Issue: 19191201

Monday, December 1, 1919
DEC., 1919
6
True
95
Friday, December 12, 2014

Articles
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1
1
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WICKES BROTHERS: WICKES BLUE PRINT SYSTEM
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WICKES BROTHERS
WICKES BLUE PRINT SYSTEM
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0001.xml
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2
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SOTHERN CYPRESS MFRS' ASSN.: Cypress Bird-House Book
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SOTHERN CYPRESS MFRS' ASSN.
Cypress Bird-House Book
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0002.xml
tableOfContents
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2,4,7
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CONTENTS
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0003.xml
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2
2
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Modern Publishing Company
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Modern Publishing Company
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0004.xml
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3
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Independent Corporation
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Independent Corporation
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0005.xml
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4
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Columbia School of Drafting
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Columbia School of Drafting
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0006.xml
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5
5
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The Oliver Typewriter Company
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The Oliver Typewriter Company
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0007.xml
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6
6
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0008.xml
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7
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0009.xml
advertisement
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8
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0010.xml
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9
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American School of Correspondence
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American School of Correspondence
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0011.xml
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10
10,11,12,14,16
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0012.xml
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13
13
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PELMAN INSTITUTE OF AMERICA
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PELMAN INSTITUTE OF AMERICA
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0013.xml
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15
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Burlington Watch Company
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Burlington Watch Company
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0014.xml
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17
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PELTON PUBLISHING COMPANY
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PELTON PUBLISHING COMPANY
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0015.xml
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18
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0016.xml
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19
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0017.xml
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Advertisements
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General Cigar Co.
OWL
General Cigar Co.
white OWL
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0018.xml
article
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Why this is called the December Issue
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This issue of Popular Science Monthly was printed in Chicago, not in New York. All through the month of October hardly a printing press was running in the City of New York, as a result of one of the most complicated and difficult labor union disputes that has ever taken place.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0019.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Did You Get Wet ?
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NO, you decide that you won’t take an umbrella—with the customary result that you reach your office drenched. And there you sit and shiver, while your wet clothes slowly dry, wondering what disease you will contract. But why shiver and worry?
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0020.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Multiplying the Power of Your Arm
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IF you were asked to pull the tank Britannia over the barrier of logs shown in the illustration, you would say that one man couldn’t possibly do it. Yet a machine designed for stump-pulling did this unusual feat, and could do it all day without breaking or straining its mechanism.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0021.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Ride a Bicycle while You Grind
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THE modern successor of the old-time farmyard grindstone combines economy with efficiency. It is a oneman machine, and it does its work more quickly and better than the old grindstone. It will sharpen a mower, sickle or ensilage-cutter in ten to fifteen minutes; a scythe in one to two minutes; a harrow disk in five minutes; and a whole set of cutaway disks in from two to four hours.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0022.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Heating, Cooling and Cleaning the Air
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"IS this an oil-stove that I see before me?” No. It is a combination fan, heater, air-washer, hair-drier, and deodorizer. Just below the middle of the device is a tubular projection where all these different functions are performed. Just behind it is a suction electric fan which sucks in the air and sends it out again ten degrees cooler.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0023.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Bundle up the Milk to Keep It Cold
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THE well known principle of the fireless cooker has now been applied to cans for shipping milk in bulk. Hundreds of thousands of gallons of milk are spoiled yearly during shipment when the ice in the refrigerator cars is not renewed along the way.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0024.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Linking Glasses and EarTrumpets Together
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HAVE your eyes and ears gone back on you? Then here is a way to get the best of both the offending members at once—a combination eye-glass and ear-trumpet. These novel ear-trumpets are made of a light-colored transparent material and are attached to the sides of the eye-glasses.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0025.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Take Your Bathtub with You
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"NOW what’s in that large case · the summer boarder brought?” murmured the farmer suspiciously. He hovered round the boarder’s room and soon he heard running water and splashing! His boarder was taking a bath ! The large case had in it one of the new bath-cabinets invented by George Stryker of Wilson, N. C. It contains not only a tub but a water-tank with two compartments for hot and cold water, an oil heater, a medicine-chest, a towelrack, a closet, and an extension seat.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0026.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Extra ! It Came by Airplane
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YOU’D like to deliver newspapers too if you could do it by airplane. (Or maybe you wouldn’t?) That’s what they do in San Francisco—sometimes. Of course ordinarily it would be ruinous to hire an airplane in order to make a delivery of a few dollars’ worth of papers.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0027.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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For He Is An Englishman
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"A POLICEMAN’S lot is not a happy one,” said the immortal Gilbert, but he did not know the English policeman of today. His lot may be quite happy, as the picture below shows. It is a hot day and he has run to cover under an advertising sign. Not that he thinks the world has grown honest or that the race of speeding motorists is extinct.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0028.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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A Concrete Illustration
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YOU think the above is a scene in the luxurious tropics—Cuba, perhaps, or Mexico? Wrong! You mustn’t be deceived by appearances. It’s nothing but an amusement park near Chicago, Illinois. The romantic balcony with the alluring arch beneath is just the corner of a cabaret, and everything—trees, vines, rustic railings and all—is made of concrete.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0029.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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First Aid to the Potato
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THE potato doctor is performing above. With the medicine tank on his back he is spraying diseased potato plants before an admiring audience. The most fashionable disease in the potato world bears the seriously alarming name Phytophthora infestans It is a fungus growth which occurs wherever the potato is grown and thrives in warm and showery weather.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0030.xml
article
24
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MISCELLANY
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How They Bag the Orange
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THOUGH the man below is evidently letting the oranges out of the bag. this bag was really constructed for gathering them It is made of heavy canvas reinforced on top with leather and fastened to a wire frame. You wear it slung over your shoulder by an adjustable canvas strap.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0031.xml
article
25
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MISCELLANY
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Every Cigarette Its Own Match
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GOT a match? Never mind. Here’s a striking cigarette. It comes in a box with sandpaper on the edge and it has a sulphur tip—just like a match. When you want a light you strike it on the box, the flame spurts out and there you are ! The sulphur composition is odorless and does not affect the flavor of the cigarette.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0032.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Make a Noise Like a Ferret
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RECENTLY we have been induced to temper our sports with mercy and in some states, notably Ohio, the ferret has been barred as a rabbit hunter. But you can’t shoot a rabbit in his burrow. How then persuade Mr. Bunny to play his part in your game ?
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0033.xml
article
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SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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Shades of the Norsemen
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PROBABLY nothing that man has invented took so early and kept so long the same shape as the ships in which he sails. Lief Ericsson, when he set the first European foot on American soil, came across the seas in a high-prowed vessel not so unlike that with the fish king figurehead just above.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0034.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Peel Off a Stamp from Your Roll
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THREE little Edwards all in a row and many more where they come from. They are all rolled up like mending tissue on a small convenient spool. Each Edward is part of a penny stamp; there are sixty of them on the roll. The stamp spool is the latest style brought out by the British Postal Authorities.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0035.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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In Again, Out Again
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WHEN you drive a pile into the ground, you naturally don’t expect to see the point again—but you can’t be sure. Look at the pile pictured below. The arrows point to the beginning and the ending of it. It was a fifty-two-foot pile of green Douglas fir.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0036.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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How to Keep Her Cackling
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ANY normal hen can equal the achievement of the HEN in the picture if she is properly dieted. Here are three rations recommended by poultry experts: (1) Equal parts of cracked corn, wheat, and oats. (2) Three parts of cracked corn, two parts of oats, and one part of wheat.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0037.xml
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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This Strange Object Is a Snail's Tongue
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Edward F. Bigelow
THE so-called tongue of the snail is a strip of horny material, rasplike in appearance and a good deal so in action. It occupies a place in the snail’s mouth corresponding to that occupied by the tongue of a cat or dog. It is in the form of a tube, and grows forward as it is needed, much as does the human finger-nail.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0038.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Saving the Fly from a Milky Grave
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FLIES have frequently proved that for one deep drink of milk they will gladly die. But the dairymen are constantly busy foiling these suicidal attempts. Some dairymen hang strips of burlap over the doorways through which the cows enter so that the flies are brushed off the cow’s back.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0039.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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An Office Built for Two
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OFFICE buildings surely vary in shape and size. In New York they tower high—one of them having fifty-one stories. In Lynn, Mass., there is a very small one—about four feet square and nine feet high. In it two car starters for the Bay State Railway Company do their work.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0040.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Proving that You Are Who You Are
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IT is nine o’clock in the morning at the Quartermaster Corps Depot, Jeffersonville, Indiana. Hundreds of artisans and mechanics, many of them foreigners, stream in through the gates. Each man is carefully scrutinized by the gatekeeper.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0041.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Whitewashing with a Pump
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CAN you whitewash the walls of a store-room or factory without whitewashing yourself and everything else in sight? Yes, if you use the machine shown in the accompanying illustration. It consists of an ordinary fifty-fivegallon barrel, mounted on a small wheeled truck so that it is moved readily along the floor close up to the walls.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0042.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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The Airplane that Leaped the Sea
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AFTER the three cheers for Captain Alcock and Lieutenant Brown—who made the first non-stop flight across the Atlantic—had died down, people’s attention turned to the faithful Vickers-Vimy airplane that carried them across. Though the men were utterly exhausted at the end of the flight, the remarkable Rolls-Royce engines of the airplane were apparently as good as new and would have kept up their work for an indefinite time had not the airmen landed in a bog.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0043.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Bringing the Laundry to the Wash
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SHOULD you see a steam tractor rolling along the road with a train of four strange, clumsy trucks behind it, do not be alarmed. It is but a moving laundry. Where a great quantity of clothes must be washed—in a section gang or lumber camp, for instance—it is easier to move the laundry than the wash.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0044.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Better Let the Shoemaker Footprint You
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YOU may make footprints on the sands of time but they won’t serve as a guide for your shoemaker when he makes your shoes. He needs more substantial footprints -usually made in vaseline or ink. Here is a foot-measuring box which not only takes the outline of the foot in ink but indicates any abnormalities it may have.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0045.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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The White Ants of Siam against Germany
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AND the white ants were our Allies all along ! In fact, they are still at war with Germany. As evidence, look at the ruined meter shown herewith. When the white ants saw that “Kilowattstunden” written in large letters on the front of the meter, they recognized it at once as a German word even though the meter was in Siam.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0046.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Introducing Women to Machine Tools
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M. F. McConaughby
AT the outset of the war, for the first few frenzied months, we wondered how we could possibly make munitions enough to beat the enemy. An exhaustive investigation brought to light the fact that there were in the country 365 machine-tool manufacturers, employing about 79,000 toolmakers, nearly every one of whom was engaged on some type of war work, either for the Allies or the United States—both of which meant that they could not be commandeered for Army Ordnance manufacture.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0047.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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How Hot Is That Pot of Molten Brass?
