Issue: 19180801

Thursday, August 1, 1918
AUGUST, 1918
2
False
93
Friday, December 12, 2014

Articles
advertisement
3
3
[no value]
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Co.
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0001.xml
advertisement
4
4
[no value]
[no value]
SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS' ASS'N.: The Cypress “Pergola-Garage”
[no value]
SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS' ASS'N.
The Cypress “Pergola-Garage”
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0002.xml
tableOfContents
5
5,6
[no value]
[no value]
Contents for August, 1918
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0003.xml
advertisement
7
7
[no value]
[no value]
THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
[no value]
THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0004.xml
advertisement
8
8
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0005.xml
advertisement
9
9
[no value]
[no value]
THEO. AUDEL & CO
[no value]
THEO. AUDEL & CO
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0006.xml
advertisement
10
10
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0007.xml
advertisement
11
11
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0008.xml
advertisement
12
12
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0009.xml
advertisement
13
13
[no value]
[no value]
THEO. AUDEL & CO.
[no value]
THEO. AUDEL & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0010.xml
advertisement
14
14
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0011.xml
advertisement
15
15
[no value]
[no value]
LIONEL STRONGFORT: STRONGFORTISM
[no value]
LIONEL STRONGFORT
STRONGFORTISM
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0012.xml
advertisement
16
16
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0013.xml
advertisement
17
17
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0014.xml
advertisement
18
18
[no value]
[no value]
Burlington Watch Company: 21-Jewel Burlington
[no value]
Burlington Watch Company
21-Jewel Burlington
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0015.xml
advertisement
19
19,20,21,22,23,24,25,26,28
[no value]
[no value]
QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0016.xml
advertisement
27
27
[no value]
[no value]
Chicago Technical College
[no value]
Chicago Technical College
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0017.xml
advertisement
29
29
[no value]
[no value]
Chicago Engineering Works
[no value]
Chicago Engineering Works
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0018.xml
advertisement
30
30
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0019.xml
advertisement
31
31
[no value]
[no value]
MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
[no value]
MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0020.xml
advertisement
32
32
[no value]
[no value]
Haywood Tire & Equipment Co.
[no value]
Haywood Tire & Equipment Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0021.xml
advertisement
33
33
[no value]
[no value]
General Electric Company
[no value]
General Electric Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0022.xml
advertisement
34
34
[no value]
[no value]
The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co.: Brunswick Tire
[no value]
The Brunswick-Balke-Collender Co.
Brunswick Tire
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0023.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
Ostermoor & Company
[no value]
Ostermoor & Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0024.xml
advertisement
102
102
[no value]
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0025.xml
advertisement
103
103
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY AND ASSOCIATED COMPANIES
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY AND ASSOCIATED COMPANIES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0026.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company: Graflex
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
Graflex
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0027.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.: “Yankee” Chain Drill
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
“Yankee” Chain Drill
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0028.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: FATIMA package
[no value]
[no value]
FATIMA package
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0029.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
WINCHESTER
MODEL Q6
WINCHESTER
Take-down .22 caliber single shot rifle
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0030.xml
advertisement
108
108,109
[no value]
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0031.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
ROBT. H. INGERSOLL & BRO.: Waterbury Radiolite
[no value]
ROBT. H. INGERSOLL & BRO.
Waterbury Radiolite
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0032.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
SLATTERY & CO (Inc.)
[no value]
SLATTERY & CO (Inc.)
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0033.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
MUNN & CO.
[no value]
MUNN & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0034.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
RESEARCH LABORATORIES OF GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY: MAZDA
[no value]
RESEARCH LABORATORIES OF GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
MAZDA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0035.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN EVER READY WORKS of NATIONAL CARBON CO., INC.: Military Daylo
[no value]
AMERICAN EVER READY WORKS of NATIONAL CARBON CO., INC.
Military Daylo
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0036.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN L.WHITING-J.J. ADAMS CO.: Whiting-Adams BRUSHES
[no value]
JOHN L.WHITING-J.J. ADAMS CO.
Whiting-Adams BRUSHES
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0037.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
GibsonMandelin-Guiter Co
[no value]
GibsonMandelin-Guiter Co
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0038.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, Inc.: Columbia Batteries
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, Inc.
Columbia Batteries
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0039.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0040.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
ALCEMO MFG. CO.: KOR-KER
[no value]
ALCEMO MFG. CO.
KOR-KER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0041.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. SHALER CO.
[no value]
C. A. SHALER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0042.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0043.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
CORBIN SCREW CORPORATION: Corbin Duplex Brake
[no value]
CORBIN SCREW CORPORATION
Corbin Duplex Brake
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0044.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
Excelsior Motor, Manufacturing & Supply Company: HENDERSON
[no value]
Excelsior Motor, Manufacturing & Supply Company
HENDERSON
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0045.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
LOFTIS BROS. & CO.
[no value]
LOFTIS BROS. & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0046.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
BUFFALO SLED COMPANY: Auto-Wheel Convertible ROADSTER
[no value]
BUFFALO SLED COMPANY
Auto-Wheel Convertible ROADSTER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0047.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0048.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
OLD TOWN CANOE CO.
[no value]
OLD TOWN CANOE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0049.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
THE HORTON MFG. CO.: "Bristol"
[no value]
THE HORTON MFG. CO.
"Bristol"
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0050.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
The Maxim Silencer Co.: MAXIM SILENCER
[no value]
The Maxim Silencer Co.
MAXIM SILENCER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0051.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO.: DIXON'S ELDORADO
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO.
DIXON'S ELDORADO
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0052.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0053.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0054.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0055.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0056.xml
advertisement
124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0057.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
RANDOLPH & CO.
[no value]
RANDOLPH & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0058.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
A. M. BUCK & CO.
[no value]
A. M. BUCK & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0059.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
LACEY & LACEY
[no value]
LACEY & LACEY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0060.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN INDUSTRIES, INC.
[no value]
AMERICAN INDUSTRIES, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0061.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0062.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0063.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0064.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0065.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., INC.: “Red Devil” Hack Saw Blades
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., INC.
“Red Devil” Hack Saw Blades
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0066.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0067.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
FRIDGER
[no value]
FRIDGER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0068.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
DAVID STERN COMPANY
[no value]
DAVID STERN COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0069.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON: JOHNSONS Hastee Patch
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
JOHNSONS Hastee Patch
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0070.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0071.xml
article
162
162,163,164
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Pour Oil on the Troubled Waters
Saved by a Pool of Oil
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AVESSEL, homeward bound and heavily loaded with a valuable cargo, misses the channel near the harbor entrance in the fog and runs aground. Perhaps she is merely stuck on a sand bar and can be towed free at the next high tide. More likely, however, she has struck a submerged rock, has sprung a leak and is gradually settling.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0072.xml
article
164
164
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
The Brassie Too Heavy? Then Take Out Some Weights
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the golfer finds his ball in a good “lie,” too far away from the hole flag for an iron shot and yet at such a distance that he fears he will overdrive by using the brassie—then is the time he should congratulate himself on having obtained a brassie with a device for lightening the club.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0073.xml
article
164
164
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
The Importance of Snugly Fitting Piston Rings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE the soul of an automobile is naturally its engine—the vital spark that keeps it going—the piston rings are its heart and lungs. If the cylinder is not absolutely airtight, it is faulty and fails to develop to the utmost the power furnished it.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0074.xml
article
165
165
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Sure Enough Mowing Machine for the Hair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"NEXT!” The hirsute backwoods man, who had been dozing in one of the chairs over the dilapidated pages of a pinkish periodical, arouses himself, walks over to the just vacated barber-chair and with a yawn settles down for another snooze. “Haircut and shave!” is his laconic order to the barber.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0075.xml
article
165
165
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Cork-Screwing Up the Himalayas to Darjeeling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most interesting railroad lines, the construction of which meant the solution of difficult engineering problems, is the narrow-gage railway which winds its way up the steep slopes of the Darjeeling range of the Himalayas to Darjeeling.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0076.xml
article
166
166
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Learn to Like Seaweed. It May Become a Popular Food
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROCKWEED soup, rockweed omelet and rockweed pie may soon be found on the table of the housewife who is alert to obtain nutritious and inexpensive food. A considerable variety of edible seaweeds, of which rockweed is one, can be found along both the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of this country.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0077.xml
article
166
166
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Peanut Flour as a Wheat Substitute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BAKING company in Gainesville, Fla., has put bread in the market which is made from peanut flour. The flour is made from peanut cake left after the extraction of the oil. It contains a satisfactory percentage of fat and is said to have almost twice the nitrogenous food value of dried beef.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0078.xml
article
166
166
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Chauffeur and Nurse, Too, Is the Ambulance Driver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE French Government has adopted for the use of the army a sidecar ambulance, which, in many respects, is superior to the other types here-tofore used. It is built of light material and is large enough to accommodate but one stretcher. Windows with removable curtains are provided to enable the patient to look out while lying on the cot or stretcher.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0079.xml
article
167
167
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
The Bacterial Inhabitants of Ice-Cream
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE population of the United States is approximately one hundred millions; the bacterial population of one cubic centimeter of ice-cream is 37,859,909, or about six hundred and six millions to a cubic inch. That makes quite a crowd of bacteria in a glass of ice-cream soda.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0080.xml
article
167
167
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Ducking Goes with an Automobile Ride in This Park
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AUTOMOBILISTS who visit Rock Creek Park in Washington, D. C., find it necessary to ride through the creek after which the park was named instead of over it. This is due to the fact that the engineers in laying out the park were careful to preserve, as far as possible, all of the natural beauties of the place.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0081.xml
article
167
167
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Here’s a Cow That Walks About Despite a Wooden Leg
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THAT a broken leg need not be a handicap to the bovine species has been demonstrated by a valuable cow which was found on the ranch of A. C. Chafin, near the town of Temple, in Texas. A corn-planting machine was the means of accidentally breaking one of her legs and her owner substituted there-for a wooden member.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0082.xml
article
168
168
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
Training Intelligent Dogs to Lead Blinded Soldiers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0083.xml
article
169
169
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
How Injured Soldiers Are Carried
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0084.xml
article
170
170,171
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
Your Automobile Tires Are More Costly Now But They Are Giving You Greater Service
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0085.xml
article
172
172,173
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
Among Greenland’s Icy Mountains the Birds Twitter and Flowers Bloom in Summer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0086.xml
article
174
174,175
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
Camouflaging to Suicide Death. The Left for the German Lure Unwary
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0087.xml
article
176
176,177
