NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
When a Bean Is Not a Bean It's a Gourd
[no value]
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ONE so-called New Guinea butter-bean will provide a meal for a whole family. If the diner does not object to the slightly bitter taste, he may he satis fied with his dish; it is indeed a cheap one, for the seeds of this curious vegetable sell six for fifty cents.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0084.xml
article
46
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HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Greasing the Griddle
[no value]
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RUCKWHEAT cakes—put 'em on the griddle," sings the negro comedian. But first you must grease the griddle. How? Take a piece of lamp-wick, soak it in grease, and clamp it in a wire frame. It will distribute the grease evenly and may be used for a long time before the wick need be changed.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0085.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
To Correct Typewriting
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STENOGRAPHERS know what a tough job it is to make erasures on a typewriter when carbon copies are being made. A card slipped between the carbon and the under sheet of paper may work some times, but often it causes a smear. Here is an arrangement for eliminating the smear.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0086.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Mud-Guards in the Air
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ONE would scarcely imagine that airplanes need fenders to keep misty clouds from splashing into the tonneau, and they don’t. But they do have mudguards to keep the mud of flying-fields from spattering all over their perfectly good propellers that are whirling at a couple of thousand revolutions a minute.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0087.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
An Electric Hair-Cut
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A SMALL electric motor operating an arrangement of suitable cutting blades, the electric hair-cutter is the invention of a Berlin barber. Instead of laboriously working a pair of scissors all day in the art of cutting hair, the electric machine needs only to be guided in the proper manner to do its work effectively and quickly.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0088.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
How the Natives Carry Water in Old Siam
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WATER-BOTTLES made of animal skins? Why?” one might; ask. Within twenty degrees of the equator, on the Indo-Chinese peninsula, the little country Muang Thai, as its inhabitants know it—Siam, as the rest of the world recognizes it—basks in the tropical sun.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0089.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Store It by Truck
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A MOTOR-TRUCK run by storage batteries saves a lot of time and labor in its useful service in storage-houses, warehouses, laundries, and freight depots. It picks up boxes and kegs and conveys them to the place that has been designated for them.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0090.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
Electrify Your Brush
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HARROWING tales will make your hair stand on end, and so will the new electric brush shown below. In fact, it will even make your hair curl. The brush has metal bristles, and on its back it carries a small box inside of which is a magneto. To operate it you simply work a convenient handle.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0091.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Gas-Holder—a City Reservoir
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THE gas-holder is to the city that uses artificial gas what the reservoir is to a city’s water supply. The water used by a city is not forced directly into the city’s distributing mains, but is pumped from its source of supply into reservoirs and stored until it is used.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0092.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Deadening Noise with Cotton
[no value]
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INSTEAD of putting cotton plugs in the ears to stop the noise of the metal gear in machinery where rasping noise is not wanted, the cotton has been put to use in making the gear itself noiseless. After trying many kinds of materials, metallic and nonmetallic, the choice was narrowed down to the use of steel or compressed cotton.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0093.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
What Makes a Baseball Curve?
It is simply a matter of atmospheric pressure
Not a New Discovery
The Ball “Follows Its Nose"
[no value]
[no value]
Lindley Pyle
HOLD blow up vigorously a sheet of between paper and the two separated ends. The leaves of paper move toward each other and cling together. Obviously, the moving stream of air exerts a suction effect upon adjacent bodies. In more precise language, the atmospheric pressure between the paper leaves is lowered by the air velocity action, and the unaltered pressure of the air on the outside crushes the paper leaves together.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0094.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Laying Concrete Under Difficulties
[no value]
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LAYING a concrete pavement in a narrow alley lined with irregular rows of fences and telegraph-poles is the feat performed by the city of St. Louis. The fifteen-foot alley was so narrow that teams couldn’t turn around in it, so all of the materials had to be delivered and spread upon the sub-grade before the actual concreting began.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0095.xml
article
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FOR THE FARMER
[no value]
An Unexpected Plunge for the Poultry
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MUCH time and labor can be consumed when it is necessary to dip poultry conforming to the rules of the poultry-yard hygiene. Imagine the task of separately immersing two or three hundred fowls! Mr. Alva F. Randolph comes forward with an ingenious patent by which the members of the feathered community can be given a highly effective plunge-bath in whatever liquid may be required.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0096.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Building Trees for Birds
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WOULD you have wrens, flickers, owls, or bluebirds, or would you like a few of each in your garden? There is a certain way to get the very birds you want, and that is to make a tree for them. Dr. B. Harry Warren, of West Chester, Pa., makes imitation trees to attract birds.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0097.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Making Gas Connections Fool-Proof
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EVEN a child may safely be intrusted with switching the current of an electric light on or off. If you have a contact socket in the wall of your room, you only need a long enough insulated double wire with a contact plug to utilize the electric current for your readingor piano-lamp, your toaster, your curling-tongs, or your electric iron.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0098.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
[no value]
An Airplane that Really "Hops Off"
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IN order to enable an airplane to hop off without the necessity of running along the ground, Earl Atkinson has invented a novel launching device. The engine pumps compressed air into a tank carried within the fuselage, and a connection with this tank extends to two cylinders fixed beneath the wings of the machine.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0099.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
How to Demagnetize a Watch
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REMEMBER the last time you were near an electric motor and afterward your watch wouldn’t go? You took it to the watchmaker and he said it was magnetized and it would have to be demagnetized—one dollar, please! The accompanying illustration shows what a simple operation it is to demagnetize a watch.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0100.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
The Name in the Ceiling
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SENSECSTEE!” garbles the subway guard. The car is crowded; you can’t see the station signs; you can’t understand the guard. You don’t know where you are. Can this situation be remedied? The London Metropolitan Railroad is trying to remedy it by installing in all the cars electrical station signals.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0101.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Turn on the Cold and Let’s Have Winter
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BEFORE we turn on the steam to make artificial spring and summer for the greenhouse, we must turn on the refrigerating system to produce artificial winter—if we would produce certain plants out of season. Experiments by Dr. Frederick Coville, botanist of the Department of Agriculture, seem to demonstrate that some plant life, such as the blueberry, can thrive only when it has passed through the cycle of climatic changes due to the seasons.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0102.xml
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
Get Off the Wire, Moose!
