Issue: 19191001

Wednesday, October 1, 1919
OCT., 1919
4
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95
Sunday, December 28, 2014

Articles
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WICKES BROTHERS
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WICKES BROTHERS
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0001.xml
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2
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Southern Cypress Mfrs.’ Ass’n.
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Southern Cypress Mfrs.’ Ass’n.
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0002.xml
cover
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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2,4,7
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Popular Science Monthly
CONTENTS
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0004.xml
masthead
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masthead
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0005.xml
article
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How I Improved My Memory In One Evening
The Amazing Experience of Victor Jones
Send No Money
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"Of course I place you! Mr. Addison Sims of Seattle. "If I remember correctly—and I do remember correctly—Mr. Burroughs, the lumberman, introduced me to you at the luncheon of the Seattle Rotary Club three years ago in May. This is a pleasure indeed!
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0006.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0007.xml
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER CO.
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER CO.
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0008.xml
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6
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0009.xml
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0010.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0011.xml
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AMERICAN SCHOOL OF CORRESPONDENCE
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AMERICAN SCHOOL OF CORRESPONDENCE
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0012.xml
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10,11,12,14,16
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0013.xml
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Burlington Watch Company
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Burlington Watch Company
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0014.xml
article
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Free Proof that I Can Raise Your Pay
No matter how much you are earning now, I can show you how to increase it. I have even taken failures and shown them how to make $100—$200, and in one case as high as $2,000 weekly. I am willing to prove this entirely at my risk and expense
How You Can Prove This at My Expense
A Few Examples
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LET'S have a little chat about getting ahead-—you and I. My name is Pelton. Lots of people call me "The Man Who Makes Men Rich." I don't deny it. I've done it for thousands of people —lifted them up from poverty to riches. I'm no genius—far from it.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0015.xml
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G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
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G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0016.xml
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0017.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0018.xml
article
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The Cause of Stomach Acidity and Fermentation
How to Remove It in 48 Hours
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R. S. Thompson
IF I were asked to sound a health warning that would be of the greatest possible benefit to mankind, I should say emphatically— “Beware of acid stomach.” For acid stomach is the cause of fermentation which, bad enough in itself, is the forerunner of a hundred ills that sap the energy and vitality of its victims.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0019.xml
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AMERICAN CHAIN COMPANY, INC.
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AMERICAN CHAIN COMPANY, INC.
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0020.xml
article
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AERONAUTICS
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Fighting Fire from the Sky
How the Watchers Do Their Work
Warnings Flashed by Wireless
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Robert H. Moulton
VISITORS to our national parks this summer have been considerably puzzled by the frequency with which airplanes and dirigibles have skimmed overhead. No reason for this activity was apparent, now that the war is over. However, an excellent reason has existed: the flyers were acting as aerial patrols, watching for and reporting any forest fires they discovered.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0021.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Putting Hinges in the Football Shoe
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AT the quarter-back's signal for a run around right end, the halfback sets his shoe-calks into the earth and waits for the ball to be snapped back. But a husky guard on the opposing team breaks through, the quarter fumbles, and there is a wild scramble.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0022.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Bringing the Pedals Up to the Feet
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THE "do-re-mi-fa-sol-fa-mi-re-do" days of piano practice are the dreariest of all to the young pianist. In the first place, he (or she) would far rather be outdoors, playing; then, the scale itself is expressionless, and is rendered more so by the fact that his legs are not long enough for his feet to reach the pedals, reminding him of the fact that he is quite uncomfortable and undignified because his feet dangle aimlessly.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0023.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Its One Fault
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SOME time ago a traveler brought home to England a "Kaffir pick." It was a versatile tool, the natives using it as an ax, a pick, or a spade. It was shaped like a heart. A British manufacturer saw it, and decided he could make it and market it more cheaply than could the Kaffirs.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0024.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Immortalizing the Band Leader
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IN the theater the orchestra tunes up, the lights go down— the play is about to start. Suddenly a moving picture of a man's back appears on a screen just in front of he orchestra-pit. It is a famous musical conductor; and while you look at his back, the orchestra sees him leading it.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0025.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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When the Wind Blows, the Wagon Will Move
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A ZIP-CAR race. Why are they called "zip"-cars? We haven't any idea; but a zip-car is a small four-wheeled wagon on which is mounted a cardboard windmill. When the wind blows the windmill goes round, and the power thus gained makes the wagon move.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0026.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Lock-Makers of Leipzig
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BEHOLD! A parade that has nothing to do with Bolshevism or higher wages. This unusual occurrence took place in Leipzig, Germany, soon after end of the war. The men are sandwiched into large locks, and they carry in their hands signs on which more locks appear.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0027.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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A Bicycle Built for Two Elements
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PERHAPS one hot day Mr. Jack Belbin, of London, England, wished he could ride his wheel in the Thames instead of along a dusty road, and of the wish was born the queer land and water craft with which he makes his fellow Britons stare. His plan is simplicity itself. Fasten a float securely to each side of the bicycle, leaving room for the legs to make the pedals go around, put on rubber boots if you mind wet feet, then ride right into the water, and keep up your pedaling.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0028.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Fording Streams in an Automobile
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NO wonder the lady below leans anxiously over the edge of her car. All she sees is water, water everywhere—even on the road over which she rides. Will she have to jump out and swim? she wonders. Such is automobiling in Jamaica; the roads are often under water.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0029.xml
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SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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The Funnel's the Thing
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IT looks very much as if the limousine above were going to try to ride up the side of the tunnel-like structure in which it stands. But that is no stunt for a new limousine to try. The car is being used merely to bring out the size and strength of a section of a battleship funnel.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0030.xml
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MISCELLANY
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"More and Better Milk"—the New Drama
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IF memory serves, it was in "Evangeline" that the domestic cow first made her appearance on any stage—and the cow was only a calf at that. But nowadays the cow and her husband are getting into all sorts of places. Not long ago we showed a gentleman and lady cow of blue-ribbon pedigree gracing a bank to help out a Liberty Loan drive.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0031.xml
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MISCELLANY
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What a Hair Will Do
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THE people on the ground are not eagerly waiting for the pagoda in the picture at the right to topple over and crush the boy in front of it. No; they are quite sure that the pagoda will not fall, since the stone on which it was built rests on a hair taken from the head of Buddha.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0032.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Off for a Swim with Two Oil-Cans
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OIL will calm the troubled waters, and oil-cans will soothe the would-be swimmer. For two oil-cans will make an excellent life-preserver. You empty the oil out, pump air into the cans and plug up the holes, then tie the two cans together. They act as water-wings, and are of sufficient buoyancy to hold up a grown-up person for an indefinite length of time.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0033.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Try It on the Roof
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I CAN outdo Locklear or Law," said Mr. Jug Reynolds, a New York city daredevil; and he immediately betook himself to the roof of a twenty-two-story building, and did a shoulder stand on a kitchen chair placed precariously near the edge of a small table which rested on top of a chimney. A dangerous stunt, to be sure; but was it as risky as Locklear’s drop from one airplane in flight to the top of another?
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0034.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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An Airplane that Rose from a Sea-Sled
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FRED G. JOPP
OUR Navy, always doing something unusual, recently made the experiment of allowing an airplane to "take off" from a fast power boat going fifty miles an hour, and, as usual, got away with it, besides settling some questions concerning certain experiments.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0035.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Hunting the Kangaroo
The modern way is to track and shoot the animals, seated in a comfortable motor-car
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Earle W. Gage
THREE sturdy automobiles, each bearing several men armed with heavy army rifles, speed through the Australian landscape. They come from Adelaide, South Australia, and head northward toward the heart of the plain which extends in unbroken dreariness for hundreds of miles in that direction.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0036.xml
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Why Is Rattan Built Up of Tubes?