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AN alloy has been developed from WHICH a satisfactory protecting tube can be made for pyrometers used in measuring the temperature of molten brass and bronze. The tube consists of three telescoping parts. The ten-inch protection tube, held in the lower end, is made of the new alloy, and is the part inserted into the molten metal.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0048.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Cooling Farm Tractor Engines with Oil
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OIL as a cooling medium has many advantages which water does not possess. It is less affected by temperature, does not clog the circulating system nor rust the parts, and actively contributes to the efficiency of the engine. The use of oil requires a different type of radiator from that used on the average farm tractor.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0049.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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A Universal Automobile Wrench
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A CHICAGO manufacturer has devised a universal joint socket wrench provided with different sockets so that one wrench can be used for every nut on an automobile. The wrench itself and its application on nuts otherwise hard to get at is shown in the accompanying view.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0050.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Distill Your Own Water, Garageman
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INSTEAD of buying distilled water at twenty-five cents a bottle for filling storage batteries in automobiles, the garageman can distill his own water for about two cents a gallon by using the aircooled still shown in exterior and crosssectional views.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0051.xml
article
31
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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New Type of Holder for Repairing Radiators
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TO make the use of a second man unnecessary in repairing radiators A. L. W. Omacht, of Cresco, Iowa, has invented and patented the holder shown in the accompanying views. It is a fork-shaped apparatus made of small pipes. The handle is held flat on the workbench by two clamps which permit the pipe to be turned around its own axis, and held in position by a thumbscrew.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0052.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Squirt Greasewith Compressed Air
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THE latest thing in grease guns for the automobilist is one which is operated by compressed air supplied through a tube connecting the gun with the engine or foot tire pump or an inflated tire carried as a spare. In operation, the gun is first filled with grease by hand. The tube is next attached and pressure on a small button admits the air into the inside of the cylinder. The grease is forced out until the button is released. A safety-valve in the cylinder plunger or piston prevents the air backing up and bursting the tire pump.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0053.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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They Tour in Their Own “Pullman”
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HERE is a hotel on wheels. In it Mr. C. G. Barley, president of an Indiana truck company, is making a four thousand mile tour. It is complete to the last detail. There are sleeping compartments for four people, with glass windows that can be raised or lowered.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0054.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Fishing for Money on Broadway
A new outdoor sport for those who are rich in leisure
Chewing gum and magnets are recommended as bait
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0055.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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And So They Were Married
Even if you don’t believe that marriages are made above you must admit that honeymoons are spent there
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0056.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Showing That It Is Not Only Aviators Who Fall
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'THE Ford of the air.” That is how several New York newspapers and at least one of our contemporaries presented the accompanying picture to their readers as the latest thing in airplanes. The mistake is so ludicrous that we may be pardoned a good-natured chuckle.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0057.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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How He Irons His Prints
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WHEN a man takes to ironing, he is usually trying to cut down his tailor bill. But such is not the case of the man shown in the picture below. He is mounting photographs, and he is using an electric iron to furnish the heat necessary. The method he uses is a very good one.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0058.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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Suppose that Alcock Had Had This Airplane !
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GAZE upon this picture of Harry van Wie’s transpacific “parasol plane.” Harry is a plumber who lives in San Francisco, and his machine is exactly the kind that we would expect a plumber without aerodynamical knowledge to construct. The plumbing business must be good in San Francisco, for Harry has embodied in his wild invention several thousand dollars’ worth of his expensive material.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0059.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Entangling a River
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ALL streams have a tendency to eat their way into their banks at some places and to deposit sand, mud or other floatable material at other places. The railroads of the country spend enormous sums every year for the protection of their property against this destructive power, and in many instances the engineers have found it extremely difficult to control and regulate the channels of the streams.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0060.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Park Your Car, Sir?
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YOUR train jerks forward; you grab for a strap and miss it! While you are apologizing on your way back to a standing position, you think longingly of our comfortable car idling its time away in the garage. Oh, for a parking place near your office!
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0061.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Helping Budding Virtuosos
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ONLY four notes of the musical scale, G, D, A and E, can be produced on the violin without fingering. All other notes within the range of the instrument are produced by shortening the vibrating length of the corresponding string by pressing it with the finger tip against the finger board at certain points.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0062.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Rounding Up the Elephants
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WHAT’S all the excitement about? Why these spears pointed ferociously at nothing but trees and shrubs? Ah, but these natives hear a thunderous trumpeting coming nearer and nearer. An elephant round-up is in progress and pictures is shown the elephants are fast approaching the fence.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0063.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Spotting Outlaw Cotton Fields
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TAKING its cue from Mexican bandits, no doubt, anyway with true outlaw instincts, the pink bollworm crossed the border, invaded the United States, and did great damage to the cottonfields near by. In order to prevent its spread, large areas were quarantined and a law was enacted which forbade the planting of cotton in these districts.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0064.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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How to Fight a Burglar
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IF you own enough money and jewelry to tempt burglars, get an outfit like the one shown here. The shield is collapsible and may be slipped inside your bureau drawer when not in use. The weapon is a combination dagger and gun to suit your individual taste.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0065.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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The Hillside Document Vault
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NO, the man in the picture below is not coming out of the vault of his ancestors. This vault is not for dead ones but documents. It stands all by itself on a hillside, is made of reinforced concrete and, what is most important of all, is absolutely fireproof.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0066.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Three Black Men; See How They Climb
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EVIDENTLY the coconut tree shown herewith does not like to live in Ceylon, for it is stretching out its branches as far as it can over the water toward India. That’s all very well for the tree but it is most inconvenient for the coconut gatherers, as our illustration surely shows.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0067.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Papers Sold Like Gum
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PUT in a cent, pull a lever; that’s how you get your chewing gum. And now the same method is used in Philadelphia for selling newspapers. You drop in two cents, pull the lever and hold your hand out for the “Public Ledger.” Twenty-five of these vending machines have been put into operation already; but the “Public Ledger” will not stop at that small number.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0068.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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A Hard Life While It Lasts
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DOWN came the gang-plank and out stepped the dog when the stupid journey was over. It was really very stupid, says the dog, for there was nothing but four black walls for him to look at. At least he was comfortable; he rested on the shorn locks of some unfortunate poodle dog—an excellent example of robbing Peter to pay Paul.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0069.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Sucking Up the Sediment in the Swimming Pool
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WHAT’S he fishing for? Dirt; evidence forces us to admit that we do pollute the waters of a swimming pool when we enter therein. The dye from our suits and the hair from our heads, are the chief offenders. The part of his fishing pole that is above water looks like an ordinary pole, but the remainder, which is under water, looks very much like the end of a vacuum cleaner.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0070.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Fashion Note
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NOW that collars are selling for thirty-five cents straight the men of collar-wearing lands might find it worth their while to adopt the prevalent style among Burmese women of the Padung tribe. The Burmese girl’s collar, made of brass rings, should be durable, and require practically no attention from the laundry, and by adding or dropping a ring or two it would always be in the prevailing style.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0071.xml
article
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MEDICINE AND SURGERY
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Teeth-Pulling Made Painless by Electricity
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IF you ever had a tooth pulled by one of those callous dental practitioners who sometimes masquerade under the guise of “painless dentist” you will be interested in the method invented by a man in New Jersey for making dentistry painless—not for the dentist but for the patient by the use of electricity.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0072.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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A Drying Reel to Save Your Lines
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A CALIFORNIAN disciple of Izaak Walton has invented a contrivance for drying fishing lines which is extremely simple of construction. It consists of a reel about a foot in diameter and from twelve to eighteen inches long, which rests upon wooden supports and may be revolved by means of a crank attached to one end of the supporting shaft of the drum.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0073.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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His Tool-Chest Is a Workbench Too
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A MINNESOTA inventor, Andrew Anderson of Crookston, Minn., has devised a portable tool-chest which also serves as a workbench. It consists of two parts which can be hinged together, side by side or back to back. If the chest is to be used as a workbench, the two parts, securely fastened together, are raised to the proper height by foldable, firmly braced supports.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0074.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Why Waste Lumber in Greenhouses
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THE hot and moist air in greenhouses is exceedingly detrimental to the wood benches, racks and supports. It favors the growth and development of the microscopic fungi and other microorganisms which cause decay. Why not employ some other material, less perishable than wood but equally strong, instead of the wooden posts and planks, thought Fred J. Mead of Newark, N. J. He decided that concrete would be just the thing, and after a little experimenting he succeeded in fashioning for his greenhouse a complete equipment of benches from reinforced concrete.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0075.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Aid for the Farmer in the Corn-Field
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RECENTLY a two-row cultivator, which can either be drawn by horses or propelled by a gasoline engine, has been developed and gives promise of becoming an important factor in the economic development of the American corn belt. The new cultivator is still in the experimental stage, but the tests which have been made by the University of Illinois and the Macon County (111.)
