Issue: 19180701

Monday, July 1, 1918
July, 1918
1
True
93
Sunday, December 28, 2014

Articles
cover
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0001.xml
advertisement
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Seneca Camera Mfg. Company
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Seneca Camera Mfg. Company
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0002.xml
advertisement
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0_3
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Victor Talking Machine Co.
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Victor Talking Machine Co.
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0003.xml
advertisement
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SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION
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SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0004.xml
tableOfContents
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0005.xml
masthead
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MASTHEAD
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0006.xml
advertisement
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER CO.
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THE OLIVER TYPEWRITER CO.
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0007.xml
advertisement
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THEO. AUDEL & COMPANY
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THEO. AUDEL & COMPANY
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0008.xml
advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0009.xml
advertisement
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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MICHIGAN STATE AUTO SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0010.xml
advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0011.xml
advertisement
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0_13
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Chicago Technical College
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Chicago Technical College
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0012.xml
advertisement
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0_14
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RAHE AUTO & TRACTOR SCHOOL
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RAHE AUTO & TRACTOR SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0013.xml
advertisement
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0_14
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0014.xml
advertisement
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0015.xml
advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0016.xml
advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0017.xml
advertisement
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American Technical Society
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American Technical Society
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0018.xml
advertisement
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0_18
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Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0019.xml
advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0020.xml
advertisement
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Burlington Watch Co.
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Burlington Watch Co.
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0021.xml
advertisement
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0022.xml
advertisement
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Chicago Engineering Works
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Chicago Engineering Works
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0023.xml
advertisement
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LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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LASALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0024.xml
advertisement
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0025.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
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POPULAR SCIENCE
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0026.xml
advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0027.xml
advertisement
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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY
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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER COMPANY
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0028.xml
article
1
1
MISCELLANY
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How We Look in Arabic
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0029.xml
article
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2
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Changing the Engines
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0030.xml
article
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3,4
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
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Changing Engines Like a Suit
How H. de M. Snell would use detachable power plants to reduce the expense of loading a vessel and how his plan would help to save lives at sea
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Joseph Brinker
THE Great Eastern was the most daring experiment in shipbuilding made in the nineteenth century. She was a financial failure. Why? Not because she was too big for her time, but because her time was inefficient. The wharves of our ports had no adequate means for loading and unloading so huge a hull; no adequate means for collecting enough freight in a short period.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0031.xml
article
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4
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Motor Trucks May Be Equipped with Pneumatic Tire
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"WILL you have it sent by railroad or motor truck freight?” This is the question that may be asked of shippers as a result of the use of pneumatic instead of solid tires for automobile trucks. The prediction that the truck may become a competitor of the railroads is based on the fact that the pneumatic tire takes away the limits as regards speed that were imposed on the truck by the solid rubber band.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0032.xml
article
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5
MISCELLANY
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Here’s the Near-Auto—as Near As a Horse Can Be One
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THE honors for the first attempt to modernize quadrupeds will go to Lynn S. Pace, located in the progressive town of Cisco, Utah. Incidentally ground has been broken in a new field of invention. Horse, auto, 50-50. This is the basis of Lynn’s invention.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0033.xml
article
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5
MISCELLANY
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Which Is Gertrude, Which Is Grace and Which Is Genevieve?