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
These Stupendous Figures Tell the Story of New York City’s Great Subway System
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0088.xml
article
178
178,179
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
Speaking of Our Shipbuilding Programme, Let’s Look at Ships in Other Ports of the World
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0089.xml
article
180
180
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
Trinidad Chocolate for You and Me
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0090.xml
article
181
181
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
Hats are Really Sunshades as Worn in Malta and Korea
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0091.xml
article
182
182,183
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
Taking Lessons from the How the Gentle Art of Chameleon and the Moth Camouflaging Is Taught
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0092.xml
article
184
184,185
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Gunning for Bird-Men
Some recent anti-aircraft guns with improvised mountings
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
THE art of war has reverted to a state similar to that which the introduction of the use of gunpowder and firearms produced in the fifteenth century. Then, conditions and methods had to be readjusted to meet the changes produced by a new and powerful agent of destruction, not yet fully understood; now, new means of warfare, evolved by the marvelous resources of modern science and engineering, have again unsettled conditions and caused an upheaval upon a fearfully exaggerated scale.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0093.xml
article
185
185
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Launching Seaplanes from Ships
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a big seaplane is to be launched from the deck of a ship (of whatever type) it is first “tuned up” on the launching stage. Then the ship is swung dead into the teeth of the wind and put at full speed. To make sure of the direction of the wind, for an error would mean a “crooked” run and, perhaps, the destruction of the seaplane, a jet of steam is sent up in the exact center of the extreme tip of the launching stage.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0094.xml
article
186
186,187
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
The Jelaliplane and the Mitromudscow. In Both the Balloon Figures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAVING become a free American, citizen, far from bloody Turkish massacres and the homelike Mount Ararat, a famous dry spot in the times of Noah, and having settled at Cranston, Rhode Island, where surfaces of water abound, Martin Jelalian has be-thought himself of means for walking upon occidental Galilees.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0095.xml
article
187
187
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Tree’s Foliage Trimmed to Let Telephone Wires Pass Through
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON the suburban lines of the Chicago Telephone Company, it has frequently been necessary to cut down trees or trim their foliage in order to give telephone wires the right of way. Foreman J. Woods, chief of construction of the local telephone company in Chicago, deserves credit for a novel method of overcoming the difficulties placed in the way of telephone-line construction by trees along the right-of-way.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0096.xml
article
187
187
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Who Cares for Whiskey or Beer When Fresh Lemon Juice is so Cheap
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE jugs nestling in the big basket on the truck shown above may arouse the suspicion in the minds of prohibitionists, but the suspicion is unjustified. The jugs, big and little, contain nothing stronger than fresh-made lemon juice. The scene is in Naples and the lemons may have grown in the garden of the enterprising vendor in the outskirts of the city.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0097.xml
article
188
188
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Ascending a Ladder to Encourage Liberty Bond Sales
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF he had been dragging children from the top floor of a burning tenement house at the risk of his life, Owen J. Ryan, a fireman, could not have received greater applause than he did when he climbed to the top of a ladder in City Hall Park in New York during the last Liberty Bond campaign.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0098.xml
article
188
188
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Do You Know Why Grass-Hoppers Spit “Tobacco Juice?”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FRENCH scientist, Dr. E. Rabaud, has unearthed the fact that the emission of dark fluid from the mouths of grasshoppers, when captured, is a swift action, which follows the stimulation of various spots of its skin. In other words, this carefree, joyous insect, when touched by the bad boy’s or the naturalist’s fingers on different localities of the surface of its anatomy, sets up a “reflex process” — a high-sounding name for a message from the skin to his spinal cord, relayed swiftly back again to a nearby muscle—between the skin and the throat of the grasshopper.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0099.xml
article
189
189
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Guns That Shoot Not Shells, but Messages to Commanders
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE transmission of messages, observations or directions from the first line trenches to the headquarters of the regimental or brigade commanders behind the lines is always difficult and attended with great risks. Of course connection by telephone is maintained whenever possible.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0100.xml
article
189
189
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Portable Canvas Locker for Use at Home or Abroad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROTECTION for clothing not in use, whether in camp, in the home, in the factory or elsewhere, is made easy by a new portable canvas locker. The device weighs but five pounds, and may be carried under the arm when folded; yet when expanded it is fifty-eight inches high, twenty - two inches deep, and six inches wide.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0101.xml
article
190
190,191,192
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION PICTURES
[no value]
A Photograph Thirty-Nine Feet Long
A panorama of Naples, viewed from San Marino Castle, is the largest photograph ever taken
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the May number of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY was described a gigantic photograph of an actual battle scene, showing the storming of the Vimy heights by the Canadian troops on the morning of April 9, 1917. It was spoken of as being probably the largest war photograph ever made.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0102.xml
article
192
192
RAILWAYS
[no value]
Converting an Automobile Into a Railway Locomotive
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMALL steam locomotives such as those used to haul coal from the mines or timbers from logging camps are very difficult to purchase today. Even the second-hand market in such engines is exhausted because the equipment is being employed to carry on the many big government construction jobs.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0103.xml
article
193
193
[no value]
[no value]
Even the Animals in the Zoo Must Now Hooverize
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIONS and tigers that used to feed on juicy beef are now glad to get a chunk of old horse. Snakes are satisfied with rats and mice—except the python, which still insists on tender pork. The bears get war bread made of wheat substitutes. The New York Zoological Garden raises a large amount of both vegetable and animal foods for its wild wards.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0104.xml
article
193
193
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Working Under Forced Draft. Air-Cooled Overalls That Defy the Heat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AIR-CIRCULATING overalls have been introduced. Their object is to contribute to the farmer’s comfort in hot weather. The garment works like a bellows, producing a draft. The harder the farmer digs or hoes the greater the draft. On the front of the overalls is a bib, which is stiff and heavy.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0105.xml
article
193
193
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Here Is a Theft-Proof Coal Pocket with Six Bins
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW kind of coal pocket consists of a large steel tank built on a concrete foundation, and divided into six bins, which may be filled through one movable spout leading from the elevating device. By using an electric motor fifty tons of coal can be unloaded into the bins in fifty minutes.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0106.xml
article
194
194
MEDICINE AND SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Drink from the Brook—But with a Sanitary Drinking Tube
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THREE little girls, on a picnic excursion in the mountains, prepare to eat their luncheon. First, however, they voice their intention of drinking from a spring near by. One of them produces a rubber tube about a foot and half in length and one-fourth of an inch in thickness.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0107.xml
article
194
194
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Keep a Toad in Your Garden and Save $19.88 Yearly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE toad is useful because of its diet. No less than eighty-three species of insects, mostly injurious, have been proved to enter into his dietary. In his “Civic Biology” (American Book Company) George W. Hunter says: A toad has been observed to snap up one hundred and twenty-eight flies in half an hour.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0108.xml
article
194
194
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Drop in a Quarter, Turn a Crank, and Buy a Thrift Stamp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MACHINE has been introduced which will provide a thrift stamp when the purchaser drops a quarter into a slot and turns a crank. The apparatus not only saves clerical work, but acts as a cash register on stamp sales. In order to make the machine ready for operation one hundred thrift stamps are placed in the bank in a small, compact roll.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0109.xml
article
195
195,196,197,198,199
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
The Caravans of the Sea
Convoying ships through the danger zone
How the Procession Steams Along
Undersea Wolves Are Lurking for the Attack, But the Dogs of War Are Ready for Them
The Slow Ships Hold Back the Fleet
[no value]
[no value]
Ernest Welleck
WHEN Germany, shortly after the beginning of the world war, entered upon an intensive submarine warfare against all shipping belonging to the Entente Allies, the U-boat was a comparatively new and untried weapon. Step by step the submarine was developed into a most formidable fighting machine.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0110.xml
article
199
199
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Fenced In by Steam Boilers, He Has Reserve Stock and an Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you ever happen to walk down a certain street in Los Angeles, don’t question the veracity of your eyesight when the craziest fence imaginable looms out before your astonished gaze. It looks as though a plumber had built a fence while in a nightmare.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0111.xml
article
199
199
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Hiding the Nakedness of a Windmill
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE highly decorative effect of ivy growing against the walls of castles and other buildings was discovered some centuries ago, but it remained for a very modern farmer to turn the climbing habit of the wild grape to good account. The photograph tells the story.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0112.xml
article
200
200
MEDICINE AND SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Keeping Him Quiet While the Ship Rocks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE usual ship’s hammock is of course out of the question for a man with a leg or arm in a splint, for instance, and the berths are equally useless on account of the lurching of the vessel. The transportation of badly wounded soldiers presents a many-sided problem which experts are finding difficult of solution in spite of the many new inventions made for the purpose.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0113.xml
article
200
200
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
“Shine Your Shoes!” All You Do Is to Drop Dime in Slot
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STEP up to the new coin-controlled boot blacking machine, ladies and gentlemen. Thrust your foot into the open mouth of the machine and steady yourself with one of the brass handrails. In one minute and fifteen seconds you remove your foot and gaze in admiration at your shoe.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0114.xml
article
201
201
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
How Far Can a Chauffeur See a Man in Dark Clothes on a Black Night
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOLLOWING action on the part of the New York State Legislature to enact a better automobile headlight law, tests to determine how much light is necessary to reveal a man in dark clothes at distances of 150 feet and 250 feet in front of a car, and how much light the driver can tolerate in his eyes at a distance of 100 feet, were held in New York city.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0115.xml
article
201
201
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
A Twenty-Five Million Dollar Ordnance Base in France
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR use by the American expeditionary forces in France there is at present under construction a huge ordnance base which will cost twenty-five million dollars. It will include many storehouses, shop buildings, magazines, and a large store of machine tool equipment.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0116.xml
article
201
201
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Weed the Garden With This New Tool
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DANDELIONS, thistles and other kinds of weeds may be rooted out without disturbing the soil by means of a weeder provided with a three-inch digging blade that penetrates the soil like a knife. The implement pulls out the top, root and all. The blade is made of steel.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0117.xml
article
202
202
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Crush the End of a Pipe and You Produce a Perfect Garden Nozzle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE garden sprinkling nozzle developed by Charles H. Stephan, of Springfield, Ohio, looks as if it were a piece of plain piping, struck with a hammer at its end. Though this is not exactly the way it is made, it is shaped nearly as quickly by a single blow in a forming press.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0118.xml
article
202
202
[no value]
[no value]
European Cattle Must Eat Leaves and Wood-Pulp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN several European countries, notably Sweden and Germany, the scarcity of cattle-fodder has led to experiments with various substitutes for the usual feed given to cattle. It has been found that dried wood-pulp provides a good cattle-fodder when mixed with molasses and albuminous substances.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0119.xml
article
202
202
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Bostonians Ride in “Snake” Cars That Wriggle Around Sharp Corners
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOME Boston streets have such sharp corners that short cars must be employed. But you can’t pack many people in small cars. So some bright Boston mind hit on the idea of combining two short cars by means of a vestibule between. The vestibule is almost square and is actually hung from the ends of the two cars by hinged pins so that very sharp curves can be rounded with safety.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0120.xml
article
203
203
MEDICINE AND SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Now the Crippled Soldier Can Do His Walking Sitting Down