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IT happened in the Maine woods. A lineman was sent out to locate an open wire. He came upon the break, but found that about five hundred feet of the wire had entirely disappeared. He went off to get enough wire to fill the gap, and when he returned he found a large bull moose there.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0103.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
The New Tie-Nipper Spikes Rails in Less Time with Fewer Men
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ASIMPLE iron tool that is stronger and more rapid than the working power of two men is the new implement employed by a Western street railway. It consists of a lever, a handle, and a head and foot. Ordinarily the laying of rails requires the use of two men at the rail-end, where each man with a steel bar guides the heavy metal, while other workmen spike it to the ties.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0104.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
How to Close All the Windows at Once
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PUT an automatic window-operator on one of the windows, connect all of the windows suitably on the inside with the “inside sash control,” and connect the system with an alarm-clock. At a designated time every one of the windows will be closed.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0105.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
An Eskimo Duel Is Fought by Tongue
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YOU’RE a mean, ugly brute, and your face reminds me of a chunk of ice,” said one Eskimo to another, and the surrounding villagers roared with laughter. That’s how the Eskimos in Greenland’s icy mountains fight their duels—with their tongues.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0106.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
The Camera Takes Its Own Pictures
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IF a tender young plant doesn’t die of fright when it sees eight large electriclight bulbs staring it in the face, then its growth will be automatically photographed with the aid of those same eight bulbs. They are part of a new automatic motionpicture camera recently invented.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0107.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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The Catcher Gives the High Sign
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0108.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
What to Do with an Old Barroom
Under prohibition books supplant beers and toys the toper
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0109.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
Mechanical Genius of the Back Woods
Without schooling or training of any kind, he has made himself a cunning artificer in wood and stone
[no value]
[no value]
A. F. Harlow
THOMAS COKE RICE is a Tennessee mountaineer who lives in one of the wildest and most inaccessible portions of the narrow, high, deeply seamed plateau known as Walden’s Ridge. An almost unbroken forest extends for several miles in all directions from his home, and a lone cabin three miles away shelters his nearest neighbor.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0110.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Unbarbered Ainu
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IMAGINE 20,000 men in need of a hair-cut and a shave, and who have been in need of these things all their adult existence! In the northernmost islands of Japan live the Ainu, or hairy men. Science hints that these curious folk may be of remote Caucasian descent, though they undoubtedly emigrated originally from the Kuriles.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0111.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Sprinkling the Envelopes
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GOOD-BY, old sponge and dirty bowl! You have mussed up the office desk long enough. An Illinois manufacturer is making an efficient aluminum envelopemoistener. An aluminum cap fits tightly over an aluminum can which is about two inches in height.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0112.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
Put Up Your Umbrella When Among Pelicans
[no value]
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ABOUT twenty miles from Saltair, Utah, on the Great Salt Lake, is Bird Island, recognized as the sanctuary of pelicans. Bird Island, derives its name from the fact that only birds—and, in fact, only pelicans—live on the island in the great inland body of salt water.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0113.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
[no value]
An Airplane Tent Hospital
[no value]
[no value]
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HERE is an airplane ambulance that carries a tent for a temporary hospital. The tent is composed of material suitably made into compartments which can be inflated to form a support for the tent. The airplane engine operates a fan which blows air into the bags.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0114.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
Where Time Counts Not
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WHAT'S all this for?” one would surely ask if he visited the bank of one of the sluggish yellow rivers in the vast domain of China, and saw a bull slowly walking around in a circle under a bamboo canopy. “Is it some queer religious ceremony?” “Not at all!” the guide would reply.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0115.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
When Kansas Was a Sea
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AT the time the gigantic flying reptile shown above soared in the sky, millions of years ago, western Kansas was in the heart of a great inland sea. The toothless Pteranodon measured twenty-one feet straight from tip to tip across the wings.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0116.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
Veils for Horses
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WHEN a horse wears a veil across its face just below its eyes it is not trying to look as if it came from a harem, but is attempting to keep the flies and gnats from landing on its nose and lunching there. The end of a horse’s nose is a favorite meeting-place for bugs.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0117.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Curious Clock
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'THAT is a curious clock in your shop window; will you tell me about it?” the stranger asked. “Well,” said the inventor, Mr. S. C. Swindler, “having an idle clock in the house, the thought struck me that I could make that clock operate a large sign which I thought I could myself manufacture.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0118.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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The Parrot Burglar-Alarm
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"MA, come get ’em! Ma, come get ’em!” was the cry that rang shrilly through the stillness of the house. Cecilia Sherman, the ten-year-old daughter of Samuel Sherman, knew at once what the parrot meant, for the family pet had been trained to pronounce this phrase at the sight of strangers.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0119.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
[no value]
Targets of the Big Guns
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[no value]
BOOM! The great guns are firing. As the smoke rises and the rumbling echo rolls away, the sailors watch eagerly. Did they hit the target? From the deck of the battleship the targets look like tiny black patches with white spots in the middle. But a close-up view is quite different, as you see in the picture below, On target No. 175 three hits are plainly seen.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0120.xml
article
60
60,61,62,63
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Do Spirits Talk through the Ouija Board?
Perhaps it is that subconscious ego whose memory is better than yours
Are You Absent-Minded?
Subconscious Memory
The Case of Miss C—
Hélène Smith from Mars
Subconsciously Evolved Dialect?
Psychology Explains Much
Another Automatic Script Case
How to Make a Ouija Board
[no value]
[no value]
A. J. Lorràine
ABOUT You place you the hovers ouija the board unseen. upon your knees or on a table, and let your hand rest lightly on the planchette, the little three-legged carriage that rides over the ouija board. See that you are comfortably seated, and your arms not cramped, but free to move.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0121.xml
article
64
64
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
This Little Dog Wears a Neck-Watch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TINY II, dog, was given a wristwatch and he didn’t know what to do with it. He wore it on his front paw for a while, but he was always buying new crystals for it. He now wears the watch around his neck. Of course it’s not of much use to him there, but he doesn’t know how to tell time, anyway.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0122.xml
article
64
64
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A Monster Beavers’ Dam
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN Taylor Creek, Bayfield county, Wisconsin, beavers have built a great dam. It is twelve feet high and a quarter of a mile long. The house is in the center. It is sixteen feet high and forty feet wide at the base. The sleeping compartment is large enough for a tall man to lie down in.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0123.xml
article
64
64
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Wrecked by a Tank—a Water-Tank
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS is what a tank did—not the tanks that did such damage in the war, but just a peaceful old water-tank! A 40,000-gallon tank carried on a 75-foot steel tower, and used in fire emergency, became so encaked with ice that the additional weight was declared unsafe, and the tons of ice were removed under orders from the Building Inspector.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0124.xml
article
64
64
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Memorandum-Pad that Comes in Sections
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“CALL Mr. Hanley,” says a memorandum on the desk-pad. Now, when he has been called, what is to be done? Should the page of the memorandum-pad be torn off, what about the other memoranda on the same page? The simple way is often the best way. There is a handy memorandum-pad having four divisions for each leaf.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0125.xml
article
64
64
MISCELLANY
[no value]
See the Meridian
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"EAST is east and west is west, and never the twain shall meet,” said Kipling, but he was wrong. In the picture below you can see the meridian line where east meets west; and to make the matter more interesting a man has one foot in each. The meridian is an imaginary line from the north to the south pole, passing through Greenwich, England.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0126.xml
article
65
65
FOR THE FARMER
[no value]
Branding Fruit and Vegetables Without Injury
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“A CAN of So-and-So’s baking powder, a bottle of Blank’s ketchup—” You can safely order your groceries by the telephone because they are labeled. But fruits and vegetables wear no protective labels. However, there is now a fruit-branding machine, invented by Ansel Wysong, of Los Angeles—the man who devised the walnut-branding machine.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0127.xml
article
65
65
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Bookkeeping of Cooks
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN you order breakfast at a fashionable New York hotel, the waiter does not shout to the cook, “One up on the ham and eggs!”—oh, no! He writes your order down and then quietly disappears kitchenward. He approaches the cook with his pad in hand, reads off the order, and the cook in turn writes it on a pad—one of many lined up on a shelf.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0128.xml
article
65
65
MISCELLANY
[no value]
This Bad Man Gave the Sheriff a Jolt
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MISSISSIPPI sheriff left a prisoner securely locked in his room at the hotel. Yet, when he returned, the prisoner was gone. The room was on the fifth floor, and there was no fire-escape. When the sheriff left the room the prisoner was calmly reading a newspaper.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0129.xml
article
65
65
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Pillars of Light to Guide the Airman
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT Hounslow Aerodrome, in England, a lighthouse has been erected to guide airmen at night and in bad weather. A beam of light of 70,000 candlepower is sent vertically into the sky, illuminating the dust and moisture in the atmosphere and standing like a luminous pillar.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0130.xml
article
65
65
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Get Ready—Sneeze!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GET ready! Set! Sneeze! These orders are given to a group of nose patients in the Battersea General Hospital, and at the word sneeze they all chime in. It has been found that sneezing helps the prevention and treatment of nasal complaints. At the order, “Get ready!” each patient dips a feather in a saucer containing iris root.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0131.xml
article
66
66
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Whirling Water Uphill
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW water-elevating device has been invented by Mr. Leon Shevchenko, of Cortland, N. if. A vertical tube fitted half way up with a system of horizontal pipes is rapidly rotated, the centrifugal force causing the water in a lower level to flow upward and outward through the pipes.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0132.xml
article
66
66
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Bedroom Pet
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the leafy trail of the dark forest one listens for the breaking twig that whispers, “Watch now and you’ll see a deer jump out of the brush!” But Mme. Clothilde Sakharoff, the exponent of a new phase in the art of dancing, became indisposed when she arrived in New York, and her husband comforted her with a refreshing breath of the outdoors by having brought to her room a tame deer.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0133.xml
article
66
66
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Bareback Rider in a Broadway Café
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GRACEFUL bareback rider, poised on one foot with arms outstretched, is a novel sight for a Broadway café; , yet this is what the habitués at one of the sophisticated old resorts about town are still talking about. Monkey and dog marriages no longer attract attention.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0134.xml
article
66
66
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Bale Them for the Rebate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EMPTY cement-sacks bring a good rebate when carefully baled and shipped. To do the work by hand is laborious and time-consuming, but above is a simple machine for baling. The empty sacks are laid across the baler, then a lever is pressed down to compress them into a compact bundle.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0135.xml
article
66
66
MISCELLANY
[no value]
He Paints with His Toes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE working in an airplane factory the boy in the picture lost both arms. He decided, optimistically, that since he still had his toes his case was not hopeless. He went to the Crailey Heritage Craft School and learned to paint pictures with them.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0136.xml
article
67
67
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
It's a Baby Hoatzin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BEHOLD a baby hoatzin! It was alone in the nest when the photographer approached. It climbed out bravely for the first time, and moved awkwardly to the end of the branch. The photographer followed. When it was two feet away, the baby bird folded its wings and did a high dive into the water below.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0137.xml
article
67
67
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Reading in Bed
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DO you like to read in bed? Most people do, but they find that in a short time their arms grow tired from holding the book, and their eyes grow tired from reading in a bad light. Both of these difficulties are done away with in the new light and book support that was recently invented by Christian Widmer, of Upland, Cal.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0138.xml
article
67
67
FOR THE FARMER
[no value]
A Trimmer for the Edges of the Lawn
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REMOVING the rough edges has always been the hardest part of lawncutting. Two tools—a scuffie-hoe and a lawn-edger—have been necessary. But now Mr. Timothy Murphy, of Beacon, N. Y., comes along with a new tool that attends to the entire edging operation. It consists of two sharp blades—one being flat on the ground and the other curved upward at an acute angle.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0139.xml
article
67
67
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Testing Airplane Wires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the pilot of an airplane cuts off his engine and starts downward, he can hear the vibration of the tautly drawn wires strung between the airplane wings. What is the strength demanded of these vital “threads” which hold the frame of the airplane and keep it from being shattered?