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0076.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Shielding the Welder's Head
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THE necessity of protecting the head and neck of the workman from sparks and small particles of metal while he is welding with the oxy-acetylene flame or the electric arc, led to the invention of numerous types of protective helmets. Some of these, which were light enough not to overburden the worker, did not afford sufficient protection, while others afforded ample protection but were entirely too heavy to be worn with comfort for any considerable length of time.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0077.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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"A Dog's Life"—So This Is It
But not as Charlie Chaplin knew it
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0078.xml
article
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Would We Were a Kangaroo!
No work, all play; plenty of food, few clothes, and petting
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0079.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Science Applied to Wedding Rings
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WITH this ring I thee wed,” said he, whereupon he slipped it on her finger. Did it fit? Certainly; for he had measured her finger beforehand with the new finger measurer shown herewith. It was invented by Julius Dinhofer of New York City. It consists of a long narrow strip of celluloid, with a slit in one end through which the other end may pass.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0080.xml
article
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How to Clean Boiler Tubes
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AFTER a certain time, the duration of which depends upon the completeness of combustion in the fire-box, the tubes of a boiler become coated with a layer of soot. But soot is a poor conductor of heat and prevents the tubes from becoming hot. Hence a considerable proportion of the heat is wasted, and at the present high price of coal this means a serious loss.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0081.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Curbing the Gas Generator
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THE generators formerly used for making acetylene gas were, as a rule, unsatisfactory because the generatior. of the gas did not cease even after the light had been shut off, on account of the continued presence of water in the flat-bottomed trays containing the carbide.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0082.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Wind Tricks the Skyscrapers Play
The weather man finds out why your hat blows off at the Times Building
Dangers of City Cañons
What Happens on a Hot Day
Beware of Corner Currents
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EVERY one has had a hat blown off by some flurry of wind in the streets swooping down at an unexpected angle. The street corners, and particularly the tall buildings of our cities, develop miniature windstorms in astonishing variety. There are air rapids, typhoons, tornadoes, chinook winds and other air phenomena well worth observation.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0083.xml
article
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44,45,46
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Bringing the Stars to the People
It’s easy to get on familiar terms with other worlds at Clark Observatory
A Universe of Radium Stars
Making the Stars
The Moon Modeled in Plaster
Getting the Best of Vibration
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Henriette Boeckmann
PROBABLY nowhere else in the world is there another private observatory like that built by William A. Clark, Jr., son of former United States Senator Clark, on the beautiful grounds of his home in Los Angeles. Even as the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY is written essentially for readers who are not scientists but interested in scientific matters, so the Clark Observatory is planned to popularize astronomy.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0084.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Providing Rapid Transit for Bolts of Cloth
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WHEN the United States entered the great war in 1917, the Quartermaster-General found it necessary to establis h depots for the enormous quantities of supplies needed for the army. In New York the Depot Quartermaster rented a building fifteen stories high for the storage of the thousands of bolts of cloth which had accumulated, and which were to be made into uniforms for the soldiers.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0085.xml
article
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47
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Don't Kill the Fatted Pig
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JUST as a great fat sow, weighing three hundred and fifty pounds, stepped from a truck to the stockyard platform, she dropped dead. Not from fright but from heat; fat pigs like people, cannot stand the heat. And so pig owners are warned to keep their pigs cool.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0086.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Its Own Temperature Regulator
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CHICAGO has a freight tunnel under the principal business section of the city, the so-called Loop district. This under-ground tube, besides being useful, is interesting, because the temperature of the air in the tunnel is remarkably constant.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0087.xml
article
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48,49
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Putting the Spinning-Top to Work
In which the marvelous gyroscope is explained with the aid of a few experiments that you can repeat yourself
The Power of Inertia
Wrestling with a Giant
A Spinning Top
Points to the True North
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[no value]
Floyd L. Darrow
FAR from being a puzzle, the gyroscope admits of both mathematical and popular explanation. Its marvelous balancing power is one of the most striking illustrations of the fundamental law of inertia, the most common property of all matter.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0088.xml
article
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MIISCELLANY
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Give Him a Helping Plate
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PERFECT table manners are hard enough to attain when you have two hands. But what of the one-armed? Fortunately there have been invented plates—soup and dinner—that will lend the one-armed a helping hand. Let us be correct and start with the soup.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0089.xml
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50
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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This Machine Is a Complete Letter-Writer
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THE roll of paper at the end of the machine goes in pure and white, and comes out in the shape of printed letters. Nothing very unusual in that; the startling feature is that each letter is addressed differently. And since the machine will turn out five thousand letters an hour, the time and money now spent in having names and addresses typed on form letters, will be saved.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0090.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Did You Blow Out the Gas?
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THE numerous accidents caused every year by “blowing out the gas” inspired a New York inventor to evolve a practical method of preventing such accidents. The accompanying picture shows the invention applied to a drop light. While the gas is burning, the heat arising from it causes a little fan wheel above the lamp to rotate.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0091.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Rust-Proof Steel
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AS a result of the invention of steel there was a tremendous progress in the metallurgy of iron. Because of its greater hardness, flexibility, and tensile strength steel took the place of iron for many uses. But, unfortunately, steel shared with iron and practically all other base metals the inability to resist corrosion.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0092.xml
article
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51,52,53
MISCELLANY
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Cutting Steps in the Skyscraper
How we may call back the sun to city streets and perhaps come to walk in high places
Four Hundred Stories—Four Thousand Feet High
The “Stepped-Back” Skyscraper and the Thirty-Story Sidewalk
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F. W. Fitzpatrick
SHALL we go on building skyscrapers? Sweden prohibits anything that looks like a skyscraper. London may allow two stories more than is now legal height, but even that is doubtful. Paris will not have any. It is in this country, where every town of ten thousand persons must have a twelve-storied building or be entirely out of the running, that there is the liveliest interest in the skyscraper problem.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0093.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Keep the Milling-Machine Busy
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THE working capacity and hence the productiveness of the milling-machine is greatly limited by the time lost in removing a finished piece of work from the table and putting another in its place. Almost as great a loss of time is caused by the stopping of work when the same piece of casting, after the completion of one cut, is placed in position for cutting another surface.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0094.xml
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54
MISCELLANY
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New Bristles After Each Shave
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WHEN we go to the barber shop (and many thousands of us are still shaved there) as a rule we get lathered with a brush that has soaped hundreds of faces before, a brush that may have lurking on its pliant bristles, despite hot water and soap, countless thousands, perhaps millions of deadly microbes.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0095.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Sharpening the Teeth of a Metal-Saw
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IN modern factories circular saws with inserted teeth of extremely hard steel are used for cutting metals. But even the hardest saw teeth become dull after a while through wear aided by the heat produced by friction, which diminishes the resisting powers of steel.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0096.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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It Does Everything but Answer to "Whoa!"