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WOUNDED soldiers and ordinary invalids who are compelled to use crutches for long periods often suffer from “crutch paralysis," caused by the great strain and the pressure of the arm rests of the crutches upon the nerves of the arm pits. Two ways to avoid this have been devised recently, in both of which the invalid is enabled to sit down while he walks.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0121.xml
article
203
203
[no value]
[no value]
The Various Ranges of Electric Searchlights on the Sea
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RANGES of electrical searchlights vary, from between one thousand to two thousand yards in foggy weather to ten thousand yards or more when the air is very clear. The average range is approximately six thousand yards, but there are cases on record where ships have been spotted at a distance of nine miles.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0122.xml
article
203
203
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
What Sounds Can Aviators Hear at Different Altitudes?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE famous French astronomer, Camille Flammarion, gives in one of his reports the heights at which certain sounds from the earth are heard from balloons. At an altitude of 3,000 feet the croaking of frogs was distinctly heard. At the height of 3,225 feet the rolling of a cart was made out. At 4,550 feet the roll of a drum and the music of an orchestra were distinguished; at 5,000 feet the sound of a church bell, the crowing of a cock and sometimes the shouts of men and women.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0123.xml
article
204
204
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Using the Camera Finder as a Rifle Periscope
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SIDEWAYS periscope invented by Colonel Kauchich of the Austrian Army permits a sniper to hide behind a tree and fire without exposing more than his elbow. The invention operates on the same principle as the finder of a camera. Mirrors are placed at angles of forty-five degrees near openings at each end and on opposite sides of a square tube attached to the barrel of the rifle just beyond the hammer.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0124.xml
article
204
204
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
The Non-Ricochet Shell Is a New Terror
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE non-ricochet shell has been used with success by the United States Navy, according to a public statement made by Chairman Oliver of the House committee investigating the conduct of the Navy. In the past, there have been designed projectiles that will dive, but it was difficult to construct a fuse that will not cause an explosion upon contact with the water.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0125.xml
article
204
204
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Armoring the Infantryman’s Knuckles with Steel Bullet Deflectors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT occurred to C. H. Gavin, of Natick, Mass., that every part of a soldier’s anatomy was better protected than his hands, which are really his most valuable tools. So he invented a protector in the form of a piece of steel bent to fit the back of the hand and held in place by a steel strip passing across the palm.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0126.xml
article
205
205
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
She Always Rights Herself
Stanch, buoyant and equipped with a powerful gasoline engine, the Liberty Lifeboat is designed to weather all storms
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“ALL hands on deck!” The captain’s stern command rings out clarion-like through all parts of the big freighter, which lists heavily to port since the explosion of the torpedo a few minutes ago. Nevertheless, the crew manages to lower several lifeboats, big and little.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0127.xml
article
206
206
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Protect Your Trench with a Deflector Made of Wire Netting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE trench mortar fires its missiles so that they fall almost vertically into the opposite trench; the hand grenade follows a similar course. Shrapnel is timed to explode so that its bullets spray the ground below like rain. Now you understand why a trench cover is employed on the Western front, consisting of a sloping wooden framework on which is stretched a screen of wire netting.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0128.xml
article
206
206
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Making Tractors by Using Tractor Power
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SHORT time ago the transformer through which the electricity passes for supplying the power for a large tractor plant in Illinois was overloaded and consequently burned out. Every wheel came to a standstill—a serious matter for the factory which had been running at top speed to fill orders.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0129.xml
article
207
207,208,209
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Terrorizing Our Atlantic Seaboard
Depth-bombs, nets, mines, destroyers, and seaplanes have not exterminated the pest of the seas nor kept it at home. How can America protect herself?
Submarines Are Not Easily Sunk
A U-Boat Needs No American Base
The Armored Submarine of the Future
What Von Tirpitz Wanted
[no value]
[no value]
Simon Lake
ALTHOUGH the U-53 voyaged across the Atlantic, slipped in and out of Newport and then sank half a dozen ships off Nantucket at a time when we were still neutral, although the Deutschland made two highly successful and profitable visits to these shores, the recent attacks of submarines on ships off the Atlantic coast amazed us with their dramatic suddenness.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0130.xml
article
210
210
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Mined! But She Limped Back to Port
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE oil tanker, Herbert L. Pratt, struck a mine on June 2 off the Delaware Capes. It was in all probability a mine “laid” by one of the German submarines that spread terror along our shores. The explosion had punctured four of her eighteen compartments. The uninjured sections kept her afloat, but with her nose in the water.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0131.xml
article
211
211
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
In Which We Tell You What “Dubbing” Means in Shipbuilding
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER the framework of a ship in course of construction is completed, the rough timbers must be “dubbed.” And that means? Simply that they must be planed snug and smooth before the planking can be put on. Heretofore the work of “dubbing” has been done by hand.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0132.xml
article
211
211
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
No More Trouble Getting Inside Your Storage Battery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW device for softening the seals of storage batteries by steam works automatically. A steam generator, a steaming box and a water supply tank are its essential parts. The generator consists of a small cylindrical tank placed over a little gas, oil or gasoline stove.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0133.xml
article
212
212,213
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Speeding Mail by the Sky Post
The establishment of the aerial mail service between New York and Washington an epoch-making event
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FUTURE histories of civilization will make a record of May 15, 1918, as the day marking the beginning of a new epoch in the evolution of the mail service. On that day the service over the first regular aerial mail route, between New York and Washington, with Philadelphia as an intermediate station, was inaugurated.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0134.xml
article
213
213
MISCELLANY
[no value]
This Stand Will Display Your Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE stand shown on the left, for displaying books, magazines, signs and stationery, is collapsible and well adapted to the use of retail dealers. The upright section can be adjusted so as to stand at any one of five different angles in order to get the best light or attract the prospective patron’s eye.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0135.xml
article
214
214
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
You Need Ice Now? Get Ready for the Harvest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHERE winters are cold and pure water can be had, any householder can keep himself supplied with wholesome ice all the year round by using a freezing mold of suitable construction and storing the ice in a cool place. A manufacturer in Spokane, Wash., has placed such a freezing mold on the market.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0136.xml
article
214
214
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Wheel and Tree Puzzle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FARMER rolled an old wagon wheel into a corner of the lot. It lay hidden amid weeds and débris. In the course of time a tiny tree started to grow between two of the spokes and grew so big that it broke one of the spokes from the rim and threatens to break another.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0137.xml
article
215
215
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
“Ten Degrees Cooler Than Outside.” And It’s True, Too!
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON a hot summer day even the most persuasive barker or press agent will find it difficult to convince the public that they will find it pleasant and cool in his theater. But the person who feels a pleasantly cool draft coming from the open door of the theater when he passes will be convinced and ready to go to the box-office for a ticket.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0138.xml
article
215
215
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Don’t Throw Away the Box. Use It for Remailing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REMAILING by means of the same box in which an article is sent is rendered convenient by a mailing box that has a transparent opening for the address of the sender and another for the address of the receiver. Cards bearing the addresses can easily be reversed so that the box may be prepared for remailing.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0139.xml
article
216
216
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Test Seed Corn with a “Rag Doll”
A simple, homemade device recommended by Department of Agriculture to the farmer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DEFECTIVE seed corn means a loss of millions to the United States annually. Clearly some method ought to be adopted to ascertain whether or not seed corn will germinate. The Bureau of Plant Industry of the Department of Agriculture is doing its best to encourage the use of the “rag doll” tester—a device which can be made at home.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0140.xml
article
217
217
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Studying Trench Warfare with the Aid of an Intricate Model
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE art of constructing entrenchments has become a science of hitherto undreamed of possibilities. Never before was trench war conducted on such a large scale. Its development, influenced by modern improvements and changes in weapons, tactics, and conditions, has become so intricate that a special course of study, embodying the principles and endless details of trench fighting had to be devised for the officers and non-commissioned officers who are to enter service at the front.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0141.xml
article
217
217
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Foot Operates the Clutch and Gear-Shifting Mechanism
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE clutch pedal and the gear-shifting mechanism have been so combined by E. R. Martino that the clutch will always be out during the shifting of the gears. Attached to the pedal is a rod extending through a pivoted tubular lever. Through a slot in the hollow lever runs an elbow rod which has a pivoted shoe resting on a rod controlling the clutch.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0142.xml
article
218
218
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
The Sun Really Rises After We See It Rise. Why?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAS it ever occurred to you that we never see our Sun either rise or set? When it seems to rise or when it seems to set it is below the horizon. These statements are absolutely true. Our eyes do not deceive us, but the atmosphere does. It possesses a quality of refracting or changing the direction of the Sun’s rays.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0143.xml
article
218
218
[no value]
[no value]
How the Deadly Mills Hand Grenade Is Made and Exploded
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE grenades which are used by the French and allied troops at the West front are of the type invented by William Mills, an Englishman. The grenades of the Mills type are egg-shaped, about four inches long and nearly three inches in diameter. The outside shell is of cast iron and deeply notched.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0144.xml
article
219
219
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
When Fifteen Million Grenades Exploded
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0145.xml
article
220
220,221
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Push Button Works the Steering Gear
The second prize in the Popular Science Monthly’s automobile labor-saving contest was won by this electrical steering control
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE winner of the second prize in the POPULAR SCIENCE contest for the best labor-saving automobile device (the conditions were published in the April issue), devised an electrically-operated and controlled automobile steering wheel, which is operated by a mere push of a button switch in almost the same manner as you would turn on and off an electric light in your home.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0146.xml
article
221
221
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Sucking Dust and Lint from Moving Machinery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE constant and rapid accumulation of dust and lint on and in the machinery has always been one of the most vexing problems in spinning and textile mills. Small particles of wool, cotton, linen or some other fiber become detached from the yarns and threads during the spinning or weaving operations.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0147.xml
article
222
222
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Saving Time and Trouble in the Office
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0148.xml
article
223
223
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Do It with Tools and Machines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0149.xml
article
224
224
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Like Opera-Glasses—Thats How Guns Are Mounted on Planes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the airplane was first introduced as an adjunct to warfare it fulfilled not even theoretically the requirements of a weapon of attack or defence. Experience proved an efficient teacher and under the stimulating influence of necessity the development of the military airplane progressed with remarkable rapidity.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0150.xml
article
224
224
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Uncle Sam’s Hat Is in the Ring— and Winslow’s Airplane Proves It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIEUTENANT ALLAN F. WINSLOW of Chicago will go down in history. He is the American who brought down the first German flying machine credited to our Expeditionary Force. The insignia seen on the side of the flying machine shown in the accompanying photograph eloquently conveys the idea that Uncle Sam’s hat is not only in the ring but that it dominates the ring exclusively.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0151.xml
article
225
225
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Making a Sport of Grenade-Throwing
The grenades are like those used in the trenches—without the explosives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAND-GRENADE throwing, conceived in the stress of war, born in the trenches through necessity and developed to the point of a fine art by constant practice, has been taken up as a sport far from the maddening din of battle and is rapidly gaining in public favor.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0152.xml
article
226
226,227,228
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Like a Duck’s Back
Proofing the cloth used for war purposes against water and mildew
Killing Mildew with Copper Salts
Will This Tent-Cloth Stand Water?
