Issue: 19180901

Sunday, September 1, 1918
September, 1918
3
True
93
Friday, December 12, 2014

Articles
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1
1
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AMERICAN CHAIN COMPANY, Inc.: Weed Chains
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AMERICAN CHAIN COMPANY, Inc.
Weed Chains
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0001.xml
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2
2
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Advertisement: United States Cycle Tires
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United States Cycle Tires
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0002.xml
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3
3
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Victor Talking Machine Co.
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Victor Talking Machine Co.
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0003.xml
advertisement
4
4
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SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION: CYPRESS
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SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS’ ASSOCIATION
CYPRESS
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0004.xml
tableOfContents
5
5,6
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Contents for September, 1918
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0005.xml
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7
7
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0006.xml
advertisement
8
8
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0007.xml
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9
9
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Chicago Technical College
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Chicago Technical College
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0008.xml
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10
10
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0009.xml
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11
11
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THEO. AUDEL & CO.: HAWKINS ELECTRICAL GUIDES
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THEO. AUDEL & CO.
HAWKINS ELECTRICAL GUIDES
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0010.xml
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12
12
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0011.xml
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13
13
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Advertisement: INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0012.xml
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14
14
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0013.xml
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15
15
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American Technical Society
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American Technical Society
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0014.xml
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16
16
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0015.xml
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17
17
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THEO. AUDEL & CO.: Marine ENGINEERS Guide
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THEO. AUDEL & CO.
Marine ENGINEERS Guide
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0016.xml
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18
18
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Burlington Watch Co.
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Burlington Watch Co.
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0017.xml
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19
19,20,21,22,23,24,26
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0018.xml
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25
25
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Advertisements
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CHIEF ENG. COOKE
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0019.xml
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27
27
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0020.xml
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28
28
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AMERICAN SCHOOL OF CORRESPONDENCE
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AMERICAN SCHOOL OF CORRESPONDENCE
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0021.xml
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29
29
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Advertisements
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HOW TO SPEAK IN PUBLIC
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HOW TO REMEMBER
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0022.xml
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29
29
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Engineers Equipment Co., Inc.
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Engineers Equipment Co., Inc.
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0023.xml
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30
30
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0024.xml
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31
31
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Rahe Auto & Tractor School
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Rahe Auto & Tractor School
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0025.xml
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32
32
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0026.xml
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32
32
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Lindstrom, Smith Co.
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Lindstrom, Smith Co.
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0027.xml
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33
33
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LIONEL STRONGFORT
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LIONEL STRONGFORT
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0028.xml
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34
34
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0029.xml
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35
35
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LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0030.xml
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36
36
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0031.xml
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37
37
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AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
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AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0032.xml
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38
38
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0033.xml
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39
39
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American School of Aviation
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American School of Aviation
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0034.xml
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40
40
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WASHINGTON SCHOOL OF ART, Inc.
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WASHINGTON SCHOOL OF ART, Inc.
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0035.xml
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40
40
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0036.xml
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41
41
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Advertisements
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AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
Civil Engineering
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
Architecture,Carpentry and Building
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0037.xml
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42
42
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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO.
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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO.
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0038.xml
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43
43
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0039.xml
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322
322
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0040.xml
article
323
323,324
WAR MECHANICS
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Now Comes the Sea Tank
Did the Italians blow up the Austrian dreadnought in Pola with an American wheeled submarine?
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Robert G. Skerrett
WHEN Lieutenant Commander Pellegrini forced his way into the harbor of Pola and sank at least one of Austria's biggest dreadnoughts, what sort of craft did he command? The dispatches say that he used a "sea tank," and that "the boat was forty feet long, six feet wide, and propelled by electricity.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0041.xml
article
325
325
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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How France Protects Her Soldiers' Eyes
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FOUR-FIFTHS of the cases in which soldiers sustain serious injuries of their eyes can be avoided, according to the statistics collected by Professor Terrien, an eminent French eye specialist. Only in one out of every five cases the injury produced by bullets, shrapnel, or splinters of bombs or shells is of such nature that it could not have been prevented by any ordinary safeguard.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0042.xml
article
325
325
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Golfers! Here's a Way to Practise Putting Indoors
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A PUTTING disk has been invented for practising golf indoors and also for playing a game, which consists in driving a golf ball into a trap with the least number of strokes. A ball struck with enough force to knock over or upset the disk does not count.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0043.xml
article
325
325
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A Magnet for Removing Metal Chips
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A MAGNET taken out of an old house telephone can be used for removing metal chips made in drilling. If the magnet is too large to go into the hole it can be placed in contact with a small rod as an extension. Several magnets tied together will recover tools dropped down an open partition.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0044.xml
article
326
326
MISCELLANY
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The "Harpitar," a Cross Between the Guitar and the Harp
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"HOW can I improve the sound of the guitar?" asked Mr. R. E. Bates of Brooklyn, N. Y., speaking to himself of course, after the manner of inventors. Then he answered the question by thrumming the "harpitar," an instrument in which he has combined harp and guitar.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0045.xml
article
326
326
MISCELLANY
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Bee Culture in Macedonia Is Primitive
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MACEDONIA, one of the most turbulent sections in the Balkan states, from which many a cry has startled a suffering world, does not seem to have progressed a great deal in civilization since the days of the great Alexander. Life in Macedonia is conducted on the most primitive lines, and the same is true of agriculture, the various trades, commerce and the methods of transportation.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0046.xml
article
327
327
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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For the Man Who Goes Off and Forgets to Water the Geraniums
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LEONARD I. LELIEVRE must have studied the kerosene lamp before he evolved the flower-pot for which the United States Government recently granted him a patent. If, he reasoned, oil can be soaked up by a wick and a lamp kept burning, why shouldn’t a wick keep the earth in a flower-pot moist?
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0047.xml
article
327
327
MISCELLANY
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Restricting Nanny's Milk Diet by Making Her Wear a "Choker"
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THE goat in the accompanying picture does not affect the latest style of fashion in goat-collars. Neither does she wear the crate around her neck because of a sore throat or other ailment. Nanny has to wear this "choker" because she had acquired the habit of milking herself and thus robbing her young of the necessary nourishment.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0048.xml
article
327
327
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Manufacturing Explosives Can Be Made Safer than Railroading
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DR. W. G. HUDSON, chairman of the Subcommittee on Industrial Diseases and Poisons, Council of National Defense, says that the automatic machinery which will replace human labor is of far more importance to the manufacture of explosives than the reduction of labor costs brought about by such substitution.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0049.xml
article
328
328,329
PICTURE PAGES
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Uncle Sam's School for Training Engineers Who Are to Back Up the Army in France
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0050.xml
article
330
330
PICTURE PAGES
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Trampling Out the Rice That Feeds Them
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0051.xml
article
331
331
PICTURE PAGES
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Mr. Hoover, Please Take Notice
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0052.xml
article
332
332,333
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They Used to Beat Swords into Plowshares. But Shells and Bullets— Here Is What We Do to Them
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0053.xml
article
334
334
PICTURE PAGES
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Butterflies That Go South Every Autumn
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0054.xml
article
335
335
PICTURE PAGES
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Not Monks, But Camouflaged Artillerymen
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0055.xml
article
336
336,337
PICTURE PAGES
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Miles and Miles of Printed Birds, Flowers, Stripes and Animals for the Nation's Walls
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0056.xml
article
338
338,339
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Out of Sight Usually Is Every Ship's Propeller; But It Is Too Important Ever to be Out of Mind
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0057.xml
article
340
340
PICTURE PAGES
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How They Wore 'Em Away Back in the Fifties