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A LIKE even to the last freckle on their noses, the Wildey sisters, of Oak Park, Illinois, present a continuous problem to their teacher, and even to their mother—not to mention prospective difficulties for the young men who, a few years hence, will be paying them attentions and will be unable to make an intelligent choice.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0034.xml
article
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6
MISCELLANY
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Newspaper Used as Socks for Horses. They Keep the Flies from Biting
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HORSES often suffer acutely from the annoyance of flies. Not only during the day, but often during the night the stamp, stamp, stamp which is heard in the stables tells the story of faithful animals unable to rest on account of the pestering insects.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0035.xml
article
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6
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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Keeping Musicians’ Hands in Trim with Finger Stretcher
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A SIMPLE device for accelerating the progress of a musician in mastering his instrument has recently been invented by Kanute I. Finney of Chicago, Ill. Such well-known soloists as Jascha Heifetz, Godowsky, Eddy Brown and Jacques Thibaud have utilized the device to keep their hands in their accustomed flexible condition on tour, when it was not practicable to spend the customary time at practise on an instrument.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0036.xml
article
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7
MISCELLANY
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Spectacles That Furnish Their Own Light
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L. ZACHARA, of Bremerton, Wash., was often hampered in his occupation by the lack of proper light. He wanted light on the object on which he was working. No shadows should interfere with clear vision. On the other hand, his eyes had to be protected from its direct rays.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0037.xml
article
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7
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Reading the Meter from the Outside
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ALL the inconvenience that results when the meter reader finds nobody at home or rings the bell and calls the housewife away from her work is eliminated by a new type of meter box which is so placed that the meter may be read without entering the house at all.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0038.xml
article
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7
WAR MECHANICS
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How the British “Tanks” Received Their Name
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BECAUSE a fellow of the Royal Historical Society has unintentionally misled the British public, as to the origin of the famous “tanks,” Sir William Tritton, who designed and built them, has published the real story of their name. It seems that in the early days of the war, Sir William Tritton’s firm made some tractors for hauling heavy howitzers.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0039.xml
article
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8,9
ARCHITECTURE
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How Liberty Hall, a $15,000 Structure in Hammond, Ind., Was Completely Built in A Single Day
After Two Hours
What System Will Do
At the Turn of the L
A Double Door Unit
Making Rapid Progress
Ahead of the Schedule
Liberty Bell in Place
Busy as a Bee Hive
Nearing the End
Patriotic “Lady Carpenters”
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0040.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Reproducing the Battlefields of France in Miniature Models— How Sculptor and Artist Work to Represent War’s Devastation
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0041.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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How Paris Protects Itself from Air Raiders
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0042.xml
article
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She Sank At Her Pier
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0043.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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How Philadelphia “Strong-Arm” Policemen Are Trained to Cope with “Criminals and Gangsters Who Resist Them
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0044.xml
article
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The Policemen Are Given a Regular Practical Course in Jiu Jitsu of a Modified Form by Competent Instructors in the Art
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0045.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Charming the Snake in the Occident and the Orient
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0046.xml
article
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Refashioning Gold, Silver and Brass into Things of Great Beauty and Utility
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0047.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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War Efficiency in France Makes the Most of Every Waste —from Shoes to Shell Cases
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0048.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Before and After Von Hindenburg Visited the Chateau de Coucy During His Retreat
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0049.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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“The Elephant Hath Joints, but None for Courtesy; His Legs Are Legs for Necessity, Not for Flexure”
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PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0050.xml
article
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PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION PICTURES
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A Cage for Photographing Growing Wild Flowers
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THE photographing of wild flowers after they are picked is at best only fairly successful. Wild flowers are inclined to wilt quickly. The finest results are obtained by time exposure; but probably no other class of subjects is so difficult to photograph.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0051.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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How Children May Be Taught to Hold the Pen Correctly
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A SIMPLE device has been patented by William J. Henry, of Akron, Ohio, to train children to write properly. The pen is held in a clamp which is hinged to the end of a short metal tube having a sliding extension which may be set by the tightening of a set screw to fit the device to any size of hand.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0052.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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How the “Smileage” Shows Travel
Collapsible scenery and improved “properties” solve the problem of transportation cost
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A. M. Jungmann
THE war has taught us that “It can’t be done” is a sentence which we may as well leave out of our language. This is exemplified in the manner in which the scenery for the Smileage plays is handled. Take “Turn to the Right.” Before that became a Smilage Play, a baggage car sixty feet in length was required to accommodate the scenic equipment when the play was on the road.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0053.xml
article
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MISCELLANY
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The Flashlight Makes It Easy to Take Goldfish from Pools
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TAKING goldfish from a large pool is not an easy problem—particularly if it is to be accomplished without frightening the fish literally to death. Mr. Dwight Warren, one of the residents of Alhambra, who has a Japanese garden, in which is a large pool full of goldfish, has devised a plan by which the fish may be caught so that they may be moved from pool to pool or from pool to globe without the slightest chance of injury.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0054.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Plants with Flowers on Their Leaves
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DR. E. BADE
THE hot midsummer’s heat in the light, dry woods of southern Europe, where the interesting varieties of butcher’s broom (Ruscus) are found, lulls everything into a deep and peaceful sleep and while the other plants look dead the “Ruscus” alone remains green.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0055.xml
article
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WAR MECHANICS
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Ornamental Identification Rings for Soldiers and Sailors
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A NOVEL finger ring, made of silver or gold, as desired, has been devised as a parting gift for that boy who is going across the sea to fight Uncle Sam’s battles. On one side of the ring is a soldier or sailor in relief work, on the other side an eagle.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0056.xml
article
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WAR MECHANICS
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Finding U-Boats in the Depths of the Sea
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“MAN the observing tube and watch sharply,” is the command given by the captain of the submarine chaser. In the gloomy light his binocular has shown him a distant periscope and it behooves him to be cautious. Just behind a gun on the forward deck of the submarine chaser an observer takes a position at one end of a viewing tube which intersects the bottom of the vessel and enables him to sight objects under the surface of the water.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0057.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Camouflage in the Wars of Nature
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THE two flowers shown in the accompanying illustrations are remarkable instances of natural mimicry, one strikingly resembling a butterfly, the other a spider. Both belong to the orchid family and grow wild in South America and the West Indies.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0058.xml
article
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CHEMISTRY
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Why Does Paper Turn Yellow With Age?