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ONE of the longest of all plants, perhaps the very longest when diameter is taken into consideration, is the rattan, a member of the palm family. The rattan palm does not need intrinsic strength, because it gets its support by leaning on other plants.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0037.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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From Beer to Maltose
How one brewery managed to stay in business
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0038.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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After a Coconut Leaves the Tree
Its varied career, ending at last in a soap factory
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0039.xml
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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How Bees Get Rid of Their Wax Scales
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Edward F. Bigelow
THE nectar that honeybees gather from flowers is changed within the bee's body into a secretion that is exuded on the surface of the wax-plates on the lower side of the worker's abdomen. These secreting surfaces, or wax-plates, may be seen by examining the under surface of a bee’s abdomen with a low-power microscope.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0040.xml
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MEDICINE AND SURGERY
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He Doctors Sick Chickens
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ANY hen, or Dr. B. F. Kaupp, a poultry pathologist, will tell you that chicken diseases, including the pip, are no joke. Moreover, Dr. Kaupp will tell you that they are most interesting. For instance, the correct dose of sulphate of strychnine for a hen is one fifth of a grain.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0041.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Live Fowl by Parcels Post
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THE cake-box that the postman is so carefully carrying in his hand contains, not cake, but two baby chicks. There is also in the box some straw and enough food to last the chicks till they reach their new owner, who is seventy miles away. They are traveling by parcels post.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0042.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Spoiling the Hog’s Sport
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PIGS spend most of their lives trying to wear out their noses. They succeed in doing a good deal of damage to the pasture without injuring the protuberance. Naturally, the farmer objects to the destruction of carefully grown turf, and with a specially designed tool he puts little metal rings in the gristly upper rim of the pig's nose.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0043.xml
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Cousin to the Hollyhock
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A SIDE from the botanists, probably not many people associate cotton with the succulent pods of okra from the kitchen-garden or with the tall hollyhock. In common with these, however, cotton belongs to the great mallow family, and is cousin to both okra and hollyhock.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0044.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Put the Water-Tank and the Silo Under One Roof
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THE silo and the water-tank are Siamese twins now on many farms. By making the foundation a little heavier and by putting the tank up on top, one roof is made to do the work of two. The tank is put on a high tower with only a little added expense, and the pressure obtained makes it possible to throw a stream of water over any of the buildings on the farm.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0045.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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To Keep the Car from Rolling When It's Jacked Up
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TO remove the tire or demountable rim from the rear wheel of an automobile it is necessary to jack up and revolve it; therefore the brake must be released. It injures a tire to run on it while deflated, and if it has gone flat on a hill, the other wheel must be blocked before it is safe to release the brake.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0046.xml
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SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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The Ship that Digs Its Way Deep Down Under the Sea
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WHEN the engines of this Canadian dredger have served their purpose of propelling the craft to a channel that is to be deepened, they are coupled up to drive the dredging buckets. You will note that a shaft runs centrally through the hull of the vessel, and that at its forward end it has a bevel gear by which the drive is transmitted to the ladder-head gears.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0047.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Why You Can Play a Whole Opera on This Phonograph
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WHEN a disk record of a band is made for the phonograph, the vibrations produced by the sound waves emanating from the various instruments are engraved on the recording disk simultaneously by one and the same needle. Since each instrument has its own peculiar tonal quality and produces tones of a highly complicated character, accompanied by overand under-tones that cover and blur one another, the record loses the finer shadings of tone and color and some of the characteristic individualities of the various instruments.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0048.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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How the Army Saved Space in Storing Automobiles
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ANY one who has been compelled to find storage space for his automobile in the congested district of a big city will sympathize with the officers in charge of the storage program of the army when they were called upon to store thousands of cars and trucks.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0049.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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What's Wrong with the Magneto? Test It Scientifically
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IT has been said that the magneto is the heart of the automobile, since without the proper spark, generated at exactly the right instant, the engine is of no avail. It is important, therefore, that the magneto must be correctly adjusted before it is installed in a car.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0050.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Eight Cylinders in a Row
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THE engine shown above is attracting a good deal of attention throughout the United States, for it made the world's record for ten miles in five minutes twenty and one tenth seconds. The cylinders are set vertically and in a row. In spite of this fact, however, the total length of the engine is one and one fourth inches shorter than that of the small Buick "Six."
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0051.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Camping by Automobile
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MADE out of balloon silk is this complete fold-up house with four bedrooms, a dining-room, a living-room, and a garage large enough for two Fords or one larger car, all under one roof. As shown in the plan view, the garage is in the center, flanked on one side by two bedrooms and the dining-room and on the other by the other two bedrooms and the living-room.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0052.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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The Runabout Truck
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BUT you promised to deliver that load of logs today," came the voice over the wire, "and I must have them or lay off my entire gang of carpenters." "It simply can't be done," replied the owner. "All my horses are away, and— But wait; I have an idea.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0053.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Another Traction Rim for the Motor-Truck
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IN many of the rural sections of the United States, motor-trucks often have to be kept in their garages, even when there is plenty of work to be done, on account of the poor condition of the roads. While many devices have been invented to overcome this great economic waste, most of them havebeen complicated.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0054.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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The Cat Cannot Eat These Canaries
So well guarded in their gilded cages
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0055.xml
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PICTORIAL PAGES
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Here Comes the Cake
Bride, bridegroom, horseshoe, and flowers, all assembled in readiness for the fatal moment
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0056.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Making Gigantic Hollow Castings
Manufacturers demand big equipment
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WITH the unprecedented growth of industrial chemistry in the United States has come a steadily increasing demand for larger and larger equipment. Chemical manufacture on a large scale requires, among other things, cast-iron tanks, kettles, and bowls of enormous size, the casting of which is a task of considerable difficulty even for modernly equipped iron foundries.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0057.xml
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Testing Steel by the Spark It Gives Off
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FOR many years most of the left-over pieces of high-speed steel tools, cutters, and other implements have been thrown away, yet this metal is very expensive because it contains tungsten. Within the last three years a method has been devised by which most of this valuable scrap is recovered.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0058.xml
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Tracing Earthquake Records by Rays of Light
A new recorder of earth tremors, which eliminates friction, has been invented at Kilauea Observatory
Record Made by Light Ray
Projected in Ordinary Camera Lens
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L. W. de Vis-Norton
BY the construction of an instrument that has succeeded in eliminating the element of friction, a very distinct advance in the recording of earth tremors must be credited to Dr. T. A. Jaggar, volcanologist in charge of the Kilauea Volcano Observatory in Hawaii, and to his assistant, Dr. Arnold Romberg.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0059.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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A Tire as Tall as You
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IF a thirty-one by four inch tire costs thirty dollars, what will one of the monsters above cost? And what manner of car will they be used on? Such are the questions that rise in your mind when you look at them. They are nearly as tall as the men who handle them.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0060.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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A Swan for a Hood
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UNDER the calm exterior of this graceful swan lie cylinders, spark plugs, oil, grease, a motor, and all the other things that the hood of an automobile usually covers. The swan is playing hood for a wealthy man living in India, whose ideas of motor beauty are most peculiar.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0061.xml
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MISCELLANY
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The Smallest Post-Office
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ALTHOUGH only five by five by seven feet in dimensions, outside measurement, you will find a postmistress stationed on the inside of the post-office shown in the picture to the left, for the transaction of any kind of post-official business negotiated at any of the larger branch offices at the national capital.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0062.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Look Before You Speed
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DRIVING desperately in an attempt to overtake the leaders, Roscoe Searles, in an automobile race, although not familiar with the course, thundered up “Death Curve” at Santa Monica, Cal., at a high rate of speed. Cramping his wheels and locking his brakes, Searles tried to skid the rightangled turn; but so great was its momentum that the big car swerved only slightly, leaped the sand-bag barricade, narrowly missing a eucalyptus tree, and crashed to the ground, crushing one of the rear wheels.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0063.xml
article
41
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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The Top that Winds Itself Up
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HERE is a top that winds itself and spins on both ends. It works on the same principle as the seesaw. The peg top is surrounded with a metal knob. One end of the string is attached to the stem. By holding the metal knob between the fingers, and pulling the string out two thirds of its length and then letting it hang loose, the string rewinds.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0064.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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It's the Silk-Cotton Tree
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WHAT is your mattress made of? If it is not made of expensive hair or cheap straw, it may easily be in the inbetween class known as the silk-cotton fiber mattress. Silk-cotton fiber grows on the curious tree shown in the picture above. It is contained in the fruits that hang from the branches.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0065.xml
article
41
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MISCELLANY
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Rex! What Time Is It?