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0058.xml
article
341
341
PICTURE PAGES
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The Ford Idea Applied to Art
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PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0059.xml
article
342
342,343
MISCELLANY
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Every Year One Hundred and Sixty Million Dollars Goes Up in Smoke—All a Preventable Loss
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The pictures on this page and the next are based on statistics gathered by the National Board of Fire Underwriters
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0060.xml
article
344
344
MISCELLANY
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Primitive Peoples Must Have Music and Dancing
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CHRISTIAN LEDEN
To the Eskimos, as well as to other primitive peoples, music and dancing are important mediums for the expression of their feelings, and much needed outlets for their excessive energy and vital force. In the summer, they ramble from place to place, engaged in a merry struggle with the wild beasts, and enjoy the excitements and pleasures of an adventurous life, but in winter, when the long and appalling monotony of the polar night overpowers them with its stillness and its cold, singing and dancing are their most important safety-valves.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0061.xml
article
344
344
CHEMISTRY
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A Few Facts About Picric Acid, Base of Explosives
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COAL-TAR, among many other things, contains phenol, and when phenol is nitrated picric acid is produced. This acid is a powerful explosive, but it has the objectionable quality of forming highly sensitive explosive compounds with the metals it touches, so that when used as a charge for shells it has to be coated with some non-metallic paint in order to prevent premature explosions.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0062.xml
article
344
344
MISCELLANY
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They Trim This Ship's Sails with the Shears
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THIS is not the captain of the Pinafore, but an ingenious old gardener who has trained a yew tree on an estate near Cadnam, England, into the semblance of a ship. The gardener may be observed just abaft the foremast engaged in trimming something that may be a sail with a pair of hedge shears.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0063.xml
article
345
345
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Crucible Gives Way to Electric Furnace in the Brass Foundry
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FOR many years brass, copper, or similar metals for pouring into castings or ingots have been melted only in crucibles. This is still the practice in many plants and foundries in this country. Until recently no other method would serve because of losses due to too high a temperature or to some other cause.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0064.xml
article
345
345
WAR MECHANICS
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Draft Animals in the War. Five Millions on West Front
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THE British have two million horses engaged in this war, according to Premier Lloyd George in a recent statement. It is estimated that the number of horses and mules in service on the whole western front is close upon five millions. A great many horses have been shipped to Europe from America —just how many it is hard to say, and doubtless many were drowned.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0065.xml
article
345
345
WAR MECHANICS
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A Six-Dog-Power Sledge-Wagon For Overseas Service
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READY for Flanders mud or Alpine snow, this dog-drawn ambulance has been given to the American Red Cross for foreign service. It was built by Allen M'Mullen, a trapper, who had handled dog trains in the far North and who took a special delight in training the six great Danes, all blue ribbon winners, that furnish the motive power.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0066.xml
article
346
346,347
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Dame Nature—Instructor in Camouflage
She knew all about the art and her children practised it long before man gave it a name
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A. M. Jungmann
WHY does the savage paint himself in gaudy colors when he goes on the war-path? Why is the leopard spotted and the zebra striped? Why is the wild duck a mottled dark color on top and light beneath? For the same reason that our "tanks" and ambulances are being painted with stripes and splotches of vivid colors—to make them invisible to their enemies.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0067.xml
article
348
348
WAR MECHANICS
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If You're in the Navy These Girls Have Your Finger-Prints
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TO the four girls in this picture belongs the Navy record for holding hands. It is sense not sentiment that moves them, since they are the finger-print experts of the service and have recorded, classified and filed an impression of the digits of every bluejacket from the admiral down to the latest recruit.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0068.xml
article
348
348
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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Blow Bubbles and Heal Your Wounded Lungs
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SIMPLE methods have been devised for treating wounded soldiers at the front. Those suffering from wounds in the throat and chest can improve their condition by blowing bubbles in a bottle of water, according to Dr. Pescher, a French surgeon.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0069.xml
article
349
349
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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The Bell Rings When You Forget Your Fountain Pen
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HAVE you the habit of walking away and leaving your fountain pen on a strange desk? If so, you will be interested in the device which Dermot Donelan of London has invented. You must, of course, use a special kind of fountain pen—one which has a case with spring holders having one side free to move by means of their own elasticity.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0070.xml
article
349
349
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Relieving the Hand That Rocks the Cradle
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WONDERFUL as this age of invention is, no one dreamed that some day the wealth of energy wasted by the swinging of a rocking-chair would be intrepidly harnessed, subdued, and regulated to do the work of mankind. But, nevertheless, this very thing has been accomplished by an inventor in the State of Wisconsin.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0071.xml
article
350
350
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Drying Sea Water to Get Salt— the Spanish Way
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THE use of salt for seasoning and preserving foods is so ancient that the earliest written records refer to it. For many centuries practically all the salt used by the human race was procured by the evaporation of sea water. This method of obtaining salt is still employed in many localities where the conditions are favorable.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0072.xml
article
350
350
WAR MECHANICS
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A Roumanian Oil Tank That Was Camouflaged Into a Grove
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THE art of camouflage has been practised in this war by all belligerents more or less skilfully, and particularly on the West front it reached its highest development. But even in the Balkan countries the value of camouflage was recognized and the accompanying picture shows that the Roumanians were not unskilful in disguising important buildings and other structures—oil tanks, for instance.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0073.xml
article
351
351
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
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Learning How to Judge Sheep in a University
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NOW, as never before, the country needs both wool and mutton. Our soldiers require wool for uniforms and blankets, and both the men in the service and the noncombatants must have meat. Therefore, the raising and breeding of sheep has become a very important and profitable branch of farming.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0074.xml
article
351
351
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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A Book-Rack Which Adjusts Itself Automatically
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TABLE book-racks are always a convenience, and can be made very attractive and ornamental too. With the ordinary rack, however, the removal of two or three books causes general disorder, for all the rest fall over and make the appearance anything but prepossessing.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0075.xml
article
352
352
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Every Auto Has a Picnic Seat All Its Own
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[no value]
[no value]
MUCH of the comfort in life comes of making good use of the things we have. Mrs. William J. Chievitz, of Cleveland, Ohio, proved that when she found that the seat cushions of her automobile and two sticks made the most restful of outdoor couches.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0076.xml
article
352
352
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Automatic Telephone System Invented by Undertaker
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INVENTORS who have new ideas which are foreign to their vocations or lines of business may derive encouragement from the fact that the inventor of the first practical system of automatic telephony was Almon B. Strowger, of Kansas City, who took out a patent in 1889.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0077.xml
article
352
352
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Carry a Wardrobe on Your Car's Running-Board
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TOURISTS traveling long distances in their automobile do not mind wearing old and even shabby clothes while they are riding. But, when they stop at some fashionable hotel or at the elegant summer home of their friends, they want to appear at their best.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0078.xml
article
353
353
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
The Parachute de Luxe
This safety contrivance has almost all the conveniences of an up-to-date hotel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHY don't our War Department officials wake up? We present here for their serious consideration a recently invented parachute which provides all the conveniences of a hotel. It's a joy to trust one's life to that parachute, after a balloon has been shot to pieces or an airplane has become unmanageable.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0079.xml
article
354
354
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Milk and Churn Are Both Supplied by the Goat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ABOUT seventy miles northwest of Mount Sinai—where, as you remember, Moses received the Commandments—is a butter factory, the machinery of which has not been improved since his day. It consists of a bag of goat skin suspended from a tripod of poles.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0080.xml
article
354
354
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Weld the Liberty Bell So It Can Speak for Victory
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT has been suggested that the Liberty Bell be welded with an oxyacetylene welding torch and rung when the Germans are beaten and the war is ended. Welding restores the tone of a bell completely, making it as melodious as when new. Welding should be done on the inside of the bell.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0081.xml
article
354
354
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Making the Dirt Fly in Korea on the Tug-of-War Principle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN they have an important excavating job on hand in Korea, the contractor doesn't have to wear out brain matter worrying over machinery to do the work. All he needs is a broad shovel with two holes through the blade, two stout ropes roved through the holes and plenty of man power to pull.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0082.xml
article
355
355
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
The Horse of Joy—A New Outlet for Animal Spirits at Coney Island
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXPRESS no surprise if the barkers at the amusement resorts plead, "Here you are, boys, lift a ton and suffocate; it’s barrels of fun." It will simply assure you that Otto Fritsche, a jovial citizen of Ulm, Minnesota, has succeeded in introducing a device which is intended to give you another outlet for your pent-up but exuberant spirits.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0083.xml
article
355
355
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Making Them Stop, Look, Heed, and Help
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SILENT but most efficient worker in the “safety first” campaign of the United Gas Improvement Company, of Philadelphia, is a box provided with a flashing light which throws into bold relief lantern slides that teach lessons of carefulness or display “horrible examples.”
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0084.xml
article
356
356
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Handling Tons of Metal Like a Toy
A giant blacksmith of steel and iron with a human brain in full control
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DID you ever watch a blacksmith at work, forging a horseshoe or some other object of wrought iron or steel? With his tongs he draws the glowing metal from its bed of fire in the forge, and resting it upon the anvil he begins to hammer it into shape.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0085.xml
article
357
357
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Tale of a Tub, for Which Supply Your Own Moral
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE man who put the bathtub where it appears in the picture is not a crank on open-air bathing. In fact, we hasten to appease Mrs. Grundy by announcing that the tub has been turned from its original purpose and made into a very efficient trough for horses.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0086.xml
article
357
357
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
The Physical Sciences and the World War
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ACCORDING to Dr. G. W. Crile, writing in the Pennsylvania Medical Journal, "The present war is a contest of ideas rather than of men. In its broad sense it is the practical application of physics, chemistry and biology in a mass struggle for the existence of nations.”