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0140.xml
article
67
67
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
For Automobilists
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE picture below is for people who drive automobiles. This poor little fellow will endure this torture, without one minute’s rest day or night, for five long weeks, just because a man driving a big touring car was not careful. The child was hit.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0141.xml
article
68
68
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
Barbers from Pole to Pole
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0142.xml
article
69
69
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
"We the People of the United States—"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0143.xml
article
70
70
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
This Truck-Tractor Cuts a Road through Underbrush
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT would a driver do with 60 horses and 7 wagons loaded with 42,000 pounds of wet clay, when he came face to face with a tangle of dense woods? His teams would refuse, as politely as teams can refuse, to budge a foot into the underbrush. But the driver of a combined truck and tractor puts on a spurt of gasoline and drives straight into the thicket; nor does the loose sand underneath the wheels interfere with his progress.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0144.xml
article
70
70
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Filling Cement Bags by Means of Suction
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FILLING barrels or bags with cement or other fine powder is dusty work. The workmen try to protect themselves by wearing goggles and by screening mouth and nose with cheesecloth bandages, but these means of protection soon prove inadequate.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0145.xml
article
71
71
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Why Does a Cat Have Whiskers?
Some startling conclusions on the subject
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Why does a cat have whiskers? This question comes under the larger one — what is the function of eye appendages? Mr. P. F. Swindle has investigated this subject very thoroughly, and he has formed some startling conclusions, which he reports in the American Journal of Psychology.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0146.xml
article
72
72
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
It Keeps the Pot from Boiling Over
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GAS regulator like that shown above is a great boon for a busy housekeeper. She may place the pot or the stewing-pan on the stove, and devote herself to other work without being haunted by the fear that the pot may boil over or the food in the pan become scorched.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0147.xml
article
72
72
MISCELLANY
[no value]
An Invalid’s Electric
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOT much larger than a tricycle is this new electrically propelled invalid’s chair. It is so easy to drive that an invalid can manipulate it; and it goes so slowly that there is little chance of accident. The power lever is located on the right arm of the chair, and the speed is regulated by the back and forward movement of the lever.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0148.xml
article
72
72
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Cutting Rails with a Motor-Driven Saw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"SEE that worn section of rail?” asked the section, boss, pointing it out to the visitor. Then he continued: "Just watch how quick a job we make of it!” And in less time than one would guess the rail was made as good as new. How was it done? Not, it is plain, by the old method, which was to have a gang of men take up the entire section of the rail and send it away to the repair shop to be sawed off, pieced out, and welded—a job that generally used up valuable time.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0149.xml
article
72
72
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Woolsack in an Old London House
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE hall of an old London residence is a strange place for a sack of wool, but a very notable one may be seen at Stoke Park, Ipswich. The sack is five feet six inches long and three feet six inches wide, and is covered with crimson material which long since has become much faded.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0150.xml
article
72
72
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Seeing His Faults
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF a man can see his own faults he will soon correct them. That’s why a mirror is placed alongside of each rowingmachine in the training quarters for students of the University of Pennsylvania. The candidate for the crew knows just how a stroke should be made, and if his is wrong he will be able to correct it.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0151.xml
article
73
73
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Where the Fly-Catcher Will Do Most Good
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLIES always flit around food. They’re not very particular about what they eat, and generally they make the garbage-can their headquarters. John E. Connolly, of Racine, Wis., noticed this and decided that the best way to round up the pests was to set a trap for them near their favorite hang-out.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0152.xml
article
73
73
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Helmets Made to Order
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AVIATORS’ helmets like that pictured below are so carefully made that a plaster cast of the airman’s head is necessary. To achieve the utmost in telephony in the air the conditions must be made noiseless. The roar of the airplane propeller, the aeolian tunes played on the tense wires, all tend to drown out the faint sounds in the receiver, which may be of the utmost importance, messages from some point miles away.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0153.xml
article
73
73
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Bomb Made of Burlap and Old Clothes
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the dead of night the black-hander lit the fuse and threw a bomb in Tony Perino’s front yard. Was he killed? Oh, no; the bomb was a homemade one, and the villain had forgotten to put a cap on it. He made it out of old clothes, burlap, rope, and, in the center, four pounds of dynamite, half a pound of nails, some unknown oily substance, and a quantity of black powder.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0154.xml
article
73
73
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Get a Little Jazz Band for Your Family
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHY not have a little jazz band in your home? Manufacturers have met this need, and a complete jazz outfit, including a cow-bell, a triangle, a drum, and several other equally effective noise-makers, can now be bought in many novelty stores.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0155.xml
article
73
73
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Hypnotizing a 'Gator
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“EVER hypnotize a chicken? or a cat? or a snake?” asked the inquisitive one. “No, I haven’t,” is the reply. “But if you’ll just step out here in the back yard I’ll show you what I can hypnotize.” Out there in the yard is a young alligator. Of course, he’s planted there fresh from the enclosure where they keep alligators at the zoo.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0156.xml
article
74
74
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Water by Dog-Power
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INDIANS in some parts of Canada have a strong prejudice against using the water near the shore of a lake for drinking, and an equally strong prejudice against exerting themselves in getting a supply from deeper water. Their problem is solved by the use of a rude water-cart drawn by dogs.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0157.xml
article
74
74
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
What Calorene Gas Does
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALCOHOL, the great unloved, has done at least one good deed for the world. It is supplying us with calorene, a new cutting gas that is not unlike acetylene. Professor A. S. Kinsey, of the Stevens Institute of Technology, was the first one to develop this gas.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0158.xml
article
74
74
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A New Nose-Mask that Filters Out the Germs
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW type of inhaler strapped over the nose presents the formidable aspect of a gas-mask, but its working principle is applied forcibly in the war on disease. This inhaler has two rubber valves, which work automatically. One of the valves permits the inhalation of fresh air, which is medicated and filtered in the inhaler.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0159.xml
article
74
74
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Scarecrow to Us, God to the Indians
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOT all gods are beautiful. Visit the Canadian Indians of a certain section, and one of the most conspicuous objects to be seen in the fields will be what at first sight seems to be a scarecrow. But it is nothing of the sort—it’s an Indian god. In the middle of the large plain is a bundle of old clothes draped about a stout pole.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0160.xml
article
74
74
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Huge Fishing-Pot
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE making of fishing-nets is one of the industries of British New Guinea, and the strange dark people of these Pacific Islands are adepts in both the making and handling of remarkable fishing-traps. Like a gigantic hornets’ nest, or like a mysterious conical basket which might enclose a bottle of the choicest vintage, these fishtraps are constructed.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0161.xml
article
75
75
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Thirty Pairs! She Must Be a Millionaire
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[no value]
[no value]
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ONE person in the world, Bessie Barriscale, a movingpicture actress, has thirty active pairs of shoes—one for each day of the month. This proves two things: first, that the “fabulous” salaries paid to movie stars are not fabulous at all, but very real.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0162.xml
article
75
75
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Complexion that Won’t Come Off
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE complexion that won’t come off is being administered to the girl in the picture below. Her beauty doctor uses an electric tattooing needle; he tucks pink pigment under her skin that perforce will neither rub off, wash off, nor fade away.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0163.xml
article