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IT is a well-known fact that paper exposed to light will become yellowish within a comparatively short time; and even when kept in storage where light does not reach it, it will undergo gradual deterioration. Recent investigations by Dr. Klemm have demonstrated that these changes are due mainly to the presence in the paper of mechanical wood-pulp or lignified fiber, although they are met with also in paper colored with dyes that fade under exposure to light.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0059.xml
article
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MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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Fountain Comb for the Treatment of the Hair
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IN the treatment of hair it is often desirable to reach the parts nearest to the scalp and the scalp itself without coming in contact with the other parts of the hair. The rubbing of ointments and salves into the scalp has always been troublesome and often ineffective because most of the ointment never reached the scalp, but was smeared upon the hair.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0060.xml
article
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WAR MECHANICS
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The Cost of Enrolling a Soldier in Uncle Sam’s Army
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FIGURES compiled from the records of the first draft show that it cost the Government almost exactly five dollars for each man drafted. All but seven cents of this amount represents the expense of the draft boards. In comparison with this, it is interesting to learn that the volunteer system of recruiting cost $24.48 per man in 1914; $19.14 in 1915; and $28.95 between July, 1916, and April, 1917.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0061.xml
article
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29
MISCELLANY
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Time for a Smoke? Take Out Your Combined Watch and Cigar Cutter
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COMBINATION tools and combination appliances have been invented in large numbers and with varying degrees of regard for the fitness of the combinations. Here is a new combination, recently invented and rather original. It is difficult to decide whether it is a watch combined with a cigar-cutter or a cigarcutter combined with a timepiece.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0062.xml
article
30
30,31
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
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Let the Torpedo Go Under the Ship
Shallow-draft ships to foil the submarine
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Joseph Brinker
TORPEDOES are set to travel a depth of ten to fifteen feet. Hence it has been suggested that the submarine problem can be solved by constructing 3000-ton ships which draw only five feet of water, except in a limited portion of the hull which has a draft of eight feet.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0063.xml
article
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31
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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An Oxy-Acetylene Cutter That Runs On a Railroad Track
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THE illustration shows an interesting application of an oxy-acetylene cutter, which is used at one of the great mills for cutting large steel plates. The plates must be cut perfectly straight. To follow the line by hand is tedious and unsatisfactory because it is invariably more or less inaccurate.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0064.xml
article
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Compelling the Lawn Swing to Work a Fan
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IS it impossible for you to “get a breath of air? Is the house stuffy? Are even the moving-picture theaters languid from the humid heat? Can you not find a refuge from the sweltering heat even in the cellar? Well, try this and be cool. If you have a lawn swing and ten square feet of ground on which to place it, you may have a breeze, no matter if you are sandwiched in between six-story apartments.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0065.xml
article
32
32
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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A Boat Landing That Is Adjustable
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A BOAT landing which can be adjusted to various water levels has been invented by William C. Ross, of Columbia, Ohio. In principle it does not differ materially from the Morris chair. The landing consists of a platform, a prop, and a supporting member which takes the place of the usual wooden piles.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0066.xml
article
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MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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The Rocking-chair Crutch and Why Cripples Should Use It
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DR. ROBERT G. HALL, of Portland, Ore., has devised a new type of crutch based upon sound mechanical principles and extremely simple in construction. In his preliminary report to the American Medical Association, Dr. Hall points out: “The present form of crutch, with only slight modifications, has been used since antiquity.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0067.xml
article
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ARCHITECTURE