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0087.xml
article
357
357
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Automobiles in the Philippines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the Philippines civilization is progressing slowly outside of Manila and some other centers of population. The accompanying picture shows one of the primitive ferries which cross the Sumag River. It is merely a big bamboo raft, unpretentious and crude, but it is evidently strong enough to ferry an automobile across the picturesque river.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0088.xml
article
358
358
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Hair-Cut? Yes?—Then Poke Your Head Through This Lampshade!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SCORES of inventions have been made and generally introduced by which the various beautifying operations usually performed in barber shops were made more satisfactory and less painful. But the bib or apron, that traditional concomitant of hair-cuts, has endured through centuries, in spite of its disgusting and unsanitary features.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0089.xml
article
358
358
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
A Silent Alarm Wrist Watch That Burns the Sleeper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SILENT alarm wrist watch has been designed with the object in view of waking a person without annoying the neighbors. If successfully attained, the object should be much appreciated in the average boarding house and is worthy of commendation.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0090.xml
article
359
359
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
It Takes Fifty Men to Transport an Observation Balloon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KITE balloons are used extensively in the present war on all fronts. Together with the numerous airplanes employed by both sides, they constitute the most important means for observation and fire control. Observation balloons are particularly useful in trench war, which, as a rule, means practical immobility of the lines for long periods.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0091.xml
article
359
359
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Look for the Pigmy Elephant When You Go to the Circus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO specimens of a hitherto unknown species of elephant, a real dwarf variety, have been captured in Africa and were recently taken to England. This is considered a most important zoological discovery, comparable with that of the okapi in the Congo forest several years ago.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0092.xml
article
360
360
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
A Fine Chance for Trouble Here When the Fish Begin to Bite
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LOOK at the picture of the ocean pier, crowded to the limit with men and women fishing for mackerel. They may catch fish, perhaps tons of them. Is that sport? Lines become tangled, hooks fasten themselves to hats, clothing and skin of the fishermen, and the scorching sunlight, reflected also by the water, burns and blisters the skin, adding tortures to the discomforts and irritation of the sweltering crowd.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0093.xml
article
360
360
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
One-Man Submarines Have Been Found Impracticable
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"MANY hundreds of proposals," says a bulletin recently issued by the Navy Department, "have been received, advocating one-man submarines and submarines of small size, to be manufactured in great numbers for the purpose of attacking and destroying the larger type of enemy submarines.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0094.xml
article
361
361
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Shock for the Thief Who Steals This Bag
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE sneak-thief or holdup man who snatches a bag or suit case equipped with the alarm device recently invented by Alexander Bull is likely to get the shock of his life. It's a simple device, which may be attached to any sort of bag or grip and which consists of a bell and blank cartridge alarm which are actuated by pulling on a string looped around the wrist.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0095.xml
article
361
361
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Teaching Waiters to Wait
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE traveling public patronizing the dining cars is fastidious and impatient and the waiters in these cars must be exceptionally efficient to satisfy the patrons. To maintain the highest degree of efficiency of service in their dining cars, one of the large western railroad corporations has established a school which all the waiters in their dining cars are required to attend.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0096.xml
article
362
362,363,364,365
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
On Wings Across the Ocean to Fight
Giant bombing seaplanes which will travel to Europe in a day
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE struts that separate her vast wings suggest the pillars of a portico; her body is as long as a Pullman car; her cockpit is so roomy that men can move about in it comfortably and even lie down to sleep. For this is the giant HandleyPage, the machine in which the Atlantic is to be crossed—a voyage as epochal in every way as that upon which Columbus set out in 1492.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0097.xml
article
366
366,367
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Housekeeping Made Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0098.xml
article
368
368
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Turn a Knob and Become a Composer of Music
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is possible for anyone to invent musical themes, provided he is able to read notes. A machine designed to aid in the composition of music and the playing of it as well has been invented by Arthur F. Blanchard, a member of the Massachusetts Legislature, in collaboration with Frank H. Grey, music composer.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0099.xml
article
368
368
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Letter More Than Thirty-Eight Feet Long Without a Blot
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A LETTER thirty-eight feet and ten inches in length has been sent to Frank Vaillancourt, a private in Company L, 104th Infantry, now in France, by his friends in Chicopee, Mass. More than fifty persons contributed to the letter, which was written in English, French and German.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0100.xml
article
369
369
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Discovered—A Cot that Doesn't Sag in the Middle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SLEEPING on a cot is an experience not likely to be enumerated among the pleasures of life. You lie down tired, and wake up next morning, if you have slept at all, more tired than ever. What’s wrong? The cots. They sag in the middle when you lie upon them.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0101.xml
article
369
369
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Mosquito Bar for the Automobile to Keep the Bugs Away
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PRACTICAL new automobile accessory is a windshield screen which permits the motorist to keep his windshield open and still be protected from insects of all kinds. The device is a window-screen set in a wood or metal frame, which is attached at both ends to the uprights of the windshield.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0102.xml
article
370
370
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Moving Day for the Shipping Board Made Easy by Motor-Trucks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RECENTLY motor-trucks were employed to move the entire office equipment of one branch of the government a distance of 167 miles. When it was decided to move the office of the Shipping Board from Washington to Philadelphia, so that the workers would be near the center of the actual shipbuilding along the Atlantic coast, it was found that by the fastest railroad freight it would take from four to eight days to move the office equipment.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0103.xml
article
370
370,371
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Give a Spy-Glass and Help Sink a German Submarine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PERISCOPE can hide as coyly as a periwinkle (though why periwinkles are coy we do not know), and something more than the naked eye is needed when you go hunting the U-boat. That is one reason why, when we began to turn out submarinechasers by the mile and cut them off in lengths to suit, the Navy Department at Washington asked everybody to send in his, or her, pet spy-glass, telescope, field-glass, or whatever they had that might be useful in peering for periscopes.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0104.xml
article
371
371
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Canal-Boats that Climb Hills, and How They Do It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Morris Canal, which begins at Jersey City, winds its way leisurely through the State of New Jersey until it reaches Phillipsburg on the Delaware, where it connects with the Lehigh Canal system of Pennsylvania. The canal was opened in 1836, and was at one time a fairly important waterway for the transportation of coal from the Pennsylvania coal-fields.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0105.xml
article
372
372,373,374
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Great Fortunes Are Thrown A way on River that Burns
Wastes Now Being Eliminated
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PRODIGAL RIVER runs through the Land of Waste and empties into the Bay of Squander. Whenever its castaway riches of chemicals, gases, oils, and gums catch fire, its economic sin is proclaimed throughout the country. The last spendthrift carnival occurred not very long ago, when someone set fire to this stream of extravagance—the Passaic River.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0106.xml
article
374
374
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Piping Oil from One Pitching Ship to Another at Sea
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE bunkering of sufficient fuel is a serious problem for ships of comparatively small tonnage starting on long cruises. Under war conditions, it becomes necessary to supply the ship with fuel from another ship at sea. Transferring fuel from one ship to another while both are on the high sea has been a difficult problem to solve.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0107.xml
article
375
375
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
The Death that Drops from the Skies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0108.xml
article
376
376
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
The Sliding Chair—It Reduces Fatigue in the Factory
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LONG before the true interrelations between economy and efficiency were generally understood, some pioneers in scientific management reached several important conclusions. They found, among other things, that it is in the interest of economy or efficiency to keep workers and machinery in the best possible condition.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0109.xml
article
376
376
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
On This Stretcher You Can Carry a Patient in Any Position
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE safest and best way of transporting an injured man is to carry him on a stretcher. The stretcher, with the injured man resting on it, is usually carried horizontally, But suppose space is limited —a narrow passage, for instance? It is just this situation that is met in an invention introduced by Dr. F. E. Clough, chief surgeon of a mining company in Lead, S. D.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0110.xml
article
377
377
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Big Sirens to Warn New York of Air Raiders
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT may never happen, but an attack on the Atlantic coast cities by hostile air raiders is by no means impossible. The military authorities have provided means of defence that are believed to be adequate, and the municipal authorities are furnishing means of warning the people of the approach of air raiders.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0111.xml
article
377
377
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Paris Is Now Making Even Its Cellars Bomb-Proof
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHETHER it be a cyclone or a bombing raid, the safest place in time of danger from the air is the cellar. So, when the siren shrieks its warning in Paris, the people seek safety underground. Once in a while, however, a shell bursts just outside and deathdealing pieces rain through the cellar windows.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0112.xml
article
378
378,379
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Diving for Millions in a Giant Bell
After the war there will be a rush for the fortunes lying in torpedoed ships at the bottom of the sea
A Machine-Shop Under Water
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DO you want a fortune that would make John D. Rockefeller jealous? It's easy. Just invent a sure means of raising the great fleet of torpedoed ships that lie in comparatively shallow water. But you'd better hurry. Here’s W. D. Sisson, of Los Angeles, Cal., already in the field with a huge diving-bell with which he plans to raise ships by an upto-date application of the pontoon method.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0113.xml
article
380
380,381
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
An Airmen's Dictionary
Just as Tommy in the trenches uses terms of his own invention, so have aviators of the American and British air services made their own vocabulary
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COLLISION FIRING.—Shooting at an enemy airplane flying in the same direction with the object of placing the shots where the enemy will run into them. CONTACT.—The closing of the ignition switch controlling the engine of the flying machine.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0114.xml
article
381
381
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Safety First Wherever the Rivet-Heads Fly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE commonest method of removing rivets is to cut off their heads with chisel and hammer, and then to punch them out with some appropriate tool. In railway shops and other establishments,where a great many rivets have to be removed, the flying rivet - heads have always beenasource of actual danger to the employees working near the place where the rivet-heads were chiseled off.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0115.xml
article
382
382
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Using the Man-Lifting Kite to Watch the Enemy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN England, and also in the United States, experiments were made long before the war to test the utility of mancarrying kites for making observations and taking photographs. The use of kites for observation purposes was suggested and tried in England by Colonel Cody (not "Buffalo Bill," but another American) years ago.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0116.xml
article
382
382
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
Oxidizing Carbon to Make a Powerful Explosive
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF liquid oxygen is combined with carbonaceous material in the proper proportions, it will make an explosive powerful enough for industrial use. The Germans, under stress of necessity, have already done this, and the United States is now conducting experiments along the same lines.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0117.xml
article
383
383
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Marines' Bullets Win in Race with Death
An incident in the recent German drive toward Paris
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT was in the early stages of the recent German drive toward Paris. At Chateau-Thierry, a small town on the Marne south by west of Rheims, American marines formed part of the Allied line. One-third of the town is north of the Marne, two-thirds are south, and a single bridge connects the two sections.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0118.xml
article
384
384
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
When You're Ready to Peel Those Fresh-Water Pearls
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT is the man in the accompanying picture doing? Wearing twostory eye-glasses, the four lenses of which form a combination equivalent in power to a low-power binocular microscope; and, armed with a sharp knife, he is peeling a fresh-water pearl.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0119.xml
article
384
384
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Are There Potato-Bugs in Your War Garden?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"IF the vacuum cleaner will suck dust off the floor, it should pick the bugs off the potato plants in my garden," reasoned Mr. Stanley Smith, of Cincinnati, and proceeded to put his theory to the test. Like many other suburbanites, he was trying to raise potatoes in his back lot.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0120.xml
article
385
385
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Learning on Land How to Pot U-Boats at Sea
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY things that the fighting sailor must know are being taught on land, in these days of intensive training. You might think that to learn to shoot German submarines you would first have to catch your submarine; but not so. A strip of canvas, a toy submarine, and a few pieces of white paper are all that is needed.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0121.xml
article
385
385
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
To Help the Boys in the Trenches to Keep Clean
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNFORTUNATELY, trenches, especially those just dug, are not furnished with bath-tubs and hot and cold water. There may be water—perhaps more than desirable—but no way of collecting it conveniently for washing. The soldier who carries in his kit one of the collapsible rubber wash basins recently placed on the market is indeed fortunate.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0122.xml
article
386
386
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Fighting in a Three-Decker Airplane
Fokker produces a fast triplane in which von Richthofen is killed
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
VON RICHTHOFEN, the German flyer who had more victories to his credit than any other living or dead rival, was killed in a triplane. It was a Fokker of a new type, which the German army had rejected, but which von Richthofen thought was well worth trying.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0123.xml
article
387
387
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Von Richthofen Flies to His Death
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
It was in this formidable-looking three-decker Fokker fighting-plane that von Richthofen, the greatest of German airmen, flew to his death. On this Fokker triplane head-on resistance has been cut down by eliminating all wires, and by a new form of landing wheels, mere disks of a stream-line design.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0124.xml
article
388
388
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Honey-Bees that Motor to the Flowers
Being an ingenious method of making the busy bee even busier
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BEEKEEPER of southern California has found a successful way of offsetting the high cost of living. He takes the bees to the flowers by automobile, thus making the most of the blossoming seasons in different localities. The bee-moving process has long been experimented with by others, but Mr. L. R. Mercer, of Castaic, Cal., has demonstrated that it can be made a success.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0125.xml
article
389
389
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Real Battle Flags of Blood and Brawn
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Betsy Ross fashioned the first American flag of silk. How her heart would have leaped could she have visioned these giant, living emblems in which the young manhood of the Republic again pledges its allegiance. The one above—a storm warning for German submarines—was displayed at a Pacific coast training station
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0126.xml
article
390
390
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Forward, the Tractor Brigade!