[no value]
[no value]
John Walker Harrington
TENTS and uniforms for the army must be proof against both moisture and mildew. These are days in which the dampness of trench and dugout, as well as the rains and the snows, plays havoc with materials and fabrics. Shoes that have been brought back are moldy; a greenish coating clings to them, composed of minute plants—the malignant microbes which cause the disease known as “trench foot.”
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0153.xml
article
228
228
[no value]
[no value]
The Mysteries of Liquid Fire Are Explained
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. E. HOWE
A LIQUID fire apparatus usually consists of a metal tank holding about four gallons of liquid to be burned, a section of pipe from this tank to a rubber hose at the other end, in which there is a smaller metal pipe about a yard long fitted with a nozzle, and a friction igniter, as well as an oil burning wick.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0154.xml
article
229
229
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Windshield and Sunshade in One. It Works with a Twist of the Wrist
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW windshield slides upward by means of two threaded bars, one on each side. Its advantages over the ordinary shield hinged at the top are obvious. When it is desired to open the windshield for fresh air or clear vision, it is pushed up only as far as needed, whereas the shield hinged at top, in order to obtain, say, two inches of open space, would manifestly require to be pushed outward a great deal further than that, thereby letting in rain or wind or snow.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0155.xml
article
229
229
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Taking Up the Wear in a Magneto Coupling by Means of Springs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN driving water pumps and magnetos on automobile engines, it is necessary to provide some method of compensation for any possible misalinement of the pump or magneto shafts with the driving shafts. While the usual type of two meshing jaw - clutch ends has given good results it wears away because of the metal to metal contact and becomes a noisy consumer of power.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0156.xml
article
229
229
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
How to Make an Old Car Pay
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE experience of an automobile owner, as told by himself in a magazine devoted to automobiling, should be of particular interest at the present time to owners of old cars. The man in question, a farmer in Ohio, had bought a touring car in 1910 and had used it five years.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0157.xml
article
230
230
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Arrow System Used by England in Guiding the Chariots of the Air
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Germans are raiding England from the air so frequently and at so many different places that they often get by the coast patrol. Should a hostile airplane cross over his beat unknown to him, which often happens, as the distance to be patrolled is generally long, coast guards on the ground instantly notify him by means of a simple signaling system.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0158.xml
article
230
230
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
How They Husband the Gasoline Supply in France
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GASOLINE is extremely scarce in France, and its use for other purposes than those of war has almost ceased. The army is, of course, supplied with all the gasoline required for the military automobiles, airplanes, motorcycles, and motor-trucks in actual service, and a limited quantity is allowed to civilians who can prove that they need the gasoline for some legitimate purpose.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0159.xml
article
230
230
[no value]
[no value]
A Hailstorm of Bombs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A statement issued by the British War Office gives the following interesting data regarding the comparative number of bombs dropped by aviators on both sides during a single month. In the area occupied by British troops in France during that period German aviators dropped 1,482 bombs, while British airmen let loose 7,653 bombs over German-occupied areas in the same time.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0160.xml
article
231
231
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
How Much Light Falls on Your Desk?
Lay this instrument on the table and measure illumination
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO measure anything you must have some standard of length, weight or capacity with which to make comparison; you must have what is called a unit of measurement. The bushel, the pint, the foot are such units of measurement. The unit by which the intensity of light is measured is called candle-power.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0161.xml
article
232
232
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Cricket and Baseball Combined—A New Outdoor Ball Game for Boys
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW ball game has been invented, which is particularly designed for boys between the ages of eight and fourteen or thereabouts. The new game, which requires only a moderately large space, may be played by two or more boys, either for independent scores or as teams.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0162.xml
article
232
232
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Man-Power Is Cheap in the Philippine Islands
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the Philippine Islands labor is still cheap and for that reason it is often employed in cases which, in the United States, would call for the use of labor-saving machinery. The accompanying picture illustrates the manner in which big logs are transported across the vast stretches of swampy ground which interfere with communication in many parts of the islands.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0163.xml
article
233
233
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Making It Easy to Remove the Large Globes of Street Lamps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BREAKAGE of the large outer globes of street lamps is reduced to a minimum by the use of a new clamp recently invented. The holding device consists of two sheet metal semi-circular forms connected at one side by a hinge and at the opposite side by a catch.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0164.xml
article
233
233
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Select Your Map with a Dial and then Pull—That’s All
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CABINET that can contain a number of maps on vertical rollers, and display them as wanted on an extension board which can be folded back within the cabinet when not in use, has been devised and patented by George S. Clason of Denver, Colorado.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0165.xml
article
234
234,235,236,237
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Live Topics of the Motor World
New Things in the World of Tractors, Motor Trucks and Pleasure Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0166.xml
article
238
238
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
An Open-Air Shrine of Cedars—A California Priest’s Conception
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the numerous attractive features in the gardens of the Santa Barbara Mission in California, is the group of cedar trees forming the background for a tall crucifix, shown in the accompanying picture. The Brother in the picture planted the cedars sixty - three years ago and trained them to form an alcove around the crucifix.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0167.xml
article
238
238
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
You May Injure Your Skin with Too Much Soap
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. SAMUEL DIXON, Health Commissioner of Pennsylvania, asserts that the use of too much soap is injurious as it fills the pores with fatty substances which interfere with the activity of the glands of the skin. Very little soap is necessary to dissolve the dirt so that water can remove it.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0168.xml
article
238
238
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
A Game to Teach Children How to Read the Clock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY children find it difficult to become proficient in reading the clock. The subject is not in itself excitingly interesting, for which reason the instruction the children receive from their parents is usually rather perfunctory. The clock puzzle placed in the market by a novelty concern in Michigan offers an excellent method to make the study of the clock fascinating to children and at the same time instructive.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0169.xml
article
239
239
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Getting Rid of the Barbed Wire Entanglement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BARBED wire entanglements were first used in warfare by the Boers in their brief struggle with Great Britain. It was recognized at once by all the military leaders of the world that a new and very formidable method of checking storming troops had been devised by South African farmers who knew nothing at all of military strategy.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0170.xml
article
239
239
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Cherry Pits a Source of Valuable Oils
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ABOUT 36,000 tons of cherries are grown annually in New York, Michigan, Wisconsin and California, of which eighty per cent, is canned. In order to can cherries the pits are removed, and in removing the pits juice is wasted. Some 1,600 tons of pits accumulate in a year, and 112,000 gallons of juice.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0171.xml
article
240
240,241
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Electric Stevedores Relieve Congestion
How a simple invention is helping to increase our military and industrial manpower
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SMALL electric industrial tractors would solve the problem of freight congestion of New York city’s piers and incidentally release from five thousand to seven thousand men for other vital war work, even if only approximately fifty thousand tons of freight were handled daily.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0172.xml
article
241
241
MEDICINE AND SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
The Terrific Strain of Trench Warfare at the Front
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER serving with the American Ambulance at the front, Dr. George W. Crile writes of trench warfare. “The nearer the trenches,” says he, “the more desperate and intense is the fighting. (“A Mechanistic View of War and Peace,” The Macmillan Company.)
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0173.xml
article
242
242,243
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Doing the Albatross Amble
A new dance from the Hawaiian Islands that is unaccompanied by the ukulele
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the middle of the Pacific Ocean about eight hundred miles west of San Francisco and a little north of Honolulu is a solitary isle about two square miles in area called Laysan. It is of coral origin. Its only inhabitants are millions upon millions of birds.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0174.xml
article
243
243
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Does War Breed a Sense of Fear in Animals?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ENGLISH writer has made some interesting studies of the behavior of certain animals under war conditions. From him we learn that parrots were employed as sentinels at the Eiffel Tower in Paris, and could be relied upon to give warning of an approaching aircraft at least twenty minutes before it could be seen by the naked eye.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0175.xml
article
244
244
RAILWAYS
[no value]
Using a Fence to Water the Lawn at a Railway Station
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE railroad officials at Mobridge, S. D., have installed a unique system for watering the station lawn. Since the fence railing is simply a pipe, it was decided to utilize it to carry the water. Holes were drilled at convenient intervals so that the water could spurt out.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0176.xml
article
244
244
RAILWAYS
[no value]
Making Tea at a Railway Station
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you carry a teapot with you when you go on a railroad trip, you may experience some trouble in getting hot water when you want it—that is, if you travel in the United States. If you happen to be on the Mukden-Tientsin Railroad in China, however, you can get your boiling water at every stopping-place.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0177.xml
article
244
244
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Look Behind You While You Fly In an Airplane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE old adage, “Look before you leap,” may well be amended nowadays to read “Look behind you while you fly.” In Europe the aviators are now as a rule equipped with “backsight” mirrors on their airplanes, so that they can observe not only the approach of any machines that may close in upon them from behind, but also keep an eye on the passenger or aviation pupil seated behind them.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0178.xml
article
245
245
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Crossing the Arizona Desert in a Ford
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE was a time when the crossing of the Arizona desert was an undertaking attended with tremendous risks. Many a prospector or ranchman who started on the hazardous journey, relying upon his trusty pony, was never heard from again. His bones are probably somewhere in that vast expanse, bleached by the merciless sun.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0179.xml
article
245
245
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Acidity in Oil Lubricants Causes Wear of Metal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE metal layers of an engine that come in contact with one another rub off small particles of matter that combine with the lubricant used and form a dirty and sticky mess. The olein contained in the lubricant will in course of time form an acid, known as oleic acid, which has a deleterious effect on the metal parts that it touches, causing progressive corrosion.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0180.xml
article
245
245
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
A Compass That Guides by Night as Well as by Day
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MEN whose calling or diversion takes them into the wilds will appreciate at its true worth the compass with a luminous face. The compass can be secured to the wrist-watch strap of a soldier or hunter, an automobilist's gauntlet or a fob and can be attached and detached without difficulty.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0181.xml
article
246
246,247
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Weighing Loads on the Run
In an endless stream, coke, coal, and cement pass on; yet every pound is weighed without a stop of the conveyor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN automatic weighing device recently introduced by an Eastern manufacturer of scales solves in a clever and decidedly interesting manner the problem of weighing material like coal, coke, cement, crushed stone, etc., while it is carried on a belt conveyor and of making a record of the weight of the passing load, without stopping its flow.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0182.xml
article
247
247
[no value]
[no value]
Armor for the Shock Troops of the Modem Army
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE German army has provided armor for snipers, sentries and observers, the suit being designed chiefly for soldiers whose duties are stationary. The metal helmet is common to both the Allied and German armies. A cuirass invented by Oscar Schaumann, a German, in 1908, attracted considerable attention.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0183.xml
article
248
248,249
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Developing a Fast Swimming Stroke
An engineer’s swimming suggestions for increasing efficiency
[no value]
[no value]
Marius Krarup
