Issue: 19181101

Friday, November 1, 1918
NOV.1918
5
True
93
Saturday, January 3, 2015

Articles
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1,2
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Popular Science MONTHLY
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0001.xml
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1
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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO.
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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO.
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0002.xml
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2
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0003.xml
tableOfContents
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2,3,4
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CONTENTS
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0004.xml
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3
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER CO.
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER CO.
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0005.xml
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4
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Chicago Engineering Works
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Chicago Engineering Works
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0006.xml
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4
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0007.xml
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5
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Chicago Technical College
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Chicago Technical College
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0008.xml
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6
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AMERICAN SCHOOL
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AMERICAN SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0009.xml
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6
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Burlington Watch Company
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Burlington Watch Company
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0010.xml
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7
7
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0011.xml
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8
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0012.xml
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9
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0013.xml
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10
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0014.xml
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11
11
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0015.xml
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11
11
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LaSALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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LaSALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0016.xml
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11
11
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PELTON PUBLISHING COMPANY
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PELTON PUBLISHING COMPANY
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0017.xml
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12
12
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0018.xml
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13
13
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Advertisements
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FREDERICK J. DRAKE & CO.
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0019.xml
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14
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0020.xml
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14
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0021.xml
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15
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0022.xml
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15
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0023.xml
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15
15
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UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
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UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0024.xml
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15
15
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0025.xml
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16
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AMERICAN CHAIN CO.
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AMERICAN CHAIN CO.
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0026.xml
masthead
17
17
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0027.xml
article
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17
AERONAUTICS
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“Stepping Over” at 10,000 Feet
Will the Parachute Become a Real Life-Preserver of the Air?
Difficulty of Placing the Parachute
Captain Sarret’s Leap
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"AT a height of ten thousand feet his machine burst into flames. His body was picked up, charred beyond recognition.” How often have you not read the sentence in a press despatch? You sickened at the thought of a brave man in the sky, either unbelting himself, as Lufbery did, and jumping to a swift, merciful death, or of being burnt alive in a roaring furnace,.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0028.xml
article
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18
WAR MECHANICS
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The Largest Book in the World
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THE largest book in the world—fifteen feet high, eight feet wide, and three feet thick—stands in the public square in Ottawa, Canada. It was made and bound by the Canadian government printing bureau at Ottawa. During the Victory' Loan campaign the question of the hour in Ottawa was, “Is your name written there?”
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0029.xml
article
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18
WAR MECHANICS
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Another Kind of Camouflage
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IN war work, as in nature, there are two kinds of camouflage coloration: one designed to make the camouflaged object harder to distinguish from its surroundings, the other to make it even more conspicuous than it otherwise would be.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0030.xml
article
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18
MISCELLANY
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These Youngsters Are Blind Boys on a Joy Ride
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A LITTLE engineering ingenuity has made dozens of blind and deaf children in Manila happier. Deaf and blind children are sometimes hard to amuse. A man who fashions some plaything that can make perpetual darkness and silence a little easier to endure adds a jewel to his heavenly crown.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0031.xml
article
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WAR MECHANICS
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They Shovel the Grain We Saved
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SOME of the wheat we are saving under Mr. Hoover's direction the direction goes right up the Thames to London and is milled there. Women do the unloading. They rip open the end of sack and empty out the contents, which are conveyed to the mill by suction through the pipe that appears in the foreground.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0032.xml
article
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WAR MECHANICS
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Dropping Truth from the Skies
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DESPATCHES from France have told of the use by the Allied and American armies of small balloons for scattering propaganda literature within the German lines. Here (below) is the working model of a balloon invented for that purpose, in the hands of its inventor, Lee A. Collins of Louisville, Ky., who turned it over to the Naval Consulting Board.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0033.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Making a Wall Out of an Old Sidewalk
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IF you have an old flagstone pavement that you don’t know what to do with, the picture above may show you how to put it to a useful purpose. A property-owner laid concrete alongside of his land, and a year or so later the strip of land was graded to make room for a street.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0034.xml
article
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19
MISCELLANY
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How to Eat the Mango
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ONCE a traveler in the American tropics scorned to use the mango fork his host proffered, and ate his mango with his fingers. When he finished, his wife whispered dryly in his ear: “Now you’d better excuse yourself and go and take a bath." Mangoes have a tough skin, and a large central pit or seed, in which there is a small aperture at the base.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0035.xml
article
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19
MEDICINE, SURGERY, AND HYGIENE
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Not to Be Sneezed At
Wash-Day Behind the American Lines in France
Fighting Young Chicken-Hawks
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HATZIE!—Hatziel—Hatzie! Three violent explosions, then the sufferer from hay-fever awaits the next explosion. Now, quick! This is the moment for applying the soothing treatment. The sufferer draws from his pocket a small object of curious form. Its lower part is shaped like a minute metal box; the top has two humps like the back of a camel.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0036.xml
article
20
20,21
WAR MECHANICS
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Uncle Sam—Canny Buyer
When he goes shopping for his army and navy, he doesn’t take any chances
The Walking Machine
Making Sure of the Army Truck
Demulsibility Test for Oils
A Standard for Manufacturers
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A. M. Jungmann
SUPPOSE you were intrusted with the spending of the millions of dollars a day that Uncle Sam is using for the purchase of war materials. How would you go about it? Would you enter upon the task with the same careless gambling spirit that carries you through your own purchases?
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0037.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Breaking a Snake’s Hunger Strike
Curator of Reptiles in New York Zoological Park
They Dont Ea't in Hibernation
This Snake Fasted Twenty-two Months
The Chicken that Killed a Snake
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Raymond L. Ditmars
BECAUSE we are accustomed to think of snakes as belonging to a low order of life, it is somewhat astonishing to learn that they are creatures of moods and that some members display an almost human temperament. Snakes in captivity, especially those from India and other tropical countries, mourn their native haunts and display great nervousness.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0038.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Through an Inferno to the Rescue
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One night last April, the freighter Florence H., loaded with smokeless powder and fixed ammunition, took fire in the harbor of a French port. The powder was in boxes piled up on the deck. For some unknown reason, it did not explode, but burned like a volcano, and the ship sank in ten minutes.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0039.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Setting the Stage for a Museum Group
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This shows the earlier steps in the preparation of a group. The frame of the case for the exhibit is built of wood and wire. All the materials entering the construction are of the finest quality. There must be no danger of cracking or warping after the group has been put on exhibition The ceiling and walls are here being prepared to receive the final painting of sky and landscape that makes the finished exhibit so true to life.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0040.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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How Did They Ever Get Along in Father’s Day?
Mechanical aids that make life easier for the school-boy
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“Teacher, my crayon’s broken.” “Very well, Johnny. Take the new holder, put the chalk in the slotted end, push down the metal ring to make it tight, and go on with your work” With this post-card size duplicator, getting out school announcements is fun.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0041.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Cast Up by the Red Tide of War
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0042.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Keeping the Army on a Good Footing
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0043.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Gasoline Bronchos in War and in Peace
The motorcycle can be as useful as a sewing-machine or as playful as a kitten
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0044.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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He Makes Thousands Laugh
Bluch Landolf, of the New York Hippodrome, poses for the “Popular Science Monthly”
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0045.xml
article
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30,31
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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We’ll Win the War with Shells—and Dollars: Staggering Figures that Explain War Cost
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0046.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Many Are the Makeshifts of War
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PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0047.xml
article
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33,34,35,36
WAR MECHANICS
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Sowing the Ocean with Death
The Chart that Means Death
Only a Hundred Submarine Engineers in the World
Contact and Observation Mines
The Mine in Time of Peace
Obstacles to Anchoring Mines
How Ships Betray Themselves
Grouping Mines for Firing
Death is Certain, at Moonless Midnight or Sunny Noon
The Cost of a Mine
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Waldemar Kaempffert
When the Germans ran away from Admiral Jellicoe in the second great naval battle of the North Sea, it was the mines that had been planted in huge numbers in the waters surrounding the island of Helgoland that saved them from defeat. Jellicoe said as much in his report.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0048.xml
article
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WAR MECHANICS
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He Also Fights Who Helps a Fighter Fight
Columbia—Thrift Stamp Car Conductor
Over the Top
Giant Register to Record Patriotism
Salem’s War Chest
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UNCLE SAM was motorman, Miss Columbia conductor, of a red, white, and blue street-car lettered with exhortations to buy thrift stamps, which plied back and forth all one day between the Manhattan end of the Queensboro Bridge, across the East River, and Jamaica, Long Island, twentytwo miles away, over the line of the Manhattan and Queens Traction Corporation.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0049.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Grinding the Coffee by Water Power
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NECESSITY IS not always the mother of invention. The Alpini in the accompanying picture, who rigged up a small water-mill to harness the rushing mountain stream near their station in the Adamello region to a small coffee-grinder, were hardly prompted by necessity.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0050.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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“Dutch Bulbs” Are Now Grown in America
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FOR centuries Holland has monopolized the production of bulb plants. Dutch bulbs, especially tulips and hyacinths, were [shipped to all parts of the world, and lovers of such plants often paid fabulous sums for bulbs of some rare variety.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0051.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Photographing the Baby—a Task for Experts
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MORE years ago than we care to remember, “Photographing the Baby” was a favorite title for the efforts of comic artists and versemakers. They aimed their shafts of wouldbe wit at the photographer at a time when his art was in its infancy, and when the iron head-clamp made wooden Indians of most grownups.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0052.xml
article
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SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
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An Unsinkable Ship at Last?