The American guns will keep pace with the advancing infantry in any drive
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR days before the big drive the artillery has been firing over the heads of the infantry, which is "dug in" along the edge of No Man's Land, keeping up a terrific bombardment of the enemy lines. The hostile trenches have been destroyed or made uninhabitable; the hostile guns within range have been silenced; and the road is cleared for the drive.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0127.xml
article
391
391
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Flying on the Ground with the "Joy-Stick"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TIGHT-ROPE walking requires a well developed sense of balance and a highly responsive action of the muscles. But, in some respects, tight-rope walking is not so hard as maintaining your balance while flying through the air at great speed.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0128.xml
article
391
391
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Champion Flame-Fighter at Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FIRE-ENGINE that can stay on the job for two days and a half, throwing 625 gallons of water every minute, and never stopping for an instant, ought to be able to conquer a stubborn blaze. That’s the record made recently at Chicago by a new combination automobile fire-engine and truck.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0129.xml
article
392
392,393,394,395,396,397
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
How We Are Making an Army of Champions
Motion Pictures Have Been Called to the Colors to Aid the General Staff in Increasing the Fighting Efficiency of American Soldiers
The Job of Raising an Army in a Republic
The Army Makes Use of Our National Pastime
Mr. Browning Tells About His Wonderful Gun
The Three Types Used in the Army
Whole Process Simplified by Moving Pictures
How Our Army Was Speeded Up
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT makes a man a champion? Not brute strength alone, not aptitude alone, although strength and aptitude are requisites. If merely brute force and luck were required to drive home a bayonet, a modern army would be nothing more than an armed mob.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0130.xml
article
398
398,399
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Giving Mechanical Aid and Comfort to the Automobile Owner and Driver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0131.xml
article
400
400
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Not a U-Boat—Just a Snag in the River
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE sinking of the excursion steamer Columbia in the Illinois River recently is another illustration of the fact that, even in this day, man is not yet complete-. ly master of the elements. Compared to an ocean voyage, with its perils from submarine and storm, a trip on the Illinois River seems safety itself; and certainly there was no thought of peril in the minds of the five hundred men, women, and children who had enjoyed a perfect summer day on the water and were returning home.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0132.xml
article
400
400
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
No Wonder This Bull Put Up at the Best Hotel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DURING the shorthorn cattle sale at Ashville last May, Mr. Roan Prince and Mrs. White Rose were guests at the Hotel Langren, and we are privileged to present their pictures, posed in the special suite prepared for them. The bull and his lady were entertained by the Red Cross.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0133.xml
article
401
401
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Promoting an Ordinary Steel Pen into a Fountain Pen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY means of an ink-feeding attachment that can readily be affixed, an ordinary steel pen can be transformed into a fountain pen, which writes as many as five hundred words without refilling. As shown in the photograph, the ink-spoon serves as a reservoir for the ink, which runs down the slit in the nib as needed.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0134.xml
article
401
401
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Motor-Cycle Ladder in Electric Light Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A COLLAPSIBLE ladder strapped to a motorcycle, as shown in the illustration on the right, is employed by the electric department of Pretoria, South Africa, for installation, repair work, disconnecting and connecting. Pretoria, which is one mile wide and seven miles in length, has 4,600 electric light consumers who are supplied by wires supported by poles thirty-six feet in height.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0135.xml
article
401
401
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Mines and Mining at the Battle-Front
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASIDE from fighting and keeping a close watch on the enemy, soldiers in the front line trenches are busy digging more trenches or improving their dugouts when on duty. Occasionally some are detailed to dig tunnels and lay mines. These mining operations are carried on under the direction of army engineers.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0136.xml
article
402
402
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Shooting Birds from Airplanes— A New Sport
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NO sport is so ancient and captivating as hunting. It was not always sport. In the early days of the human race hunting was a necessity, almost the only means of subsistence. Later it became the favorite pastime of a constantly narrowing circle of devotees.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0137.xml
article
402
402
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION PICTURES
[no value]
Even Far-Off Fez Succumbs to the Fascination of Moving Pictures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVEN the dark-skinned natives of picturesque Fez are not able to resist the fascination of moving pictures. The interesting and thoroughly characteristic street scene in Fez, shown in the accompanying picture, bears witness to that fascination.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0138.xml
article
403
403,404,405,406,407
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Driving Them Nine a Minute
Unearthly din in our shipyards foretells trouble for the Kaiser
How a Championship Riveting Team Is Made Up
What Five Extra Rivets per Gang in an Hour Means
[no value]
[no value]
Frank Parker Stockbridge
THE contest for the title of "World's Champion Riveter" is in full swing. Records are being broken almost weekly. The competition began in March of this year and the title has passed since then twice across the ocean; from the Atlantic Coast to the Great Lakes, and for a few minutes to the Pacific, with the Gulf ports as strong contenders.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0139.xml
article
408
408
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Oiling Your Automobile Without Soiling Your Hands
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INSTEAD of having to fuss with oiling your spring shackles, brake-rod connections, universal joints, etc., and get yourself oily and greasy into the bargain, why not make the regular oil pump of the automobile engine do the work automatically for you?
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0140.xml
article
408
408
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Concrete Ships Contain Forty-Two and One-Half Per Cent Steel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT has been figured out that in ships built of reinforced concrete the weight of steel is about 42½ per cent. of that in a steel ship. This estimate is based on a ship 205 feet long, 32 feet beam and 19½ feet draft.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0141.xml
article
408
408
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
How Slabs Are Hauled by Electricity
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the recent devices designed to save man labor is the slab-handling storage battery truck, which is employed at the plant of a steel company in Cleveland to haul heavy pieces of steel from the storage yard to the heating furnaces. The distance approximates five hundred feet.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0142.xml
article
409
409
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Why You Must Have Two Good Eyes to Be a Flyer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FAMOUS English physician, Sir Watson Cheyne, in speaking recently regarding the medical aspect of aviation, says that an aviator must have true binocular vision, especially when traveling at great speed, and there must also be a very rapid connection between the sight and the action.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0143.xml
article
409
409
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
No More Fumbling in the Dark for That Key
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW many times have you fumbled in the dark for the door key, fingering over half the bunch on your keyring, picking out the wrong one and burning up a lot of energy in foolish impatience? That has been the common lot of key-bearing humans, but it does not need to be now, since there has been placed on the market a key-ring with a special section for the most used key.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0144.xml
article
409
409
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
An Electric Pad Instead of an Incubator
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRIC heating pads have already proved useful in the hospital; and now a new type, designed for general use, has been put on the market. It is a modification of the hospital type of pad, and contains a thermostat in a sealed box and wound with the continuation of the German silver wire that forms the main heating element.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0145.xml
article
410
410
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION PICTURES
[no value]
You Can Sight a Camera Like a Rifle with This Finder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MR. C. C. CARPENTER, of Akron, Ohio, has invented a lensless direct view finder which is easily attached and which enables the operator to see his object right up to the moment of exposure. The new finder is merely a half-cylinder about an inch in diameter, with no lens, attached directly over the lens of the camera to the body of the camera by a tongue and loop.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0146.xml
article
410
410
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Secret Organization Builds a Clubhouse of Driftwood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Arctic Brotherhood, whose home in Skagway is shown in the accompanying illustration, is a secret society the rules of which permit the formation of a "camp," or lodge, only north of the parallel 54 degrees 40 minutes, the southern limit of Alaska.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0147.xml
article
410
410
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
What Is the Color of a Smell?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAN we say that a thing has a "green odor," or a "pink smell"? Professor R. W. Wood of Johns Hopkins thinks so. It seems that colors bear a certain relation to odors. This is especially true of gases. Bromine and peroxide of nitrogen, for instance, are both reddish-brown in color, and although chemically different they affect the sense of smell in the same disagreeable manner.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0148.xml
article
411
411
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
This Machine Will Make the Most Fractious Fraction Behave
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIFE is to be made easier for accountants and draftsmen by the invention of a device that will add and subtract fractions with a minimum expenditure of brain power. The device consists of two superimposed disks, one smaller than the other, pivoted at their centers.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0149.xml
article
411
411
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Removing the Dents Caused by a Fast Life
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS is a silverware hospital with A. L. Barth as surgeon. He is called a repair man instead of doctor; his operating room is the Union Pacific Railroad's repair shops at Omaha, and his patients are the silver pots and bowls bearing the dents and scars of their strenuous dining-car life.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0150.xml
article
412
412,413
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Do It with Tools and Machines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0151.xml
article
414
414
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Making the Safety Zone Post Resilient and Safe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER his auto had bumped a few safety zone posts, resulting in disfigurement of both post and car, Stanley Kempner, of New York city, hit upon the idea of using rubber in place of iron for the post rods. In his invention the base of the zone post is iron, as in the ones commonly in use, and the plate—where one is used—bearing the “Safety Zone” sign, is also of metal, but the connecting rod is of hard rubber.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0152.xml
article
414
414
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Washington May Get Along Without Traffic Policemen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO avoid congestion at busy street crossings in Washington, D. C., a new system of "rotary traffic" has been adopted. The purpose of it is to prevent any “left turns,” and automobiles must go around the circle marked on the pavement, when they want to shunt off in that direction.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0153.xml
article
414
414
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Twenty Miles an Hour Is the Most Economical Touring Speed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS the automobile touring season is now in full swing it may be well to remind the autoist of the proved fact that the most economical touring speed is from twenty to twenty-five miles an hour. Fast driving on tours means increased fuel consumption, greater strain on the car and its occupants as well as lower mileage.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0154.xml
article
415
415
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Caring for the Teeth of Our Soldiers
Because an army fights with its teeth as well as with bullets
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR the first time in history the American Government has assumed supervision and control of the teeth of the Army and Navy. In full recognition of the importance of sound teeth the military authorities pay careful attention to the condition of the teeth of the volunteers and drafted men who present themselves for examination as to their fitness.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0155.xml
article
416
416