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THE dog will have his watch, says the lady below; but we don't see what use it will be to him unless he learns the whys and wherefores of time. The watch is not intended for use, but for beauty, scornfully says the same lady. In fact, the watch is not a real one.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0066.xml
article
41
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MISCELLANY
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He Must Anchor Himself to the Mountain
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RECENTLY topographical surveying in Alaska has been done with the help of the panoramic camera; but under the conditions usually found among high mountains it is probable that the topographer will long have to do his sketching in the old-fashioned way, by hand, and in doing so must often face such difficulties as the topographer in the picture below is up against.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0067.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Some Bird! It's a Native of Africa
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IT was a case of "look like a birdie" and not "look at the birdie" when this picture was taken. Perhaps you wouldn't be fooled by the straw skirt and the artificial bird's head, but the Munshi who is wearing these strange garments isn't interested in you; he is trying to fool a bird that he wishes to catch; and, according to his previous experiences, he will do so.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0068.xml
article
42
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Mummifying Fruits, Flowers, and Vegetables
It is done by "processors," of whom there are only fifteen in the world
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IN a basement room in Los Angeles a magician is at work. He is putting fruits and vegetables into tall, glass-stoppered jars, to keep for years to come, and canning lilies and roses and bridal bouquets. His tables are loaded with the finest of everything that California can raise, and his shelves, lined with huge containers, will soon hold a complete assortment of the state’s products.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0069.xml
article
42
42
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Sending the Butcher to School
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MEAT, from time immemorial, has been cut up primarily to please the eye. When the United States entered the Great War, at a time when every cubic inch of shipping space was precious, it occurred to the Quartermaster-General of the Army that perhaps the methods of butchers could be improved upon.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0070.xml
article
43
43
MISCELLANY
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When the Burglar Goes a-Burgling
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HANDS up!" says the hold-up man. "Now give me the money I see in that drawer," he continues. The bank cashier grabs it gleefully; for as he takes it out two contacts above and below it come together and close an electric circuit that opens a trap-door on which the burglar is innocently standing.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0071.xml
article
43
43
MISCELLANY
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Electric Lights for Goldfish
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HOW would you like to be a goldfish? Fine, you say; nothing to do but eat, sleep, and swim in comfort. But don't be too sure. Rudolf Eickemeyer, of Yonkers, has just invented a new ornamental aquarium, which has an electric light in the center surrounded by a transparent cylinder of many colors.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0072.xml
article
43
43
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Pipe-Line Ashes Express
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THINK of the cost in labor, ash-cans, and conveyors in getting ashes to the ash-dump; and think of the inconvenience that ashes cause. But these troubles are no longer necessary, for a pneumatic conveying system has been devised by means of which you need only rake your ashes from the furnace into a pit in front of it.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0073.xml
article
44
44,45
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Come On In and See the Greatest Show on Earth
Hey, Jim, Tom, Mattie, Jerry, let's get up a regular circus
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0074.xml
article
46
46
MISCELLANY
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Presto! The Kitchen Is a Bedroom
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ONE room, a revolving platform, and you have the makings of a four-room apartment. This contribution toward lowering the high cost of rent comes from Pasquali Cimini, of Buffalo, N. Y. Mr. Cimini divides the revolving platform into four quarters: in one he puts a folding bed; in another a desk; in a third the sink, stove, ironing-board, and cupboards of a kitchenette; and in the fourth a dresser and a clothes closet.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0075.xml
article
46
46
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Finding the Force of Felt
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AT the right is a resiliometer, a machine that measures the resiliency of felt. You place your felt on the platform, and then let down the presser foot until it touches the felt. The presser foot is attached to a dial. One revolution of the pointer means that the presser foot has moved one tenth of an inch.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0076.xml
article
46
46
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Your Hard-Working Heart
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THE human heart beats seventy-two times a minute, one hundred and four thousand times a day, thirty-eight million times a year. If a person lives up to his seventieth year his heart-beats— estimated according to the various averages during life—will approximate three billion beats.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0077.xml
article
47
47,48,49,50
AERONAUTICS
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What of Tomorrow's Flying?
Is the airplane safe? Can you fly where and when you like? What's the cost?
Peace-Time and War-Time Flying
Needs of the Airplane
The Higher You Are, the Safer
Government Aviation Maps
Radio Beacons Will Help
Fire-Extinguishing Bombs
Exploring by Airplane
Will Commercial Flying Pay?
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Waldemar Kaempffert
Carl Dienstbach
WHEN the manufacturers of airplanes turn to the public for support, they are met with conservative skeptical questions: "Is flying safe? What about these accidents?" The manufacturers reply with statistics to prove that flying is no more dangerous than automobiling, that the blacksmiths and carpenters who built the first flimsy machines have been supplanted by engineers who test the wood, steel, and wing fabric used in construction, and that all the resources of modern science are tapped to build an airplane that is safe.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0078.xml
article
51
51
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Stay that Stays the Ladder from Falling
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IF the ladder slips from under you while you are painting the house, you unfortunately come down after it, and are apt to get severely bumped, bruised, and painted. Perhaps Mr. James Maxwell, of New York city, has so slipped, for he has invented a "ladder stay" which helps a ladder to stay put.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0079.xml
article
51
51
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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An Elevator for the Coal-Bin
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"CLEAN Coal," says the fence of the coal-yard shown above; and the bins just behind help to prove it, for in them some of the coal is stored—free from dirt and refuse. The bins are twenty-five feet in diameter and thirty feet high. They are made of two-by-four planks, held together by iron bands spaced twelve inches apart.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0080.xml
article
51
51
MISCELLANY
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Who Are You, Anyway?
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WAR conditions made it imperative to use the utmost caution in protecting the military and naval depots of the United States Government from spies and other undesirable hostile intruders. In view of the fact that thousands of persons were regularly employed at these depots, and that hundreds of persons visited the depots daily on legitimate business, some method had to be devised to make strict supervision possible.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0081.xml
article
52
52
PICTORIAL PAGES
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How That Carpet of
Carpets are woven very much piano. Instead of a roll of the yard) perforated cards (they M. Jacquard, a French invent-forations automatically govern
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0082.xml
article
55
55
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Who Called? The Ticker Tells
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"THEY don't answer," singsongs Central. You hang up your receiver disgustedly as that same nickel rattles back for the fifth time. If only you could leave word that you have called! Ah, but Arthur Engelberg, of Oakland, California, has recently patented a device for doing just that.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0083.xml
article
55
55
MISCELLANY
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One Way to Make the "Sanitary" Fountain Sanitary
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ONE large railroad, which installed more than a hundred “sanitary” water fountains in as many of its stations, found upon testing them that they were by no means safe. Germs of pneumonia, diphtheria, and scarlet fever were plentiful on various parts of the fountain, and even typhoid and other dangerous germs were not always absent.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0084.xml
article
55
55
MISCELLANY
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Will It Explode?
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HE pulled the rope, down came the weight, and bang! the powder exploded. It looked as if he were celebrating the Fourth of July with a new kind of powder cap and stick, but in reality he was very seriously testing the sensitiveness of a commercial explosive to friction.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0085.xml
article
55
55
MISCELLANY
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Keep Out These Aliens
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NEW YORK is very particular about whom she lets into her port; each incoming ship must stop at quarantine and pass a rigid health test before the people on board are allowed to land. This is to prevent the bringing of foreign disease and possible plagues into the country.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0086.xml
article
56
56
AERONAUTICS
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Testing Airplane Engines Behind Chain Curtains
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THE airplane engine is a wonderful piece of mechanism. It must be compact, because space in the fuselage is extremely limited. It must be light in proportion to the horsepower developed. Try to imagine an engine capable of developing one hundred and thirty-two horsepower which weighs only one hundred and ninety-four pounds.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0087.xml
article
56
56
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Tractors and Tanks Today Get Peace-Time Jobs
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0088.xml
article
57
57
AERONAUTICS
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Carry a Saw in Your Pocket
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IT will curl up and nestle harmlessly in your pocket; but when you take it out and open it, you will find it a dangerous thing to play with, for its teeth are so sharp that they will cut through wire, or even trees, very easily. Such is the folding saw shown below.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0089.xml
article
57
57
MOTOR VEHICLES AND ACCESSORIES
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Farming Under the Sign of the Iron Horse
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FARM tractors have long been employed for hauling plows, cultivators, planters, mowers, and reapers; and now a Western manufacturing concern has placed in the market a horseless binder, propelled by a gasoline-engine tractor which also supplies the power for operating the binder machinery.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0090.xml
article
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57
MISCELLANY
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Helping the Hard-Working Piano-Mover
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JUDGING by the crowds that gather at piano-hoistings, the general public enjoys them—but not so the hoisters. Their job is a difficult and clumsy one; for a piano is about the unwieldiest thing made. The so-called “self-lifting piano-sill” is intended to make the piano-mover content with his lot.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0091.xml
article
57
57
MISCELLANY
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Cleaning London's Air
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UNSUSPECTING Londoners would probably be very uncomfortable if they knew what the Atmosphere Pollution Research Department recently discovered about their city: that each cubic inch of air in the vicinity of London contains six million particles of dust.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0092.xml
article
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58
MISCELLANY
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Only Insulated Thieves Can Steal This Grip
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A MAN, who has entered the parlor-car from the other end, walks down the aisle in a businesslike manner, looking from one side to the other, as if he were trying to remember the location of his chair. He must be the owner of the prosperouslooking satchel in the vacant seat near the door, for he stops and takes hold of its handle.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0093.xml
article
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58
PICTORIAL PAGES
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How Will You Have Your Eggs?