Well, perhaps not; but at all events she is hard to sink
Not a New Principle
Its Chances Against Submarines
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UNSINKABLE ships are undoubtedly possible in theory; but, in spite of all efforts, it has not been possible so far to translate them into actual fact. They belong to that class of much desired things which includes perpetual motion, frictionless bearings, fast dyes, and a perfect substitute for rubber.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0053.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Self-Loading Truck Saves Own Time and Man Power
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IN these days when motortrucks are playing such an important rôle in the transportation of the nation’s goods, and when it is so difficult to obtain competent truck-drivers, the self-loading commercial vehicle illustrated below points a way to efficiency.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0054.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Making the Engine Dump the Truck Body in a New Way
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THE next time you see a big motortruck with its body elevated above the rear end to dump a load of sand, stone, or asphalt, note the vertical cylinder directly back of the driver’s seat. You will see coming out of the top of the cylinder a rod having two pulleys with ropes running down to some point on the body itself.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0055.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Trucks to Pump Out Trenches
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MEN in the trenches have made a feeble effort to save themselves from rheumatism and pneumonia by bailing out the water with buckets. The British army is now employing trucks to pump out the flooded trenches. The new apparatus consists of a 32-horsepower, four-cylinder gasoline motor mounted in the body of a motortruck, and connected to a dynamo furnishing current by flexible cables to three motor-centrifugal pumps.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0056.xml
article
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41
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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This Grease Will Not Soil Your Hands
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A NEW bucket-pump for lubricating oil has been invented and patented by Ira A. Weaver, of Springfield, 111. It consists of a metal bucket, conical in shape, with a tight fitting cover. A pump-cylinder fits through an opening in the center of the cover, and extends down to and through the bottom of the bucket.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0057.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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An Attachment for Driving a Truck Over Soft Ground
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AN entirely new attachment for the motor-truck has made its appearance out in Los Angeles, Cal. It is a heavy steel flange, to be attached to the outer side of the various wheels of the car, which makes it possible to use the truck on the soft ground of an orchard, grain-field, or even vegetable patch.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0058.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Convenient Engine Pump for Trucks with Pneumatic Tires
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WITH the increasing use of giant-size pneumatic tires on trucks up to five tons in capacity has come the problem of fitting some sort of pump on the trucks, so that the tires can be inflated on the spot, even if miles away from the nearest garage. The big tires cost as much as two hundred dollars, and it would be suicidal to try to run a truck of such size with a flat tire.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0059.xml
article
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42,43
MISCELLANY
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Blame It on the Sunspot
Solar upheavals that make mischief on earth
Cause Still a Mystery
The Sun s Periodic Variations
Photographing the Sun
How the Sun Affects Our Wheather
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THAT favorite scapegoat, the War, was not responsible for all the abnormal'events of the memorable year 1917, and the German spy, as a versatile mischief-maker, has a rival who is none the less formidable because his base of operations is 93,000,000 miles away from the nearest munition plant.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0060.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A Convenient New Label-Holder
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MUCH of the inconvenience that results from label-holders standing in a vertical position can be eliminated by the use of a holder that stands at an angle. The label is held in the best position to catch the eye and to be read with ease; at the same time it is firmly fixed in position, and so compact as not to occupy valuable space and be cumbersome. The holder is readily attached to papers and holders, and is all metal.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0061.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Turning the Barbecue Ox with a Gasoline Engine
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BARBECUES at which oxen are roasted whole ought to become more popular than ever, now that an ingenious method has been perfected that turns the carcass for hours with the regularity of clockwork, permitting the meat to cook deliciously enough to please any connoisseur.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0062.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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A Typewriter Brush with Self-Oiler
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IT is easy to keep your typewriter in apple-pie order with the aid of the brush shown in the photograph above. Attached to the handle of this brush is a small oil-can, from which oil can be forced directly into the bristles. The oiled bristles then pick up the dust from the various parts on contact.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0063.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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Anyone an Expert Signaler Now
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THE bluejacket snapping his flags about so briskly from the bridge of a battleship, the mystic movements of the semaphore or the swift interchange of messages by pennant need no longer puzzle the landsman. An alert publishing house has put on the market a device by means of which anyone can quickly become an expert at reading code, wigwag, or Vȳry system signals.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0064.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Modern Way to Plant Poles
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DIGGING holes and setting up telegraph or telephone poles by man power is slow work, and besides man power is becoming scarce and costly. But new telegraph and telephone lines must be established. The problem seems to have been solved by a labor-saving machine which has been tried out in building a telephone line across Nevada and Utah and has given remarkably good results.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0065.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Here Is a Handy Blow-Torch
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THIS useful pocket torch, which can be used in joining telephone, electric light, or broken current wires of any description, consists of a small metal tank, two by three inches in size, made at a small cost and designed to burn alcohol as fuel.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0066.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Refrigerated Library
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YANKEE ingenuity might be defined as “making something do for something else” if it didn’t lay us open to the charge of being a race of substitutors; but the ability to make use of the apparently useless is not to be sneezed at. Moreover, it has been put to the test by the war, and has survived the test.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0067.xml
article
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INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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To Outwit the Pickpocket
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THE haunting fear of being held up and left penniless out in a strange world is done away with by a little device so small that it may be carried on the key-ring, where no self-respecting hold-up man would think of looking. It has a capacity of one reserve bill.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0068.xml
article
45
45
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Making Life Easier for the Shine Boy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE young man in the picture below found this shoe-shining stand very convenient. Before the boss bought it for him he had to lug all the shoes that the hotel guests left outside their doors at night down to the basement and back again. But this stand is light and is equipped with wheels, so that the shoe-shine boy can wheel it to a convenient nook on the same floor, and do his night’s work in half the time it used to take.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0069.xml
article
45
45
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Labeling 7,000 Cans an Hour
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE labeling of tin cans is now almost everywhere done by machinery. A modern labeling machine like that shown in the picture above, if worked by hand power, will label from 40,000 to 50,000 cans in ten hours. A machine driven by steam or electric power averages from 60,000 to 70,000 cans in ten hours.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0070.xml
article
45
45
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Beer-Keg Anvil-Stand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THEY have pretty largely taken the beer out of industry now, but that’s no reason why the old keg should not remain, as the blacksmith in the picture above has shown by using a beer-keg as an anvilstand. He filled the keg with sand, which made it heavy enough to be steady, yet did not make it too heavy to move about as need might require.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0071.xml
article
45
45
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Roaster for the Camper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COOKING eggs in hot coals or ashes often meets with disaster, but the difficulty disappears when the device here shown is used. The holder has a capacity of four eggs, though of course one, two, or three may be cooked. The eggs may be held over the coals, or placed in the ashes or coals in the holder, to be withdrawn when cooked.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0072.xml
article
46
46
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Harness the Reel to Your Motorcycle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you like surf fishing with a hand-line, you may be interested in the invention of John J. O’Connor, a Californian who is a lover of surf fishing besides being a motorcycle enthusiast. Watch Mr. O’Connor at his favorite sport. A strong pull at the line.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0073.xml
article
46
46
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Your Safety Blades Can Be Honed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAZORS, particularly the old-fashioned kind, must be honed and stropped from time to time, to keep them in good condition. A device that has been put on the market recently by a Western manufacturing concern makes the honing and stropping of safety blades, as well as of the old-fashioned razors, extraordinarily easy.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0074.xml
article
46
46
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
A Pocket Edition of the Great American Game
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
POCKET-SIZE baseball game, which is said to have a great vogue among United States soldiers and sailors, consists of three important baseball positions: “at the bat,” represented by a white dial, subdivided into the different hits and runs;, “the field,” an inner ring of green, with alternate squares labeled “safe” or “out”; and “the umpire,” occupying the center space which is divided into “out strike” and “safe hit.”