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Blow Your Megaphone-Whistle to Proclaim Your Patriotism
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN Eastern novelty concern has placed in the market, a new instrument of torture. We suppose that it must be classified as a musical instrument. It is a megaphone whistle which sounds both "coming and going," like the reeds of a mouth harp. It will produce noise enough to satisfy the most patriotic youngster.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0156.xml
article
416
416
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Change the Electric Light Bowls to Suit Your Taste
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOMETHING new in electric light fixtures has been placed upon the market, that will greatly please women, who often wish to change the color scheme of a room, perhaps for one evening. This, of course, includes the light globes, and new globes are expensive.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0157.xml
article
416
416
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
How Can We Save Potash Now Wasted in Smoke?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. CURTIS H. THWING, of the University of Washington, has been examining the ashes found in the incinerators of lumber-mills in the Northwest, with a view to conserving the potash salts from them. He found that the flue dust contained only about seven per cent of potash.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0158.xml
article
417
417
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Good-bye, Axe! They Chop Down Trees with Gasoline Now
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN automobile truck comes to a stop among the big timber. Two men lift a heavy framework of iron rods and pipes from the truck, while two other men drive four stakes at equal distances around the base of one of the giant trees and connect each pair by nailing planks to them at a height of about two feet.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0159.xml
article
417
417
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Making the Perch Sanitary for the Hen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW to make hen houses vermin-proof has been solved by a Michigan man who has invented a hollow perch containing germ-killing disinfectants which seep through and destroy all hen-troubling pests. The perches are connected with a gravity supply tank holding a gallon of the disinfectant and each perch has a dripping plug to regulate the flow.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0160.xml
article
417
417
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
What Makes an Airplane?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INCLUDED in the materials necessary for one airplane are: Nails, 4,326; screws, 3,337; steel stamping, 921; forgings, 798; turnbuckles, 276; wire, 3,262 feet; aluminum, 65 pounds; spruce, 244 feet; pine, fifty-eight feet; ash, thirty-one feet, hickory, one and one-half feet; varnish, eleven gallons; dope, fifty-nine gallons; rubber, thirty-four feet; linen, 201 square yards; veneer, fifty-seven square feet.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0161.xml
article
418
418,419
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Breakfasting on Poi
It is made from taro and has been the food of primitive people for centuries
[no value]
[no value]
A. M. Jungmann
NOW that the entire civilized world is occupied with the question of food production, let us consider taro, perhaps the very-first crop raised. Taro is a plant that grows wild in Polynesia, the Malay Archipelago, and India. The very earliest of those daring European navigators who voyaged on untraversed seas found taro cultivated from Japan to New Zealand.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0162.xml
article
419
419
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
The Okapi's Coat Outshines Joseph’s Coat of Many Colors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most precious trophies which Mr. Herbert Lang, of the expedition sent by the American Museum of Natural History to the Belgian Congo, brought back to New York, was the skin of the extraordinary animal shown in the accompanying illustration.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0163.xml
article
420
420
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Use a Nail to Unlock the Nut of This Bolt
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE nuts of screw bolts used on high-speed machinery invariably have a tendency to work loose. No matter how well they are made and how tightly they are screwed down, continuous vibration will sooner or later loosen them. Unless their looseness is ascertained in time and they are tightened again, the nuts may work loose altogether and the dropping out of the bolt may wreck the machinery.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0164.xml
article
420
420
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Fitting the Gun to the Man Who Shoots It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you are particular you had better get measured for your gun. The “try-gun” shown in the pictures below was invented for that very purpose. It is made with joints, screws, and bolts that permit you to change the length of stock, the “drop,” and the “cast-off” as you choose.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0165.xml
article
421
421
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A Beetle That Does a "Flip"
Alaus oculatus would be a great circus performer
[no value]
[no value]
Dr. E. Bade
THE beetles of the Elateridae family are distinguished by their comparatively short legs. This is a handicap, for they cannot right themselves with their legs, as other beetles do when thrown on their backs, and they would have to remain lying where they fell if they were not fitted with a peculiar jumping device by which they right themselves.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0166.xml
article
422
422
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Tail Light and Searchlight Too
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY accidents which happen to automobiles when backing up at night could be avoided if every car were equipped with the new combination of tail light and searchlight shown in the accompanying illustrations. It contains in one casing a regulation red danger signal and above it a powerful searchlight electrically controlled from the driver's seat.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0167.xml
article
422
422
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
"Stop!" It Shouts to the Car Behind
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE rear automobile signal device shown in the illustrations below is automatic in action and is manipulated through the suction of the car engine, as the brake pedal is depressed to slow down or stop the car. The signal consists of a ruby red tail light with the word “Stop” in white letters and a circular black disk with a small hole at its center.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0168.xml
article
423
423
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Meatless Meals for Men Who Handle Meat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ACCORDING to a bulletin issued by the Food Administration, meatless luncheons are now served in the employees' dining room of one of the largest meat-packing concerns in the Chicago stock yards. Between 1,200 and 1,500 people are served daily, the menus including eggs, fish, oysters, mushrooms, cheese, milk, ice cream, beans and other proteid foods, together with a wide rangeof fruits and vegetables.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0169.xml
article
423
423
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Ground Floor Becomes Second Story
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE owner of a one-story frame house in Waco, Texas, desired to add another story. He found that a large part of the cost would be the expense of tearing off the roof to add another story, and rebuilding the roof. To save this expense—and also time—he had the entire house raised some fifteen feet off the ground and built the new story underneath.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0170.xml
article
423
423
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION PICTURES
[no value]
Built to Enable the Heroine to Escape When It’s Burning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the foregoing illustration both the house and the frightened lady clutching Fireman Charles Chaplin are products of art—one being a plaster front and the other being made of straw, and dressed to look "very much of a lady." The photograph illustrates a simple ladder device that is used frequently in taking moving pictures.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0171.xml
article
424
424,425
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Training the Anti-Aircraft Gunner
Why not use free balloons shaped like airplanes?
Some Objections to Balloons
Why Not Use Dirigibles?
Trap-Shooting with Anti-Aircraft Guns
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
IN the good old days when Wild West shows instead of motion pictures thrilled the youngster who yearned to lead the life of a scout cunning enough to outwit the wiliest Apache, Buffalo Bill would gallop around the tanbark ring, preceded by a rider who tossed glass balls into the air.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0172.xml
article
426
426
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
A Whistle Sounds When the Cooking Water Runs Low
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DON’T be startled if you hear a shrill whistle sounding from the kitchen where the dinner is being cooked. It is not a call for help nor an alarm of fire —only a signal that the water supply in the steam cooker is low. The whistle sounds fifteen minutes before the water is entirely gone.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0173.xml
article
426
426
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Make Waste Hot Air Work and Conserve Both Fuel and Food
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE heat generated by the running of the alternators has always been a source of annoyance to the station engineers of light or power plants. The degree of heat produced depends upon the amount of work done by the alternator and is usually more than sufficient to soften insulations and to cause other troubles.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0174.xml
article
427
427
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Mixing a Batch of Concrete in Twenty Seconds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ATWISTING or turning movement as well as one of tumbling is required to mix concrete thoroughly in a cylindrical drum. At first slanting blades or fins were mounted inside of the drum, but these did not mix the concrete properly into a homogeneous mass unless the drum was revolved long.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0175.xml
article
427
427
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
For an Army of Four Million a Ship Must Sail Every Hour
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"OUR ship program is a very serious one," says Major W. A. Garrett in an article published by the Journal of the Engineers' Club of Philadelphia; "in fact, the situation during the war. To feed an army of a half million men and the horses for a half million men and the guns for a half million men requires three ships a day—one every eight hours.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0176.xml
article
428
428
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A Novel Spring Seat for Farmers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LEWIS E. BAKER, of Hudson, Illinois, hsa patented a novel spring seat. The device consists of an upright support provided with lateral extensions; the lower extension is fastened to the vehicle, the upper one carries the seat on a cross-bar mounted on a pivot.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0177.xml
article
428
428
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Using Steel Balls in a Flywheel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE effectiveness of a flywheel in maintaining the rotary movement of an engine at a uniform speed under variations of the load or driving power depends upon the size and weight of the wheel. The heavier the wheel the more effective it will be in maintaining a uniform speed.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0178.xml
article
428
428
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
The Microphone Has Given Place to Other Devices
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the Germans began to mount their motors on sound-absorbing bases, the original microphones employed by the Allies for the detection of the submarine, which depended upon the hum of the engines and motors, were no longer effective. The devices substituted have reached a high state of excellence, not only detecting the presence of the submersible when it is in motion, but also its exact location.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0179.xml
article
429
429
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
The Sewer-Worm Cuts Its Way Through Clogged Pipes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN entirely new type of a sewer-cleaning device has recently been placed on the market. It consists of a bell-mouthed tube with a rotary disk at the front end. As the tube is drawn through the sewer by means of a rope attached to the hook at the front end of the device, the force of the water, acting upon the slanting fins of the disk, causes it to revolve rapidly within the bellshaped end of the tube.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0180.xml
article
429
429
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Send Your War Inventions to Inventions Section, General Staff
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN Inventions Section has been created as an agency within the General Staff to investigate promptly and thoroughly all inventions submitted to it. Any person desiring to submit an invention for consideration, test, sale, or development, should do so by letter, giving in order the following information: Name and object of the invention; any claim for superiority or novelty; any results obtained by actual experiment; whether the invention is patented; whether remuneration is expected; whether the invention has been before any other agency; whether the writer is owner or agent; the number of enclosures with the letter.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0181.xml
article
430
430
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Just One Twist—and All the Cigars in Your Case Are Beheaded
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR the convenience of cigar smokers, Charles E. Johnson, of New York, has invented a combined pocket cigar-case and cutter. The case, which holds four cigars of average size, has a hinged door and at the lower end four conical, thimble-like cups, intended to accommodate the points of the cigars.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0182.xml
article
430
430
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