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0094.xml
article
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Why Does Nature Do It?
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DOUBLE-HEADED calves, Siamese twins, three-legged chickens—why is it that nature plays such pranks? No one knows exactly. Every living species, whether animal or plant, is unstable. The four-leaved clover and the white crow—just as remarkable, in their way, as the monstrosities of the circus sideshow—prove it.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0095.xml
article
59
59
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Have Insects' Antennae Some Unknown Sense?
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IT is the general consensus of opinion among entomologists that the antennae of insects smell as well as hear. Those of us who have studied these wonderful organisms are inclined to think that they contain some sense, or at any rate a sense modification, that human beings cannot comprehend, because they possess no faculty that exactly corresponds to it.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0096.xml
article
59
59
NATURAL SCIENCE
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How a Snake Wriggles into the World
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THE National Zoo in London announces the arrival of three newborn ring-necked snakes— all doing well. Of course, there isn’t anything very unusual about the birth of a snake, but these three little ones were caught by the camera man in the act of coming into the world.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0097.xml
article
60
60,61
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Give a Thought to Motor Maintenance
These new ideas and accessories will help you keep down overhead
Will your car do this?
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0098.xml
article
62
62
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Save Money by Baling Your Clothes
Apply this lesson learned in the war
Compressing Twenty Cubic Feet into Four
Folding the Garments Scientifically
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Michael Connors
IF you are a manufacturer or an exporter of clothing, it will mean dollars and cents to you to learn how the Quartermaster-General’s Department shipped uniforms and shoes to France in a way that saved the Government eighty-five million dollars in a little more than a year.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0099.xml
article
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63
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Electromagnetic Scissors for Cutting Cloth
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TAILORS, dressmakers, and others whose business compels them to use shears or scissors frequently, may save themselves a great deal of unnecessary waste in strength and energy by employing mechanical scissors operated by electricity, air-pressure, or some other force.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0100.xml
article
63
63
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Cargo Is the Ship
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SHIP, cargo; cargo, ship: remove the ship and let the cargo serve as both. So said the owners of five million feet of timber which they wished to send from British Columbia to England. The timber was sawn so that it measured twelve inches square in crosssection.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0101.xml
article
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63
AERONAUTICS
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What the War Did to Governor's island
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NEARLY everybody who lives in the vicinity of New York knows Governor’s Island; yet it will probably not be recognizable in the view shown above, which was photographed from an airplane flying over the harbor at a height of eight thousand feet.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0102.xml
article
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64,65
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Can You Make a Crate that Won’t Break?
Some results of the Forest Products Laboratory’s experiments in the testing of boxes, barrels, and crates
Initiating Tests
The Revolving Drum
More Facts About Nails
Effect of Wet Lumber and Storage
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[no value]
Lloyd E. Darling
SHIPPERS have, within recent years, rather been forced to the conclusion that there is a science and art in the building of shipping containers. Before the war this conclusion was thrust upon them by the mishaps that befell them in attempting to reach South American and other foreign trade.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0103.xml
article
66
66,67
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Who Won Our Hairpin Contest
In these pages are set forth a few of the avalanche of ideas contributed to the Popular Science Monthly
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William Wylam
C. F. Gimm
James McIntyre
Otto Kirby
W. C. Scully
Alfred C. Fox
Lawrence Halsey
Dr. John N. Lawrence
Anthony F. Schoch
WHEN you glance at the illustrations below we are sure you will never despise the hairpin again. POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY has proved, beyond a doubt, that the humble hairpin, in an emergency, is without a peer. The Contest Editor was swamped with letters from all parts of the world, and many and various were the uses suggested. The judges awarded the prizes, not for the novelty of the ideas, but for their practicability.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0104.xml
article
68
68,69
PICTORIAL PAGES
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The Latest Fashions in Radiators for Trucks and Automobiles
Different makes have different types of cooling systems
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The ring type circular radiator is peculiar to one or two makes of trucks. It is set in back of the engine instead of in front, and the blower fan is inside the nest of tubes A novel feature of this radiator includes a tube that is filled with kerosene and lighted to keep the water from freezing in winter Here is the truck with the circular radiator mounted upon it, a sketch of it being shown in the upper lefthand corner of this page.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0105.xml
article
70
70,71
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What Can We Do About the High Cost of Living?
In which we attempt to set forth in pictures why we are chasing dollars more madly than ever, why the dollar is fleeter than we are and why we have got to increase our speed
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IN addressing Congress on the cost of living, President Wilson said: "With the increase in the prices of the necessaries of life come demands for increase in wages—demands which are justified if there be no other means of enabling men to live.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0106.xml
article
72
72,73,74
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Jostling the Clouds to Change the Weather
Rain-makers, hail-preventers, and their strange devices
Weather-Conjuring Is Not New
Even the War Has Not Checked the "Hail-Rod” Man in Europe
Gassing the Hail Storm
Gunning for the Weather
They Have "Electric Niagaras" in France
Climate of the U. S. Worries Weather Wizards
Jostling the Clouds to Make Rain
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MARK TWAIN'S immortal remark that, though much has been said on the subject of the weather, very little has ever been done about it is one of those epigrammatic assertions that will hardly bear comparison with the facts. It is true that most people accept the weather philosophically as something that cannot be cured and most therefore be endured; but the aggregate of those who, from the earliest historic times down to the present, have declined to assume this acquiescent attitude would certainly populate a New York or a London.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0107.xml
article
75
75
MEDICINE AND SURGERY
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Decrease Your Waist-Line—Increase Your Life-Line
What's more you can do it without exercise
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AN examination of 186,579 policy-holders in forty-three American life insurance companies has shown that the heaviest mortality is found among men and women who are between forty and forty-four years old and who are from fifty to eighty pounds overweight.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0108.xml
article
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75
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Burglars Have Crossed One Bank Off Their List
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"STEER clear of the Pullman Trust and Savings Bank," one Chicago bank robber says to another these days. They have heard about the steel sentry-box that was recently built on the front of the bank because of the many hold-ups in the neighborhood.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0109.xml
article
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76
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Still Another Mouse-Trap to Add to Your Collection
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WALKING the plank—a source of innocent merriment and an easy way of killing captives, greatly indulged in by the pirates of yore— has been revived. But, fortunately, the victims now are mice and the plank is part of a mouse-trap invented by Humbert Pierini, of Greenville, Miss.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0110.xml
article
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76,77
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The Wonderful 535-Foot Deck of the Seaplane-Carrier "Argus"
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THE seaplane-carrier Argus is the latest thing in airplane mother ships. For her entire length of 535 feet, the flyingdeck upon which the seaplanes start and land is entirely free from all obstructions of any kind whatever. In this respect the vessel is more advanced than the battle-cruiser Furious, which has been described and illustrated in the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, because the Furious had such obstructions on the flying-deck as her tripod mast, navigating bridge and stack.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0111.xml
article
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77
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How One Man Beat the High Cost of Labor
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IF you want to build a house for yourself, and cannot afford to pay for having it done because of the present scarcity and high cost of labor, you can do one of two things: give up your plan for the present and wait until you have enough money or until the cost of labor drops to a more reasonable level, or follow the example of the man in Newark, N. J., who built himself a house by his own labor, assisted only by a few friends and a small tractor.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0112.xml
article
78
78,79
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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A Visit to Davy Jones's Locker
Going down in a submarine—Walking on the bed of the ocean—How the war's lost ships are to be recovered
The Hole in the Floor
To Salvage Wrecks
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[no value]
Lloyd E. Darling
GETTING down into the submarine Argonaut is no very difficult process. You clamber up into an open hatchway at the front of the Argosy, and find yourself at the mouth of a huge steel pipe, four and a half feet in diameter. Descending the pipe is a good deal like going down an ordinary stairway.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0113.xml
article
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80
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Do It with Tools and Machines
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0114.xml
article
81
81
PICTORIAL PAGES
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Making Things Easier for the Busy Housekeeper
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0115.xml
article
82
82,83
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Finding Your Way Among the October Stars
How the characters of an ancient legend may be found in the skies
The Planets for October
How to Use the Planet Map
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[no value]
Ernest A. Hodgson
"ONCE upon a time,” as the story books say, there ruled a great king in Ethiopia whose name was Cepheus. His queen, as beautiful as she was vain and as vain as she was beautiful, was called Cassiopeia. Their daughter Andromeda was as beautiful as her mother.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0116.xml
article
84
84,85,86
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
How the Popular Science Monthly Dropped Mail on a Liner's Deck
In order to save the time now lost by waiting for the next mail steamer to England, the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY proposed that a ship at sea be overhauled by airplane and pressing mail matter dropped aboard her. Read here how the experiment was successfully carried out
The Post-Office Carries Out the Popular Science Monthly's Idea
Test to Make Sure the Plan Would Succeed
Wrapped in Floating Package
Catching Up with the Adriatic
Drop Mail on Steamer Two Days Out
Day of Transatlantic Airplane Near?