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0075.xml
article
46
46
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
A Combination Rack and Triangle for Pool-Players
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN improvement for amusement places where pool is played is a combination wall rack and triangle which does away with handling the balls when they are to be returned to the table at the end of the game, and which makes unnecessary the triangular rack for assembling them.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0076.xml
article
47
47
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Wrecked Pilot-Boat Turned into a Dwelling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ABOUT nineteen years ago a large pilot-boat was wrecked off the coast of Scituate, Mass. A mighty wave lifted it and dashed it high up on the beach, where it crashed into a fisherman’s cottage. The cottage was splintered, but the boat was only smashed in on one side.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0077.xml
article
47
47
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
A Mere Matter of Self-Protection
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BEING an instructor in boxing at one of the army cantonments, with some thousands of husky young Americans taking delight in slipping in an unexpected blow,is at times not the pleasantest job in the world. Hence the boxing helmet shown in the photograph.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0078.xml
article
47
47
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Vigia: Being the Newest War Horror
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BEFORE the war a captain off soundings — in other words, well clear of the land and in deep water— was free from anxiety. Today he threads his way with fearful caution between a swarm of “possible dangers.” More nerveracking than any U-boat is his new war horror — the “vigia.”
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0079.xml
article
48
48
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Better Stop! Look! and Listen!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT has been suggested that a universal danger sign be adopted—one that will be recognized immediately by any person of any nationality, irrespective of his ability to read the language of the country. In addition, it could be associated with a graphic illustration of the danger to be avoided.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0080.xml
article
48
48
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Here’s a Marine Railway Portage
How river boats scale a thirty-foot levee
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the thirtyfoot levee along the banks of the Illinois river, below Peoria, 111., was built to protect about fourteen thousand acres of farm-land from periodic floods, the connection that had existed between the river and Spring Lake, thirty miles from Peoria, was cut off.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0081.xml
article
49
49
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Making Over Old City Pavements into New
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE municipal government of Cincinnati has found a way to make new streets out of old ones, thereby saving fully two thirds of the cost. When granite pavement begins to show holes and ruts, the entire paving is torn up, and the layer of sand beneath it is removed. In nine cases out of ten the concrete foundation of the street will be found in first-class condition.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0082.xml
article
49
49
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
To Restrain the Frivolous Focusing-Cloth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT has taken amateur photographers thirty years to produce a man—■ Edward W. Humbert, of Uniontown, Pa.—sufficiently annoyed with the focusing-cloth to patent a method that will make it shield the camera it formerly pulled over. The reformed cloth is of the ordinary material, and rectangular. It has, however, near the forward end and in the center, an opening of sufficient size to let the lens and its mounting protrude. This opening is equipped with eyelets corresponding with the usual projections of the front-board of a camera, to hold the cloth in position.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0083.xml
article
49
49
MEDICINE, SURGERY, AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Gassing the Germs in Books
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALMOST the first thing to meet the eyes of French hygienists in their war-time campaign for protecting the younger generation was their old enemy, the circulating book, well known as a carrier of disease. The many obvious solutions of the problem shared one disadvantage: while killing the germs they destroyed the book also.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0084.xml
article
50
50
MEDICINE, SURGERY, AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Treating Four-Footed Patients In a Hospital
Women's League for Animals Hospital
A Dog with Nervous Prostration
[no value]
[no value]
A. M. Jungmann
IF you had a favorite horse that broke its leg, would you shudder and cover your ears while someone put a bullet through its brain? Or, if your horse is sick, would you try to “doctor” it yourself as best you could? Neither the finishing bullet nor unskilled doctoring are necessary.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0085.xml
article
51
51
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
The Airplane Flare—To Light the Enemy’s Country
Suspended by a Parachute
[no value]
[no value]
Albert Whiting Fox
THE new airplane flare, which the Bureau of Ordnance of the War Department has perfected, is destined to play an important part in the offensive operations which American air-craft is to undertake against selected targets in German territory.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0086.xml
article
52
52,53
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
The Bomb-Droppers and How They Work
Great birds, laden with death-dealing bombs, carry terror far back of the German lines
Development of Bomb-Dropping
First Big Bombs English
The Night-Birds and How They Fly
Was the Raid Successful?
[no value]
[no value]
Carlyle F. Straub
BEFORE the war only a few imaginative journalists believed in dropping bombs on fortifications. To be sure, the General Staffs of the European Powers made experiments with dropped bombs, but that was chiefly to confirm their view that it was almost impossible to hit a target on the ground from an airplane moving at high speed several thousand feet above the ground.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0087.xml
article
54
54
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Tractor with Three Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BECAUSE approximately 100,000 farm tractors will be manufactured in the United States this year, the farm tractor industry is fast bringing us to the motorized farm, with motor-cars to carry the farmer in his work, motortrucks to deliver his goods, and now the motor farm tractor to plant, cultivate, and cut his crops.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0088.xml
article
54
54
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Motor-Trucks Revolutionize Telephone Construction
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DID you ever think of the enormous amount of labor that makes it possible for you to talk to a person hundreds of miles distant? Take the wire, for instance. It had to be stretched, perhaps over mountains and through valleys, across rivers and around obstacles too difficult to surmount.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0089.xml
article
55
55
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
This New Litter-Carrier Doubles the Service
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OUT in No Man’s Land, with the shrapnel splinters burying themselves into man and beast, quickness in rendering aid to the injured is more precious than anything else. The Medical Corps has designed a new type of litter-carrier which will enable stretcher-bearers to care for double the number of men they could handle without it.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0090.xml
article
55
55
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Don’t Scrap That Old Car—There’s Money in It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE tremendous decrease in motor passenger-car production, due to the demands of the government, has put a premium on the used car. A Richmond, Va., dealer awake to this, took the opportunity recently to do some unusual advertising.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0091.xml
article
56
56
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Out-Guessing Anti-Aircraft Guns
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PART of every airplane pilot’s training has for its object the avoidance of shrapnel. His one safety lies in out-guessing the gunners below. He has the advantage over them, in a sense, because he knows where he will be three seconds hence. One of his first lessons is to keep his airplane between the anti-aircraft guns and the sun.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0092.xml
article
56
56
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
How the Hoffman Wire Tuning-Box Works
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the help of the Hoffman wire tuning-box, the old “guess” method of tightening the bracing wires in airplanes is done away with. This instrument consists of a light veneered sounding-box on top of which is placed two metal V-shaped saddles, one of which is the indicator.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0093.xml
article
57
57
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Ford’s Cavalry in Action
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALONG a roadway of Epides, the Germans were intrenched, and were putting up a stubborn defence with machine-guns against our troops. In the rapid advance our artillery had not yet been able to catch up with the infantry, and the thickly placed German machine-guns seemed to have the best of the situation.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0094.xml