How the one-man tractor is steered, started, stopped, and turned by simply pulling on two sets of reins
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Joseph Brinker
THE one-man farm tractor is driven just like a horse, and maybe started, stopped, its speed varied at will and turned to right or left, at the operator’s desire, by simply pulling on two sets of reins. With one or two men the motor farm tractor does the work of several teams of horses with double the number of men.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0097.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Accessories that Mark Automotive progress
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0098.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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That Old Worn-Out Hat
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WHEN the summer ends and you begin to look enquiringly over your trunkful of last winter’s clothes, out comes a felt hat—stained, limp, shapeless. You cast it aside and buy a new one. But that old hat was still full of energy Had it been cleaned, steamed, blocked, and ironed you might have worn it another year.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0099.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Cleaning with Air-Driven Sand
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SAND blasts and tumbling barrels have been employed for a great many years in foundries and metalware factories for removing scale, molding sand and core particles from castings or for finishing metals preparatory to rustproofing, enameling or sherardizing.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0100.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Crutches with Springs in Them
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HAVE you ever used crutches? If you have you know that in spite of their rubber tips they jar you at every step. But that is natural since you are using wood for legs. Wood has no spring to it; your legs have. When you walk you bend your knees, and your ankles, move your toes and, perhaps wear rubber heels.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0101.xml
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59,60,61
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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What Shall We Do for Oil?
Even a billion barrels a year falls short of supplying the demand
How to Strike Oil
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PETROLEUM is the most gorgeous sky-rocket in the industrial world today. Ever since it began its blazing ascent with the Pennsylvania oil boom of 1859 it has been indulging in all sorts of pyrotechnic outbursts. Its flight has followed no smooth and simple curve; its zigzags upset all calculations.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0102.xml
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62,63
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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"See, Ladies and Nothing Up Gentlemen, I Have My Sleeve”
The Chinese Linking Rings
The Welsh Rabbit Trick
Here’s the Burning Globe
The Flag and Handkerchief Trick
Agricultural Note
The Inexhaustible Hat
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“Ladies and gentlemen,” says the magician. “See, the links are solid steel. Feel them yourself. There isn’t a break or opening in one of them. And yet I will make a chain of them which will fall apart at my command.” Yet one of the rings has a secret opening.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0103.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Pegs Tell Where the Trucks Are
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WHERE are my wandering trucks tonight?” said the manager of a great trucking station in France to the two men in the picture above. The men glanced at the board in front of them and one of them started “trucks three and seven are in warehouse number eight and have just been loaded; trucks five and nine—” and so he continued until he had given the location and condition of every truck belonging to the station.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0104.xml
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63
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Birds that Walk Like Men
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AS soon as father and mother penguin get ready to raise a family, they walk inland from the sea and raise their young on high ground. All during the time the young penguins are on the nesting grounds, the old birds may be seen constantly going back and forth from the high land to the sea.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0105.xml
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64,65
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If Automobile Tires Could Talk
The heedful motorist might easily acquire some dollar-saving wisdom
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Fred Gilman Jopp
SHE was out on her first automobile trip and her husband asked her to lean out of the car and see if the tire was flat. “Not enough to hurt, John,” she said, “it’s just flat on the lower side.” If only the poor old tire could talk what harrowing tales of torture we would hear.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0106.xml
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66
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Pull Tightens the Grip
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MACHINES for drilling, reaming, and milling are used in every machine-shop and every factory that works in metal. Sometimes the same machine is used for both drilling and reaming. The adaptation is made by removing the drilling tool from the rotary spindle of the machine and putting in its place the required reaming tool.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0107.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Tracing Colors on Glass
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AT first glance the machine shown above looks as though it were used for clamping lids on preserving-jars; but then, why does the workman thrust a sharply pointed steel instrument into the jar’s side? No, the machine is evidently not for lids; its real job, we find, is tracing beautifully colored designs on glass vases and bowls.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0108.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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A School of Correction for Airplane Motors
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AIRPLANES are absolutely dependent on their engines. When an engine stops, down comes the airplane. So when an aviator starts on a long-distance flight over water, or over country too broken to permit of a safe landing, he is making an extremely hazardous bet against fate; he wagers his life on the efficiency of his engine.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0109.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Do We Talk Too Much? Look at This Record!
The telephone wires alone carry thirteen billion words for us in twenty-four hours
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0110.xml
article
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68,69,70
MISCELLANY
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The Death that Lurks in Dope
Drug-taking costs the country $150,000,000 a year through loss of work. Every year at least $61,000,000 is spent for dope
Putting on the Shackles
The “Saddle Nose"
Nature's Toll
Dullness the Penalty
The Children of Addicts
Addiction Is Increasing
The Situation Is Serious
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A. M. Jungmann
HAVE you ever had a toothache ? Do you remember how black the world looked while the torturing pain set every nerve in your body on edge? You would not want to face another toothache, if you could help it. Certainly you would not go out of your way to acquire one.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0111.xml
article
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71
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Getting the Dope Across
Prisoners' friends are always finding new ways of smuggling in drugs
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0112.xml
article
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Do It with Tools and Machines
Save your energy and at the same time speed up work
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0113.xml
article
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73
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Housekeeping Made Easy
New inventions that simplify housework
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0114.xml
article
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74
AERONAUTICS
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They Are Doing Business on the Wing
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THE more luxurious trains of the United States have all the imperial comforts and conveniences of a hotel. Do you need a shave or a haircut? Walk this way to the barber-shop. Do you want to read a book? Here is the library. Have you a mass of business correspondence that you were compelled to take with you?
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0115.xml
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MEDICINE AND SURGERY
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Reaching High Altitudes in the Laboratory
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STUDENTS of aviation soon learned from experience that the conditions existing in high altitudes exert a powerful influence on the efficacy of the engine of the airplane rising from some point near the sea-level. They realized that the diminished pressure of the rarefied air at great heights is the cause.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0116.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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He Dreams of Flying on a Rail
And while we shall never fly with him, science may find some use for Mr. Laur’s invention
Guided Flight
A Pocket Edition
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WHILE very seriously intended as a public service vehicle of great speed, charm, and safety, the monorail flier invented during all the horrors of war, in 1915, by Francis Laur, C.E., of Paris, and only recently released from the United States Patent Office, is little more than a picture in so far as its value for practical transportation work is concerned.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0117.xml
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76,77
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Electricity Direct from Fuel
Doing away with the intermediate steam boiler, engine and dynamo
Where Energy Is Wasted
Oxidizing Coal
Carbon plus Sodium Hydrate
What Edison Proposes
A Swedish Method
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[no value]
Ernest Welleck
VISIT one of the big electric light and power plants and look around you. As you approach the plant you pass enormous coal piles and on the spur track leading to the yard of the plant there may be cars with more coal not yet unloaded. The potential energy of all this coal is transformed in the plant into electric energy and made available for purposes of light, heat or power.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0118.xml
article
78
78
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A Metal that Bends When Heated
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT are they watching with such interest? They have just placed a strip of a peculiar metal, with two heavy books resting on it, on a hot radiator. The metal curves under the influence of the heat, the upcurving ends of the strip gradually lifting the books an inch or more.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0119.xml
article
78
78
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Three-Layer Suits for Winter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DOWN on one knee with his arms flung out, the man in the picture would seem to be a teacher of gymnastics. On the contrary; he works in a shipyard. The reason for his present pose is that he is demonstrating the excellence of the new padded winter suit for outdoor work which the shipyard has recently adopted for its employees.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0120.xml
article
78
78
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Welding with the Electric Arc
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRIC welding is employed in many of the metal industries, and in many cases is given preference to the welding by means of the oxyacetylene flame. The cost of welding by electricity is smaller than that of welding by the oxy-acetylene process, yet many manufacturers hesitate to introduce the electrical method.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0121.xml
article
79
79,80,81
MEDICINE AND SURGERY
[no value]
When Minds Get Off the Track
Some examples of what happens to victims of mental indigestion
Why? Nobody Knows!
Are You Afraid of High Places?
Perhaps Your Mental Switch Is Open
Cleanliness May Be Next to Insanity
Haunted by the Fear of Blushing
The Awkward Predicament of Sudden Loss of Memory
Apraxia—Loss of Control Over Certain Actions
[no value]
[no value]
Alfred J. Lotka
HAVE you ever had that uncanny feeling that it had all happened before? Something that you were just doing you had done before, in just the same way, or something you were reading you had read before, or something you heard you had heard before?