[no value]
[no value]
Waldemar Kaempffert
SUPPOSE you have a contract involving hundreds of thousands of dollars, and suppose that that contract must be signed in London by a certain day. The steamer has just left New York. She is seventyfive miles out at sea. If you can catch her and drop that letter of yours aboard, it will mean a fortune to you.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0117.xml
article
87
87,88
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
When You Live in a Duffle-Bag
An autumn vacation in the woods
What Is Indispensable?
'Ware Damp Matches
Concerning Water Buckets
The Culinary Department
Don't Forget Your Camera
[no value]
[no value]
Charles Coleman Stoddard
THE other day, when I was sewing up Joe's pants behind the tent, I was reminded that I had carried a sewing-kit in the old camping outfit for more than two years without using it. Oftentimes it seemed a nuisance, and I was tempted to throw it out; and yet it is just these little things, useful only in such an emergency, that save a situation—perhaps a life—or unexpectedly add to our comfort in the woods.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0118.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
WINCHESTER JUNIOR RIFLE CORPS
[no value]
WINCHESTER JUNIOR RIFLE CORPS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0119.xml
article
90
90
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Door Hook Easy to Grasp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. W. B.
THE common screw eye and hook, by means of which screen and storm doors are ordinarily fastened on the inside, is frequently the cause of much annoyance. The hook turns around on one side and lays flat against the casing. When it is located high in the doorway, it is often impossible to get hold of it with the gloved hand.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0120.xml
article
90
90
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Give the Old Post Air to Make It Come Out Easily
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOST people who have had occasion to pull up old fence posts have undoubtedly been exasperated by the way they refuse, at times, to come out even when very loose. Very often this is caused by air pressure; the pole acts like a piston and the hole as the cylinder.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0121.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
1900 WASHER COMPANY
[no value]
1900 WASHER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0122.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY
[no value]
THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0123.xml
article
92
92
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Farm Sewage and Its Disposal
Old Automobile Tires Aid in Moving Barrels
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. Robbins
PROBABLY no subject is so important in farm life and life in rural communities generally, or so lightly regarded, as proper sanitation and disposal of sewage. Thousands of farmers allow the sewage from sink and closets to flow either directly upon the land adjoining the dwelling, or into a nearby stream, before removing the poisonous contents or making any attempt to reduce it to a negligible quantity.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0124.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
The Hammond Typewriter Co.
[no value]
The Hammond Typewriter Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0125.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
HOBART BROTHERS CO.
[no value]
HOBART BROTHERS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0126.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0127.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
General Cigar Co., Inc.
[no value]
General Cigar Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0128.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Trousers-Hanger Used to Display Magazines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
A LIVE newsdealer discovered a novel way to display interesting illustrations in a magazine, by which to attract customers by, suspending it from a post or other convenient point with the aid of a skirt or trousers hanger. He simply clipped the two spring jaws of the hanger to opposite sides of the periodical and hung it by a cord at a height at which those passing by could read.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0129.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How Short Circuits Occur on an Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALBERT E. JONES
AUTOMOBILE owners will do well to note the following and to do a little examining on their own account, if they are not getting the power from the engine that they should. Our machine which had been running excellently, gradually began to lose power when the load was thrown on.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0130.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0131.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
Geneva Cutlery Corporation
[no value]
Geneva Cutlery Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0132.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Uses for Empty Carbide Cans
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
David Baxter
EMPTY carbide cans may be employed for quite a number of different things that are convenient to have about the garage or shop. The garage or repair shop possessing an oxyacetylene welding plant will find the empty cans especially useful.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0133.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0134.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
HOBART BROTHERS COMPANY
[no value]
HOBART BROTHERS COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0135.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
REDDING & CO.
[no value]
REDDING & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0136.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Jobbers OverAll Co., Inc.
[no value]
Jobbers OverAll Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0137.xml
article
98
98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Never Breathe the Exhaust Gases of an Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. T. OFELDT
WHEN Nat Wills, the noted actor, was found lying beneath his car, dead, and it was found that his death had resulted from inhaling the exhaust gases of an automobile, the motoring public began to take precautions against this menace. If oneshould remain for five minutes in a small unventilated garage, with the door shut and fumes pouring from the car's exhaust he would be beyond the doctor's aid.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0138.xml
article
98
98
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Improving the Handsaw with Additional Teeth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. PEASE
A DEVICE much used by our local carpenters, instead of carrying a special nail saw to negotiate nails encountered in repair work, consists of forming what may be termed an emergency hacksaw, by cutting, on the back of their regular saw, for a space of six inches or more, commencing at the point, a series of fine teeth, about sixteen to the inch, as shown in the sketch.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0139.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
WM. DEMUTH &. CO.
[no value]
WM. DEMUTH &. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0140.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0141.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0142.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
WM. VANDERPOOL CO.
[no value]
WM. VANDERPOOL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0143.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER COMPANY, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0144.xml
article
100
100
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Cheap, Heavy Flywheel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOWARD GREENE
ONE of the most troublesome items in the building of an amateur lathe, or any other foot-power machine, is the flywheel. A good heavy wheel is needed; a light wheel often spoils an otherwise good job, while a heavy one gives a steady, powerful motion that is conducive to good work.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0145.xml
article
100
100
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Small Punch Fitted with Renewable Ends
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
D. A. HAMPSON
ON small assembly work, such as typewriters, computing machines, small arms, etc., there is much work that calls for punches of a rather delicate nature. The one shown in the illustration is a fair sample. It is required to reach through a 7/64in. hole, 11/16 in. in length.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0146.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
JOS: M. HERMAN SHOE CO.
[no value]
JOS: M. HERMAN SHOE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0147.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Ottawa Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Ottawa Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0148.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
KUEMPEL CO.
[no value]
KUEMPEL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0149.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0150.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
DAFOE-EUSTICE CO.
[no value]
DAFOE-EUSTICE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0151.xml
article
102
102
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Pipe Brackets to Support Bottom Boards of Wagon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. W. BUERSTATTE
ORDINARILY, in dumping the load from a wagon, the bottom boards must be lifted over the high sides and placed on the axles. This is inconvenient and can be obviated if two brackets, as illustrated, are made for supporting the boards. For each bracket use three pieces of pipe, about 1 in. in diameter, screwed into two, 90-deg. elbows.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0152.xml
article
102
102
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Keeping the Pores of Your Skin Free from Grime
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. PEASE
MACHINISTS and mechanics know how difficult it is to remove thoroughly from the skin, the grime that is the inevitable consequence of the oil and metal dust that pervades every machine shop. The following suggestion will be found useful for the removal of grime, paint, and kindred substances from the skin.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0153.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0154.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
Champion Ignition Company
[no value]
Champion Ignition Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0155.xml
article
104
104
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A High-Grade Varnish from an Old Automobile Tire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN E. CLEGG
THE old tire is first cut up into very small pieces with a pair of shears. This is accomplished very easily if both the tire and the shears are kept wet. The rubber scraps, which weigh about ten pounds, are then put in an iron pot (an old wash boiler will do) and covered with water, to which two pounds of caustic soda is added.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0156.xml
article
104
104
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Remove Nails Without Damaging Fine Wood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VANDALS are, unfortunately, like the poor—they are always with us. Antique furniture is by no means exempt from their depredations. Consequently, at times one finds fine old Sheraton, or Chippendale, or other pieces, with nails or tacks ruthlessly hammered into their legs, panels, etc.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0157.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
The Florsheim Shoe Company
[no value]
The Florsheim Shoe Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0158.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
THE ROBINSON CABINET MFG. CO.