article
57
57
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
The Life-Lines of the Airplane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THe airplane shown below is a standard Curtiss training biplane, hundreds of which are in daily use throughout the country. The fighting planes do not rely on wires for support, since their construction is such as to make wires nearly unnecessary.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0095.xml
article
58
58
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Learning to Use Giant Searchlights
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HUGE searchlights are used in the defence of our coasts and harbors. The large parabolic mirrors throw out the rays of a high-power electric arc to a distance of many miles. The picture above shows a class of coast guards receiving instruction in the use of the searchlights.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0096.xml
article
58
58
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
The Latest Thing in Bedrooms
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE expression of surprise at sleeping accommodations must have palled on the lips of men in active service. The Tommies here shown climbing into some vast tank in the ruins of a town in northern France seem bored rather than excited at their novel dormitory.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0097.xml
article
58
58
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Women Bosses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a sight that will gladden the hearts of feminists — a forewoman bossing a gangof subordinate males. This happy condition exists in a French factory for making airplane bombs, where this photograph was taken. The bombs, which are standing on the floor, are being tested for weakness.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0098.xml
article
58
58
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
It Clips Its Way through Barbed Wire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAVING converted our farm tractors into tanks, and the “stinkpot” of the Chinese into gas-shells, we now turn barber-shop experiences to account. At least, it seems to us that the remarkably effective wire-cutter recently shown by its inventor, John E. Logan, before officers in the Capitol grounds at Washington, is reminiscent of the type of clipper applied to the back of the male neck.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0099.xml
article
59
59
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
The Army Shoots Clay Pigeons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
International Film Service AS every rifleman knows, shooting from ground level and shooting frqm a height are two different things. This is the reason why the United States Government provides, for those likely to see aerial or mountain fighting, a course on towers.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0100.xml
article
59
59
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Mending the Bones of War Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WELL back of the lines in France there are enormous open hospitals for open broken motor-trucks. Some of the British transport vehicles in the picture below seem ruined beyond hope. But not so. If nothing is left but one wheel, that wheel will help to repair some other car having three. The most complete smash imaginable always yields a good supply of nuts and bolts, which, while the hopelessly twisted metal is sent to the scrap heap, are stored for repairs on some future casualty of the same make.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0101.xml
article
59
59
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Launching a Hydro -Airplane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE picture above shows the launching of a hydro-airplane from a British battleship in the harbor of Saloniki. The aquatic biplane is suspended from the end of the cable by wires, and carefully lowered until it rests upon the water.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0102.xml
article
59
59
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Armor for the Picture-Hanger
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER he had injured himself a great many times by smashing his fingers with a hammer, Nathaniel Carr Fleming, of Coldwater, Kas., invented the finger-armor above. He has secured a patent on it.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0103.xml
article
59
59
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Watching the Shots Fall
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT first glance you would suppose that the men climbing this ladder are fruitpickers. Then you notice that they are soldiers and that the trees are not fruit trees at all. The truth is that the ladder is merely one of a hundred different devices for climbing to a great height in order to observe the effect of artillery fire on the enemy.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0104.xml
article
59
59
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
East and West in France
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
No these Chinamen are not going to have a May-pole dance. They are hardworking, worthy laborers in France, lined up for roll-call. The seeming May-pole is the Chinaman’s idea of a roll-book. On the streamers are written the names of the men. When we see the English officer calmly inspecting these Chinese names, we begin to lose faith in the proverb about East not meeting West before the judgment-day.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0105.xml
article
60
60
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Scow Makes Gas Attack on New York
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Passengers on the Fall River liner Providence, docked at her pier in New York, recently had a remarkable demonstration of the possibilities of a gas attack by sea. The boat had reached her pier in the early morning, and the passengers, still asleep in their berths, were awakened by choking fumes.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0106.xml
article
60
60
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
No More Waiting While They Figure Your Interest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOME savings banks have done away with much of the delay occasioned by reckoning interest and setting it down in the pass-books of depositors by using certificates devised by J. E. Hanzlik of Minneapolis, Minn. These certificates show the interest that has accrued on different given amounts at various times.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0107.xml
article
60
60
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Mule-and-a-Half Power in the West Indies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT offends the West Indian to see natural power going to waste. West Indian carts are nominally one-horse vehicles. The first measure of conservation is, obviously, to replace the horse by the still more sturdy mule. The next measure is to insure that the cart carries on each trip its fullest possible burden.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0108.xml
article
61
61
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
Steam, Sail, and Wood Meet Again in New Craft
Follows Conventional Schooner Design
Vindication of Goethals' Plan?
Satisfactory Trial Trip
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT is out of place on the huge five-masted sailing schooner in the picture below ? Why, it’s the smoke, of course, and the smoke comes from two tall stacks just in front of the fourth mast. The schooner is almost reminiscent of the balmy days in the early part of the nineteenth century when the sailingships of the United States ruled the seven seas.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0109.xml
article
62
62,63
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Mechanical Aid and Comfort for the Automobile Owner and Driver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0110.xml
article
64
64
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
When There's One More River to Cross
How the soldiers ferry themselves over when bridges are down
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0111.xml
article
65
65
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Chemical Parsons in War Service
In which you are told something about catalyzers
Platinum to Help Win War
Soup and Soap
[no value]
[no value]
John Walker Harrington
ALTHOUGH “chemical parsons” are only substances, they are helping to win the war. The chemists call them thus because they marry certain elements without themselves entering into the new combinations. Technically, they are catalyzers; that is, they affect the velocity of a chemical reaction without appearing in the final product.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0112.xml
article
66
66
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Let Machines Do Your Work
A few labor-saving devices that make it easier for the mechanic
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0113.xml
article
67
67
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Housekeeping Made Easy
A few labor-saving devices for those who work in the home
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0114.xml
article
68
68,69
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
Casting Ships
Concrete vessels that are lighter
Why a Ship Floats
Construction Not Life Steel
To Protect It from Sea Water
How the Ships Are Reinforced
“Hogging” and “Sagging”
Not as Light as Steel
[no value]
[no value]
A. M. Jungmann
CONCRETE looks like stone, and everybody knows how quickly a stone sinks when it is cast into the water. That probably accounts for the idea that a concrete ship must be very heavy. But according to R. J. Wig, Chief Engineer of the Department of Concrete Ship Construction of the United States Shipping Board, a new concrete material that has recently been developed will enable us to build concrete ships twenty per cent lighter than wood ships.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0115.xml
article
70
70,71,72,73
[no value]
[no value]
Crippled But Undaunted
Which shall it be for the crippled veteran of thirty—playing cards in a home or earning his living?