A Sanitary Method of Cleaning Floors with a Mop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you chanced to be in the American Museum of Natural History some time when the floors were being washed, you would see a squad of men, each equipped with a mop which cleaned the white floor without leaving a single dirty streak. This phenomenon is explained by the presence of a square steel tank mounted on a portable truck, the invention of Harry F. Beers, Chief of Construction of the Museum.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0183.xml
article
431
431
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION PICTURES
[no value]
In Retouching Photographs, Move the Plate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO lighten the most tedious and wearisome task of the photographer, that of retouching negatives, as well as to make the work quicker and more accurate, is the object of an electrical negative retoucher invented by R. L. Woods. This device reverses the ordinary method of retouching by keeping the retouching pencil stationary and moving the negative to obtain the desired effects.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0184.xml
article
431
431
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Plenty of Action Here; the Whole Window Display Turns
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CALIFORNIA shopkeeper makes his show window revolve by the device in the illustration. The floor of the window, circular in shape, is supported by a central shaft, and is revolved by a friction-pulley rubbing against the under side of the platform’s rim.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0185.xml
article
432
432
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Devices That Make Temporary Wiring Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE present war conditions, especially the shortage of labor and materials, have opened a field for labor-saving inventions in every branch of work. Here are a few devices of a labor-saving nature which should be of interest to persons engaged in temporary electrical wiring.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0186.xml
article
432
432
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
"Shooting the Parachutes" Makes You Feel Like a Wriggling Worm
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE kite balloons which do sentinel duty over the waters surrounding the British Isles are provided with parachutes, which are used by the observers in an emergency. These aerial life-preservers are at the side of the car and may be quickly attached to the braces worn by the men.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0187.xml
article
433
433
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Count Your Chickens Before They Are Hatched by Weighing the Eggs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PRACTICAL tests and experiments by agricultural colleges and poultry raisers have established the fact that it is not profitable for a poultryman to use an egg weighing less than 23 ounces a dozen for hatching, as it was found practically impossible to hatch a strong, sturdy chicken from a lightweight egg.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0188.xml
article
433
433
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
This Stapling Machine Uses a Spool of Wire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DEPARTURE from the type of machine used heretofore to bind papers together is shown in a new device which, instead of relying upon ready made fasteners, uses a roll of wire and makes its own binders. The economy of operation which results is striking.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0189.xml
article
433
433
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
Alcohol and Benzole as a National Motor Fuel in France
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALCOHOL, mixed with an equal quantity of benzole, has been used as motor fuel in France. Its use exclusively would have been general had it not been for its steady rise in price. It is the purpose of the French Government to secure a monopoly of alcohol and to encourage its use in industry while laying a heavy tax on its human consumption.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0190.xml
article
434
434,435,436,437
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
"All Wool and a Yard Wide"
What "all wool” really means and why shoddy is a necessity
Shoddy Is Now "Remanufactured Wool"
The Wool Used for Soldiers and Sailors
Have You Heard of “Mungo” or of “Extract?”
[no value]
[no value]
Frank Parker Stockbridge
"WHAT is shoddy?" Ask that question of the next ten men you meet, and nine of them will reply, in substance if not in terms: “Stuff they use to make soldiers’ uniforms of." Some of them will proceed to a denunciation of the President, the Secretary of War, the Quartermaster General and the “Woolen Trust.”
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0191.xml
article
437
437
MISCELLANY
[no value]
New Rails from Old—How Railroads Save Money
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STEEL is scarce and rail-rolling plants must charge more for their product than ever before. That is why George Langford, of Milwaukee, has patented a process for making new steel rails out of worn, old ones. Several railroads are using his process; for they find they can reroll a 100-lb. 33-ft. rail into a 90-lb. section 34 feet in length or to a 92-lb. section 33 feet long.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0192.xml
article
438
438,439
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Behold the University-Bred Horse Dentist
Doctoring the teeth of domesticated animals is a real business necessity
[no value]
[no value]
J. G. Dolan
THANKS to the fact that their food is raw and unrefined and contains all the mineral matter so necessary for the growth and repair of the tissues of the teeth, domesticated animals are almost immune from natural decay as well as diseases of the teeth.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0193.xml
article
439
439
MISCELLANY
[no value]
How Science Has Convicted Plants of Causing Hay Fever
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WIND-POLLINATED plants are responsible for hay fever. Science is able to make this statement after considerable study. Moreover, it is also able to state just what plants are responsible. In the biological laboratory of the American Hay Fever Prevention Association, the oak, pine, willow trees, ragweeds, marsh elders and cockle-bur have been found to cause direct hay fever.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0194.xml
article
440
440
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Neat Thief-Proof Carrier for Automobile Tires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SIMPLE and neat automobile tire-carrier is shown in the illustrations above. It consists of a pair of convex metal disks between which the tire or wheel is clamped by means of a nut on a supporting spindle attached to the rear of the car. Removal of the spindle nut instantly releases the outer disk and the wheel with its tire or the rim with the tire, according to whether a spare wheel with its tire complete is used or merely a spare tire on a rim.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0195.xml
article
440
440
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Lock Your Hub-Cap and Your Wheel Won’t Come Off
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SERIOUS accidents may occur if a wheel of a rapidly moving automobile comes off. Wire wheels are easily removed, and it is important to prevent them from working loose while the car is in motion. A simple device for locking a wheel securely in place on its hub is shown in the accompanying picture.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0196.xml
article
441
441
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Using One Pane in a French Window for a Ventilator
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN D. ADAMS
ALTHOUGH they are steadily becoming more popular, it has always been found rather difficult to regulate the ventilation of a room having French windows because of the fact that any opening must necessarily extend from top to bottom, which causes drafts.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0197.xml
article
441
441
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Put a New Wick in a Mechanic’s Torch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. H. THOMAS
TORCHES are used by all classes of mechanics. The ordinary torch has a wick about ¾ in. in diameter, consisting of strands of candle wicking, and when a new wick is to be inserted it is often found to be a troublesome job. The easiest way of re-wicking a torch of this kind is to pass a strand of the candle wicking through the oil opening at the top, and then through the extending wick tube of the torch; then tie the end of this strand to the main strand so as to form a loop about 3 feet long.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0198.xml
article
441
441
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Solution for Re-Inking Typewriter Ribbons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
USE the following formula for black: 1 oz. of aniline black, 15 oz. of pure grain alcohol, 15 oz. of concentrated glycerine. Dissolve the aniline black in the alcohol, then add the glycerine. For blue ribbons use Prussian blue; for red ribbons use red lead in place of the aniline black.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0199.xml
article
442
442
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Removing Photographic Film for Mounting on Watch Crystals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is not generally known that the film may be easily removed from a negative plate by soaking it for a few minutes in a solution of carbonate of potassium. This fact may be used in a number of ways, among which is the method of mounting transparent photographs on watch crystals, chinaware, etc.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0200.xml
article
442
442
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Color Tracing to Keep Ink from Running
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is always best to color tracings on the back, as the ink lines are liable to run or be obliterated when the color is applied. The colors should be mixed dark enough, so that they may appear in the proper depth on the other side. If the ink or color does not run freely on the tracing cloth, it may be made to do so readily if mixed with a little oxgall.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0201.xml
article
442
442,443
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Homemade Camera to Make Pictures Without a Lens
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE next time your snap-shots turn out to be failures do not place all the blame on the lens. It depends how you use it. Take a look at the pictures accompanying this article. They were all made without any lens, and in a camera made of common cardboard.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0202.xml
article
443
443
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Spacing the Windings on High Frequency Coils
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WIRE for coils on electrical devices may be spaced evenly by the use of a cord run parallel with the wire at the same time. The wire is first attached to the coil and one turn is taken, then the cord or string is tied to the little finger on the right hand and passed over the first finger and across the core.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0203.xml
article
443
443
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Raising the Fluid Level in a Gasoline Tank
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. H. THOMAS
ONE day during the boating season I found that I had run out of gas, three miles from the nearest gas station. Knowing that the nipple of the gasoline pipe which leads to the carburetor was inserted about ¾ in. up from the bottom of the tank, I paddled towards the shore, where I looked up some clean, irregular pebbles that were small enough to enter the tank.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0204.xml
article
444
444,445
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Easel Clamp to Hold Copy for Photographing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PERHAPS you have tried to copy a picture from a book or magazine and have found considerable trouble in keeping the page flat and in a position for focusing the camera on it properly. Where the page curves, portions of the picture are sure to be out of sharp focus.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0205.xml
article
445
445
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Using a Piece of Gaspipe for a News-Stand Coin Box
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NOVEL coin holder has been devised by a newsboy. He used a pipe about 1 ft. long for holding the pennies. The top has been plugged and a nail driven through it. About 2 in. below the top a slot for the pennies has been filed in the pipe. Near the lower end of the pipe a pin passes through it and is locked.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0206.xml
article
445
445
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cutting Sheet Iron with a Hack Saw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. H. THOMAS
AFTER breaking four or five hack saw blades while trying to cut a piece of sheet iron in a vise, it was discovered that by holding the saw almost longitudinally to the sheet, instead of at right angles to the flat surface, the vibration of the sheet iron was reduced sufficiently to cut it with ease.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0207.xml
article
446
446,447
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making Useful and Ornamental Novelties Out of Gourds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL of the many varieties of the peculiar and unique ornamental gourds may be grown in the garden. When looking at the fruit, one instinctively feels the possibilities they present for beautiful ornaments or useful utensils. The gourd, when ripe, has a wood-like vine.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0208.xml
article
447
447
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Dry Battery Sealing Compound Used for Wax Imitations
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR making wax copies of keys or other small designs I have found that the wax on the tops of discarded dry batteries is a very practical and satisfactory substitute when other materials are not at hand. The dry battery wax is prepared by melting it in a cup over a flame or on a stove.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0209.xml
article
448
448
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Mounting Photographic Prints on Glass
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
USE 4 oz. gelatin, soaked for a half hour in cold water. Place it in a glass jar, adding 16 oz. of water, and put the jar in a large dish of warm water to dissolve the gelatin. Pour the solution into a shallow tray, then have the prints rolled on a roller, albumen side up, and holding them by the corners, pass them rapidly through the gelatin.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0210.xml