[no value]
THE ROBINSON CABINET MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0159.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0160.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
ROGERS FUR CO.
[no value]
ROGERS FUR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0161.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
CHALMERS MOTOR CAR CO.
[no value]
CHALMERS MOTOR CAR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0162.xml
article
106
106
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Preventing Road Dust from Entering Carbureters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN A. WEAVER
ON one of the older models of a well known make of motorcycle some trouble was experienced from road dust and grit being sucked into the air intake of the carburetor. To overcome this annoyance the air intake was fitted with a piece of extremely fine mesh copper gauze.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0163.xml
article
106
106
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Save and Filter the Old Oil from Your Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. MOORE
THE writer, in common with other automobilists, has found that the oil bill for his car is a considerable item. Deciding to cut down this expense he constructed a filter, for about fifty cents, as shown in the illustration, and before long saved much on the cost of new oil.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0164.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
NEWSKIN CO.
[no value]
NEWSKIN CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0165.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Larkin Co.
[no value]
Larkin Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0166.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
N. W. School of Taxidermy
[no value]
N. W. School of Taxidermy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0167.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0168.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
RESEARCH LABORATORIES OF GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
RESEARCH LABORATORIES OF GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0169.xml
article
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
An Improvised Saddle with Stirrups
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G. H. GLITZKE
HERE is a convenient and inexpensive saddle for those who have work horses that can be ridden in spare time. It can be made with materials that are always to hand, and constructed at absolutely no additional expense. A folded blanket is placed over the horse to form a cushioned seat, and a circular strap holds it in place.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0170.xml
article
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Method of Removing Broken Pins from a Shaft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM FARRAY
FREQUENTLY, when a pin becomes rusted or broken off in machinery shafting, the operator, without thought, injures the threads of the hole when removing it. Great pressure upon the broken pin may sometimes remove it, but if a small hole is drilled through the broken pin and oil poured into the hole, filling it to half its length, and then pressure is applied, the pin will usually come out without further trouble.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0171.xml
advertisement
108
108
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0172.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
UNITED STATES CARTRIDGE COMPANY
[no value]
UNITED STATES CARTRIDGE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0173.xml
article
110
110
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Frame to Hold the Fruit-Straining Cloth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES TAYLOR
TO prevent the possibility of the straining cloth from slipping over the mouth of a kettle, jar, or pan, the little device here illustrated will prove a boon in canning time. The two vertical pieces may be fashioned from ⅜-in. thick boards and the cross slats from 3-16-in. thick pieces.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0174.xml
article
110
110
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Make a Hole in the Storm Curtain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. C. SPREEN
DRIVING through rain, snow or fog is dangerous business at night if the storm curtains entirely enclose the car. The searchlight at the left of the driver cannot be used unless the curtain is unbuttoned. A circular hole, large enough for the arm to be thrust through, can easily be cut in the curtain and patched in the manner shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0175.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK E. MORRISON
[no value]
FRANK E. MORRISON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0176.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Folding Sawing Machine Co.
[no value]
Folding Sawing Machine Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0177.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
PORTER E. SARGENT
[no value]
PORTER E. SARGENT
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0178.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
JACQUES DEPOLLIER & SON
[no value]
JACQUES DEPOLLIER & SON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0179.xml
advertisement
111
111
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[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0180.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Drill-Press from Old Pipe and Fittings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STEVEN NAGY
WITH a few pieces of gas-pipe and fittings a very useful drillpress can be made. Take a piece of gas-pipe, 10 in. long, with one end of it threaded and a 90-degree L fitted to it. To this couple another piece of pipe 5 in. long. About half an inch from the end of this, drill a hole the size of the screw on your hand drill, from which the handle has been removed, and find a nut to fasten it on the top.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0181.xml
article
112
112
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Pocket Flashlight May Become a Spot-Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. B. EDWARDS
THERE are times when the automobile breaks down out on the road and failing a “handy repair light,” it is useful to know how to connect a pocket flashlight with the storage battery in order to provide illumination to repair the break-down. This may be done by removing the flashlight’s dry battery and plugging up the lamp end of the cell container with a wooden plug or cork.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0182.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
LIFE’S BACKBONE
[no value]
LIFE’S BACKBONE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0183.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0184.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0185.xml
article
114
114,115
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Set-Screws—Their Uses and Abuses
Don't Crack, the Collars
Use the Right Sized Screws
Set-screws are of different shapes, and you should know how to insert and adjust each kind properly
[no value]
[no value]
Charles R. Fisher
THE problem of set-screws, as used in modern machinery and devices, is one of considerable importance. Referring to the illustration, the setscrew shown at A is flat on the end. This form is frequently found in general service, but it has certain objections.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0186.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
STEGER & SONS Piano Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
STEGER & SONS Piano Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0187.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
THE ARLINGTON WORKS
[no value]
THE ARLINGTON WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0188.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
SHAW MFG. CO.
[no value]
SHAW MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0189.xml
article
115
115
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Three-Horse Equalizer on a Two-Horse Tongue
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES TAYLOR
WHENEVER it is desired to use three horses on the usual two-horse tongue, the arrangement shown in the illustration will be found to be practical. Measure off the distance from the end of the equalizer to the tongue and vice versa on the other side.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0190.xml
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115
115
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0191.xml
article
116
116
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Use Old Safety Razors to Sharpen Pencils
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS W. BENSON
A CONVENIENT tool to have on the desk for cutting paper or sharpening pencils is a safety razor blade. A neat and serviceable handle for it may be made from a metal refillable pencil. Cut off part of the shell at the tip and slot one side to take the safety razor blade.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0192.xml
article
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
An Emergency Motorcycle Hub Repair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN E. HOGG
WHILE twenty miles from home recently I had the experience of having the ball-races and bearings of the front wheel of my machine go to pieces. The wheel locked, the machine spun around in the road and stopped, and for a few minutes it looked as if I was there to stay.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0193.xml
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116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0194.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co.: Velvet
[no value]
Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co.
Velvet
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0195.xml
article
118
118
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Bevel Gage for Transferring Angles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. DANE
THE bevel gage is very handy for transferring angles and bevels. For instance, a slide with angular sides has to be filed and fitted to a machine part that it is to work in. The gage may be set to the existing angle of the side already finished and the part to be worked upon may then be machined and filed to the exact angle, thereby making the two surfaces fit exactly together.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0196.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0197.xml
article
119
119
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Cleaning Stick for Taper Holes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is absolutely necessary, in accurate work, to insert a tool or center in a clean taper hole. If there are any particles of dirt or metal cuttings in the hole the tool or center will be thrown out of true a few thousandths of an inch and the work machined will be inaccurate to just that amount.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0198.xml
article
119
119
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Measuring Water without a Graduate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONCE, while developing films, I was handicapped by not having on hand any graduated glass measures. I had to measure one four-ounce quantity and one eight-ounce quantity. I happened to see in a corner of the kitchen an empty glass bottle that had contained beer (poor thing) and on its label was marked “contents 12 ounces.”
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0199.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0200.xml
article
120
120,121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Fitting Piston Rings Isn't an Easy Job
The Behavior of Gases in the Cylinder
Leaks Past the Rings
[no value]
[no value]
G. F. COLLINS
MANY and varied are the hints and tips which have appeared within the pages of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY from time to time with reference to piston rings, yet, judging by what has not been written, I am afraid very little is known of the fundamental principles underlying their action.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0201.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0202.xml
article
121
121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Pair of Tweezers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M. TOCABEN
IN first aid calls, when baby has a sliver in his finger, and in other similar home surgical cases, as well as in delicate mechanical emergencies a pair of tweezers is usually not near by and consequently you do the best you can with makeshift tools.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0203.xml
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121
121
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0204.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
Larkin Co.
[no value]
Larkin Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0205.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
LUCKY 13 PHONOGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
LUCKY 13 PHONOGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0206.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
LaSALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
[no value]
LaSALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0207.xml
article
122
122,123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Rifle-Sight Camera View-Finder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARTHUR KENNEDY
IN the process of cutting down the size on the very small cameras, made especially for reporters and writers, who find it to their advantage to carry a camera constantly, the view-finder is done away with. The manufacturer, however, makes a detachable finder for which he charges anywhere from two to three dollars, and the finder itself is frequently larger than the camera.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0208.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN SCHOOL OF CORRESPONDENCE
[no value]
AMERICAN SCHOOL OF CORRESPONDENCE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0209.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Hardin-Lavin Company
[no value]
Hardin-Lavin Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0210.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
ROYAL DIAMOND & WATCH CO.