75
75
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
An Interesting Experiment in Hybridization
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM eastern Africa to Trinidad, and from there to the estate of General Juan Vincent Gomez, the president-elect of Venezuela, the zebu has gone to find himself the subject of a remarkable experiment; for the distinguished general is one of the world’s greatest cattleraisers.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0164.xml
article
75
75
MISCELLANY
[no value]
In China the Barber Comes to You
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOU can never be sure of getting a hair-cut in China. Barbers in that land have a taste for travel, and they carry on their business in a little shop on wheels. The matter of a hair-cut, therefore, is left to fate, which comes when the traveling barber gets around your way.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0165.xml
article
75
75
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Hooking the Shoe-Horn
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"HANG it! What’s the matter with this shoe-horn?” one is apt to exclaim when using an ordinary shoe-horn; for these supposedly useful little instruments are often annoying to the last degree when they slip between one’s fingers while trying to pull on an unruly shoe.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0166.xml
article
76
76
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
The Size of This Valve Is Easily Gaged by the Human Element
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[no value]
[no value]
IMAGINE a valve so large that twenty-four people can look out of the opening into the great cylinder that forms the main chamber of the “shut-off” arrangement—for the valve is called a “shut-off’ valve and is used on large piping systems. The height of the cylinder, as scaled from the size of the figures, is about fourteen feet, while, estimating the width in the same way, it is considerably more than seven feet in diameter.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0167.xml
article
76
76
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Retouching by Electricity
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“WHAT an ideal likeness,” remarks a friend. The prints from the latest negative are retouched so that all of the natural defects are missing. Ordinary negatives often contain minute blemishes caused by very small particles collecting on the film during development.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0168.xml
article
76
76
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Reducing a Brick-Pile with Speed
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LOADING bricks takes time when each brick must be handled separately. Perhaps thousands of men handling bricks were contented to go on handing them out singly or in pairs, until one day along came a man with an idea. “What a laborious way to pass bricks!” and he immediately planned a quicker way.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0169.xml
article
76
76
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Austrian Banknotes Make Good Beer Labels
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"BEHOLD—a bottle of beer! Alas, it is not for you, but for some lucky Swiss. And look at the label—an Austrian banknote! In fact, the brewer of this glorious liquor puts Austrian banknotes on all his bottles. And he is not, as might be thought, rash and extravagant, but most economical.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0170.xml
article
76
76
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Fresh Air for a City Horse
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“WHY do they keep a horse on the roof?” passengers on the elevated trains in Brooklyn are asking one another when they look out of the windows and see a large white horse standing near the edge of a flat roof. One with sufficient curiosity, who asks the question of the man who runs the livery stable downstairs beneath the remarkable roof-ground of the white horse, learns that the animal is kept there merely as an advertisement.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0171.xml
article
77
77
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Put Both Ears on the Wire and Double Your Hearing
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“HELLO, hello—I can’t hear you!” So saying, you put your finger in your exposed ear and try to shut out the noises around you. Your telephone ear works at crosspurposes with your other one. But if you used a double receiver like the one above both ears would be listening to the same thing at the same time and your hearing power would be doubled.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0172.xml
article
77
77
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Drilling at an Angle
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO drill a hole at a certain angle, there is an arrangement by which it can be done with an electric or hand drill. A protractor and a small spirit-level furnish the means. The level is set at the desired angle as indicated by the protractor, and the drill brought to the angle necessary to make the level stand at zero—or “level.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0173.xml
article
77
77
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Heating Metals in a Self-Regulating Electric Melting-Pot
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[no value]
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[no value]
EVERY metal-worker has probably received a jolt, on returning after a brief absence from his melting-pot, to discover that he had failed to turn down the gasoline torch under the melting-pot to prevent too high a degree of temperature being raised.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0174.xml
article
77
77
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Puss in a Bundle
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MARY has a little cat; his hair is white as snow. Everywhere that Mary goes, the cat is sure to go. He doesn’t trot along behind her, either. She carries him in a paper cornucopia. Only his head peeps out, and from the sleepy expression on his face it would seem that he rather likes being wrapped up like ten cents’ worth of cinnamon. With no stray feet, claws, and tail to worry about, his mistress finds him easy to carry.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0175.xml
article
77
77
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Self-Heating Smoothing-Iron for Asphalt Pavement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BELCHING forth a cloud of smoke and filling the air with ashes, the wood-fire wagon comes down the street. Workmen carry the irons from the fire to the asphalt spread on the street, and much of the heat is lost in transit. Time is also taken up in the process, so that the old way of heating the asphalt is inefficient in economy.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0176.xml
article
78
78
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
Do It with Tools and Machinery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0177.xml
article
79
79
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
Housekeeping Made Easy
Here are some new machines that help promote household efficiency
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0178.xml
article
80
80
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Solving the Heavy Truck Load Problem
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SINCE tire cost and weight are perhaps the greatest factors of interest to truck-owners, it will be interesting to note that instead of using the giant 48 by 12 pneumatics, weighing 398 pounds each, on the rear of five-ton trucks, the tandem axle construction embodied in the new six-wheeled truck allows the use of four 40 by 8 pneumatic tires, weighing 119 pounds each—a reduction of 279 pounds in the weight the driver on tire changes will have to lift.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0179.xml
article
80
80
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
The Tilting Steering-Wheel that also Locks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AUTOMOBILE steering-wheels that may be tilted to give the driver more space to get into or out of his car are not new. Neither are steering-wheels that may be locked. But a wheel combining both of these features is brand-new. This steering-wheel is made in two models, one for Ford cars and one for other makes.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0180.xml
article
80
80
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
At Last—a Real Mirror for the Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you have ever had a near accident on account of a law-breaking speeder coming up on the right side of your car when your fender mirror was placed on the left side, you will appreciate the value of the new type of rear vision indicator shown in the accompanying illustration.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0181.xml
article
81
81
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
$633,000,000 for Highways
But first the government is measuring automobile impact on roads
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE United States government is planning this year to spend $633,000,000 in building permanent highways. Owing to the vastly increasing use of the motor-truck and automobile, the road problem has become of great importance. Heavy loads at rest on the road surface exert but little effect, except where the surface is too soft to bear the load.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0182.xml
article
82
82,83
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
There's Always Something New in Accessories for the Automobilist
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0183.xml
article
84
84
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Electric Wrench for Automobiles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE electric wrench is a new power-driven combination tool by which nuts or bolts may be readily screwed into position or removed without danger of breaking the bolts. It is useful also as a screwdriver or as a portable drill. It has a specially constructed clutch with an adjustable pressure of from ten to sixty pounds.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0184.xml
article
84
84
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Combination Measure and Funnel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you have ever tried to pour lubricating oil into the breatherpipe of your automobile engine without the aid of a funnel, you know how much oil is wasted that way. Of course, no motorist wants to waste expensive lubricating oil, but many times the funnel is mislaid or lost.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0185.xml
article
84
84
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Shipping Automobile Bodies by Truck
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BECAUSE automobile production is far behind the demand, many passenger-car makers have had to resort to new means of getting materials shipped from other factories. Among other things which it is necessary to have in order to sell cars, is the body.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0186.xml
article
84