article
448
448
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Stain to Give Wood an Ebony Hue
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To a pint of boiling water add ¾ oz. copperas, and 1 oz. logwood chips. Apply this solution to the wood while it is hot. When the surface has dried thoroughly, wet the wood with a solution composed of 5 oz. steel filings dissolved in a quarter of a pint of vinegar.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0211.xml
article
448
448
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Homemade Hoist for Lifting Concrete Mixtures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CONTRACTOR on a time limit job found himself short on shipments of machinery and a badly needed hoist was not at hand. The time was slipping away and it was necessary that a way to lift the materials for the work be devised. A local planing mill made a drum for him which consisted of a pine core encased with oak pieces laid on lengthwise.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0212.xml
article
449
449,450
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Camper's Dutch Oven
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J.S. Zerbe
COOKING is always the most difficult problem for the camper. A simple fire made of faggots, a tripod to hold the kettle, or a few stones between which the fire can be built and on which the utensils may rest, are always available for preparing food.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0213.xml
article
450
450
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Telescoping Clothesline Post for the Yard
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS post is for placing in the yard where it can be used for the line on wash day and telescoped into a part that can be set in the ground on other days of the week. The part set in the ground should be 7 ft. long and 1 in. in diameter. Its full length is set in the ground.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0214.xml
article
451
451,452,453,454
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Simple Designs for Sheet Metal Working
XVI.—Patterns developed by Triangulation
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
THE problems demonstrated in this issue are of exactly the same type as those illustrated in the last issue, the only difference being that they are a little more advanced. The illustration, Fig. 1, demonstrates the method of developing the pattern for a “compound offset” hot air pipe by the triangulation method.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0215.xml
article
454
454
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Simple Way of Removing Waste Gases from the Garage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE exhaust gases emitted by automobiles in closed garages sometimes cause death. In view of this danger the plan shown deserves consideration. As the illustration shows, all that is required is a length of 3-in. pipe, a reducing elbow, tapering to 1 in. a short 1-in. nipple threaded at one end and a piece of flexible steel tubing that will fit over the end of the nipple and slip over the end of the exhaust pipe in the rear of the automobile.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0216.xml
article
455
455
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Jack Frame for Lifting and Holding a Wagon Rack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. E FRUDDEN
IT usually requires three or more men to unload the rack from the trucks or to lift the rack on the wagon. This change must be made at least twice a year and in some cases several times a month. With the device shown it is only a one-man job. To unload the rack from the wagon, drive in at the low end and the rack slides up the incline and is raised from the trucks.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0217.xml
article
455
455
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Rat Trap Made of a Board Placed Over a Tub or Barrel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. A. KELLY
THIS is rather an improvement on the old tub-of-water rat-catcher. The tub is partly filled with water, and in the center there is placed an upright object, on which the bait, cheese or other food is fastened. On one side of the tub a piece of shingle is attached on a spring pivot, with the thick or heavier part next the edge of the tub.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0218.xml
article
455
455
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Asbestos Covering for Steam Pipes to Save Coal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a large wood working factory where a 312 k. w. heating and power plant was used it was found that a saving of 22 tons of coal was obtained by giving the 111 sq. ft. of exposed pipe surface a covering of two layers of asbestos board each ⅛ in. thick and a layer of 85 per cent magnesia covering.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0219.xml
article
456
456
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Anchoring a Barrel on a Barrow to Prevent Its Overturning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN iron hook attached to a cord long enough to permit its being slipped between the staves and over the hoop of a produce barrel will anchor it to the barrow quite securely. In fact, a series of four cords and hooks will allow a full barrel of this type—even wider than the barrow—to be wheeled up and down hill without danger of its tumbling off.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0220.xml
article
456
456
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Simple, Effective Way to Cut Glass Tubes and Beakers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PETER J. M. CLUTE
FIRST, with a sharp triangular file draw a fine line across the tube. Then, holding the two ends of the tube firmly in the hands, bend it, pulling the two ends or halves apart at the same time, and it will crack at the scratch usually with a smooth edge.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0221.xml
article
456
456
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Guide Blocks to Start Taps in Soft Metals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TAPPING fine holes in brass, copper or lead with the small taps is a very difficult task for the amateur mechanic. Either the tap is broken or the hole is reamed out instead of being tapped. The reaming is caused by not applying the right pressure.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0222.xml
article
457
457,458
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Old Truck Becomes an Amusement Thriller
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. Avery
A GOOD second-hand, two-ton auto-truck of reputable make, and the attachment here shown produces a money-making amusement device for traveling from place to place and taking in the country fairs and places of amusement. If there is no cab on the driver's seat, build one and provide side curtains and a wind shield.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0223.xml
article
458
458
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Repairing the Metal Body of a Broken Plane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A METAL body plane broken by a fall was too good to be thrown away and it was decided that a repair could be made with the use of solder. The break was in such a place that a cross brace would interfere with the egress of the shavings. Each edge of the fracture was filed with a round file to form a pin of solder, as the inner edges of the break could not be soldered as that would destroy the shape of the plane.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0224.xml
article
459
459
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Reflector Made of Tin to Cast Sunlight on a Window Box
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOT every window in apartments can face the sun. Sometimes, even when they do, buildings, shading them, keep the light away from window boxes, to the detriment of the growing plants. To provide a means of throwing the sun’s rays on the boxes, a reflector made of tin was provided for each side of the window, as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0225.xml
article
459
459,460
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Heat-Treating Steel When Doing Experimental Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN model building and experimental work it often becomes necessary to harden a piece of steel and temper it to a definite degree of hardness or soften a hard piece such as a spring so it can be drilled or machined, and a few simple experiments in heat treatment of steel are sufficient to enable one to obtain the desired results.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0226.xml
article
459
459
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cleaning the Lime from Gold Fish Globes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Do not use soap or scouring powder to remove the streaks of lime or other mineral deposits found on the top of your gold fish globe, caused by slow evaporation of the water. Soap or scouring powder is injurious to the fish if any particle remains on the globe.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0227.xml
article
460
460
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Clothes Peg Cut from a Limb for the Camper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAMPERS seldom provide a means of taking care of clothes, but the woods furnish the required material if one cares to take a little time for the making of a clothes peg. Look around and find a Y-branch on a suitable size limb; cut it so that the arms forming the Y-part are about 3 in. long and the lower end 4 or 5 in. long.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0228.xml
article
460
460
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Coloring White Roses Blue with a Chemical Preparation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS transformation may be readily. carried into effect by submerging the stems of white roses in a solution prepared by dissolving a little more than ½ oz. aniline methyline dye in half a pint of water to which some saltpeter has been previously added.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0229.xml
article
461
461,462,463
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Flying Model Airplane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Charles H. Hubbell
THE body or fuselage of the model airplane is constructed of spruce sticks ⅛ in. square. The four main beams, or longitudinals, are each 22 in. long. In making the body it is well to lay the four sticks side by side, and mark the places where the struts, or distance sticks, are attached.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0230.xml
article
464
464,465
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Farm Tractor Made of a Wrecked Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
FARM work is becoming more mechanical as the years pass by and the problem of most interest today is the mechanical horse. Tractors of various designs have sprung up in the past few years, and the farm owner will soon be considered without progressive spirit if he does not own at least one power-operated pulling machine.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0231.xml
article
465
465
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Concrete Posts for Grape Trellis or Farm Fence
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. FRUDDEN
IT is an easy matter to make concrete posts for the grape trellis, or farm fence. For a grape trellis make the posts 10 ft. long so that you can set them 4 ft. underground. The butts should be 6 in. square and the tops 4 in. At equal distances apart through the posts are set ½-in. pipes so that you can run the wires through them.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0232.xml
article
465
465,466
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Flexible Try Square for Curved Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TRY-SQUARE with a flexible blade will be found a desirable addition to any carpenter's kit. Difficulties are always encountered where a piece of work having a concave or convex surface must. be marked and cut, and a miter-box is not always available or can be used.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0233.xml
article
466
466
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Artistic Combined Sundial and Fountain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. B. SMITH
THIS sundial fountain may be easily and inexpensively constructed in concrete. The forms are simple and quickly built and may be further simplified by omitting the cap at the crest of the column. The hand or indicator A is made of non-rustable metal and is embedded in the concrete as are also the two hooks that support the upper ends of the metal numeral shield.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0234.xml
article
466
466
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make Celluloid Stick on Wood, Tin and Leather
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO parts of shellac, three parts of spirit of camphor, and four parts of pure alcohol dissolved in a warm water bath, give an excellent gluing agent to fix wood, tin, or leather to celluloid. The glue must be applied when warm to give the most satisfactory results. It should be securely corked when not in use.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0235.xml
article
466
466
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Removing Pyrogallic Stains from the Fingers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A STRONG solution of chlorinated lime should be prepared, into which the stained fingers may be dipped for a few minutes. The fingers should then be rubbed thoroughly with a large crystal of citric acid. Apply the lime solution and acid alternately until the stains are wholly removed, and rinse the fingers in running water.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0236.xml
article
467
467,468,469,470
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Electric Devices and How They Work
IX.—Alternating current generator principles
[no value]
[no value]
Peter J. M. Clute
IN the consideration of the generation of electrical current, it is first advisable to study the fundamental principles of electromagnetic induction. It has been shown that a current of electricity flowing through a conductor sets up around the conductor a magnetic field, which exists as long as the current flows.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0237.xml
article
470
470
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How the Airplane Carrie's the Aerial for Radio Communication
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE aerial is coiled on a windlass in the radio operator's portion of the airplane fuselage, or body, and is run out through a silk wrapped bamboo tube. A lead weight shaped like a torpedo, to hold it nose-on into the wind, is fastened to the end of the aerial to carry it downward.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0238.xml
article
471
471
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
The Automobile Opens and Closes the Gate Automatically
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN PETERS