Forty Thousand Cripples Out of an Army of a Million
Federal Board for Vocational Education
Some Men Who Have Been Re-educated
Teaching a Man to Use Untrained Muscles
How the Disabled Will Be Re-educated
For Use, Not for Show
Adapting Tools to Cripples
The Future in Industry
[no value]
[no value]
Waldemar Kaempffert
A. M. Jungmann
IN one of the battles of the Boer War, Piper Findlater, a Scotch Highlander, had his legs shot off. He lay on the ground, a bleeding wreck of a man, clutching his bagpipes and playing “The Cock o’ the North.” A whole regiment was fired by the man’s grit.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0116.xml
article
74
74
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Peanut Wagon Remodeled into Street Floral Shop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the price of peanuts advanced to such a figure that the business became unprofitable, James Carlton, of Urbana, 111., remodeled his peanut wagon into a street floral shop. He now sells ferns, geraniums, tomato plants, and similar products in demand by home gardeners.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0117.xml
article
74
74
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
For Plucking Fowl
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CONVENIENT device for holding a chicken or other fowl for plucking can be made without tools and at a trifling expense from a piece of heavy wire The wire is bent into the shape of a capital “W," with the lower loops just large and close enough to catch and hold the legs of the suspended fowl, above the spread of the toes.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0118.xml
article
74
74
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Meter Readings by Post-Card
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Twin State Gas-Electric Company of Brattleboro, Vt., has adopted a new method for avoiding delays in keeping records and making out monthly bills in cases where customers were absent when the meter reader made his monthly call. If the meter reader finds that he cannot get into the house, he slips an addressed post-card under the door.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0119.xml
article
74
74
[no value]
[no value]
How a Bridge Gave Way to a Steamer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Wisconsin river, which flows into the Mississippi at Prairie du Chien, Wis., was once a great commercial highway. When the stream became blocked with sand-bars, river navigation was gradually abandoned, and the Burlington Railroad built a bridge across the river at Prairie du Chien.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0120.xml
article
74
74
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Barrel-Shaped Germ-Proof Churn of Stoneware
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are many churns in the market which, when new, are sanitary, but which soon become unsanitary because they cannot be kept clean. The churn shown in the picture above does not belong to this class. The barrelshaped body is of glazed stoneware.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0121.xml
article
74
74
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Not a Wrist-Watch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE functions of wrists increase daily. A few years ago a wrist’s only duty was to join hand to arm. Then it became the bearer of watches, and now it carries whistles. A California police sergeant has invented the wrist whistle here illustrated. The whistle has a keeper on its under side through which the wristband is passed. The lippiece is directed angularly upward to make its use more convenient.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0122.xml
article
75
75
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
An Adjustable Golf Rim Cup
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY means of an adjustable golf rim cup recently placed on the market, the terminal point on each green is made a lodging-place for the ball rather than for water and earthy deposits. By means of a sort of wrench and a screw on the lower part of the cup, the rim may be raised or lowered so as to be always level with the top of the ground, while a space beneath takes care of water and earth which filters in, leaving the cup proper always clean.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0123.xml
article
75
75
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A 46-Inch Horse in a 36-Inch Manhole
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most unusual accidents happened in a city in New York State recently, when a horse 42 inches in diameter at the widest part kicked off a manhole cover and slid down the manhole, which measured only 36 inches. The horse dropped down to the bottom of the manhole, ten feet below, leaving only his front feet visible.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0124.xml
article
75
75
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Cartridge that Carries Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
USUALLY bullets are messengers of death. The one shown above carries light into dark places. It is merely the now familiar electric torch in a war-time setting, the cartridge form lending itself easily to the purposes of the torch-maker.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0125.xml
article
75
75
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
The "Speeder"—a Joy for the Modern Youngster
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE youngster who is driven to Such straits that he attempts to make for himself a speeder or scooter, which he can hold in an upright position, will appreciate the worth of the device shown in the photograph (left). One foot is placed on the carriage; the other is used to propel the speeder; at the same time the handle held in either the right or the left hand keeps the device in the proper position and gives the user control over it.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0126.xml
article
75
75
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
"Loop-the-Loop" Glider for Boys and Girls
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is great fun for both boys and girls in the “loop-the-loop” glider, which sails for over two hundred feet straightaway, or, when properly adjusted, loops the loop in true Beachey fashion and then sails on again. The user, after a little practice, can control the flight of the glider with reasonable accuracy.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0127.xml
article
76
76,77
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Battling in a Tank
Locked in a Steel Box
On the Edge of Death
The Men Never Knew
Bombs Seem Like Pebbles
The Enemy Gets a Gunner
[no value]
[no value]
Captain Richard Haigh
WE all looked round the little chamber with eager curiosity. Our first thought was that seven men and an officer could never do any work in such a little place as this. In front are two stiff seats, one for the officer and one for the driver. Two narrow slits serve as portholes through which to look ahead.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0128.xml
article
78
78,79
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Ways to Make the Freight-Car Do More Work
Government Eliminates Some Evils
Suggestion for a New Style Car
Some of the Advantages
A Typical Case
A Saving in Freight Charges
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FEW people realize that approximately twenty cents out of every dollar they spend for things to eat, wear, and use goes for freight. Nor do they realize that in the case of perishable goods (milk, ice, etc.) the cost of transportation from the point of origin to the final consumer is often as much as fifty cents for each dollar spent.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0129.xml
article
80
80
[no value]
[no value]
Salvage Miracles Foil the Hun
Emergencies that confront modern ships as a result of submarine warfare, and how they are being met by resourceful ship captains
The Captain TooK the Chance
A Winter in the Arctic
The “Euryanthe’s” Experience
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the rending crash of a German mine under the bows of his ship announced to the captain of the Tipperary (war alias of a famous Atlantic liner) that his ship “had got hers,” he looked out across the ice-clogged lanes ahead and smiled grimly.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0130.xml
article
81
81
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
You Can’t Keep a Good Ship Down
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The thrilling experiences of the British standard ship Euryanthe are depicted above. No. 1 shows the ship after the collision. The cargo of fats is blazing and the forward cargo space flooded. In No. 2 the Euryanthe, still afire, is in tow of two salvage tugs.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0131.xml
article
82
82
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Taking the Bray Out of the Army Mule
In the present war even the bray of the mule comes in for serious consideration
The Mule Must Raise Its Tail When It Brays
Getting the Mule Ready ¡or an Operation
Another Operation Acts as a “Dimmer”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NO matter how faithful are the services of the army mule, there is one serious objection against him—his bray. Veterinary surgeons have been devoting a great deal of attention to the problem of how to deprive the mule of his ability to greet all and sundry with his loud and hearty hee-haw, hee-haw.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0132.xml
article
83
83
MISCELLANY
[no value]
“In Again, Out Again”: Orchestra and Pit Lowered Complete
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TALLY’S Theater, one of the finest moving-picture theaters in Los Angeles, is equipped with a mechanical orchestra-pit which brings on the orchestra and takes it out again without all the fuss and commotion that usually attends the ducking in and out of musicians through the litt’e door under the stage.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0133.xml
article
83
83
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Flying on the Stage—and How It Is Done
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VAUDEVILLE performers who float about the stage playing in mid-air on equally “buoyant” pianos, or who swim up, down, and around in the rather unsubstantially thin air, never fail to appeal to the coldest audience. Mysterious as such feats always are to the uninitiated, they are commonplace matters of business to the men behind the scenes.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0134.xml
article
83
83
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Portable Outfit for the Lecturer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE lecturer who carries with him his slides, lens, lamp, and other essential parts of a projecting apparatus need no longer journey heavily laden. The outfit shown in the photographs combines efficiency in operation with ease of carrying because of lightness and compactness.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0135.xml
article
84
84
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Giant Bubbles that Foretell a Fortune
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT may seem a far cry from hunting oil in the Mexican jungle to hunting submarines in the English Channel, but they are closely related occupations. The greater number of the destroyers, chief of the submarine-hunters, are oil-burners, and most of the oil that they burn comes from the Mexican wells.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0136.xml
article
84
84
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
How a Caterpillar Loads Itself on a Truck
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is tremendous activity in the rear of the Allied lines. The army in the sector is advancing, and that means work, work, and still more work. Guns, big and small, have to be brought forward, and with them the necessary ammunition and the reserve stores that must be held in readiness at all times.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0137.xml
article
85
85
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Domesticating the Airplane in Crowded Cities
How the problem of providing starting and landing facilities might be solved
Lack of Landing Facilities
A Revolvable Platform
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
THE airplane has come to stay. It has passed through its probation period in a remarkably short time, and, since the beginning of the Great War, has developed with a rapidity unparalleled in history. “But,” ask the doubters, “will it ever become commercialized, as is the automobile?”