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0122.xml
article
82
82
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
When the “Graf Waldersee” Rammed the “Redondo” in a Fog
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY ship is but a bubble of air floating on water. The skin of the bubble is either steel or wood. Even on the biggest ships not more than one half or three quarters of an inch of steel separates you from the water. Suppose that there is a collision in a fog, and that a hole is rammed through that thin plating.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0123.xml
article
82
82
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Hammering by Foot-Power
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOU drop the hammer, and jump up and down in pain; instead of hitting the nail on the head it had hit the nail of your finger. You can never be sure that the hammer you wield will land just where you want it to— neither can the blacksmith. And so Sill Hamilton, of Alabama, has invented a self-wielding blacksmith’s hammer that always strikes in the same place.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0124.xml
article
82
82
MISCELLANY
[no value]
What Will You Have Today, Sir?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“HAM and eggs,” says he. “Chicken salad and a lime quencher,” says she. And the waitress writes it down. There is no chance of the waitress losing her orderbook, for she wears it on her sleeve, or, to be more exact, on her leather cuff—held in place by a rubber band.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0125.xml
article
83
83
MISCELLANY
[no value]
An Electric Power-House for Your Pocket
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NO doubt it has been your experience, while searching for something by the light of your pocket flash-lamp, that the battery of your lamp became exhausted and the light went out. Such an experience stimulated a French inventor to devise the electric flash-lamp below.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0126.xml
article
83
83
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Keeping Books by Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER the style of the typewriter desk, there has been invented a bookkeeper’s desk. When the top is closed, the bank clerk can stand and sort his checks on it. This done he lifts the lid and sits down. There are two drawers and a shelf to the left of him, his loose-leaf ledger to the right of him, and a bookkeeping-machine in front of him.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0127.xml
article
83
83
MISCELLANY
[no value]
This Machine Saws through a Thick Propeller Hub
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DID you ever try your hand at sawing wood? Didn’t you find it a task altogether too strenuous for your taste? Now, if sawing through a few boards made you perspire and tired you, imagine how you would feel if you had to cut through a mass of iron or some other hard metal two or three feet thick.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0128.xml
article
84
84,85
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Cut the Cost of Living by Cutting Terminal Congestion
Producers and railroads are fairly efficient: it’s the antiquated system of getting goods to and away from them that is constantly raising the price of everything we eat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is said that in New York harbor the amount of cargo handled each year averages only 150 tons per foot of bulkhead or pier, while some European ports average 500 tons. It costs ordinary freighters from one to three thousand dollars a day to wait around for their turn to load and unload —which, of course, is ultimately taken out of the consumer.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0129.xml
article
86
86
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
She Was Launched with Steam Up
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERYBODY is happy at a launching except the shipbuilder. His heart is in his throat. When the band is playing he mops his brow and wonders if his creation will prove to be a duck or a stone. The launching of a ship is perhaps the most critical moment of her career.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0130.xml
article
86
86
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
For a Dark and Stormy Night on the Ocean
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the bridge officer in the picture above turns that switch, the circular glass window just above his hand will start to revolve at a very high rate of speed. What has that to do with navigation? When it is a dark and stormy night on the ocean, and the rain falls thick and fast, the bridge officer is often so blinded by the rain that he is apt to put his ship in danger.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0131.xml
article
87
87,88
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making the machinist More Efficient
A device for eliminating trouble with dead centers, together with other devices for increasing efficiency
It Prevents Good Work
Accurate Turning of Angles
The Template Is Unreliable
Testing the Adjustments
Setting Up the Lathe
Making the One Calculation
[no value]
[no value]
J. B. Gray
FOR some time we had been having considerable trouble with the dead centers, that is the tail-stock centers, of the lathes. They either ran hot and necessitated a stop to loosen and oil the center, or, in many cases, the center burned off altogether.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0132.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
Winchester Junior Rifle Corps: WINCHESTER MODEL 90
[no value]
Winchester Junior Rifle Corps
WINCHESTER MODEL 90
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0133.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
1900 WASHER COMPANY
[no value]
1900 WASHER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0134.xml
article
90
90
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Preserving the Shape of Stored Tires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES R. FISHER
THERE are very few public or private garages that have not at least one tire not in use. The usual method of storing these spares is to hang them on large nails or hooks. This may do for a day or two, but if left for any length of time the tire will assume an irregular shape and a weak spot will develop where the nail has been when the tire is put into use.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0135.xml
article
90
90
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Obtaining Longer Life from Grass Rugs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
A GRASS-CLOTH rug that had seen a year of service in a livingroom was put in fairly good shape again and made to last two years longer by painting it. The rug was spread upon a flat surface and painted with a heavy coat of house paint. The original colors were solid, with a different color at each end for the border.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0136.xml
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91
91
[no value]
[no value]
DAFOE-EUSTICE COMPANY, INC: USTUS Limousette
[no value]
DAFOE-EUSTICE COMPANY, INC
USTUS Limousette
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0137.xml
article
92
92,94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Stopping the Airplane Propeller from Drinking Too Much
Humidity Is the Bugbear
Testing the Propeller' s Strength
[no value]
[no value]
Fred Gilman Jopp
DURING the war one of the greatest troubles experienced with airplane propellers was the warping and twisting of the blades near the tips, and a large percentage of the propellers received at the front were rejected on this account. After the experimental beams have been constructed in the carpenter shop of the Forest Products Laboratory they are delivered by truck to one of the testing laboratories for a final strength test. One of these beams is show*, undergoing test. The load is applied at four points through the lever system vdfich is attached to the cross-head of the testing machine. The two screws are turned by means of gearing, thus drawdng down the crosshead through which they are threaded. In order to determine the causes and to develop methods of preventing this trouble, a number of experimental propellers were manufactured for the War and Navy Departments by the Forest Products Laboratory of the U. S. Forest Service, at Madison, Wisconsin.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0138.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
Champion Ignition Company
[no value]
Champion Ignition Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0139.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
IVER HOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
IVER JOHNSON SAFETY— AUTOMATIC REVOLVERS
IVER HOHNSON'S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
Iver Johnson Superior Roadster
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0140.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
GENEVA CUTLERY CORPORATION: GENCO Razor
[no value]
GENEVA CUTLERY CORPORATION
GENCO Razor
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0141.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Yale & Towne Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0142.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Broaching Keyways in a New Way
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JACK E. HOMEWOOD
WHERE there is no key-seater available and there are a number of keyways to be cut to a uniform size, the following method will prove worthy of the necessary preparation. The illustration shows a plug A which can be of steel or cast-iron, slotted the width of the required keyway and having the standard taper.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0143.xml
article
96
96,98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Artist’s Combination Easel and Work-Table
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
AN easel that can quickly be converted into an inclined table of adjustable height is shown in the accompanying sketch. It can be constructed of odds and ends and will be found to give good results whether the artist wishes to work at a painting held in a vertical position or at a piece of work which needs to be laid horizontally or at a slight angle.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0144.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
JOS. M. HERMAN SHOE CO.: Herman Style 44
[no value]
JOS. M. HERMAN SHOE CO.
Herman Style 44
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0145.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
WM. VANDERPOOL CO.
[no value]
WM. VANDERPOOL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0146.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Columbia Dry and Storage Batteries
[no value]
[no value]
Columbia Dry and Storage Batteries
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0147.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0148.xml
article
98
98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Adjust the Radiator Curtain Without Getting Out
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
IN cold weather, when the blankets are on the auto hood and the curtain is lowered over the radiator, it is inconvenient to be getting out to adjust them for varying degrees of temperature as the heat of the day changes. By arranging the curtain on a roller similar to a window shade, this trouble can, in a very great measure, be overcome.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0149.xml
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99
99
[no value]
[no value]
EVEREADY DAYLO
[no value]
EVEREADY DAYLO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0150.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
WESTFIELD MANUFACTURING CO.: Columbia BICYCLES
[no value]
WESTFIELD MANUFACTURING CO.
Columbia BICYCLES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0151.xml
article
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Your Rubber Boots and How to Treat Them
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE GILBERT
NOTHING is quite so soggy and hard to dry out as a pair of rubber boots or waders—if you do not know how. Most people try to force matters by leaving the boots close to a stove or radiator or over a furnace flue—and take the life out of the rubber. Try this way, next time you get in over your depth or have your boots or waders spring a leak: Take the wet boots off as soon as you get home.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0152.xml
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101
101
[no value]
[no value]
UNITED STATES CARTRIDGE COMPANY: The BLACK SHELLS
[no value]
UNITED STATES CARTRIDGE COMPANY
The BLACK SHELLS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0153.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
FREDERICK J. DRAKE & CO.
ELECTRICAL BOOKS
FREDERICK J. DRAKE & CO.
STEAM ENGINEERING
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0154.xml
article
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Drive Machinery with Your Motorcycle
Make your motorcycle do the work of the hired man
[no value]
[no value]
A. H. Rider
THE accompanying, illustrations and drawings show how a motorcycle can be used to run small machines, etc., around the farm and home workshop when no other power is at hand. The device is portable and can be set up anywhere, ready for use, in less than five minutes.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0155.xml
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103
103
[no value]
[no value]
HENDEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
HENDEE MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0156.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICATELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICATELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0157.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0158.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
The HATFIELD INST
[no value]
The HATFIELD INST
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0159.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN L. WHITING-J. J. ADAMS CO.