[no value]
ROYAL DIAMOND & WATCH CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0211.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Farmer Burns School of Wrestling
[no value]
Farmer Burns School of Wrestling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0212.xml
article
123
123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Keeping the Screwdriver from Slipping
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOWARD GREENE
A SCREWDRIVER that slips in the screw slot when pressure is applied is not only a disagreeable tool to work with, but is likely to mar the head of the screw and detract from the appearance of finished work. To prevent this the first thing is to hold the driver properly, directly in line with the screw.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0213.xml
article
123
123
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Preparing a Surface for Painting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is common practice, when we do an odd job of painting around the house, simply to apply the paint without thought regarding the foundation surface. It is just as important that the surface be in good condition as it is that we select a good grade of paint, for no matter how good the paint, the result will be far from satisfactory if some attention is not given to this very important detail.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0214.xml
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123
123
[no value]
[no value]
The American Technical Society
[no value]
The American Technical Society
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0215.xml
article
124
124
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
What Can You Do with the Exhaust of a Gasoline Engine?
The Popular Science Monthly will pay fifty dollars for the best answer
Rules Governing the Contest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT can you do with your engine exhaust? Is it an automobile, boat, or stationary engine? We know of one man who heated his greenhouse with the exhaust from his stationary engine. There are, of course, many other uses for it, and we want to know in how many practical ways it can be applied to save time and money.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0216.xml
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124
124
[no value]
[no value]
FREDERICK J. DRAKE & CO.
[no value]
FREDERICK J. DRAKE & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0217.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
This Novel Pen Inker Helps Keep the Sketch Clean
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWIN G. GETTINS
WHEN doing very fine lettering and mechanical drawing, it is often necessary to hold the work flat with the left hand. Every time the pen is to be inked, the stopper of the bottle must be removed and the quill touched to the ruling pen. This necessitates the use of the left hand, which interferes with the rapidity of the work and sometimes allows the work to slip, making an untidy job.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0218.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Semaphore Signal to Summon Taxicabs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ORIN CROOKER
WHEN a telephone call, summoning a cab, is received in the offices of a taxi company in Illinois, the operator handling the order sets a semaphore on the outside of the building, by means of which a driver is summoned from the regular "stand," some 300 or 400 feet away.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0219.xml
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125
125
[no value]
[no value]
W. L. Douglas
[no value]
W. L. Douglas
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0220.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
VIBRATING ELECTRIC RAZOR CO.
[no value]
VIBRATING ELECTRIC RAZOR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0221.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
BENJAMIN ELECTRIC MFG. CO.
[no value]
BENJAMIN ELECTRIC MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0222.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN L. WHITING-J. J. ADAMS CO.
[no value]
JOHN L. WHITING-J. J. ADAMS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0223.xml
article
126
126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Funnel Gage that Warns Against Overfilling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. PEASE
OBTAIN a piece of medium-stiff wire (bailing wire is good) about two inches longer than the top of the funnel. Make an eye in the middle by winding it tightly around a small wire nail one turn. Lay this wire across the funnel top, and slightly off center as measured along the wire —about half the diameter of the funnel tube is right.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0224.xml
article
126
126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Securing a Stud in a Hole with a Steel Ball
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S. B. ROYAL
THE illustration shows an efficient means of securing a stud tightly in a hole. A hole is drilled in the end of the stud, with a combination drill, and countersunk. An ordinary ballbearing of a suitable size is dropped into the hole and the stud either screwed or hammered down upon it.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0225.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0226.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Floor-Layers' Clamp for Refractory Flooring
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. PEASE
THE accompanying illustration shows, complete and in detail, a very useful tool for forcing crooked flooring into place, making tight joints and holding the flooring in place while nailing. The block A is made from stock 2 by 5/16 in., the two parts being riveted or, better, welded together.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0227.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Emergency Level for Builders
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE L. YASTE
TAKE an ordinary piece of gage-glass, set a cork in each end, and fill the glass with water until just enough air is left in to form a bubble. This bubble may be made as long as desired by adding to or lessening the water in the tube. A scratch should then be made, with a file, at the center of the tube.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0228.xml
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127
127
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0229.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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A Use for the Dash Lamp on the Ford
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. D. GALT
POSSIBLY not one half of the owners of Ford cars ever use the oil lamps that are located on each side of the wind shield. Keeping the lamps filled with oil, lighting them with a match every time you desire to use them, and extinguishing them after the journey is over is very annoying and consumes valuable time.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0230.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Shingle-Marker to Replace the Old Chalk-Line
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALBERT E. JONES
CARPENTERS, when shingling, are obliged to make several trips across their staging to chalk up the line used as a guide for placing the shingles. The little device here shown obviates this. A triangular-shaped piece of wood is made, as shown at A.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0231.xml
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128
128
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[no value]
Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0232.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
[no value]
R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0233.xml
article
130
130,131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Removing Sediment from Storage Battery Cells
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M. W. PULLEN
HAYING been in rather severe service for four years, the cells in the storage battery of the Johns Hopkins University reached a condition where a thorough cleaning was necessary. Active material had fallen from the plates into the bottom of the jars until it was within a little of the plate bottom.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0234.xml
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130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
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[no value]
[no value]
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[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0235.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Sprinkler Attachment for Garden Irrigation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN L. VON BLON
IN slow and continuous irrigation of garden plots, which is preferable and more effective in producing sure and steady growth to spasmodic waterings, trouble has always arisen because the gasket in the pipe or hose line soon wears out and the pressure varies so that results are uncertain without constant watching.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0236.xml
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131
131
[no value]
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0237.xml
article
132
132,133,134,136,137,138,140
For the Radio Experimenter
[no value]
The Thermionic Detector
Crystal Detector Acts as Rectifier
Relation Between Electrons and Atoms
Crowding the Space with Electrons
Controlling the Electron
Two Examples
Further Tube Characteristics
[no value]
[no value]
H. J. van der Bijl
THE art of radio communication owes agreat deal of its recent remarkable development to the thermionic vacuum tube. This device is capable of performing a large number of functions. It can amplify telephonic currents with great precision, detect high-frequency electrical oscillations and make them audible, and produce oscillations or "sing" at almost any desired frequency.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0238.xml
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133
133
[no value]
[no value]
MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH CO.
[no value]
MARCONI WIRELESS TELEGRAPH CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0239.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
The Ives Mfg. Corporation
[no value]
The Ives Mfg. Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0240.xml
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135
135
[no value]
[no value]
THE COCA-COLA CO.
[no value]
THE COCA-COLA CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0241.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
THE BELL TAILORS
[no value]
THE BELL TAILORS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0242.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
DE FOREST RADIO TEL. & TEL. CO.
[no value]
DE FOREST RADIO TEL. & TEL. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0243.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
C. BRANDES, Inc.
[no value]
C. BRANDES, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0244.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
OMNIGRAPH MFG. CO.
[no value]
OMNIGRAPH MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0245.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0246.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN INDUSTRIES, INC.
[no value]
AMERICAN INDUSTRIES, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0247.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0248.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0249.xml
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139
139
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0250.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0251.xml
article
141
141,142
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Try a Little Wireless on the Trees in Your Yard
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON page 83 of the July issue, POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY told in detail how Major-General Squier, Chief Signal Officer of the Army, had successfully experimented with "tree wireless." Here we show James V. Candido and a youthful friend from Brooklyn, N. Y., trying out the idea for themselves.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0252.xml
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141
141
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0253.xml
article
142
142
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Oscillator Patent Rights Decision
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THAT J. A. Fleming of London, England, was the original discoverer of the radio-receiving functions and possibilities of vacuum valves was decided some time ago by the courts. But that the owner of his patents, the Marconi Company, is also to have the rights for the transmitting capabilities was only recently affirmed.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0254.xml
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142
142
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0255.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Chesterfield
[no value]
[no value]
Chesterfield
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0256.xml
article
144
144
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Receiving Six Hundred Words a Minute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RADIO men have dreamed often enough of a machine that would record all that they hear on an aerial as fast as it comes in. To have such a machine seemed the ultimate a man could desire. But always some technical difficulty has arisen and prevented such a machine from being evolved.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0257.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
Buffalo Sled Co.