THERE is room for engineering in the sports to revise faulty traditions and to hold the interest of those who demand more than physical exercise. Most swimmers operate as a single-cylinder engine without a flywheel and therefore move in jerks.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0184.xml
article
249
249
[no value]
[no value]
A Well That Is More Than a Mile Deep
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A WELL being drilled on a farm in West Virginia in search of deeper oil sands penetrates into the bowels of the earth for 7,363 feet, or nearly one and one-third miles. It is hoped to find gas or oil under great pressure at a still lower level. The depth of this well exceeds the height of Mt. Washington.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0185.xml
article
250
250,251
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Ford’s Artificial Armored Horse
The new two-man tank designed to take the place of cavalry
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAVALRY is almost as extinct as the Dodo or the Mammoth. The machine gun, barbed wire, shells that bury themselves twenty feet in the ground and then explode are responsible for the passing of the trooper. Horses cannot be used to advantage in shellpitted territory and against a hail of machine gun bullets.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0186.xml
article
251
251
[no value]
[no value]
Cost of Railroad Equipment Has Gone Up the Last Four Years
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE transportation troubles of last winter—especially those which were due to shortage of freight cars and locomotives—were directly attributable to the enormous increase in cost of everything that a railroad needs, ever since the European War started in 1914.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0187.xml
article
252
252
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Stop Your Ears! The Band Is Playing the Boiler Makers’ Fox-Trot
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN electric hammer that will imitate the sounds made in riveting during the construction of ships and boilers has been devised by Louis Paulero, of Petersburg, Va., for the use of bands in rendering a musical march composed especially for the ship-builders of the United States.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0188.xml
article
252
252
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Making It Easy to Handle Large Blueprints
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FILES or holders hitherto devised for blueprints are unsatisfactory. Their locking device is too insecure or too complicated to permit the quick handling of the prints. A Boston manufacturer has now put an improved file on the market with an efficient locking device.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0189.xml
article
253
253
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Taking Sheep to Pasture on a Giant Excursion Boat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WAY out in Washington State lies Lake Chelan. Its head is accessible only by rough, narrow mountain trails or by boat or canoe from the lower end. At both upper and lower ends there is fine grazing country. But it was absolutely impracticable to take sheep over the trails, although it had often been tried.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0190.xml
article
253
253
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Still Another Apparatus for Holding Vicious Horses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the May issue of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY _we published an article describing the apparatus constructed by the army farriers to counteract the evil designs of refractory horses. Here we have another contrivance, made for the same purpose, but of totally different design.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0191.xml
article
253
253
[no value]
[no value]
Ten Thousand Dollars Offered for a Process of Making Mixed Oil Fuel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE British Government has decided to offer a prize of $10,000 for a process of making a mixture of dehydrated coal tar with mineral petroleum oils suitable for Admiralty use as fuel oil. This will be awarded to the first competitor submitting a successful process which must be capable of ready and economical application without undue absorption of material and labor.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0192.xml
article
254
254,255
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Housekeeping Made Easy with Mechanical and Electrical Devices
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0193.xml
article
256
256
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Flowers of Tin That Need Neither Water Nor Sun
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM putting tin on roofs to making artificial flowers that rival Nature’s own is a far cry. Yet that is exactly what has been done by Robert J. Nimmo, who is a sheet metal worker in the Department of Construction of the American Museum of Natural History.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0194.xml
article
256
256
[no value]
[no value]
The Medium-Sized Oysters Make the Best Eating
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOST people are under the delusion that the largest oysters are the best. Mammoth oysters are served in good hotels and expensive restaurants at fancy prices, and the innocent consumer imagines that he has eaten something really choice. As a matter of fact, these bloated and pallid bivalves are poor eating. They cannot begin to compare with smaller oysters in respect to flavor or nutrient value.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0195.xml
article
256
256
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Air (the Kind You Breathe) Pinched This Oil-Tank
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVEN a large steel oil-tank will not stand up against an atmospheric gas attack. Such a tank, with a capacity of eight thousand and eighty-five gallons, was being overhauled in San Francisco. It was planned to refill it with cocoanut oil; but first it was cleaned out by steam, a valve in the bottom being opened to permit the refuse to run out of the tank.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0196.xml
article
257
257
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Bumps and Hollows That Teach a Child How to Write Correctly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PEN-HOLDER which is designed to aid in correcting the faults of handwriting in school children is shown in the accompanying illustration. The device is made of hard rubber and can be slipped over the pen-holder proper. Three lugs or enlargements on the device enable it to be gripped firmly by the thumb and first two fingers of the hand.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0197.xml
article
257
257
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Ornamental Lattice Protects Young Vines from Direct Rays of Sun
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOUNG Virginia Creepers and similar climbing vines must be protected from the direct rays of the sun until their growth is started and they become hardy enough to take care of themselves. Usually this is accomplished by hanging a piece of gunny sack, or some other unsightly thing in front of them.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0198.xml
article
257
257
MEDICINE AND SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Planning a Diet for Weight Reduction
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FUEL is the main food requirement of the body. A certain amount of fuel keeps the engines of the body working normally and produces energy. The surplus of fuel derived from the food forms layers of fat. So it is evident that the matter of keeping the body weight where you wish to have it is merely a matter of arithmetic.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0199.xml
article
258
258,259,260
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
The Canary Birds of War
How they save our soldiers from suffocation by succumbing to gas
[no value]
[no value]
John Walker Harrington
THOUSANDS of canary heroines were called to do their bits in this war as gas scouts in mine, and sap, and grim replacement. As these feathered auxiliaries, although native to the Madeiras, have been bred by myriads in the Hartz Mountains, the Germans can draft all they need.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0200.xml
article
260
260
[no value]
[no value]
Using Cottonseed Flour in the Foods of Man
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH the housewife may not be aware of the fact, it is likely that she is using cottonseed oil in some form as a food. This is due to the fact that it is contained in some of the novelties employed to replace fats longer known in cookery. Cottonseed flour, probably representing ground and bolted meal, is used to some extent in the foods of man.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0201.xml
article
260
260
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Milking Cows on Floats to Raise Money for French Children
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN war times it takes the unusual to attract the attention of busy New Yorkers. But one day recently everybody on Fifth Avenue, Broadway and other crowded thoroughfares of New York paused to look in wonder when a number of floats carrying cows—real cows—and young women dressed as milkmaids appeared.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0202.xml
article
261
261
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Guiding Lamp in the Window Displays a Service Star
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE honor light, designed to serve the same purpose as the flag, has been devised to be placed in the window at night. The light has a handsome imitation bronze pedestal consisting of two decorative eagle models that support an alabaster flat ball, eight inches in diameter.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0203.xml
article
261
261
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Delivering Mail on Tricycles in a Great Electrical Plant
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE delivery of the shop mail in a big electrical plant in East Pittsburgh, Pa., has always presented a difficult problem. There are seventy-six acres of floor space and several hundred departments to be served. The rapid delivery of papers, drawings, etc., is essential, especially in these days when the plant is working on Government orders, turning out engines for motors for ships and airplanes.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0204.xml
article
261
261
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
A Collapsible Boat for a Submarine’s Use
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SHORT time ago a man was landed on the Irish coast from a German submarine. The man was arrested by British officers and the boat in which he had reached the coast was seized. It was a collapsible canvas boat, about eight feet long, two feet wide and twenty inches deep.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0205.xml
article
262
262,263
PICTURE PAGES
[no value]
ѤBuilding Imitation Alps of Rocks and Concrete on an English Nobleman’s Estate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0206.xml
article
264
264
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
How San Francisco Pumps Bathing Water from Pacific
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SAN FRANCISCO uses vast quantities of salt water in scores of her large public bathing establishments. To conduct this water from the Pacific into the city a powerful steel bridge has been erected, which extends outward from the beach to a distance of one thousand feet.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0207.xml
article
264
264
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
A Brace to Bar Your Door to Burglars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DEVICE for securely fastening a door opening inwards in case the lock should be out of order or as an additional protection against intruders was invented recently by Dr. Harry B. Roberts. It consists of two metal parts hinged together to form a knee joint.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0208.xml
article
265
265
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
A Miniature Fort for Every Soldier
He can carry it with him when he goes out to lick the Germans
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MAN down in the well-known city of Myrtle, Miss., has evolved a truly beautiful modification of the many portable breastworks and bullet stoppers, in that he has added to this laudable effort, also a battery of revolvers, making the whole merely a miniature Maubeuge or Namur.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0209.xml
article
266
266
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Surrender Quickly When You Face This Armored Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“HOLD up your hands and cry ‘Kamerad,’ or I’ll shoot!” cries a boyish voice, as you approach the house. Coming down the path you see a miniature armored' car, moving rapidly toward you. The only occupant, a little boy in military uniform, tries to look his fiercest as he looks at you from behind the formidable machine-gun which is pointed threateningly at you.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0210.xml
article
266
266
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
And the Mountains Arose and Cried “57 Varieties!”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS one travels through the countryside of Southern California, impressed with the grandeur of the scenery and marveling at the wonderful sweeps of mountain and valley, a number looms up like a nightmare on a distant hillside—a familiar and dread number that recalls stifling street-cars and crowded subways.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0211.xml
article
267
267
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Fifty-Seven Ways of Sleeping in This Mechanically Adjustable Bed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PERHAPS it isn’t poor digestion that makes you spend sleepless nights tossing about on your bed; it may be that all you require are new positions for your head and feet. In that event the bed shown in the accompanying illustrations will fulfill the requirements, for the operation of its mechanism will place the sleeper in fifty-seven different positions.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0212.xml
article
267
267
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
There’s Little Hope of Conquering the Clothes Moths
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. RALPH C. BENEDICT, an eminent chemist and student of entomology, about four years ago undertook a careful and systematic study of the clothes moths with the aim of solving the problem of moth-proofing ordinary woolen fabrics. Dr. Benedict accumulated a mass of the most interesting information concerning the life and activity of the various clothes moths during the various stages of their development and made numerous experiments to ascertain the effect of many poisonous substances on the eggs, the larvae and the mature moths.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0213.xml
article
268
268
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
It Wets, Sweeps and Carries the Dirt Away. One Man Runs It.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MACHINE that is able to do the work of four horse-drawn sweepers, and clean the streets at a cost of onlyseven cents per thousand feet is shown in the accompanying illustration. This machine is equipped with an eighty-gallon water tank, under a sixty-pound pressure, which is located at front and which sends the water onto the pavement through four nozzles.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0214.xml
article
268
268,269
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Warm? Push a Button and the Window Opens
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IMAGINE yourself leaning back against the swelling cushions of your luxuriously equipped limousine. It was cool when you started and the windows of the car were closed. But now it is warm, uncomfortably warm, and you long for a breath of fresh air.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0215.xml
article
269
269
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
For Excitable Car Drivers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE man in an automobile who hits a pedestrian usually loses his head. He becomes so excited that he fails to apply his brakes or shut off the engine. In addition to being knocked down the pedestrian is run over. Clifford W. Cole of Camden, N. J., comes to the poor pedestrian’s rescue with a type of fender which automatically applies the brakes and shuts off the engine when the fender strikes.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0216.xml
article
269
269