THE accompanying illustration shows a gate which is automatically opened and closed by the automobile itself, thus making it unnecessary for the driver to stop his car, climb out and open the gate and them stop again, and close it behind him.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0239.xml
article
471
471
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Restoring the Elasticity of a Paint Brush
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
SOAKING a hardened paint brush in a strong alkaline solution will soften the paint so that it can be washed out, but it will also soften the hair and render it flabby. This will, surely happen if the brush is left in the solution too long. This was what happened to a brush a painter had forgotten, and after washing out the paint he thought he would see what effect vinegar would give to remedy the trouble.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0240.xml
article
471
471
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Steaming-Box Heated by a Shop Heating Plant
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE illustration shows a very cheap, easily installed and practical steaming-box. The idea for making this box arose out of necessity to devise a method of steaming some ash wood to bend for skis for the boys. Such a box may be used for various steaming operations.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0241.xml
article
472
472,473
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
The Construction of a Simple Parallel Rule
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE ordinary T-square may be of extra fine construction, yet it is almost a nuisance on the drawing-board; for the operator must constantly reach to the left to see if the head is against the edge of the board, and it is almost always necessary to hold it while drawing the lines.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0242.xml
article
473
473
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Handy Blueprint Binder and Filing Rack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN most offices of drafting-rooms where many blueprints are constantly used for reference a system is needed to keep track of the prints. If they are left promiscuously in the drafting-room it is difficult to find the one you need in a hurry.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0243.xml
article
474
474
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Contrivance Which Will Remove Your Tire with Ease
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS simple tire remover is made from two pieces of ⅜ in. strap iron 1 in. wide and 14 in. long and a piece 4 ft. long, 2 in. wide and ½ in. thick. The latter piece is used for the lever to which the other two pieces are attached with clevises. The center clevis straddles the lever and the pin is inserted through hole to make the length suitable for the rim size.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0244.xml
article
474
474
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Cleaning Glass Surfaces Without Leaving a Stain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE best method to clean glass—for instance, the interior of a bulb or flask—is to wash it in turn with chromic acid, distilled water, and alcohol. Sometimes a mixture of alcohol and ether is used in place of the alcohol alone. Caustic potash or soda will clean certain things; but they themselves adhere to glass, and must be removed by a most thorough rinsing with water.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0245.xml
article
474
474
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Effective Use of Veneer on Gift Boxes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMALL gift boxes or chests are favorite articles, with the amateur craftsman. A distinctive touch may be added to these boxes by the use of veneers in making an inlaid variegated border around the edge of the box. There are several operations in preparing the veneers, but they are not difficult and the result will pay one for the time spent.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0246.xml
article
475
475
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Homemade Fuel Saver Attached to Automobile Engine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR making and attaching this fuel saving device drill a 1-in. hole in the upper part of the crank case on the same side of the motor as the carburetor and as near the breather pipe as possible. If the breather pipe is one of the kind fitted with a tight cap a ¼-in. hole should be drilled in the cap to form a vent so that a vacuum is created in the crank case.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0247.xml
article
475
475,476
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Block Plane Into an Edge-Trim Plane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR accurately squaring long endgrain edges, such as the side of a table, an edge-trim plane is a great convenience. It is almost a necessity where the edge to be trimmed is not square but beveled. Here is a way to make your block-plane instantly convertible into a very efficient edge-trim plane at no expense and with only half an hour’s work:
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0248.xml
article
476
476
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Electric Gas Lighter for the Laboratory or Factory
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN laboratory and other places where gas is used at frequent intervals, a simple electric gas lighter is not only a necessity but also a convenience. The casing of the lighter described is of hard rubber or fiber, sawed as shown in the diagram.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0249.xml
article
476
476
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Protect a Soap Bubble and Keep It for Weeks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LASTING soap bubbles cannot be made unless the air inside and outside the bubble is almost free of dust particles and is saturated with moisture. Where-ever you are the air is dust-laden so that the whole blowing apparatus must be conducted inside of a large cork.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0250.xml
article
476
476
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Reliable Solution for the Electro Deposition of Aluminum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALUMINUM is at best an uncertain metal with which to make an electro deposit. The following formula, however, has been found to be quite reliable. Dissolve 50 parts by weight of alum in 300 parts of water, and add 10 parts of aluminum chloride. The resultant solution.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0251.xml
article
477
477,478,479
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Toy Transformer
A simple method of making the now much used bell-ringing transformer
[no value]
[no value]
W. A. Hirsch
THE transformer described in the following article is known as a toy or bell-ringing transformer of the shell type. It can be attached to a lighting circuit of 110 volts and the current stepped down to 12 volts. It is used for ringing bells, running small electric motors, miniature lights, railways, etc.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0252.xml
article
479
479
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Ventilating Potato Bin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO make this bin four sticks of fire wood, or other similar material are required for supports, and a discarded picture frame and a gunny sack. The sack is taken apart to form one thickness and tacked to the frame. The texture of the material is sufficiently open to allow plenty of good ventilation.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0253.xml
article
479
479
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Paste for Coating Metal Surfaces with Silver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DISSOLVE pure silver, or a silver alloy, in cold nitric acid. If an alloy is used which does not contain lead, the acid may be warmed to hasten the process. Precipitate the silver with common salt until no more will separate from the solution.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0254.xml
article
480
480
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Direct-View Finder for Hand Cameras
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN F. MAHONEY
IN photographing moving objects with the ordinary hand camera, the reflecting view finder is not always satisfactory. When the object being photographed is over 25 ft. away, it appears very small in the finder, making it very difficult to place correctly in the picture.
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0255.xml
article
480
480
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Blinker Telegraph Equipment for Boy Scout Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAYMOND FRANCIS YATES
SIGNALIN by the flash of a light is a very practical method of communication over short distances at night. The small electric flash lamps run on dry batteries constitute a ready means of signaling in this manner and, with the use of a telegraph key in the line, a portable blinker set for Boy Scout work may be made as follows:
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0256.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
SMITH MOTOR TRUCK CORPORATION
[no value]
SMITH MOTOR TRUCK CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0257.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
IVER JOHNSON’S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
[no value]
IVER JOHNSON’S ARMS & CYCLE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0258.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.: "YANKEE"
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
"YANKEE"
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0259.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0260.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0261.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
WINCHESTER
[no value]
WINCHESTER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0262.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN CHAIN COMPANY, INC.: WEED TIRE CHAINS
[no value]
AMERICAN CHAIN COMPANY, INC.
WEED TIRE CHAINS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0263.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0264.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
GRINNELL
[no value]
GRINNELL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0265.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: United States Cycle Tires
[no value]
[no value]
United States Cycle Tires
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0266.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0267.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0268.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0269.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0270.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0271.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
HOLCOMB & HOKE MFG. CO.
[no value]
HOLCOMB & HOKE MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0272.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
TWIN FIRE SPARK PLUG CO.
[no value]
TWIN FIRE SPARK PLUG CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0273.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
EVEREADY DAYLO
[no value]
EVEREADY DAYLO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0274.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
THE WAHL COMPANY
EVERSHARP
THE WAHL COMPANY
TEMPOINT
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0275.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
GOODRICH: Goodrich Silvertown
[no value]
GOODRICH
Goodrich Silvertown
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0276.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE CO.
[no value]
H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0277.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0278.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
CORBIN SCREW CORPORATION: Corbin Duplex Coaster Brake
[no value]
CORBIN SCREW CORPORATION
Corbin Duplex Coaster Brake
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0279.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
SLATTERY & CO
[no value]
SLATTERY & CO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0280.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
THE VEEDER MFG. CO.
[no value]
THE VEEDER MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0281.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0282.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0283.xml
advertisement
124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0284.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
RANDOLPH & CO.
[no value]
RANDOLPH & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0285.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0286.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0287.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0288.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0289.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0290.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.: Brown & Sharpe Machinist Tools
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.
Brown & Sharpe Machinist Tools
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0291.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0292.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0293.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN PIPE BENDING MACHINE CO.
[no value]
AMERICAN PIPE BENDING MACHINE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0294.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS: Harness-Leather TOOL BAG
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
Harness-Leather TOOL BAG
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0295.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
L. S. Starrelt Co.
[no value]
L. S. Starrelt Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0296.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.: Disston Saws and Tools
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
Disston Saws and Tools
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0297.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Goodell-Pratt Company: BENCH DRILL
[no value]
Goodell-Pratt Company
BENCH DRILL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0298.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Bernard-Hewitt & Co.
[no value]
Bernard-Hewitt & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0299.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
OTTAWA MFG. CO.: OTTAWA ENGINES
[no value]
OTTAWA MFG. CO.
OTTAWA ENGINES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0300.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER Co., INC.
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER Co., INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0301.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
W. A. SHEAFFER PEN CO.: SHEAFFER pen
[no value]
W. A. SHEAFFER PEN CO.
SHEAFFER pen
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0302.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
COLGATE & CO.
[no value]
COLGATE & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180901_0093_003_0303.xml