84
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Carrying Eggs Without Breaking Them
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SEVERAL United States mail motor-trucks operating on the rural truck routes out of Washington, D. C., make use of an ordinary canvas-covered mattress to protect the cases of eggs in transit. The post-office rural delivery trucks must maintain their schedules irrespective of road conditions, and when any speed is attempted over poor roads the entire load is sometimes thrown an inch or two off the floor.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0187.xml
article
85
85
PICTORIAL PAGES
[no value]
Very Latest Fashions in Automobile Bodies
Stop and admire the luxurious smartness of these automobile bodies: wouldn't you be proud to own one?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0188.xml
article
86
86
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Exposing the Double Exposure in Moving Pictures
Strange feats made possible by the tricks of the camera
[no value]
[no value]
Dorothea B. Herzog
HAVE you ever wondered how a “movie” star could shake hands with herself? In the first picture Genevieve Fluff, famous for her work in the five-reel thriller “Double Exposure,” is doing this. According to Arthur Miller, the camera-man, this is how it is done.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0189.xml
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87
87
[no value]
[no value]
THE B.V.D. COMPANY
[no value]
THE B.V.D. COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0190.xml
article
88
88,90,92
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Split-Bamboo Fishing-Rod
Making your own apparatus adds much to the pleasure of fishing
How to Split the Cane
Gluing the Six Strips Together
The Cork Hand Grasp
Putting on the Ferrules
[no value]
[no value]
Stillman Taylor
ANYONE who can handle a plane well enough to smooth a strip of wood sufficiently to make a good glued joint will find no great difficulty in making his own Split-bamboo fishingrod. I speak from experience because I am merely an amateur with tools and have made over a dozen split-bamboo rods that compare very favorably with those costing three times as much as mine.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0191.xml
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89
89
[no value]
[no value]
Champion Spark Plug Company
[no value]
Champion Spark Plug Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0192.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
THE GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY
[no value]
THE GOODYEAR TIRE & RUBBER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0193.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
“X” LABORATORIES
[no value]
“X” LABORATORIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0194.xml
article
92
92
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Useful Threading Tool for a Lathe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN easily made internal threading tool can be made from a tool-steel rod. The V-edged disk has a segment cut out, leaving a radial cutting edge. The reduced diameter shank may be held in a small V-block in the toolpost. The cutting point is sharpened in the same manner as a circular forming tool, by grinding the cutting edge on a radial line with the center.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0195.xml
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93
93
[no value]
[no value]
CHALMERS MOTOR CAR COMPANY
[no value]
CHALMERS MOTOR CAR COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0196.xml
article
94
94,96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Airplane Kite for a Man to Fly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. P. Bradley
GOOD kite-sticks can be made from white pine lath by sawing each lath into three parts. Smooth the sticks with a plane if you have one, because you are liable to split or cut them too thin if you whittle the sticks. If you do not wish to make a kite as large as this you can reduce the dimensions proportionately.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0197.xml
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95
95
[no value]
[no value]
Kelly-Springfield Tire Co.
[no value]
Kelly-Springfield Tire Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0198.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
United States Rubber Company: Keds
[no value]
United States Rubber Company
Keds
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0199.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Prevent Dry Grass from Sticking to a Rake
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD R. SMITH
HOW many times have you raked up dried grass from your lawn with an ordinary wire rake and become disgusted with the way the grass stuck to the teeth? Many times, we know. A simple attachment, as illustrated, will eliminate this annoying trouble.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0200.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Do You Economize on Your House Rugs ?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN an effort to economize, somebody recently discovered that the appearance of worn fiber rugs are greatly improved by an application of flat paint. That means a paint such as is generally used on interior walls; it has no gloss. If desired the borders may be stenciled in a different color of the same product.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0201.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
The Palmolive Company
[no value]
The Palmolive Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0202.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
UNITED STATES SAND PAPER COMPANY
[no value]
UNITED STATES SAND PAPER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0203.xml
article
98
98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Straighten a Bent Rear Axle of an Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. PRINDLE
A BENT rear axle-housing seemingly presents a difficult task to the mechanic, but it isn’t as difficult as one would think. The axle to be straightened is first placed in a heavy lathe. A fixture supports the axle on the face-plate at the right of the lathe.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0204.xml
article
98
98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Quick-Action Ice-Cream Freezer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE exceedingly simple form of receiver for freezing ice cream shown in the accompanying illustration has proved by actual use to be a practical and quick means of producing a very fair quality of ice cream. As may be seen, no crankturning is necessary.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0205.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL COMPANY
[no value]
BAUSCH & LOMB OPTICAL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0206.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
TUBULAR WOVEN FABRIC CO.: DURACORD
[no value]
TUBULAR WOVEN FABRIC CO.
DURACORD
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0207.xml
article
100
100
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Alarm to Announce the Charged Storage-Battery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
TO avoid waste of current, a simple alarm was made in a batterycharging station to announce a charged battery. Completion of the recharging process is marked by the escape of gas from the cells. The device consists of a bent glass tube which is inserted in the opening of one of the battery cells, and, upon the formation of the gas a small amount of mercury in the tube is forced upward, making contact with two wires, which close a dry-cell system with a door-bell connected in.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0208.xml
article
100
100
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Filing Saw Teeth with a Spacing Gage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK HARRIS
OFTENTIMES the mechanic finds it desirable to use a saw or a broach that is different in some respects from the standard tools of that nature, and to avoid the tedious job of setting up a milling-machine to cut the teeth on it he files them in by hand, gaging the pitch with his eye.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0209.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0210.xml
article
102
102
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Keep an Eye on Your Automobile
A frequent inspection is essential to motor upkeep
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN automobile is a sensitive mechanical organism that requires considerate treatment. Drivers who are not mechanically inclined have neither the sympathy nor the respect for machinery that is necessary for its continued upkeep, and consequently it is something they should cultivate.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0211.xml
article
102
102
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Things You Should Know About Paint-Brushes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
John Henry Coon
WITH everything else so high in price, it is not surprising to find a good paint or varnish brush costing double what it did a few years ago. It is surprising, though, to find, even among otherwise clever painters, a woeful lack of knowledge in the care of brushes.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0212.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.: Camels
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
Camels
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0213.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
CLOVER MFG. COMPANY
[no value]
CLOVER MFG. COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0214.xml
article
104
104
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Cheap but Excellent Copy-Holder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. S. STANDIFORD
THE typewriter has come into such extensive use by all classes of people that an added interest attaches to any device which allows the typist to turn out more work with less expense and fatigue. In copying, the typist usually lays the copy down on a table alongside of the machine, glancing down, from time to time, at the text.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0215.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
CYCLE TRADES OF AMERICA, Inc.
[no value]
CYCLE TRADES OF AMERICA, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0216.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0217.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE
[no value]
SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0218.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
HENDEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
HENDEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0219.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
ECLIPSE MACHINE COMPANY
[no value]
ECLIPSE MACHINE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0220.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE FROST COMPANY
[no value]
GEORGE FROST COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0221.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
CENTRAL CAMERA CO.
[no value]
CENTRAL CAMERA CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0222.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Thomas Shoe Co.