[no value]
JOHN L. WHITING-J. J. ADAMS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0160.xml
article
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Making Blue-Prints on Old Negatives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. E. ZIMMERMAN
EVERYONE who uses a camera accumulates a number of spoiled plates or discarded negatives. These can be utilized by making blue-prints on them. For certain kinds of subjects, especially of marine views, no prettier pictures can be made than blue-prints.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0161.xml
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105
105
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0162.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0163.xml
article
106
106,110
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Make a Water Circulator for Your Ford
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MORE than one case of engine trouble in the Ford may be traced to sluggish water circulation. The water in the thermo-syphon system of water circulation is never in rapid motion as it is in any of the engines equipped with a water-pump. This article describes a simple device, which may easily be made and inserted in the cooling system of the Ford or other car minus a mechanically driven water-pump, to create a constant and positive water circulation.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0164.xml
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107
107
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0165.xml
article
107
107
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Study in Concrete Posts
How they should be constructed in order to give the best results
Expensive but Good
[no value]
[no value]
Roy H. Poston
HAVING had occasion to erect new posts to replace others that had evidently been carelessly put up, I made a study of different types of pier and post connection, and herewith offer the results. The design of any layout is affected primarily by two things, namely, the cost and the probable life of the building.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0166.xml
article
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Rub That Hollow Oilstone on the Sidewalk
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. F. NEFF
WHEN an oilstone becomes hollow on the surface it is practically impossible to sharpen plane cutters, chisels or any edged tool that should be perfectly straight across the cutting edge. If the user is not an expert the surface of any oilstone is certain to become uneven.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0167.xml
article
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Repairing the Firepot of an Old Stove
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
N. W. GANDY
THE illustration shows the easy method by which I repaired the firepot of a coal-stove, and obtained another winter’s use from it after it had warped so badly that it would not hold fire. The grate fingers D D, at the base of the firepot A A had so warped and twisted that they left a good-sized opening at their lower ends at C C, with a space at F F, which made a fire impossible.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0168.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0169.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0170.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0171.xml
article
111
111,112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Make Your Own Lead Boiler Gaskets
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
USUALLY, in mine plants, watertube boilers are installed, which require gasketing every so often. The gaskets are expensive when they are bought, but with the outfit here described they can be easily and cheaply made. The illustration shows a tool that has been used by engineers in mine and manufacturing plants, and which has been copied and modified to suit local conditions.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0172.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
TUBULAR WOVEN FABRIC CO.: DURACORD
[no value]
TUBULAR WOVEN FABRIC CO.
DURACORD
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0173.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK E. MORRISON.
[no value]
FRANK E. MORRISON.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0174.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
THE BELL TAILORS
[no value]
THE BELL TAILORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0175.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0176.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0177.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Toy Electric Signal for Miniature Trains
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH very simple to make, this alarm signal works very well, and gives a realistic finish to a toy railroad. To the lad who owns an electrically operated line it is both interesting and instructive. The materials needed are an old electric bell, a piece of stiff cardboard about ¼ by ½ in., and a piece of wire.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0178.xml
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113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0179.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Dixon Crucible Co.: DIXON'S ELDORADO
[no value]
Joseph Dixon Crucible Co.
DIXON'S ELDORADO
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0180.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY
[no value]
TECHNICAL EQUIPMENT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0181.xml
article
113
113
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Combination of the Level and Door-Jack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
A COMBINATION of a level with a door-jack may sound incongruous, but it is nevertheless exceedingly practical. On odd jobs the carpenter is often hard put to it to find some way of holding a door or window for planing and mortising in the butts.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0182.xml
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113
113
[no value]
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0183.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
The Florsheim Shoe Company: The Florsheim SHOE
[no value]
The Florsheim Shoe Company
The Florsheim SHOE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0184.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
GOODELL & CO.
[no value]
GOODELL & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0185.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0186.xml
article
114
114,115
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Things You Ought to Know About a Roof Before You Build
Shingle Roofs Are Not Heat-Tight
A Roof that Lasted Fifty-two Years
Use Good Brick in the Chimney
[no value]
[no value]
D. L. Merrill
CONSIDER the above illustration as taken anywhere in the United States. Let us look at it a moment. The house has a good foundation, is ratand mouse-proof, and safe against frost. It has the usual pine frame construction, sheeted with matched lumber, covered with paper, sided with lap siding, and then all joints painted perfectly airtight.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0187.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO.
[no value]
LIGGETT & MYERS TOBACCO CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0188.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
The Veeder Mfg. Co.: Veeder COUNTERS
[no value]
The Veeder Mfg. Co.
Veeder COUNTERS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0189.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0190.xml
article
116
116
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Change the Liquids in Two Glasses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M. TOCABEN
THE illustration shows how to run a full glass of port wine into a full glass of water without the aid of another receptacle, by the use of an ordinary post card. When you present this trick to your friends they will study it for a while, then tell you that such a thing is impossible, but you inform them that nothing is impossible in these progressive times.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0191.xml
article
116
116
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Repairing a Gearcase Break with Babbitt
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
HAVING a break in the gearcase of my car recently, I did not care about paying a large repair bill for taking the engine down and having it welded, so I used the method shown in the illustration. I poured molten babbitt into the part that was broken and, up to date, it has held together exactly as if they were welded.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0192.xml
article
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
Transforming the Turtle into an Ash-Tray
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNIQUE and ornamental ash-trays can be made from the shells of box turtles. First, naturally, the turtle must be killed and thoroughly cleaned in boiling water or, if necessary, in a concentrated lye solution (caustic soda). This done, procure a roll of strip brass in.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0193.xml
article
117
117
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a T-Square Stay Put
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MORRIS G. MILLER
ONE of the troublesome things about the ordinary T-square is its aggravating habit of sliding off the drawing-board to the floor the instant it is left alone for a moment, especially if the board is inclined as it should be for comfortable work.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0194.xml
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117
117
[no value]
[no value]
P. H. HANES KNITTING CO.: ELASTIC KNIT UNDERWEAR
[no value]
P. H. HANES KNITTING CO.
ELASTIC KNIT UNDERWEAR
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0195.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
THE HAMMOND TYPEWRITER CO.
[no value]
THE HAMMOND TYPEWRITER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0196.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0197.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0198.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.: WURLITZER
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.
WURLITZER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0199.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0200.xml
article
120
120
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Improvising an Emergency Stencil-Brush
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE G. HANSON
HAVING a lot of stenciling to do and being without a brush of any sort, I made the rather primitive one shown in the illustration in the following manner: First, I took the wooden handle from one of those wire carryalls, that the big stores furnish gratis to their customers for carrying heavy parcels.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0201.xml
article
120
120,121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Make These Scales and Save Fifty Dollars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. B. BADE
LABORATORY scales are so expensive that the average student of chemistry would rather go without one than spend fifty dollars or more for an accurate chemical balance that he will seldom use. But it is not at all difficult to construct an accurate scale sensitive either to one grain or one centigram.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0202.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0203.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0204.xml
article
122
122
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Profile Marker
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK L. MATTER
A HANDY and efficient profile marker can be made in a, few minutes by driving a nail and drilling a hole in the wooden handle of a common carpenter’s square, as shown in the illustration. The hole should be of such size that the pencil will fit firmly when pushed into it.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0205.xml
article
122
122,123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Changing a Wood-Stove into an Oil-Burner
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
IN a garage, the accumulating oil from drained crank-cases, which was dumped into a big tank, was put to a good use by burning it in an ordinary wood-stove, which was slightly altered for the purpose. First, a tin pan, of a shape to fit, approximately, the bottom of the grate, was procured, and lined with several layers of asbestos.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0206.xml
article
123
123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Old Bottle Made into an Acetylene Lamp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLOYD L. DARROW
AN acetylene lamp for use in the laboratory or shop may be made as follows: Obtain a large-mouthed bottle of one or two quarts capacity, a large lamp chimney, a small disk of coarse wire gauze, a one-holed rubber stopper, a 6-in. piece of glass tubing, a rubber connection, an acetylene gas tip; and 18 in. of aluminum or other heavy wire.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0207.xml
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123
123
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0208.xml
advertisement
124
124
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0209.xml
article
124
124
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Locating the Light Switch in a Dark Room
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DALE VAN HORN
WHO has not poked about in the dark, vainly trying to locate an elusive electric light switch? One person did who decided to end that gentle and joyous proceeding forever. He removed the mother-of-pearl center-piece from the “on” button and put in some radium paint.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0210.xml
article
124
124,125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Safety First Belt Shift for a Grinder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
SAFETY first is one of the chief slogans nowadays in manufacturing plants. As one result of such a campaign a prominent manufacturer had the combination belt shift and safety guard, combined with a warning sign, installed over all his grinders.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0211.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Keeping the Houn'-Dawg Out of the Garbage Pail
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRI G. DEKRUIF
HOW many times have you gone out into the yard to find your garbage pail upset and four or five dogs streaking off with their tails between their legs at your angry shouts? More times than you care to mention, we’ll warrant. While there are many types of garbage cans upon the market designed to prevent them being overturned— some made to be buried and others so heavy that they cannot be upset—they are all rather expensive.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0212.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Take the Dents Out of Mudguards
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM FARREL
DURING my experience as a mechanic in the automobile business, I have found that to remove dents in fenders and mudguards is a rather difficult job. To try and hammer them out, flat, will only buckle the dent from one side to the other.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0213.xml
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125
125
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0214.xml
advertisement
126
126
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[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0215.xml
article
126
126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Ride Around in a Chariot While You Scrub
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S. R. WINTERS
THE irksome job of mopping or scrubbing floors may be made less of a drudgery by converting a soap-box into a padded frame placed on rollers, whereby the housewife may roll herself about the house to do the floor cleaning. One side of the box is removed, and the remaining sides are trimmed down to about 5 inches.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0216.xml
article
126
126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Change Your Old Bottles into Drinking Glasses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DUARD SCOTT
PROCURE a bottle—any kind will do that has a flat bottom—and tie a string around it, about halfway up the side, that has been soaked in kerosene or turpentine. Then set the string afire. After the string has nearly burnt itself out, dip the bottle in ice-cold water, and a clean break at the point where the string was tied will result.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0217.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Mend That Loose HammerHead with Cement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
HOW often has the handle of the screwdriver or hammer you were using come off ? And how often were you nearly hurt by its flying past you ? Did you ever consider that the cheapest and quickest repair, in either instance, could be made with cement?