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0138.xml
article
86
86,87
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Who Won Our “Helping Out the Farmer” Contest
The three prize-winning labor-saving devices made by farmers for farmers
A Drainage and Irrigating Pump Made from a Motor-Boat Engine
A Sling-Reel for the Front End of a Hay-Rack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
First Prize Article HAVING occasion to drain a low place in my land, a motor-boat engine was made use of for the power plant, and its propeller for the pump. The propeller lifted the water to a higher level, from which a fall carried it away. In this instance discarded hot-water boilers were used for the tube.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0139.xml
article
87
87
[no value]
[no value]
A Small Follow-Up Harrow for a Single Plow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Third Prize Article THREE is nothing on our farm that saves more labor than a simple little one-furrow followup harrow that was made from a piece of wagon tire and some old hay-rake teeth. It is attached to the beam of the sulky plow by means of an ordinary coulter clevis. To make the harrow, a piece of hickory 18 in. long and 2½ in. square was shaped to hold the teeth ends.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0140.xml
article
87
87
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Warm a Lens to Make Photograph in Cold, Damp Places
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAVING occasion to take some flashlights in a mine, I found that the moisture persisted in settling on and fogging the lens, and that wiping it off did not clear it, for, the moisture would immediately settle there and prevent the making of the picture.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0141.xml
article
87
87
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Transparent Lacquer for Celluloid Surfaces
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DISSOLVE uncolored celluloid in a mixture of strong alcohol and ether. The celluloid at first swells up in the solvent. When this is done shake the bottle vigorously and permit it to stand quietly so the undissolved portion will settle. Then pour off the clear supernatant fluid. The latter may be used immediately. It yields a colorless glossy lacquer, and it may be colored with aniline colors.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0142.xml
article
88
88
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Skin and Dry Pelts
Two methods of curing the winter skins of fur-bearing animals
The Other Method
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are two kinds of furs, the winter fur, which has long hairs, and the summer fur, which has short hairs. The color of the hairs also varies with the seasons. But, above all, the desirable wool of the animals’ winter coats is entirely absent in summer.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0143.xml
advertisement
89
89
[no value]
[no value]
HAMMOND TYPEWRITER COMPANY
[no value]
HAMMOND TYPEWRITER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0144.xml
advertisement
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
The General Fire Extinguisher Company: GRINNELL
[no value]
The General Fire Extinguisher Company
GRINNELL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0145.xml
article
91
91
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A New Steam-Air Blower for Forced Draft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE accompanying illustration shows the simplest but most efficient furnace blast. It is available wherever there is steam pressure that has ever been devised. It consists of an air duct about 1 ft. in diameter leading to the fire-box and carrying at its mouth a somewhat flattened hollow brass ring perforated on one side with small holes.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0146.xml
article
91
91
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Try This Apparently Hard Trick on Your Strong Friends
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DO you know that a person of ordinary strength, by putting the tips of the forefingers together a little above the waist level, can with little effort resist their being pulled apart by another person? The person pulling should stand directly in front of the other; the arms should be gripped immediately above the elbows, and pulled (not jerked) horizontally.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0147.xml
advertisement
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.: YANKEE
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.
YANKEE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0148.xml
advertisement
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
DU PONT FABRIKOID COMPANY
[no value]
DU PONT FABRIKOID COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0149.xml
article
93
93
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Construction of an Altazimuth for Locating Stars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMATEURS interested in astronomy may readily trace the diurnal path of the brighter stars by means of the apparatus shown in the illustration. It is nothing more than a substitute for the more expensive instrument, but gives very satisfactory results if care is exercised in its construction.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0150.xml
advertisement
93
93
[no value]
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER CO., INC.: CORONA
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER CO., INC.
CORONA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0151.xml
advertisement
94
94
[no value]
[no value]
GoodellPratt Company
[no value]
GoodellPratt Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0152.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Mechanic’s Mercury Plumb Bob
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE illustration shows the few operations required for making a simple but highly efficient mercury plumb bob. The body may be of ordinary cold rolled stock and the cap may be of the same material. The cork can be easily removed by shaking the plumb bob vigorously, causing the mercury to act as an internal hammer.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0153.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cleaning Aluminum to Bring Out Original Luster
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALUMINUM articles are very difficult to clean so that they will have a bright appearance. This is particularly the case with matted or frosted ware. To restore the pieces to brilliancy, you should place them for some time in water that has been slightly acidulated with sulphuric acid.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0154.xml
article
94
94
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Machine Bearing from a T-Rail
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BEARING standard for any countershaft and for various machine tools can be made from a piece of ordinary T-rail if it is not too difficult to cut it to size. The illustration shows one of its uses—for constructing a speed lathe and polishing head.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0155.xml
advertisement
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
WINCHESTER
[no value]
WINCHESTER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0156.xml
advertisement
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Utica-Duxbak Corporation
[no value]
Utica-Duxbak Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0157.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Camera for Projecting Post-Cards on a Screen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is a very easy matter to use the camera which took your photographs to act as a stereopticon. Perhaps it might better be called a cameropticon. Anyhow you can cause it to project enlarged images of your favorite photographs, picture postcards, etc., upon a screen.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0158.xml
article
96
96
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Remove a Tightly Fitting Can Cover
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO remove the cover on a round remove cover on a round metal or paper container that fits tightly, place a stout string with the ends tied together so that the loop will fit loosely just below the cover edge on the can body, and then by means of a stick twist the string up very tightly.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0159.xml
advertisement
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0160.xml
advertisement
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0161.xml
article
98
98
[no value]
[no value]
Improving the Keeping Qualities of Negatives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY photographer usually has some choice negatives that he would like to preserve permanently. These fine negatives may be rendered permanent, after they have been fixed, by placing them in a ten per cent solution of alum, and allowing them to remain in it for a few minutes.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0162.xml
article
98
98,99
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Home-Made Portable Crane for Garages
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
APORTABLE crane for a garage is one of the most necessary tools required. It provides a means for lifting motors, gear cases and other heavy parts from automobile chassis. The one illustrated is easily constructed of old iron pipe, bed casters, bicycle chain and sprockets and one crank and one gear, several pieces of band iron, a length of steel cable, a wood drum, old sash pulley at the top, nuts, bolts, etc.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0163.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
WM. DEMUTH & CO.: Wellinaton THE UNIVERSAL PIPE
[no value]
WM. DEMUTH & CO.
Wellinaton THE UNIVERSAL PIPE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0164.xml
advertisement
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0165.xml
article
99
99
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Movable Stop-Cock End for the Sink Water Faucet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is always a time while the sink is full of pots and pans when the water is wanted in one vessel and not in another. The turning of a stop-cock is quite a task when busy handling the utensils. A movable stop-cock end is more desirable in this case and very few would think that such an attachment could be applied to the regular cock.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0166.xml
article
99
99
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Paste for Removing Ink-Stains on Silver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARTICLES of silver in domestic use frequently become badly stained with ink. These stains cannot be removed by any ordinary process, but they readily yield to a paste composed of chloride of lime and water. In an emergency, Javelle water may be used with good results.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0167.xml
advertisement
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
L. C. CHASE & Co.
[no value]
L. C. CHASE & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0168.xml
article
100
100,101,102,103
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Simple Designs for Sheet Metal Working
XVIII.—Interesting Sheet Metal Patterns Developed by Triangulation
How to Proceed
The Zigzag Triangle
Thz Most Difficult Problem Yet
Explaining Solid and Doited Lines
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
THOSE of you who have been following this series from the beginning will have no great difficulty in developing these patterns, even though at first glance they may appear to be rather complicated. The illustration Fig. 1 is for the purpose of bringing before you more clearly the three types of triangles that are used when developing sheet metal patterns by triangulation.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0169.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0170.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0171.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO.
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0172.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0173.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
IDEAL AEROPLANE & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
IDEAL AEROPLANE & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0174.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
Folding Sawing Machine Co.
[no value]
Folding Sawing Machine Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0175.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
Meccano Co., Inc.
[no value]
Meccano Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0176.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0177.xml
article
104
104
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Fireplace Dummy May be Made to Radiate Heat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRUE fuel conservation consists not so much in scrimping on coal as in saving heat, a very large percentage of which goes straight up the chimney, doing no good. A dummy fire-place, of which there are many, may be arranged as shown in the illustration, through which the smoke and hot gases may pass on their way up from the heater below and be discharged into the chimney above the fireplace.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0178.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.: LUCKY STRIKE CIGARETTE
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.
LUCKY STRIKE CIGARETTE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0179.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0180.xml
article
106
106
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Substantial Eyelet for the Soldier’s Barrack Bag
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE regular eyelet used on barrack bags as they are supplied to the army does not answer the purpose for which it was designed. Many complaints came from the boys in khaki, and for this reason a soldier boy made an improvement in the eyelet as shown in the illustration. The place where the drawstrings come out of the hemmed edge he covered over with a piece of sole-leather.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0181.xml
article
106
106,107
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Testing the Polarity and Compounding of Motors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is necessary at times to test the polarity of a motor when a compass is not at hand. A simple method of doing this when the armature is removed is to use several nails or other soft iron pieces. The field circuit is closed and the nail placed at the edge of the pole pieces as in the illustration.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0182.xml
article
107
107
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Efficient Filter for Chemicals Is Cheaply and Easily Made
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASIMPLE chemical filter, yet withal an efficient piece of apparatus, can be readily constructed with materials found about the laboratory. A glass tube is bent twice at right angles, as shown in the illustration, so that the larger leg is about six times that of the shorter one.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0183.xml
article
107
107
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Remedying Frayed Ends of Shoe-Laces
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW often has a perfectly good shoestring lost its metal tip, rendering it a nuisance or utterly worthless, because the frayed end cannot be pulled through the eyelets of the shoe? A simple and effective remedy is to apply several coats of ordinary mucilage or glue to the ends, letting them dry between coats.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0184.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
The American Technical Society
[no value]
The American Technical Society
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0185.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
COLT’S PATENT FIRE ARMS MFG. CO.