[no value]
Thomas Shoe Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0223.xml
article
108
108,109
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Utility of the Hand-Power Grinder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BESIDES running a regular grinding wheel for sharpening tools, a small hand-power bench grinder may be adapted to a large variety of other uses in the home or small shop, especially when no lathe is at hand. By removing the grinding wheel, different sizes of pulleys may be clamped on the spindle in its place.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0224.xml
article
109
109
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Underground Irrigation System for the Garden
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
IF the garden plot is not large and one has access to an old tin can pile, no fears need result from continued dry spells, according to the plan of an ingenious farmer. He amassed a lot of half-gallon and gallon cans from such a pile, perforated them with small nail-holes, plied the hoe, and sank each can to the level of the ground between rows of garden stuff.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0225.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
[no value]
THE PEPSODENT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0226.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Iver Johnson’s Arms & Cycle Works: IVER JOHNSON REVOLVER
[no value]
Iver Johnson’s Arms & Cycle Works
IVER JOHNSON REVOLVER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0227.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
J. SKINDERVIKEN
[no value]
J. SKINDERVIKEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0228.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
U. & J. CARBURETOR CO.
[no value]
U. & J. CARBURETOR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0229.xml
article
110
110
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make an Extension Bench Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES H. WILLEY
ONE good use for old pipe and fittings is that of making a benchvise extension bracket light, as shown in the illustration. The construction is simple. A bracket shaped as shown is made for holding it to the wall, a pivot stud being screwed in the one lug, over which the bent end of the pipe sets.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0230.xml
article
110
110,111
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Pressure Apparatus for the Gas Blowpipe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. PRINDLE
A GAS blowpipe requires air under slight pressure, and a simple and inexpensive way to obtain this pressure, and to maintain it steadily, is shown in the accompanying sketch. Arrange a foot-pump—an ordinary tire-pump—to deliver air to a bag made of a section of an old inner tube; about 2 ft. of the tube will be enough.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0231.xml
article
111
111
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Prevent Water Running Beneath Window-Sills
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROY POSTON
UNLESS steps are taken to prevent it, rain water often runs back under cornices or window-sills, and from there down the sides or walls of the building. This may be prevented by grooving the under side of the sill in the manner shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0232.xml
article
111
111,112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Why Mismatched Bolts and Nuts Become Loose
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN experienced mechanic sometimes will force a nut on to a bolt, even if the threads do not match, and in such cases the nut seldom stays on. The cause of the trouble will be made plain by a reference to the illustration on page 112, in which the threads are shown farther apart on the bolt than on the nut member.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0233.xml
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111
111
[no value]
[no value]
THE DAVIS SEWING MACHINE CO.
[no value]
THE DAVIS SEWING MACHINE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0234.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0235.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0236.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Here’s a Paint and Varnish Remover
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. E. DURST
A PINT bottle or can containing equal parts of benzol and denatured alcohol is a good thing to have around the house, in the workshop, and in the garage. Primarily it is a paint and varnish remover. Applied with a clean brush to a painted or varnished surface, and allowed to remain five or ten minutes, it will eat down to the bare wood and give very good results.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0237.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Substitute Handle for the Tool-Kit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOWARD GREENE
AS a rule, a carpenter straps all his tools into a bundle and, for lack of a suitable handle, carries them under his arm. A convenient handle for carrying a bundle of tools may be provided by strapping the brace to the outside. It gives a good grip, is comfortable to hold, and it does not add anything to be carried.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0238.xml
article
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Cover Automobile Door Tops for Protection
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
CONSTRUCTION of automobile side doors usually embodies enameled steel top strips, which, because of their constant wear and tear in opening and closing the doors, causes the paint to wear off and the metal to rust. This is not only unsightly, but it is also a means of soiling the hands.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0239.xml
article
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Counting Revolutions by a Simple Method
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO ascertain the speed in revolutions a minute of a revolving shaft, attach a short pencil to the shaft in any convenient way, so that it will turn with the shaft, but will not run true; the sketch shows the idea. Tack a strip of paper to a smooth strip of wood.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0240.xml
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113
113
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0241.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
WESTFIELD MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
WESTFIELD MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0242.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
NEWSKIN COMPANY
[no value]
NEWSKIN COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0243.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
CARNES ARTIFICIAL LIMB CO.
[no value]
CARNES ARTIFICIAL LIMB CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0244.xml
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114
114
[no value]
[no value]
K. C. AUTO & TRACTOR SCHOOL
[no value]
K. C. AUTO & TRACTOR SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0245.xml
article
114
114
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Adjustable Drop for the Shot-Gun Stock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN experienced wing-shot says that the majority of amateur sportsmen fail to score hits in bird-shooting because they use guns having too much, or more often too little, “drop” of the stock. In covering the bird as it “gets up” they do not run their eye along the barrel, but more often see only the muzzle sight.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0246.xml
article
114
114,115
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Why Use a Step-Ladder to Change Light Bulbs?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN replacing burnt-out electric-light bulbs it is usually necessary to use a step-ladder. Because a number of electric lights in a large church were hard to reach and necessitated the use of a very long ladder, the changer here described was made.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0247.xml
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115
115
[no value]
[no value]
Western Electric Company
[no value]
Western Electric Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0248.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0249.xml
article
116
116
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
When You Paint Strips Near the Floor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
IT is a bit difficult to keep paint off the floor when painting strips or borders along the wall next to the floor. Usually such work is done as carefully as possible, and what gets on the floor is removed with a rag soaked in kerosene. This, however, results in a poor job, and is not satisfactory.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0250.xml
article
116
116,117
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making Freak Photographs with an Ordinary Camera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALMOST everyone has seen freak photographs made from negatives on which the emulsion has run by overheating, or by placing the subject so his image is reflected in a mirror with an uneven surface. The picture of the image will also be distorted.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0251.xml
article
117
117
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Old Hacksaw Blade Makes a Durable Scriber
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DONALD A. HAMPSON
A DURABLE scriber can be made out of an old hacksaw blade. Old and broken blades are always and everywhere available. By grinding the end off square and thinning this down to an edge instead of a surface, two scribing points are produced. The hardness of the blades makes the scriber lasting and the right-angle “point” has more backing than a needle point, which adds to its durability.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0252.xml
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117
117
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0253.xml
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117
117
[no value]
[no value]
SPENCERIAN PEN CO.