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0218.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Turnbuckles for Use on Model Airplanes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. H. PARKER
BUILDERS of model airplanes generally encounter difficulties when they reach the construction of very small turnbuckles, as it is often impossible to obtain small left-hand taps and dies. Turnbuckles are the most essential parts of a working model and here is a way out of the difficulty.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0219.xml
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127
127
[no value]
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0220.xml
advertisement
128
128
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0221.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Equal in Holding Power to the Manufactured Clamp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
A HANDY and novel bench clamp, equal in holding power to any vise, and very cheaply made, is shown in the accompanying sketch. The action is self-apparent. A represents a holder, which goes through the bench in the manner shown. B is the clamping arm.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0222.xml
article
128
128,129
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Anyone Can Make This Electric Water-Heater
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. E. BRIMMER
TO make an electric heater that will quickly bring water to a boil, take two thin copper plates, 5 in. by 8 in., and mount them on four spools, which will bring them slightly over an inch apart. Be sure that the screw which fastens the plate to the spool does not extend far enough to touch the screw from the other plate, for it would spoil the heater if there was contact anywhere between the plates of copper.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0223.xml
article
129
129
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Blow-Torch from an Old Generator
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ERNEST SCHWARTZ
GASOLINE torches are expensive, but by following the suggested idea you can make a contrivance that will do almost the same work. A hose 6 or 7 in. long, is attached to the water filler hole of an old motorcycle gas generator. Gasoline is then poured into the apparatus, the fumes from it being ignited at the outlet.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0224.xml
article
129
129
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Drill Beyond the Depth of the Bit-Stick
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
TO drill a deep hole in wood, beyond the capacity of the brace, often causes considerable trouble, but if you follow the suggestion given in the illustration, you will have no further difficulty. After the hole has been drilled, remove the brace, take a common waterfaucet handle and place it over the bit shank.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0225.xml
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129
129
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0226.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: SOLAR MANTLE LAMP
[no value]
[no value]
SOLAR MANTLE LAMP
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0227.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Choraleon Phonograph Co.
[no value]
Choraleon Phonograph Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0228.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Write for Booklet JACQUES DEPOLLIER & SON
[no value]
Write for Booklet JACQUES DEPOLLIER & SON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0229.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0230.xml
article
130
130
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Silage-Carriers to Facilitate Feeding Steers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. FRUDDEN
FOR steer feeding, silage is cheap and efficient. Whether it is fed to breeding cattle, fattening steers, stockers, or baby beeves, there is no other feed in the corn belt that can entirely replace it at the same low cost. An equipment for feeding silage conveniently is shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0231.xml
article
130
130,131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Floating Clips for Films Help Wash Them Properly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. BADE
FILMS, after they have been developed and fixed, should float in water but should not sink to the bottom of the receptacle. The bottom always collects the heavier fixing solution which clings to the film.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0232.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Moisture Separator for Garage Air Line
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES H. WILLEY
A VERY satisfactory moisture separator for the garage air line can be very easily made from pipe and pipe fittings of the dimensions given, and assembled as shown in the illustration. The device must be installed in a vertical position and the air lead must be upwards as indicated.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0233.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
THE LIONEL CORP.: LIONEL ELECTRIC TOY TRAINS
[no value]
THE LIONEL CORP.
LIONEL ELECTRIC TOY TRAINS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0234.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
LOFTIS BROS. & CO.
[no value]
LOFTIS BROS. & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0235.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0236.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Two Ways to Keep an Engine Quiet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES LINDAY
A SILENT engine is the ideal of all who own or drive cars. The valve tappets are responsible for a great deal of engine noise and it is comparatively easy to eliminate it. Remove the valve tappets from the engine case. Find the center and drill a ⅜-in hole ⅛ in. deep in the face of the tappet.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0237.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
MECCANO COMPANY, INC.
Electric Tractor
MECCANO COMPANY, INC.
Automobile Chassis
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0238.xml
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134
134
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0239.xml
article
134
134
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Rest for the Arm-Weary at the Telephone
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK L. MATTER
FOR those who have to stand up to a wall telephone during a long conversation this little accessory will prove a boon. First cut a piece of ¾-in. wood about 5 in. by 7 in. in size (a shield design is best).
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0240.xml
article
134
134
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Tests of the New Liberty Motor Fuel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TESTS made in the aeronautic laboratories of the U. S. Army and placed at the disposal of the Fuel Administration gave out that the fuel was made up of “approximately 65 per cent of benzol, 25 to 30 per cent of kerosene, and the remainder of a small percentage of amyl acetate together with, perhaps, small quantities of dissolved solids, and other volatile liquids, as yet undetermined.”
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0241.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
The Ives Mfg. Corporation: Ives Toys
[no value]
The Ives Mfg. Corporation
Ives Toys
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0242.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0243.xml
article
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Unscrewing Pipe Without a Pipe Wrench
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DAVID BAXTERz
TO tighten or loosen a pipe or other round threaded object when there is no special wrench at hand, place a coarse file between the jaws of an ordinary monkey wrench and the object to be turned. The teeth of the file will grip the round smooth surface, being embedded in it by the pressure of the wrench.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0244.xml
article
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Emptying Jugs and Bottles Without Splashing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR TODD
WHENEVER it is necessary to empty liquid from a large jug or bottle it will always splutter and gurgle, splashing a goodly portion of its contents outside the utensil it is supposed to pour into, and usually taking a very long time before it finally empties.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0245.xml
article
137
137
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Letterand Bill-Files Made from Old Books
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
THE writer has an artist friend who makes a practice of filing away old clippings and examples of other artists’ illustrations for future reference. To suit the various sizes of clippings he made his filing boxes from old books found in the attic, and the result was that he later made letterand bill-files in the same manner.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0246.xml
article
137
137
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Use a Hairpin as a Switch Fuse
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN B. HERFORD
A HAIRPIN will be found very useful for repairing burnt out fuses on lighting and ignition systems. By slipping the hairpin over the burnt out fuse and inserting it in the original container, the circuit is again completed. This, of course, is only an emergency repair, until a new fuse can be obtained, as the metal from which a hairpin is made is of too high a resistance and has too high a fusing point to be used permanently for that purPOSE.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0247.xml
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137
137
[no value]
[no value]
American School of Correspondence
[no value]
American School of Correspondence
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0248.xml
article
138
138,139,140,142,143
For the Radio Experimenter
[no value]
Working with Artificial Lightning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Lloyd E. Darling
WE find that a small particle of dust, or an insect alighting upon an electrode, when under the high potentials we have at our new testing station,” says Adrien L. Anderson of Palo Alto, California, “is sufficient to start a corona plume. “Sometimes corona plumes have been started by flies and wasps flying within two or three feet of the high potential leads.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0249.xml
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139
139
[no value]
[no value]
MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH CO. OF AMERICA: MARCONI V.T.
[no value]
MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH CO. OF AMERICA
MARCONI V.T.
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0250.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
MARSHALL STILLMAN ASSOCIATION
[no value]
MARSHALL STILLMAN ASSOCIATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0251.xml
advertisement
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY
[no value]
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0252.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0253.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0254.xml
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144
144
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0255.xml
article
144
144,145
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND -TELEPHONY
[no value]
Important Papers Read at Radio Meeting
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[no value]
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INDICATIVE of the spirit of radio, the, attraction the art has for its adherents, and of the remarkable expansion in the industry which has taken place during, and since, the war, was the large joint meeting of the Institute of Radio Engineers and the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, held in New York City on October 1st.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0256.xml
article
145
145
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND -TELEPHONY
[no value]
Navy to Broadcast News for Benefit of Amateurs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SINCE October 5th, and by authority of the Director Naval Communications, a code broadcastschedule, addressed to all amateurs, has been transmitted by the Naval Radio Station, 44 Whitehall Street, New York City, on 1500 meters. This broadcast immediately follows the 9:00 P. M. press schedule.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0257.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Rahe-Auto and Tractor School
[no value]
Rahe-Auto and Tractor School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0258.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Harold Bell Wright Story-Picture Corporation
[no value]
Harold Bell Wright Story-Picture Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0259.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
DE FOREST RADIO TEL. & TEL. CO.