[no value]
COLT’S PATENT FIRE ARMS MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0186.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0187.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
BUFFALO SLED CO.
[no value]
BUFFALO SLED CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0188.xml
article
108
108
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Binding Pages with the Help of a Single-Piece Back
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PENNSYLVANIA printer used a single sheet for binding a number of pages as shown. The sheets were run through the press and scored with flat sides of five two-point brass rules for the folding lines. After perforating and folding, the backs were applied and secured with brass fasteners.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0189.xml
article
108
108
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Clean-Sweep Broom for Outdoor Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CUT from dead or old trees in the country about fifty or sixty of the thinnest branches, or twigs, each about 3 ft. long. Trim them so that they will make a neat, compact bundle, and tie just as tightly together as possible with very stout rope, keeping the cut ends closely joined.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0190.xml
article
109
109
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Ventilator Which It Is Easy to Regulate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE ventilator shown in the illustration is one that is used in the large local bank of a country place. It is made up in two halves, A and B, fitted with neatly shaped elbows, cut from sheet tin. The elbows are about 3 in. in diameter. A damper is provided in each elbow for regulating the air inlet.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0191.xml
article
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
You Can Make This Package-Carrier for Your Bicycle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE frame of the package carrier is made of strips of steel and the basket is of 16-oz. duck. The strips of steel are fitted to the front axle and extend upward above the front wheel where a spreader is fitted in and riveted. A broad hem is stitched in around the upper portion of the basket part and a rectangular strip of steel placed in it.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0192.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
IVER JOHNSON’S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
[no value]
IVER JOHNSON’S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0193.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0194.xml
article
110
110
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
To Start a Charcoal Furnace Without Smoke
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PLUMBERS and tinsmiths know the difficulties of starting their charcoal fire, when doing an indoor job, without filling the room with smoke. The illustration shows a means of eliminating the smoke, where there is a furnace or a heating stove. A pipe made up of two short pieces and an elbow is connected with the charcoal furnace and the opposite end of the pipe is run into the furnace feed opening.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0195.xml
article
110
110,111
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Adapting a Hand-Power Grinder to Foot-Power
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FINDING a small hand-power grinder to be inconvenient for running by hand, in which capacity it was useful only for light work, the owner decided to run it by foot-power, if possible. A piece of junk in the form of a driving-wheel and frame, evidently used at one time by a dentist, helped him out of his difficulty.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0196.xml
article
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
A Reel for Winding Up an Electric Test Cord
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE following scheme was adopted to prevent a 50-ft. ground testing cord from becoming tangled. Two pieces of wood fastened as shown at A formed a stand, in which was drilled a hole that was a driving fit for a ½-in. pipe. Narrow strips of copper B were then attached, by small brads, around the circumference of both flanges of a small wire reel.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0197.xml
article
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
A Waterproof Ink that Will Not Run When Washed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANY ordinary ink may be made waterproof by mixing it with a little glue of the ordinary quality, care being exercised to ascertain the presence of impurities, which must be removed. After ink has been waterproofed in this manner, it is possible to wash drawings with soap and water, if necessary, without having the ink RUN.-HERMAN NEUHAUS.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0198.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0199.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0200.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0201.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0202.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0203.xml
article
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Making an Electrical Socket from Wood and Strips of Brass
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the construction of a homemade enlarging machine for photographs, a series of lamps placed close together was needed. The ordinary electric socket would not permit this close setting and the only other method was to make sockets in wood as shown.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0204.xml
article
113
113
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Safeguarding an Emery Wheel with Rubber Washers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN efficient but simple method of preventing the fracturing of emery wheels due to the excessive tightening of the nuts is shown in the illustration. The two rubber washers are cut from 1/8-in. sheet rubber somewhat larger than the outside diameter of the metal washers.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0205.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
EXCELSIOR MOTOR MANUFACTURING & SUPPLY COMPANY
[no value]
EXCELSIOR MOTOR MANUFACTURING & SUPPLY COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0206.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0207.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
American Lead Pencil Co.: VENUS PENCIL
[no value]
American Lead Pencil Co.
VENUS PENCIL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0208.xml
article
114
114,115,116
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Five Ways of Saving Fuel in Heating Houses
Variety of House-Heating Fuels
To Regulate the Drafts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN house-heating equipment fuels that require little attention in burning are the most economical and give the best satisfaction. In time of war less desirable coal may have to be used, in order to simplify transportation problems; but the fact remains that some coals are more efficient than others when the same attention is given to the fire.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0209.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0210.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0211.xml
article
116
116
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Handy Dark-Room Lamp Made from a Tin Can
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SUBSTITUTE for the modern electric dark-room ruby light may be easily constructed from a large tin can similar to those in which apples are put up for the market. Cut a rectangular hole in the side and place a piece of ruby cloth over it, binding it close to the opening with twine.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0212.xml
article
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Improving the Erasing Qualities of Old Typewriter Erasers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the eraser becomes well worn it is apt to smear the paper when it is used to erase a letter. To avoid this, simply rub a. little chalk on the edge of the eraser, and no smear will occur; and the erasure of the letter will be done much more quickly as well as more neatly.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0213.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
Wright-Marlin Aircraft Corporation
[no value]
Wright-Marlin Aircraft Corporation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0214.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Burlington Watch CO.
[no value]
Burlington Watch CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0215.xml
article
118
118,119
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Com-Crib Rat-Proof
With the advancing prices of cereals, corn has became valuable and must have proper housing
How the Rat-Proofing Is Made
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN these days of great corn yield, the very best kind of buildings for housing the valuable grain are desired. Specialists in rural engineering have worked out plans for a corn-crib that will both aid in the drying of the corn and protect it from the rats. As the accompanying drawings show, there are really two cri is in the complete structure, each 32 by 8 ft., with a capacity for 1,000 bushels.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0216.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0217.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
BARNARD & cO.
[no value]
BARNARD & cO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0218.xml
article
120
120
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Reinforcing Motor-Truck Frames for Heavy Loads
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MULTITUDE of motor trucks, including several makes operating on lumber and ore hauls, have had their frames broken by overloading and traveling over rough roads. Some have been repaired by welding; some by having raw stock machined to fit the channel of the frame to which the stock was riveted overlapping the crack; others were trussed.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0219.xml
article
120
120
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Spikes Make the Most Serviceable Tent Stakes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAMPERS and others who “tent out” will spare themselves much labor and aggravation by providing themselves with a few large spikes used for the holding of any wood framework instead of using tent stakes. The spikes never need any sharpening and may be driven into the hardest ground with little difficulty.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0220.xml
article
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
An Electric Heater for a Toy Steam Engine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE alcohol lamp furnished with toy steam engines require constant refilling and, because of this disadvantage, they are dangerous for small boys to handle. It would probably be worth while for “big brother” or “Dad” to rig up this simple electric heater to replace the alcohol lamp in the little steam engine.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0221.xml
article
121
121
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making Flanged Steel Wheels in One Piece
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FEW years ago one would have scoffed at the idea of a car wheel made of a piece of 3/16 or 1/4in. sheet steel that formed the web and tread and flange all in one. But such a thing is now seen in daily use on hand cars, motor cars and much of the other auxiliary rolling stock found on standard gauge railroads.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0222.xml
article
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
The Ordinary Buzzer Used for a Shocking Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE accompanying illustration is self-explanatory. The buzzer connected up as shown with eight dry cells in series may be employed to give a fairly large shock. The shocking handles may be made from round battery carbons, if metal ones cannot be secured. The shock may be intensified at any time by wetting the hands with salt WATER.-HERMAN NEUHAUS.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0223.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0224.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0225.xml
advertisement
122
122,123,124,125
[no value]
[no value]
QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0226.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0227.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
American Bureau of Engineering
[no value]
American Bureau of Engineering
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0228.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
B.GUTTER&SONS
[no value]
B.GUTTER&SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0229.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
LEONARD-MORTON & CO.