[no value]
Buffalo Sled Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0258.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
Perfect Voice Institute
[no value]
Perfect Voice Institute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0259.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
J. W. JOHNSTON
[no value]
J. W. JOHNSTON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0260.xml
article
145
145,146
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
What to Do to Avoid Automobile Engine Trouble
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. A. CUFFE
IF you want to get enjoyment and comfort out of your car you must take care of it as you would a fine horse. Therefore you must: Not race the engine unnecessarily. Have your ear tuned for every unusual noise. If it is a squeak locate and lubricate the part.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0261.xml
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145
145
[no value]
[no value]
COYNE TRADE AND ENGINEERING SCHOOLS
[no value]
COYNE TRADE AND ENGINEERING SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0262.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Rahe Auto and Tractor School
[no value]
Rahe Auto and Tractor School
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0263.xml
article
146
146
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Celluloid Window for a Yacht Curtain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLOYD L. DARROW
A SIMPLE device, which will be appreciated by all yachtsmen, who, in steering a motor-boat into the wind, must face the sting of the salt spray, is a celluloid window, placed in the curtain immediately in front of the helmsman's seat. There should be three of these windows, each about 5 in. by 8 in., equally spaced on the front of the curtain.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0264.xml
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146
146
[no value]
[no value]
S. LEVY
[no value]
S. LEVY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0265.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
[no value]
MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0266.xml
advertisement
147
147
[no value]
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0267.xml
advertisement
148
148
[no value]
[no value]
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY: Camels
[no value]
R. J. REYNOLDS TOBACCO COMPANY
Camels
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0268.xml
article
149
149
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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An Inexpensively Made Jack for the Automobile
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[no value]
[no value]
JOHN D. LOWRY
THE illustration shows a simple and easily made lever jack for raising one of the rear driving wheels of an automobile and holding it steady by means of anchor pins, which sink into the ground, permitting the car to operate machinery driven by a belt from its rear wheel.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0269.xml
article
149
149
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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To Use Gas Under Pressure for Experimental Work
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GEORGE CAREY
THIS gas pump may be used for filling miniature balloons, or in other operations where it is desired to use gas under pressure in a small quantity. The pressure is only limited by the head of water that can be obtained. The diagram explains the construction clearly.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0270.xml
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149
149
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0271.xml
article
150
150
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Foot-Power Reversing Tap
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[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR H. TODD
WHEN there are a large number of small parts, such as small die castings or punchings, to be tapped and threaded, and they do not require more than 5 or 6 threads, the arrangement shown in the illustration may be successfully used if a reversing power tap is not available.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0272.xml
article
150
150
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Why Distilled Water is Used for Batteries
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[no value]
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FLOYD L. DARROW
A GOOD deal of ignorance is abroad as to why nothing but distilled water should be used in storage cells. All water but distilled water contains mineral matter in solution, and although this may be small in quantity, as the water evaporates the mineral matter is left behind and all that ever enters the cell remains there.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0273.xml
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150
150
[no value]
[no value]
The L. S. STARRETT COMPANY
[no value]
The L. S. STARRETT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0274.xml
advertisement
150
150
[no value]
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0275.xml
advertisement
150
150
[no value]
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0276.xml
article
151
151
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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An Emergency Repair for Eyeglasses
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[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
OWING to a broken lens in a pair of prescription glasses a local commuter contemplated a long railroad ride in the morning, minus the usual newspaper. The break (Fig. 1) was of such a nature that but little cement-holding surface was present.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0277.xml
article
151
151
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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How to Place Electric Lights in Candlesticks
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[no value]
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[no value]
IT is not an easy task to drill through silver or china candlesticks in order to permit a wire to pass through; indeed, one runs a chance of destroying the candlestick if he attempts to do so. I have been very successful in placing electric lights in candlesticks by the use of the little fixture described in the ensuing paragraphs.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0278.xml
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151
151
[no value]
[no value]
The Veeder Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Veeder Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0279.xml
advertisement
151
151
[no value]
[no value]
PARAGON INSTITUTE
[no value]
PARAGON INSTITUTE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0280.xml
article
152
152
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Waterbox Noiseless with Rubber Hose
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR H. TOPP
MANY waterboxes are very noisy after the chain has been pulled and they are refilling with water. This noise may be easily eliminated by placing a piece of rubber garden hose between the nozzle of the faucet and the bottom of the box. This allows the water to enter into the waterbox below the surface of the water, and thus completely eliminates the NOISE.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0281.xml
article
152
152
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Adaptable Break-up Coops for Poultry
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. T. BARTLETT
THE combination indoor and outdoor breaking-up system is an excellent one. Both coops, one inside and one outside the poultry house, are of the slat bottom type, about 2 ft. wide, 3 ft. long, and 3 ft. high, the top and sides being of hen wire.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0282.xml
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152
152
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK MOSSBERG CO.
[no value]
FRANK MOSSBERG CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0283.xml
advertisement
152
152
[no value]
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0284.xml
article
153
153,154
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Magnetic “Fishing” Tool for Locating Blind Wiring
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. A. WEAVER
IN wiring old buildings it is the custom to install the wires, covered with an insulating tubing called "loom," in the partitions and ceilings without disturbing the exterior, whenever possible. This practice is called "fishing" by the electrical trade.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0285.xml
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153
153
[no value]
[no value]
Simonds Manufacturing Company
[no value]
Simonds Manufacturing Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0286.xml
article
154
154
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make an Inexpensive Saw-Filing Tripod
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[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
AMONG the problems that worry the carpenter, is that of getting a good light for filing his saws, and a convenient position to file them in. If he fastens his clamp to a window opening, he is dependent upon the sun and the weather. If he has it on his work-bench, the light is usually far from being what it should.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0287.xml
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154
154
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0288.xml
article
155
155
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Speeding Up the Tedious Process of Section Lining
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[no value]
E. EARL GLASS
THE simple device shown in the illustration can very easily be made and will increase the speed and accuracy of section lining. A thin strip of soft wood or a piece of celluloid, such as is used by draftsmen for making templates, is notched 1/16 in. longer than the short edge of the triangle to be used.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0289.xml
article
155
155
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
You Can Repair that Eye-glass with Celluloid
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[no value]
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ONE day, when adjusting my eye-glasses, they fell to the floor and were broken, leaving a portion of the lens in the clamp. I did not wish to have the lens reground, so I decided to try and mend the broken lens myself. Cementing the two sections together, I laid the glasses away until the cement had thoroughly set.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0290.xml
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155
155
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0291.xml
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156
156
[no value]
[no value]
U. S. Navy
[no value]
U. S. Navy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0292.xml
article
157
157
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Transforming a Drill into a Drill-Press
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M. K. GORDON
A SMALL drill with a three-jaw chuck can be made into a serviceable drill-press with the aid of a stand and proper supports. As there are so many different makes of hand drills on the market no detailed description can be given, but the drawing shows clearly the general construction.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0293.xml
article
157
157
PRACTICAL WORKERS
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Don't Let that Chimney Become Clogged Up
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[no value]
[no value]
G. H. DAVIS
SHORTLY, now, the furnace will go into action again, and then comes the problem of removing soot from the chimney. Every week or two, as needed, spread out on the cellar floor six or eight sheets of newspaper and sprinkle them generously with kerosene oil.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0294.xml
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157
157
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0295.xml
article
158
158
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
For the Home Draftsman
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G. A. Luers
THE usual folding table lid desk is very well adapted for drafting purposes, but its convenience and utility can be very greatly enhanced by converting the lid into a first-class drawing board and adding a self-alining parallel ruler as a permanent fixture.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0296.xml
article
158
158
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Proper Care of Electric Motor Brushes
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON all electrical machines, the brushes on a stud must aline properly with each other, and with the commutator bar from front to back of the commutator. An accurate method of spacing the brushes is to place a strip of paper tape around the outer edge of the commutator and mark the paper where the ends overlap.
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0297.xml
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158
158
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0298.xml
advertisement
159
159
[no value]
[no value]
Goodell-Pratt Company
[no value]
Goodell-Pratt Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0299.xml
advertisement
160
160
[no value]
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0300.xml
advertisement
161
161
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: MURAD
[no value]
[no value]
MURAD
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0301.xml
advertisement
162
162
[no value]
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Co.
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19191001_0095_004_0302.xml