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Gasoline as Dangerous as Dynamite
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY automobile owners do not fully realize the danger connected with the careless handling of gasoline. In a general way they recognize the explosive power of the liquid, but few of them know how great that explosive power is. A writer in one of the magazines devoted to the automobile trade seeks to make this clear and more impressive by comparing the explosive power of gasoline with that of dynamite.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0217.xml
article
270
270
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Exploding “Duds” by Electricity
Shells which have failed to explode are fired by electric sparks to find out their defects
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DO you know what “duds” are? In the military slang which has developed during the great war a “dud” means a shell which shirked its duty by refusing to explode. Many of these shells are picked up after every artillery attack, and they constitute a source of danger, because they sometimes explode unexpectedly while they are handled.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0218.xml
article
271
271
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
The Labor-Saving Sail-Raiser
A sail-raising device that lightens the labor of the crews of wind-jammers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT was in 1862, when rounding Cape Hatteras in an army transport, that E. W. Brown, then a soldier in the Union army, realized the hardships of a sailor in raising and lowering sails in stormy weather. Although now in his seventy-eighth year, he has only recently patented a sail-raising and lowering device by which he expects to reduce the crew of a sailing ship from four to twelve men.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0219.xml
article
271
271
[no value]
[no value]
Huns Drop Bombs That Light Up the Landscape
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GERMAN aviators in recent raids on Paris used a device like a rocket, with a clock movement. The bomb on exploding releases a linen parachute equipped with a cartridge containing a substance with a magnesium base. This is lighted automatically about 1000 feet above the ground and casts a strong light over objects below it for two minutes.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0220.xml
article
272
272
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
How Crying Babies Summon Their Mothers by Telephone
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY modern city apartments have no yards, and even if they had, it is a long way down from the upper stories. How is the baby to get the several hours a day out of doors so necessary to health? I solved the problem for myself by building a crib on the roof.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0221.xml
article
272
272
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Ingenuity and Concrete Save a Flagpole
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a one hundred and ten foot flagpole in Central Park, Los Angeles, became wobbly, a resourceful city engineer reset it in concrete. Props were set around the pole to hold it securely while workmen excavated to a depth of four feet around its base.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0222.xml
article
273
273
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Thirsty? Take a Drink from the Fern Ball in the Garden
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EARTHEN jars sufficiently porous to keep their surfaces moist, and thus cool the contents by evaporation, are commonly used in Mexico and throughout the southwestern sections of the United States. These jars are known as ollas. By wrapping such a jar with floral moss to a depth of five inches, binding it in place with copper wire, and covering the moss with growing maiden-hair ferns, Herbert C. Goudge, prominent Los Angeles lawyer, has secured a most beautiful as well as useful article for the adornment of his Japanese garden.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0223.xml
article
273
273
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Unsafe “Safety Islands” and How to Make Them Safe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PARADOXICAL as it may seem, there are such things as unsafe islands of safety, those little havens of refuge for the pedestrian who has to cross a busy street and finds himself hemmed in by the criss-cross traffic. The “unsafety” of these “islands” lies in the circumstance that many of them are not properly lighted at night, and the motorist, confused by the glare from his own headlights, is liable to run into them.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0224.xml
article
274
274
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Looking at the Other Side of Things with a Mirror
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PIPES, pipes, and some more pipes; long and short, straight and crooked pipes; they run in every direction and form a perfect maze between the condensing tanks and boilers. Two men, one the superintendent of the plant, the other, judging from his appearance, some kind of mechanic, have picked their way through this jungle of pipes in the dim light filtering through the distant basement windows.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0225.xml
article
274
274
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
You Can Blow Up Germans or Grow Vegetables with Nitrogen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NITROGEN enters as a vital element in the making of various explosives, and without it many destructive articles could not be manufactured. On the other hand, nitrogen is indispensable to man’s chief source of food supply—namely, plant life.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0226.xml
article
274
274
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Compact Air Pump for Your Launch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OWNERS of gasoline launches or other power boats may be interested in an unusually clever air pump which has recently been placed in the market. The pump is compact, takes very little room, is worked by the propeller shaft to which it may be attached without taking out the shaft and requires no appreciable extra power to operate it.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0227.xml
article
275
275
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Get Acquainted with Your Engine by Setting It Up Yourself
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE advantage of putting together his own engine, after a man has bought it, is obvious. It gives him the chance to study its construction and learn the part each piece of mechanism performs when the engine is in operation—knowledge invaluable when it comes to cleaning it or making adjustments and necessary repairs from time to time.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0228.xml
article
275
275
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Will the Sahara Furnish Power When Coal Gives Out?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN view of the fact that coal and wood, the principal sources of artificial heat, are rapidly diminishing and that eventually the time must come when we shall be compelled to derive the heat required in our homes and our industries from other sources, a discussion of the possibility of finding such new sources is of intense interest.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0229.xml
article
276
276
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
This Pocket Can Be Attached Almost Anywhere You Please
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR the convenience of campers and soldiers in the trenches a detachable pocket has been put on the market that can be fastened to a horse-blanket, or the inside of a coat, or, in fact, anywhere that is convenient. The pocket is complete in itself and is fastened to the desired piece of cloth by four metal clips that penetrate the cloth and are bent over to hold it in place.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0230.xml
article
276
276
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
At the Tail End of the Earth’s Glacial Period
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. Marsden Manson of San Francisco, an eminent authority on geology, points to the fact established by recent antarctic explorations, that the great ice cap covering the region of the South Pole is shrinking. From this he draws the conclusion, that the gradual subsidence of the Age of Ice, of which the polar ice caps are the existing remnants, is still going on and that we live, so to speak, at the tail end of the glacial period.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0231.xml
article
276
276
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Switchman Is a “War Gardener” When He Is Not on Duty
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THAT a man can be a switchman and a “war gardener” too has been demonstrated by George J. Budman of Los Angeles. He was anxious to start a “war garden,” but as he lived in an apartment he could not have one at home. However, he did not give up the idea and at the crossing where he is stationed— one of the most dangerous in Los Angeles —he found a plot of ground about twelve feet in width and twenty feet in length, which was close to the switchman’s working quarters.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0232.xml
article
277
277
[no value]
[no value]
Converting Garbage into Chicken Feed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MR. WILLIAM H. FAUST, of Los Angeles, has recently patented a process for converting garbage into poultry food. The garbage is sorted, and wood, tins and other inedible articles removed, together with the large bones. The remainder is then cooked with steam for about four hours at well above the boiling-point of water.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0233.xml
article
277
277
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Steel Instead of Wood for the Felloes of Automobile Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STEEL instead of wood is now being used in a certain measure for the bands connecting the outer ends of the spokes of automobile wheels. This is due to the difficulty of obtaining properly seasoned hickory. The outer ends of the spokes are capped with steel ferrules to afford protection from water, the spokes being forced into the felloes under hydraulic pressure.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0234.xml
article
277
277
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Washing Vegetables in Bunches for the Market
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is perfectly natural that vegetables brought to market covered with dust or mud are not as salable as those presented to the purchaser in a clean and fresh condition. Many gardeners on a small scale lose a good part of their profit because they neglect to wash their vegetables before bringing them to market.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0235.xml
article
278
278
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
A Windmill That Dodges a Kansas Cyclone
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FUNNEL-SHAPED clouds chase one another about overhead, portending a heavy wind storm. Two men driving by a field in which is a pump operated by a windmill commented on the shortcomings of such apparatus. “The trouble with windmills,” says one of the men, “is that you can’t depend on their standing up under a gale. Now just watch.”
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0236.xml
article
278
278
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
The Chance of Death in an Air Raid
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN an airplane flies over a city, dropping bombs indiscriminately, it is natural to consider a certain area within a definite radius of the bombs’ explosive force as dangerous. A writer in a French periodical has recently given some figures that tend to show the comparative destruction of life wrought by these aerial missiles; and he comes to the conclusion that density of buildings and population increases the effectiveness of bombs dropped at random.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0237.xml
article
279
279
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Millions of Horses and Mules in the War
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOTOR vehicles are used extensively for war purposes, but they have not entirely displaced horses. According to a statement by the British Premier Lloyd George, the British alone employ 2,000,000 horses in their armies. 5,000,000 horses and mules are in service on the West front.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0238.xml
article
279
279
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Curb That Protects Parkway Flowers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CURB to protect the flowers and shrubbery growing in a parkway before a home from heavy rain torrents is shown in the accompanying photograph. The parkway is located on the side of a hill. Every rain-fall caused a flood of water to run over the street curb on to the parkway, sweeping away or inundating the growing things in its path.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0239.xml
article
279
279
[no value]
[no value]
Tiptoeing Your Way Across the Lawn on Stones
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALBERT MARPLE
A NOVEL approach for the small home is made entirely of stepping stones—a pleasing contrast to the ordinary solid-concrete approach to a bungalow. This place is located in Pasadena, California, in a neighborhood enjoying a number of unusual features, among the most unique of which is this approach.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0240.xml
article
280
280
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Let Joy Be Unconfined ! the Farmer’s Wife Can Now "Listen In" All She Likes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"BR-R-R-ING! B-r-r-r-ing! B-r-r-r-rr-r-r-ing!!” “Oh my, that’s Mrs. Simpson’s call. I must hurry and listen in, and see what the news is up our way this morning.” And the farmer’s wife rushes to the telephone, and there hears all the news of the neighborhood.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0241.xml
article
280
280
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
A Simple Economy Hanger for Wiring Old Buildings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE wiring of old buildings, always a difficult and often an expensive matter, is made much easier and less expensive by a new work hanger recently invented and placed in the market. This device consists of a stud with a screw thread at the lower end and a square hole through its upper part.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0242.xml
article
281
281
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Just a Piece of Sheet Iron and You Have a Camp Stove
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a valuable stove idea for the camper, especially if he owns an automobile. Although it has been tried out and found satisfactory, its simplicity will cause its value to be questioned by many. It consists of a single piece of sheet iron ⅛ in. thick, 18 in. in width and 24 in. long. It can be purchased at any hardware store.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0243.xml
article
281
281
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Starting Induction Motors When Coils Fail to Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN D. ADAMS
ALMOST all alternating current fans have starting coils that are automatically thrown out of circuit by a centrifugal device when the motor operates rapidly. Sometimes this device becomes deranged and does not break the connection, with the result that the fan fails to attain full speed and becomes overheated.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0244.xml
article
282
282
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Injecting Water Into Vines to Make Pumpkins Grow Rapidly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S. LEONARD
PUMPKINS, vegetable marrows, etc., usually grow at a great rate; but their development may be hastened to an astonishing degree by feeding them through the stalk with plain water. Holes are made in the stems of the fruits and into these the ends of lamp wicks are pushed as shown in the photograph.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0245.xml
article
282
282
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Drying Potatoes for Future Use Instead of Storing Them
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF the American housewife allows any waste or fails to put aside a generous supply of summer products for winter use it will not be because she has not been admonished and shown how by the Department of Agriculture. The latest exhortation is of special interest to those having too little storage space to accommodate the surplus potato crop.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0246.xml