[no value]
DE FOREST RADIO TEL. & TEL. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0260.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
Service Radio School
[no value]
Service Radio School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0261.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
C. BRANDES, Inc.: Brandes Wireless Headset
[no value]
C. BRANDES, Inc.
Brandes Wireless Headset
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0262.xml
article
146
146,147
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND -TELEPHONY
[no value]
Aero Radio Surveying and Mapping
Applying the System
Aerial Photography Helps
Photographic Contour Results
Other Regions Need Surveys
[no value]
[no value]
John Hays Hammond
THE forerunner of industrial development of a territory is the explorer. Millions of square miles of inaccurately mapped territories face us every day on our maps and charts. Vast timber tracts exist that are scarcely known, unsurveyed miles of land that will some day bear a golden harvest, mountain ranges that have only been sketched by the passing traveller, whose rocks are rich with the metals upon which our industries depend.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0263.xml
advertisement
147
147
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0264.xml
advertisement
147
147
[no value]
[no value]
MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
[no value]
MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0265.xml
advertisement
148
148
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0266.xml
article
148
148
[no value]
[no value]
These Variable Condensers Save on Receiving Sets
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[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH CHMIELNISKI
THE two types of condensers shown herewith are easily made in any small laboratory or workshop, and save materially in the cost of receiving apparatus. The amateur may take his choice. Either is good, and as much as three or four dollars on] condensers alone may be economized— toward the purchase of the apparatus which is harder to make.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0267.xml
article
149
149,150
RADIO-TELEGRAPHY AND -TELEPHONY
[no value]
A Renewable “B” Battery for Vacuum Tubes
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[no value]
[no value]
PHILLIP A. WALL
NOW that the vacuum tube has achieved practically universal use there is a great demand for a simple “B” battery, or high voltage battery— one that can be made cheaply and easily by amateurs not caring to spend a large amount for a manufactured battery These latter rapidly polarize and become unserviceable.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0268.xml
advertisement
149
149
[no value]
[no value]
Chandlee & Chandlee
[no value]
Chandlee & Chandlee
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0269.xml
advertisement
150
150
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0270.xml
article
151
151,152
[no value]
[no value]
A Buzzer Set that Uses Little Current
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOS. W. BENSON
A CODE practice set is a necessity to get the arm tuned up for the opening of the amateur transmitting stations. A buzzer is not suitable for the purpose as it's irregularity gives a ragged note. To overcome these defects the code practice set here described was designed and built, giving gratifying results.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0271.xml
advertisement
151
151
[no value]
[no value]
LANCASTER & ALLWINE
[no value]
LANCASTER & ALLWINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0272.xml
advertisement
152
152
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0273.xml
article
152
152
[no value]
[no value]
Radio Calculators — Check This Value of “Pi”
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[no value]
ERNEST WELLECK
THE relation between the circumference and the diameter of a circle, usually referred to by the Greek letter π (pronounced “pi”), is much used in radio calculations. As a rule, the value 3.1416 is considered sufficient for π. But if you are fastidious, hereafter use the following number:
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0274.xml
article
153
153,154
[no value]
[no value]
Getting There Ahead of Engine Troubles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANY motorist can doctor trouble in his car after he knows where it is, but it takes talent and knowledge to diagnose it. One of the most important matters to watch about the car is the condition of the valves. Most cars are started by battery these days but occasionally the crank should be inserted to test the “feel” of the compression in each cylinder and the valves ground if they show the least sign of leakage.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0275.xml
advertisement
153
153
[no value]
[no value]
L.E.Waterman Co.
[no value]
L.E.Waterman Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0276.xml
advertisement
153
153
[no value]
[no value]
Dean Medicine Company: DEANS MENTHOLATED COUGHDBWS
[no value]
Dean Medicine Company
DEANS MENTHOLATED COUGHDBWS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0277.xml
advertisement
153
153
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
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[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0278.xml
advertisement
153
153
[no value]
[no value]
Phiia. Motor Tire Co.
[no value]
Phiia. Motor Tire Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0279.xml
advertisement
154
154
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0280.xml
article
154
154
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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The Hairpin Takes to the Movies
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[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES S. STUCKEY
WHEN the operator breaks the moving picture film he resorts to various repairs, some of which take a considerable length of time. Of course the audience fumes and remarks about the poor operator in charge. So, operators, why not adopt this colleague’s emergency repair and start the film running again without undue loss of time.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0281.xml
article
155
155,156
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Why Stay Awake to Call the Nurse?
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[no value]
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AN easily improvised substitute for the expensive type of clocks, sometimes termed “program” clocks, which have been in use in schools for announcing work periods, recess, and dismissal times, etc., may be made as an attachment to the common desk or bureau clock.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0282.xml
advertisement
155
155
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0283.xml
advertisement
156
156
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0284.xml
article
156
156
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Fixing a Key to Fool the Petty Thief
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A COMMON drawer or cupboard lock with a simple two-lever action can be made much safer by inserting a small wire ring around the base of the stem and filing off the barrel of the key as shown in the illustration. No other key, even if made to fit the lock, can then be pushed in far enough to turn.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0285.xml
article
157
157
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Rub That Hollow Oilstone on the Sidewalk
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. F. NEFF
WHEN an oilstone becomes hollow on the surface it is practically impossible to sharpen plane cutters, chisels or any edged tool that should be perfectly straight across the cutting edge. If the user is not an expert the surface of any oilstone is certain to become uneven.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0286.xml
article
157
157
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Repairing the Firepot of an Old Stove
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
N. W. GANDY
THE illustration shows the easy method by which I repaired the firepot of a coal-stove, and obtained another winter’s use from it after it had warped so badly that it would not hold fire. The grate fingers D D, at the base of the firepot A A had so warped and twisted that they left a good-sized opening at their lower ends at C C, with a space at F F, which made a fire impossible.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0287.xml
advertisement
157
157
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0288.xml
advertisement
158
158
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0289.xml
article
158
158,159
[no value]
[no value]
A Study in Concrete Posts
How they should be constructed in order to give the best results
Expensive but Good
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[no value]
Roy H. Poston
HAVING had occasion to erect new posts to replace others that had evidently been carelessly put up, I made a study of different types of pier and post connection, and herewith offer the results. The design of any layout is affected primarily by two things, namely, the cost and the probable life of the building.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0290.xml
article
159
159
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Here Is an Anti-Rattler for Tire Chains
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DO you lock your spare tires on? If you do, and use the ordinary chain and padlock, you undoubtedly are disturbed by the rattling of the chain. You have also noticed that it bruises the paint on the parts with which it comes in contact. Perhaps you have adopted the common expedient of covering the chain with a piece of hose, and perhaps you also have found the hose so stiff that it is still noisy and still bruises the finish of the car.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0291.xml
advertisement
159
159
[no value]
[no value]
Simonds Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
Simonds Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0292.xml
advertisement
160
160
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK MOSSBERG CO.
[no value]
FRANK MOSSBERG CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0293.xml
article
160
160
[no value]
[no value]
A “Loaded” Door-Bell Button
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[no value]
[no value]
FRANK GILLOOLY
WHEN you are alone in the house, reading perhaps, or singing baby to sleep, and the door bell so persistently rings that you steal downstairs unobserved and discover that your disturber is a peddler, or a collector, or the constable, just throw over the switch and your door-bell button will become “loaded” so that the next time the unwanted caller presses the button he will get such a shock as to leave him with no further inclination to ring the bell.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0294.xml
article
160
160
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[no value]
Whitewash for Garage Interiors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOTHING brightens up the interior of a dingy garage like a good coat of whitewash. It is a good investment aside from the looks, too, for it adds wonderfully to the distribution of light. Poorly prepared whitewash flakes off soon after being applied, and is money thrown away.
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0295.xml
advertisement
160
160
[no value]
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.: Red Devil
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.
Red Devil
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0296.xml
advertisement
160
160
[no value]
[no value]
you are not sa GILSON SLIDE RULE CO.
[no value]
you are not sa GILSON SLIDE RULE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0297.xml
advertisement
160
160
[no value]
[no value]
The Pilliod Lumber Co.
[no value]
The Pilliod Lumber Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0298.xml
advertisement
161
161
[no value]
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY: High-Speed Hand Drill
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
High-Speed Hand Drill
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0299.xml
advertisement
162
162
[no value]
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0300.xml
advertisement
163
163
[no value]
[no value]
THE BRUNSWICK-BLAKE-COLLENDER COMPANY: BRUNSWICK
[no value]
THE BRUNSWICK-BLAKE-COLLENDER COMPANY
BRUNSWICK
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0301.xml
advertisement
164
164,165,166
[no value]
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Co.
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191201_0095_006_0302.xml