[no value]
LEONARD-MORTON & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0230.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0231.xml
article
126
126
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Electrical Spot-Light for the Sewing-Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most prevalent causes of eye-strain with women is the habit of working at a sewing-machine with insufficient light. A spot-light which will shine directly upon the work and the needle can be arranged as herein described at little cost and labor and from simple materials.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0232.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0233.xml
article
127
127,128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Device to Amplify Weak Wireless Signal Impulses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN invention to increase the sensitiveness of detecting methods in order to amplify the impulses of weak signals in wireless telegraphy has been introduced by Elmer E. Bucher. Employed in the device are means by which the maximum potential obtained from a certain amount of energy derived from the signals is impressed on a detector, preferably of the multiple-element valve type.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0234.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0235.xml
article
128
128
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Easy Method of Rebinding Magazines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER saving up the numbers of a magazine for a year, the fasteners used to bind each number may be pulled out, and the pages separated, in order to rebind the different sections. Remove the surplus glue on the edges. Take out all material “For Practical Workers ” and make a book of it.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0236.xml
article
129
129
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Age of an Egg Told by Its Angle as It Lies in a Solution
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOWADAYS when so many folks are interested in poultry keeping it is well to know how easy it is to tell the exact age of an egg. Most people are aware that, in the thicker end of each egg, there is an air space. As the days pass by this space increases in size owing to the fact that the moisture from the egg evaporates through the pores of the shell.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0237.xml
article
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
A New Solder that Will Expand in Cooling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOLDER that expands on cooling may he made of six parts lead, one part bismuth, and nine parts’ antimony by weight. The solder is very useful in fixing metals in stone, or for filling cracks or holes.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0238.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0239.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
BROS & CO.
[no value]
BROS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0240.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
NATURAL BODY BRACE CO.
[no value]
NATURAL BODY BRACE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0241.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
SHAW MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
SHAW MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0242.xml
article
130
130,131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Construction of a Two-Inch Spark Coil
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE coil described herein is rated as a 2-in. spark coil when operated on a 10 to 12-volt storage battery. The first part to construct is the core of iron. A thin paper tube of 1 in. outside diameter and 10 in long is tightly filled with soft annealed iron wires.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0243.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Protecting a Small Drill Where Much Pressure Is Applied
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN drilling a hole with a very small drill, upon which it is necessary to apply a good deal of pressure, run the drill first through a block of wood that is as thick as the length of the drill minus the depth of the hole to be drilled. Hold the block stationary while drilling.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0244.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0245.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Combination Candleand Match-Holder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOTWITHSTANDING the popularity of the handy, flashlight, mechanics—and others—still find the primitive candle indispensable at times. It sometimes happens, however, that a candle is at hand but no matches. Herewith is illustrated a good candlecase, holder and match-safe combined.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0246.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Mosquito Netting for Reinforcing Roof Repairs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ORDINARY mosquito netting as an auxiliary to paint and putty in repairing leaks in a tin roof appears to be unreasonable; yet it does contribute materially to the strength of the repairs. A leaky seam in an old tin roof had been puttied so often that it looked like a golf bunker.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0247.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Heating the Carburetor of an Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the simplest ways to start an automobile during cold weather is through application of heat to the carburetor. Most appliances to perform this particular duty are complicated and costly. The following device, which can be made by the amateur workman, will be found easy to construct and wonderfully efficient.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0248.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0249.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
THE A. C GILBERT-MENZIES CO.
[no value]
THE A. C GILBERT-MENZIES CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0250.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS STOVE CO.
[no value]
THOMAS STOVE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0251.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
ARCUS MFC. CO.
[no value]
ARCUS MFC. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0252.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0253.xml
article
133
133
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Trick of Drawing a Card from a Pack in a Handkerchief
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PACK of cards is shuffled and an ordinary handkerchief examined. The cards are wrapped up in the handkerchief and the parcel held by the extreme finger tips. The performer says he wishes to use the “eight of clubs” or some other card for a special trick and commands the card to come out.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0254.xml
article
133
133
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Weigh a Finger Ring on a Large Platform Scale
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MAN who wanted to find the weight of a gold ring, and who had at hand only a large platform scale, found the weight of the ring in the following manner: He stood on the platform, and balanced the beam by moving the runner, which showed 145 lb. Then, while still standing on the platform, he placed the ring on the hanger where the weights are placed, and moved the runner back until it balanced again.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0255.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Munn & Co.
[no value]
Munn & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0256.xml
article
134
134,135,136,137
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Electric Devices and How They Work
XI—Principal Types of Current Rectifiers
[no value]
[no value]
Peter J. M. Clute,
WHILE a very large percentage of the electrical energy now available from central stations available from central stations is generated in the form of alternating current, many applications of electrical power require direct current, therefore direct current must be available from the distributing system, even though alternating current is required for transmission.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0257.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0258.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
L. W. SWEET & CO., Inc.
[no value]
L. W. SWEET & CO., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0259.xml
article
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
Safety Method of Fastening Field Wires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OPENING synchronous motor and D. C. motor fields while the machines are running is liable to result in the breaking down of insulation; and in the case of the D. C. machine the motor will run away. Wherever binding posts and connectors, as used for rheostats and fields, are employed, a length of unbroken insulation material should be stripped from the end of the temporary field wire, so that the portion stripped can be passed through the binding post and bent back over the terminals.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0260.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
[no value]
G. & C. MERRIAM CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0261.xml
article
138
138,139
[no value]
[no value]
Inclined and Vertical Drop Shelves for House or Store
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN our modern world space saving is a matter of great importance. In commercial and even domestic affairs, space, time and money have become almost synonymous. In the illustration is shown a simple inclined drop shelf unit designed to utilize the space above a cupboard or to make this space, as used for storage purposes, much more accessible.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0262.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0263.xml
article
139
139
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make Attractive Colored Varnishes
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ATTRACTIVE varnishes of any desired color or shade may be readily made for work requiring delicate tinting by dissolving different colored pieces of sealing wax in spirits of wine. The operation is readily performed by permitting the wax to remain in the spirit for about five hours, in a bottle tightly corked.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0264.xml
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139
139
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0265.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0266.xml
article
140
140,141,142,143
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A New Wireless Chain Between the Americas
“Damped” and “Undamped” Wireless Systems
A Typical Long-Distance Station
How Incoming Messages Are Handled
The Receiver of the Poulsen System
The Poulsen Arc Sender
[no value]
[no value]
John V. L. Hogan
IT has long been the ambitious dream of wireless men to supplement the present cable systems between the North and South American continents by means of a chain of high-powered radio-telegraph stations. Difficulties in securing concessions and capital, and (by no means least) apparatus capable of working continuously and dependably over great stretches of land and sea, have invariably interfered with the completion of the projected Pan-American systems.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0267.xml
advertisement
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0268.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
L.S.Starrett Co.
[no value]
L.S.Starrett Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0269.xml
article
143
143
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Ring and Chain Prevents the Theft of the Pressure Gage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GASOLINE service station attendant is responsible for the following kink. He lost several tire gages through motorists absent-mindedly slipping them into their pockets and forgetting to return them. After losing three in one week he enlisted the aid of a machinist.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0270.xml
article
143
143
PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Enlarging a Hole in a Small Pulley Without a Reamer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN doing some model work, a mechanic found himself without a hand reamer of the proper size to enlarge a hole in a small pulley. Looking about him for a substitute, he took a small round file less than 1/4 inin diameter and ran it through the hole. For the propelling power to revolve the pulley on the file, he used a driving belt from a sewing-machine wheel.
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0271.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, INC.
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0272.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0273.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0274.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
Victrola
[no value]
Victrola
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19181101_0093_005_0275.xml