[no value]
SPENCERIAN PEN CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0254.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0255.xml
article
118
118,119,120
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Photographic Bronze and Plaster Plaques
Making the Gelatine Plate
The Plaster Cast
[no value]
[no value]
SAMUEL WEIN
IN 1861 M. Willeme was successful in making plaster casts in relief from photographic negatives. To carryout this process a series of cameras was required as well as various devices such as pantographs to make the impression in the plaster.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0256.xml
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119
119
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0257.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0258.xml
article
121
121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Detector Stand Having a Set Adjustment
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. T. JONES
MANY kinds of detector stands have been devised, but still another, one that contains an uncommon arrangement of the mechanical parts, is here presented. The amateur may find in the instrument several ideas of interest. The illustration shows a stand capable of exact adjustment.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0259.xml
article
121
121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Repairing a Gasoline-Logged Carburetor Float
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE comes a time when the cork float of many carburetors becomes gasoline-logged and heavy. To remedy this is not quite so easy as it looks unless one understands the trick of removing all the gasoline from the interior of the cork. Perhaps the gasoline has filled the pores of the cork through one small hole.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0260.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0261.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0262.xml
article
122
122,123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Laboratory Rheostat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN electrical laboratory is incom. plete without a small rheostat, and after trying out numerous styles and kinds I have yet to find the equal of the following hand-made contrivance. Into a piece of slate or other good insulating material drill holes as laid out in Fig. 1. Note that there are eight large holes and twelve small ones, and that each two of the small holes occupies approximately as much space as one large hole.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0263.xml
article
123
123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Paint Milk-Cans to Prevent Them from Rusting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is a common practice to paint milk-cans, but as a rule the dairyman’s only thought in doing it is to enable him to pick out his cans more readily from among others when they are put out on station platforms. By selecting the right kind of paint —antoxide, it is called by the paint trade—the can, besides being made distinguishable by its color, is also made rust-proof.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0264.xml
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123
123
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0265.xml
advertisement
124
124
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[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0266.xml
article
124
124
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Water-Glass for Preserving the Cistern
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
WATER-GLASS, which is used for preserving eggs, can also be used in cisterns. That is, it forms a coating upon the walls, keeping away pollution and the creeping in of surface or sub-surface water. When a cistern is built, there is a pronounced chemical action between the water contained therein and the cement walls.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0267.xml
article
124
124
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Even a Tractor Sometimes Gets Stuck in the Mud
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
COSTLY delays are often encountered in any farmer’s tractor experience, because of miring down in wet or loose soil. This can sometimes be avoided by resorting to the use of proper methods. One farmer hit upon a simple scheme which brought the tractor out in less than twenty minutes.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0268.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Practical Way to Tighten Wrist-Pin Bushings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO tighten a loose wrist-pin bushing when it is located on the connecting-rod, take a piece of tubing that will just slip over the bushing on one side of the connecting-rod. Next get a piece of metal a little smaller than the bushing to put against it.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0269.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Keep the Dust Out of the House
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOUSEWIVES in general will wel wecome anything that removes mud from the shoes outside the hous door. The frame shown in the illustration is made of wood, with the exception of the scraper, which is a piece of 1/2-in. iron. The wood may be of hard maple, pine, oak, or cedar; but whatever wood used should receive a coating of enamel or water-proof varnish to make it durable and also to permit of an occasional washing.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0270.xml
article
125
125,126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
One Reason Why a Gasoline Engine "Skips"
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[no value]
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[no value]
FAILURE of a cylinder to fire may be due to an improper mixture of gas and air, dirty spark-plugs, too great a spark-gap or too lean aspark. Every motorist has noticed e that skipping is much more frequent when the motor is running slowly than when it is running fast.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0271.xml
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125
125
[no value]
[no value]
COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF DRAFTING
[no value]
COLUMBIA SCHOOL OF DRAFTING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0272.xml
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125
125
[no value]
[no value]
NIAGARA SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
NIAGARA SCHOOL OF MUSIC
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0273.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
GOODELL & CO.
[no value]
GOODELL & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0274.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0275.xml
article
126
126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Novel Way to Use a Discarded Milk-Can
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[no value]
[no value]
HARVEY MEAD
THE house shown in the illustration was built under a hill, and with a short chimney the draft for the stove was poor. In order to improve the draft the man of the house took an old milk-can, cut out the bottom, and secured it to the top of the chimney.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0276.xml
article
126
126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make New Lamps from Old
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIKE Aladdin of old a good many industrious housewives believe in rubbing their metal lamps. Aladdin got what he wished for when he rubbed his wonderful lamp, but the housewife generally gets, in the course of time, what she doesn’t want; namely, a shabby lamp; for it doesn’t take long to rub the lacquer off metal.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0277.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Rhubarb Press Made from a Clothes-Wringer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
AN old clothes-wringer was converted into a press for extracting the juice of rhubarb by the following procedure. The rubber rolls were removed, and in their place were substituted wood rolls. These rolls were cut round, of the same shape and size as the rubber rolls, and then sawed into equal halves.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0278.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Suitable Holder for Pieces of Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. C. RIDGELY
FOR the purpose of securing the piece operated on in a machineshop, it is often necessary to construct a special holder, the shape and size of which must be governed by the particular conditions. For example, suppose that a bolt, rivet, or similarly shaped piece is to be clamped for an operation such as threading, filing, shortening, etc. Under such conditions, a device like the one illustrated may be used to advantage.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0279.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0280.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0281.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
There’s the Rain-Alarm—Close the Window
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
IT is no joke to wake up in the middle of the night and find the windows open and rain coming in. After one or two such experiences, one practical fellow made an automatic rain-alarm which was placed outside his bedroom window on hot nights when the windows were left open.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0282.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Hairpin Becomes a Pair of Calipers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. G. VIDAL
A PAIR of calipers is perhaps the most frequently used tool in the machine-shop, being required for almost every kind of job. One day the writer wished to take some outside measurements and he couldn’t find his calipers in the toolbox. His eye lighted on a scrubwoman in the next room and a bright idea came into his head. Why not beg a hairpin and make a pair of calipers with it?
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0283.xml
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129
129
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0284.xml
article
129
129,130
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Neglect Is the Cause of Most Battery Trouble
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REMEMBER that the battery is totally different from any other part of your automobile—that it is chemical, not mechanical, in its function. You do not pour electricity into it like a fluid, and then draw it out to use as you do water from a faucet.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0285.xml
advertisement
130
130
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0286.xml
article
130
130
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Roll the Beans Around This Way, Please!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE contrivance shown in the illustration has been put into practical use by a Wisconsin man. Instead of “Please pass the beans,” the standard request at his table is, “Please roll the beans around this way.” Or the hungry one quietly revolves the stand until the bean dish is within reach.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0287.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Piercing Holes in a Large Gasket
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOWARD GREENE
WHEN overhauling an automobile—or, for that matter, any machine that has gaskets—it not infrequently happens that a gasket has to be made that is large and of awkward shape and therefore difficult to cut in one piece. Further, a large piece of material would be required to make a one piece job.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0288.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Use Your Watch as a Protractor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
IT was quite by accident that the writer discovered that a watch made an ideal protractor in an emergency. A circle consists of three hundred and sixty degrees; therefore each of the twelve hour spaces would consist of one twelfth of three hun dred and sixty, or thirty degrees.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0289.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
UNIVERSAL CHIROPRACTORS
[no value]
UNIVERSAL CHIROPRACTORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0290.xml
article
132
132,134
For the Radio Experimenter
[no value]
Electron Relays as Amplifiers and Oscillators: II
Amplifying the Currents
Plate Resistance
Mutual Conductance
[no value]
[no value]
H. J. Van der Bijl
IT was shown in the article in the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY for April how the grid in a thermionic vacuum tube makes it possible to use this device to amplify currents. The fact that the insertion of the grid in the tube makes it possible for the tube to amplify also brings within its scope a number of other uses to which the tube can be put.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0291.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN RADIO AND RESEARCH CORPORATION
[no value]
AMERICAN RADIO AND RESEARCH CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0292.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0293.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
[no value]
Sears, Roebuck and Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0294.xml
article
136
136
RADIO
[no value]
A Receiving System for Reducing Interference
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD T. JONES
SOME receiving units make use of direct coupling, others static coupling, and still others electromagnetic coupling. The one that I have designed cannot be classed in any of the above. My system uses an antenna tuned to resonance. Connected to the antenna is the “balancing circuit.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0295.xml
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136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: SIGNAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
[no value]
SIGNAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0296.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
[no value]
UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0297.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0298.xml
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136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0299.xml
article
137
137,138
RADIO
[no value]
A Self-Closing Telegraph Key that Will Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SAMUEL W. BEACH
ONE of the most persistent annoyances met with in American telegraphy has been seated in the simplest of its apparatus—the familiar transmitting key. The Morse telegraph circuit used almost exclusively throughout the western hemisphere employs a “hookup” that necessitates an absolutely unbroken pathway throughout its entire length for the flow of current that steadily passes along while the line is at rest.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0300.xml
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137
137