article
282
282,283
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Old Buggy Wheels Used for Training Growing Vines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PERSON that took a great deal of pride in his small backyard garden used some old discarded buggy wheels for training his bean vines. Each wheel was supported by a substantial post with its upper end hewn down to fit in the hole in the hub.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0247.xml
article
283
283
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Underslung Rack for Hauling Green Corn Fodder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GUY S. ELLIS
BY those who are using the high flat rack for hauling the long, heavy bundles of green corn fodder to the silage cutter this underslung rack shown will be much appreciated. The expense of building such a rack is not to be considered in measuring its convenience.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0248.xml
article
283
283
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Removing Static Charges from a Moving Belt
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PETER J. M. CLUTE
TO remove the heavy static charges from a moving belt, the hangers, bearings, etc., are usually grounded. It will, however, be found advisable, in addition to such grounding, to install metal combs in the under side of the belt close to the point where it leaves the revolving pulleys, and also to treat the outside surface of the belt periodically with a mixture of equal parts of water and glycerin.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0249.xml
article
283
283
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making Transparent Varnish of White Shellac
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DISSOLVE one part of pearl ash in about eight parts of water; add one part of shellac and heat the entire mixture up to the boiling point. When the shellac has completely dissolved, cool the solution, and saturate it with chlorine until the shellac precipitates out entirely.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0250.xml
article
284
284,285
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Mounting Seaweeds on Cardboard for a Collection
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MAKING a collection of seaweed may be a difficult task for the average person as the regions where the different varieties may be found are limited. For this reason such a collection is valued and much sought after by the naturalist. Algae (the general name for seaweed) develop no roots with which to penetrate the sand and are therefore not adapted for sandy beaches or shallow places where small stones are continually being rolled about by the tides.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0251.xml
article
285
285
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
That Old Clothes Brush—Use It for a Door Check
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KARL CHASE
A CERTAIN door in our house would not stay where it was set, and as it was a nuisance to prop it all the time, and not wanting to purchase a door stop, one was devised as shown in the illustration. A clothes brush that was somewhat worn was placed under the edge of the door, and when the door was moved the brush would slide along on the floor and hold it there in the desired position.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0252.xml
article
285
285
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Dash Fastener for the Driving Reins
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. S. THOMAS
AN iron harness ring about 2 in. in diameter is sewed, riveted or nailed inside the dashboard of a buggy or wagon for a reinholder. This will be found a convenient and safe way to fasten the reins with a simple hitch which can be quickly freed by one jerk.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0253.xml
article
285
285,286
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Pointers on the Care of Tools to Prevent Rust
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. STANDIFORD
ALL experimenters should know how to take care of tools for laying away in the tool chest to prevent rust. A tool may appear to be in first class condition but a little carelessness will reduce its lasting qualities and prevent it giving good service.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0254.xml
article
286
286
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Applying a Coat to Ivory to Make It Look Like Silver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IMMERSE the ivory in a dilute solution of silver nitrate after having thoroughly cleaned it. Then put it into a solution of common salt until it assumes a deep yellow color. Dip it in water, and expose it to the sun’s rays until it becomes black.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0255.xml
article
286
286
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Submarine Decoy of an Old Cedar Log
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. T. PENDRAN
THE “submarine” here illustrated was made of a flat cedar log about 25 ft. long by 3 ft. wide. One end was cut off square and a piece of 12-in. plank nailed upright to it and to this plank was attached a rowboat motor. Steering was accomplished by running two ropes from the engine to the “conning tower.”
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0256.xml
article
286
286
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Let Old Dobbin Pull Up the Old Fence Posts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS is a very simple post puller. It consists of a 2×6-in. timber about 3 ft. long, placed in a slanting position against the post which you desire to pull out of the ground. Fasten the chain around the post just above the ground and run it over the plank.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0257.xml
article
287
287
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Handy Substitute for a Paint Striping Brush
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE amateur will usually find that striping his remodeled speedster is a difficult job, especially with such brushes as he happens to have on hand. An excellent method of producing neat stripes is to use the striping paint in a draftsman’s ruling-pen, using a yardstick to steady the hand or guide the pen.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0258.xml
article
287
287
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Catching Ants in Pie Tins—How It’s Done
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN D. ADAMS
IN the western states there is a large red ant whose bite is very painful and lasting in its effect. When a nest of these ants becomes established it can only be eradicated by persistent and continued application of a strong poison in the form of powder sprinkled around the hole.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0259.xml
article
287
287
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Convenient Method of Keeping Brads and Screws
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. H. SARGENT
HOW do you assort and preserve all the various kinds of brads, screws, tacks and rivets required in a well-ordered household? See if this method doesn’t appeal to you. Procure a number of wide-mouthed “homeopathy” vials, with corks, and keep them filled with these little articles.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0260.xml
article
287
287
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Saving Undersize Bushings and Liners by Plating
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EXPENSIVE brass and bronze bushings are often thrown out of production and consigned to the scrap pile at inspection benches on account of being turned undersize. These may be saved by building up the diameter with copper plating, the expense of so doing usually being slight in comparison with the value of the article.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0261.xml
article
288
288
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Silver Plating That Will Not Scale When Burnished
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN silver-plating steel or brass articles, much annoyance is caused by the scaling off of the silver during the burnishing process. This may be very easily avoided by immersing the article for a few minutes in a hot solution of potash or soda, and rinsing it without handling in water.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0262.xml
article
288
288
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Compressed Air Manifold for Boiler Shops
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. R. MINTER
IN boiler shops where a large number of pneumatic tools are constantly in service it is quite impossible at times to make a connection with the air main without using several lengths of hose. Again, where there are several leads or connections branching from a drop line, part of the efficiency of the tool is lost due to the pipe not being able to supply air at the proper working pressure fast enough.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0263.xml
article
288
288
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Burning the Camp Garbage—How the Army Does It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE M. PETERSEN
AS a part of the sanitary system adopted by the Government for the guardsmen on the Mexican border last season, a garbage incinerator was devised which has proved quite efficient. The details are fully given in the illustrations. The wood fire is built in the opening under the pan, and into the latter all liquids are thrown and boiled down, the resulting residue being raked out and thrown into the fire.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0264.xml
article
289
289,290,291,292
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Simple Designs for Sheet Metal Working
XV.—Development of patterns for sheet metal work by triangulation
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
THE development of patterns by triangulation is a subject of great interest to sheet metal workers. Many arguments and discussions have been held concerning the manner of developing patterns for certain pieces. Many workers claim to possess the “secret” of triangulation, and decline to divulge it.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0265.xml
article
293
293,294
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Hand-Operated Crane for the Shop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
THE crane shown in the illustration is easily and cheaply constructed in your own shop and is suitable for wood as well as brick structures. The idea is to provide a means of transporting, lifting or carrying any heavy casting, piece of machinery, automobile motors, transmissions, axles, boxes and heavy parts to be shipped, to remove a heavy forging from the lathe to the planer or drill press and numerous other lifting jobs.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0266.xml
article
294
294,295
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Stanchion for Holding a Hog Fast While Ringing His Nose
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. V. STANLEY
THE hog holder illustrated may be made of 1¼-in. oak or pine. The frame is made first from two pieces A 3 ft. long, two pieces B 38 in. long and two pieces C 31 in. long. A hole is bored in one end of the pieces B, which are then securely fastened together.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0267.xml
article
295
295
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Ingenious Grinding Rig for Steel Knives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. C. GRINDELL
A GRINDING rig as shown in the illustration will be found a welcome addition to any woodworking establishment or whereever a large number of knives need to be ground. It is especially quick and handy for thin steel knives, for, no matter how short they are, it is difficult to hold them by hand to a uniform level.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0268.xml
article
295
295
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Coating for Drawings to Preserve the Lines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WASH the drawing well with a solution of isinglass. Prepare another solution by dissolving 1 oz. of Canada balsam in 2 oz. of best oil of turpentine. Coat the drawing with this, using a camel's hair brush to obtain an even surface.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0269.xml
article
295
295
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Photographic Plates Used for Mounting Pictures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. K. CAPPS
FOR mounting post-card photos an excellent and unique mount, I have found, can be made easily and conveniently by taking an old post-card plate and removing the emulsion by pouring hot water on it and scraping off with a sharp knife. The plate is then dried, placed over the face of the post-card photo, and both are bound together along the edges with lantern-slide binder or adhesive tape.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0270.xml
article
295
295
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Automobile Engine Used for Driving Stationary Machinery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
THE automobile appears to be the first power-propelled piece of machinery a farmer will purchase and its power plant is useless when not employed for its intended purpose. Many devices are manufactured for utilizing the engine power for driving stationary farm machinery, but the handy man in his leisure hours can construct such a device that will answer the purpose just as well.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0271.xml
article
296
296
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A New Type of Carpenter’s Saw-Horse
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. S. THOMAS
WHILE this saw-horse may appear to be cumbersome in use the operator will find it a great convenience. The upper swinging arm or jaw is operated through connecting arms by the foot treadle. A counterbalance weight is attached to open the jaw when placing a board in or taking it out.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0272.xml
article
296
296,297,298
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Kinds of Hand-Saws to Use on Hard and Soft Wood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. B. MURPHY
WOOD-WORKERS, generally, in choosing a saw for a given job, will estimate the efficiency of the saw by the appearance of the work after the cut is made. This can be the cause of very serious errors in fine work, such as cabinets, ship-joinery, etc., particularly where several men are employed.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0273.xml
article
298
298
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Handpower Paddle Wheel for a Rowboat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
THERE are some persons who like a boat ride but do not take kindly to rowing with oars. For those having this disinclination the paddle wheel here shown was especially designed. A shaft supported with two brackets at the stern, and carrying a paddle wheel made of thin metal sheets into four divisions, has one end fitted with a small sprocket placed in line with a driving sprocket stationed on the gunwale just forward of the canoe seat.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0274.xml
article
298
298,299
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Lumbering Dimensions for Figuring Quantity Wanted
Make Due Allowance for Lapping
Price of Timber Sure to Increase
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. FRUDDEN
ALL lumbermen talk in terms of board feet. A board foot is a piece of timber 12 in. long, 12 in. wide and 1 in. thick. This means that a block of timber 12 in. square on the ends and 1 ft. long would contain 12 board feet. Follow this simple rule: Multiply the end dimensions together and divide the product by 12 and then multiply by the length of the piece in feet.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0275.xml
article
299
299
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
The Barber-Pole Aiming-Point Used in Artillery Firing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DUDLEY HESS
ALMOST all artillery firing practice in the present war has been done with the use of an aiming pole. This is a device which enables the gunners to get an angle of deflection so that they can lay their guns on a target without seeing it. There are but few designs for these poles.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0276.xml
article
299
299
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Using Molten Lead Safely in a Damp Mold