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0301.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0302.xml
article
138
138,139
RADIO
[no value]
A Homemade Transformer for Stepping Down 110 Volts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN making a transformer it is well to remember that the volts per turn, i. e., winding, are the same in both the primary and the secondary. If the primary has 770 turns, then for every seven turns we put on the secondary we increase the open-circuit voltage of the secondary by one volt.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0303.xml
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139
139
[no value]
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
[no value]
HARLEY-DAVIDSON MOTOR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0304.xml
advertisement
139
139
[no value]
[no value]
Lockwood-Ash Motor Company
[no value]
Lockwood-Ash Motor Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0305.xml
advertisement
139
139
[no value]
[no value]
Standard Business Training Institute
[no value]
Standard Business Training Institute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0306.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0307.xml
article
140
140
RADIO
[no value]
Mounting Detector Crystals in Amalgam
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. STETSON
A SIMPLE device for holding crystals for a detector may be made by the use of an amalgam, as shown in the sketch. The container may be a section of a small brass tube. However, almost any metal receptacle maybe ultilized. An amalgam gives a good, firm contact, which is yielding nevertheless to such an extent that the crystal can be turned completely around if desired.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0308.xml
article
140
140,141
RADIO
[no value]
It Produces 30,000-Voltage Direct Current
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MILTON KENT
A MACHINE of several kilowatts capacity, that will develop 10,000 volts direct current, has long been sought. The machine here illustrated does this, and more, for it is possible to build it for voltages as high as 25,000 or 30,000 and capacities of 50 kilowatts.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0309.xml
article
141
141
RADIO
[no value]
Radio Transmission Is Best in Winter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOSE radio operators who have had years of experience know how markedly the transmission efficiency of the ether varies from time to time. Some years ago Dr. L. W. Austin, working with the United States Navy and the Bureau of Standards, made a series of tests on transmission under different weather conditions.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0310.xml
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141
141
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[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0311.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0312.xml
article
142
142
RADIO
[no value]
Amateurs, Do You Protect Your Supply Mains?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a method of protecting the supply mains. The spark-gap is made of three terminals, each with a 3/16-in. hole through it, set on a slate base. The points are made of three pieces of 3/16-in. brass rod, pointed sharply and adjusted very closely.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0313.xml
article
142
142
RADIO
[no value]
Bells Controlled by Radio for Ships in Distress
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CABLEGRAMS from London tell of developments promising that ships in distress may be able to ring alarm bells on other ships within about three hundred miles—that is, near enough to be effective in offering aid. No details are given, but probably the usual receiving set is altered only by the inclusion of a sensitive relay instead of the head telephones.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0314.xml
article
143
143,144
RADIO
[no value]
How to Construct a Dry-Cell from Tinfoil
[no value]
[no value]
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PAUL F. KNAUS
VERY satisfactory dry-cells may be made by using the various parts of worn-out cells. The advice given here is intended only if the zinc coverings are so worn out as to be useless. The graphite-manganese dioxide filling, carbon rod, and bindingscrews should be saved.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0315.xml
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0316.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0317.xml
article
144
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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To Make a Water-Tight Joint for Buildings
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ROY H. POSTON
ONE method of making a water tight joint between the brick wall of a building and a side roof of cor rugated iron con sists of a wooden support for cement. This is set over the edge of the roof, and causes the rain to jump the leak and come down on the roof past it.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0318.xml
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Here’s a Good Substitute for Frosted Glass
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ALL kinds of glass are scarce on the markets, and frosted glass is particularly hard to get now. A makeshift substitute that isn’t bad at all, if properly applied, consists in brushing on the plain glass a coat of ordinary flat wall paint, afterward stippling it with a stiff brush to give it a uniform appearence and eliminate the brush marks.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0319.xml
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0320.xml
article
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Removing a Cork from the Inside of a Bottle
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WHILE the glass bottle is not so popular as it was a year ago, it still has some uses. It often happens that a cork, that you are trying to remove from its neck, is accidentally pushed down into its interior. An easy way to remove this cork is to take a double piece of twine, tie a large double knot on one end, and lower it into the bottle.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0321.xml
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Carry a Button-Hook When You Go Motoring
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Did you know that a button-hook is a very useful thing to keep in your automobile? With it you can locate and pull out small parts that fall into the mud-pan or inside the engine; and for the pulling out of cotter-pins it is the very best tool that could be used, for the hook seems to be made for the express purpose of catching hold of the looped end of the cotter-pin.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0322.xml
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Turn a Ball on the End of a Rod
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A QUICK way to turn a ball on the end of a rod—as, for instance, in making ball handles for machine tools—is to take a pipe the inside diameter of which is somewhat less than that of the desired ball, and grind it, leaving a keen edge. Cyanide hardening completes the tool.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0323.xml
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STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
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STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0324.xml
article
146
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Harnessing the Summer Zephyr
How to make a windmill that will operate light machinery
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Thorton Hallett
FREQUENTLY a small amount of power is wanted to operate very light machinery, toys, fans, etc., and no power is at hand except the wind. This, however, can be harnessed to do the work if the amateur mechanic will only gather together a few tools and utilize the cast-off things about his bench.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0325.xml
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Turn on the Light with the Power
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MACHINES operated by individual electric motors can be automatically illuminated when the current is turned on to operate the machine by the simple wiring method illustrated above. A knife-switch is used to control the current, and is wired directly to the motor or rheostat.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0326.xml
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147
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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An Improvement on the Old-Style Oil-Gage
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IN large generators and other machines made several years ago, the bearings had exposed and unprotected gage-glasses to show the oil level. These gages constantly invite danger of a shut-down, owing to breakage of the glasses and consequently a burned bearing.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0327.xml
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The L. S. STARRETT COMPANY: Starrett Tool
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The L. S. STARRETT COMPANY
Starrett Tool
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0328.xml
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147
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CHAS. H. JOHNSTON
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CHAS. H. JOHNSTON
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0329.xml
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J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
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J. H. WILLIAMS & CO.
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0330.xml
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For Small Garage Owners
You can make a shop crane for lifting engines
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A SHOP crane in a small garage that was very inexpensive to build proved extremely useful in lifting automobile and truck engines in and out of the chassis. Its use on a few jobs paid its initial cost. The crane was constructed as follows: A piece of timber, either spruce or hard pine, 8 in. long, 4 in. wide, and 8 in. deep, is needed for the cross or top piece.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0331.xml
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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This Cover Keeps Free the Fire-Barrel Head
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IN buildings where fire-barrels are used, it is generally the practice to make a round cover to place over the barrel to keep out the dirt. About half the time these covers are mislaid, or materials are placed upon them because they afford a convenient resting-place.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0332.xml
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0333.xml
article
149
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Pencil Used as a Spark Plug Tester
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J. F. DWIGGINS
THE ordinary lead pencil which has a metal point protector makes an excellent sparkplug tester, and one that is always in your pocket when needed. A small hole is bored or cut through the pencil at its middle, so as to make a gap for the spark to jump.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0334.xml
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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He Says the Simplest Jack is the Best
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H. C. RIDGELY
JACK O. JACKSON, of Jacksonville, says that the simplest jack is the best, and he ought to be an authority on such a subject. He uses the old-fashioned board, which is neither new nor complicated, the matter of adjustment being the unusual feature.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0335.xml
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BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.
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BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0336.xml
article
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Utilize Old Barrels by Making a Water-Tank
In these days of the high cost of everything old barrels can be put to an important use
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Windsor Crowell
AN inexpensive though serviceable water-tank for the farm, shop, or camp can be constructed of barrels, and will do all that the more costly kind will. The number of barrels necessary to use depends, of course, upon the volume of water it is desired to store and consume at each pumping; the illustration, which is of a tank made of three barrels, will supply the average family with a day’s supply of water.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0337.xml
article
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Cut Roofing with a Chisel
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HENRY SIMON
VARIOUS kinds of knives are employed in cutting roofing; and, though some of them are better than others for the purpose, none of them are satisfactory. The reason is inherent in the knife, and is that, no matter how it is shaped, it has wedge action.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0338.xml
article
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PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Simple and Useful Electric Light Adjuster
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A USEFUL, very simple and inexpensive shade adjuster can be made from two clamps and a piece of string. The clamps are tied to the end of the string. By fastening one of the clamps to the edge of the shade and the other to different points on the cord, the illumination may be directed to any angle.
PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0339.xml
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HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
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HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0340.xml
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S. C. JOHNSON & SON
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S. C. JOHNSON & SON
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0341.xml
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153
153
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Radium Luminous Material Corporation
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Radium Luminous Material Corporation
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0342.xml
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154
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WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.
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WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.
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PopularScience_19200501_0096_005_0343.xml