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY mechanics have had their patience sorely tried when pouring lead around a wet or damp joint, to have it explode, or scatter from the steam generated by the heat of the lead. This blowing may be avoided by putting a small piece of resin into the ladle and permitting it to melt before pouring the lead.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0277.xml
article
300
300
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Tobogganing Over Flanders Mud in a Mud-Toboggan
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOSE of our readers who live in the northern states and Canada are quite familiar with the carrying power of the Canadian toboggan on soft snow; but the idea of a similar vehicle for negotiating mud will probably sound rather bizarre to them.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0278.xml
article
300
300
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Toy Boat with Steam-Boiler That Turns a Propeller
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE boiler for this steamboat is a baking-powder can held in a horizontal position between two upright standards 3 in. from the base board of the boat. Under this can three candles are placed. In the upper part of the can, and 1 in. to one side of the center, a small hole should be made with a nail.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0279.xml
article
301
301,302
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Drop—and You Have a Microscope
Making a high-power magnifier with a drop of Canada Balsam
[no value]
[no value]
W. S. Standiford
WHILE almost every one has heard of the wonderful powers of the microscope, yet but few have ever had an opportunity to look through a high-powered one. Fewer still have been able to possess a really good instrument. The high price of the instrument will always prevent its common use, for a serviceable microscope cannot be purchased for less than $25, while the more expensive ones cost several hundreds of dollars.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0280.xml
article
302
302
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Take-Down Birdhouse for Cleaning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BIRD conservation received a great impetus last year owing to the interest taken by the leaders of great organizations, and thousands of bird houses were erected in parks and nearby woods. After one season’s use by feathered tenants a domicile, however carefully designed, is practically useless until it is thoroughly cleaned, which is well-nigh impossible when ordinary lines of construction are followed.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0281.xml
article
303
303
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Mending a Broken Vise with a Clamp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
T.H.LINTHICUM
A CARELESS workman using a bench vise for an anvil broke away a part of the base, as shown at A. Thislet the sliding jaw sag, putting the tool out of commission. The broken piece was clamped in place by the saddle clip B, and the vise worked as well as ever.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0282.xml
article
303
303
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Safe Case for Holding Needles Cleanly Without Rust
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. J. BRICKETT
NEEDLES are so commonplace that the inherent danger in their use often is not brought forcibly to mind until an accident occurs. A needle, carelessly dropped on the floor, is a menace to the bare or stockinged feet of children and adults, and a needle, if broken in the foot, may lead to serious consequences.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0283.xml
article
303
303
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Preventing Dirt from Entering a Shifting Shaft Bearing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ADOLPH KLEIN
TROUBLE often occurs when shifting the gears of an automobile. In many cases the difficulty can be traced to such cause as shown in the accompanying Illustration. The part at A illustrates the manner in which grit and dust may readily work their way inside the gear case.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0284.xml
article
303
303
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Tightening the Cane in the Bottom of a Chair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CANE chair bottoms will, in time, sag in the middle and the cane will eventually break out at the edges. To tighten the seat proceed as follows: Turn the chair bottom upwards and rub the cane thoroughly with hot water until it is well soaked. Should it be dirty, use a little soap.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0285.xml
article
304
304
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Aerial Photography with a Box Camera Held Up by a Kite
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE the photographs are not as clear as those required on the battle front in Europe, very interesting pictures of limited areas may be made, automatically, from considerable elevations with a small box camera suspended from a large kite in the following manner.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0286.xml
article
304
304
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Bicycle Pump to Clear a Drain Pipe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M. M. CLEMENT
WAR demands make plumbers scarce and for this reason a residence owner had to clear his own water drain pipe. To do so he had to make some sort of a force pump, and he selected a bicycle pump for the purpose. The rubber hose was detached and the hole plugged.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0287.xml
article
305
305,306,307
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Construct a Voltmeter for Experimental Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BERT RODSON
THE first essential of a good, substantial, portable voltmeter is a case in which to inclose the working parts. Such a case is dimensioned in the illustration. The side walls, top, bottom and back are preferably made of oak for durability and appearance.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0288.xml
article
307
307,308
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Old Telephone Receiver Made Into a Buzzer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS MILLSPAUGH
AN old receiver that has lost its magnetism can be easily made into a buzzer, as shown in the illustration. Make a base of wood and fasten the receiver to it with screws. The cap and diaphragm is not used. A strip of metal —steel, not brass—is bent as shown and fastened to the base so that its overhanging end will be close to the end of the magnet core.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0289.xml
article
308
308
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Convenient Stand for a Heavy Potted Plant
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. ADLON
THE sketch shows a tabouret or stand of strong and simple design to hold a flower pot. The tapered posts are 1½ in. square at the base and taper to ¾ in. at the top and are 15 in. long. Each part is shown with dimensions for making the stand. Cypress, white and yellow pine are the best woods to use.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0290.xml
article
308
308
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Saving of Time and Twine in Tying Bags
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EMILE PARENT
A VERY clever method of tying a bag that will result in economy of twine and also of time is deserving of being better known. The old method required enough string to encircle the parcel two or three times before it was held securely and that needed from 20 to 36 in. of string for a moderately small package.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0291.xml
article
308
308
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Repairing Leaks in Aluminum Ware with Rivets
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT takes more than average experience to repair a leak in aluminum ware by soldering. An easy method of effectively repairing small leaks is to ream out the hole to a diameter that will accommodate a piece of aluminum wire. A short piece is passed through the hole and riveted in place with a hammer until the surface of the metal is practically smooth.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0292.xml
article
309
309,310,311,312,313
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Electrical Devices and How They Work
VIII.—Principles of direct current dynamos
[no value]
[no value]
Peter J. M. Clute
A DYNAMO-ELECTRIC generator is a machine for converting mechanical energy into electrical energy; in other words, it generates electric current when driven by mechanical power. The term “dynamo-electric generator” is so long that it is usually abbreviated into “dynamo,” which bears the same meaning.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0293.xml
article
313
313
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Easy Method of Renewing Used Carbon Paper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. M. THAYER
YOUR used carbon or transfer paper can be made to last much longer by simply holding it over an open flame such as a lamp, candle or match, with the carbon side down. The wax substance of the unused parts will melt and run into the thinner sections of the parts which are worn out.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0294.xml
article
313
313
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Efficient Primer for Starting Gasoline Engines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SPEAKING of anesthetics in connection with automobile troubles, it will be found valuable to remember that a mixture of half ether and half gasoline used as a primer, will often start an obstinate engine when all other means FAIL.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0295.xml
article
313
313
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Simple Wardrobe for the Camp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE illustration shows the construction of a very simple wardrobe for a soldier’s camp. It can be quickly made from any cheap lumber. Material taken from shipping boxes does very well. The ends are made up of two boards 6 ft. long and 1 ft. wide, or can be constructed of two narrow boards.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0296.xml
article
313
313
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Using an Egg Beater to Mix Dry Color in Paint
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MIXING dry colors in ready mixed paint with the ordinary paddle to get the desired shade is a decidedly tedious job and unless thoroughly mixed will be streaked and spotted when applied with a brush. A much quicker method of accomplishing the mixing is to use an egg beater, which also eliminates the skin and other foreign matter from the liquid.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0297.xml
article
314
314
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make a Thatched Lean-To in an Emergency
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the boys found themselves far from the camp and miles from any habitation, with great storm clouds forming in the west, they knew it meant an all-night stay in the open. As they had neither water-proof coats nor blankets and no hillsides were available, shelter had to be improvised, and improvised quickly.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0298.xml
article
315
315,316,317
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Wireless Work in Wartime
XIII.—Further details of the radio receiver
What Happens in the Receiver
Effects of Spark Frequency
The Audion Detector
[no value]
[no value]
John V. L. Hogan
IN last month’s article the general action of the complete contact-rectifier receiver of Fig. 47 was described; this illustration is again reproduced for reference here. In the diagram, the aerial wires are represented by A, the primary or antenna circuit inductances by L3 (the load coil) and L1 (the primary coil), the secondary coil by L2, the secondary condenser by C1, the contact rectifier by D, and the telephone and telephone condenser by T and C2.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0299.xml
article
317
317
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Inexpensive Method of Charging Storage Batteries
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS W. BENSON
THE usual practice in charging storage cells is to use some form of rectifier when the current at hand is A.C. To cut the voltage down a resistance or lamp bank is employed. With current selling at even nine cents a K.W. hour this is rather an expensive proposition, for a large part of the current is wasted in the lamp bank or resistance.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0300.xml
article
317
317
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cleaning the Surfaces of Celluloid Articles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CELLULOID articles can rarely be restored to their original whiteness if they have been thoroughly discolored throughout, but if merely superficially discolored, wipe them with a woolen rag wet with absolute alcohol and ether mixed in equal proportions.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0301.xml
article
318
318
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Homemade Ambulance for Towing in an Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
IF an axle or wheel breaks on a pleasure car or truck the whole car may be easily hauled in by means of the ambulance illustrated. It is made from a large screw-jack, a length of 1½-in. shaft for the axle and two pulleys or belt wheels. The base of the jack is clamped to the axle in the center and the pulleys placed on the ends.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0302.xml
article
318
318
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Way to Determine if Copper Is Used in Canned Goods
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COPPER compounds are often used in canned goods, such as peas, beans, and spinach, to give additional depth to the green tint. Precautionary measures should be taken to detect the presence of these compounds. Vegetables suspected of containing copper should be mashed in a dish, a little muriatic acid added and the contents warmed.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0303.xml
article
318
318
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cleaning Dirt and Grease Marks from Tracings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRACINGS may be very readily cleaned and pencil marks removed by the use of benzine, applied with a cotton swab. It may be rubbed freely over the surface without fear of injury to the lines drawn in ink, or even water colors, but pencil marks and dirt will quickly disappear.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0304.xml
article
318
318
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Screening Gravel as It Is Loaded Into Dump Wagons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE handling of gravel and passing it over screens for building highways added considerable cost to each yard of the material handled, but an ingenious creen invented by Donald A. Thomas, and adopted by the Michigan Highway Department, reduced this cost to one-half.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0305.xml
article
319
319,320
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A New American Ball Game Using the Inflated Ball
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS new game is called American Ball because it is adapted from and includes the best elements of the three great American games that are played with a large inflated ball,—college foot-ball, soccer foot-ball and basket-ball. Its rules are simple, its play varied, and its action vigorous.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0306.xml
article
320
320
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Porch-Swing Support Made of Pipe and Fittings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
THE illustration shows the construction of a porch-swing support built by a gasfitter from materials he was proficient in handling; however, this material makes it quite convenient for any person not so well informed on mechanics to put together after the parts are made ready by a local plumber.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0307.xml
article
320
320
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Repairing a Speedometer Shaft With a Nail
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. K. CAPPS
FOR repairing the shafts of speedometers of the link type, I have found that a very satisfactory job can be made by taking a finishing nail of the proper length and size to suit the size of the speedometer shaft it is desired to repair, and by cutting off the point and head and bending to the proper link shape.
PopularScience_19180801_0093_002_0308.xml