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Studying History at First-Hand
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LIGHT travels at the rate of 186,000 miles per second. As everyone knows, we are now looking at some stars with lights that left them centuries ago. Suppose that you could be shot into space at a velocity greater than that of light. And suppose that you were armed with a telescope so powerful that you could see everything that happened on this earth.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0068.xml
article
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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Beware of This Horror of the Cactus Jungle
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THERE are many pleasanter places than the cactus jungles which are found in different parts of southern Texas. Luther Burbank has produced a spineless cactus, but that isn’t the kind that grows in these jungles. Besides the large assortment of perfectly good and efficient “stickers” of which the Texas cactus jungles can boast, an incredible large variety of living creatures, apparently created for the special purpose of making these jungles more interesting to unsuspecting travelers, may be found in these localities.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0069.xml
article
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How to Avoid the Spontaneous Combustion of Coal
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[no value]
[no value]
UNLESS coal piles are well ventilated spontaneous combustion will follow. To prevent spontaneous combustion, the Bureau of Mines gives these suggestions: (1) Build a coal pile on dry ground. (2) Store only one size of coal in each pile. (3) Remove fine coal for immediate use if possible.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0070.xml
article
34
34
[no value]
[no value]
If You’re Weak in Arithmetic Let This Device Do the Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A DEVICE designed for accurately reckoning the number of small articles has a quantity scoop on top of the apparatus and a ratio scoop at the end of a scale. In order to make the scale balance, each unit placed in the ratio scoop calls for fifty times as many in the quantity scoop.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0071.xml
article
35
35
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Making the Soldiers’ Undergarments Proof Against Vermin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE chemistry department of the State University of Iowa is taking the initiative in making underclothing vermin-proof for use by American soldiers in France. Undergarments made by Red Cross groups, or relatives and friends of the soldiers, are sent to Iowa City, where they are treated to withstand “trench lice.”
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0072.xml
article
35
35
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
A Kerosene Lamp for Fruit Drying
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE lack of suitable apparatus for evaporating fruit and vegetables for preservation has been felt keenly in many rural communities where neither gas nor electricity is available. A simple and thoroughly sanitary evaporator for fruit and vegetables, in which a kerosene lamp supplies the required heat, has recently been placed in the market and should prove practical for farmers and housekeepers in small villages.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0073.xml
article
35
35
[no value]
[no value]
Making Cannon Powder Explode Gradually in the Barrel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A propellant explosive, such as is used to propel a shell from a cannon, has its rate of explosion controlled to a certain extent by varying the chemical composition and the size and shape of the grains of powder composing the charge, so as to be consumed gradually. It is essential that the explosion of the powder occupy the same space of time that it takes the shell to pass through the bore of the gun, in order to utilize in full the propelling force of the charge.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0074.xml
article
36
36
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Passers-by Are Protected from this Open Factory Window
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MAN passing close to a factory wall, where one of those outward slanting windows happens to be open, might sustain a serious injury by knocking his head against it. An automobile plant in Detroit has recently attached wire guards to its lower windows, so that, when they are open, adequate protection will be afforded against just such accidents. Our illustration shows how these guards are adjusted.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0075.xml
article
36
36
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Aviators, Electrically-Clad, Defy the Cold
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B-R-R-R! It was cold—so cold that the watch of a sentry in the Allies’ camp had stopped. He pointed commiseratingly at the aviator who was soaring aloft in the driving snow storm. “That fellow’s going to suffer more than we are,” he re-remarked to a companion, “going way up among the clouds.”
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0076.xml
article
37
37,38,39,40
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
The Armored Flying “Tank”
When Lufberry was killed battling with a German armored flying machine a new epoch in aviation dawned
Why the Gothas Were Built
The Merrimac of the Air
Mail-Clad Knights of the Machine Gun
[no value]
[no value]
Waldemar Kaempffert
Carl Dienstbach
OVER the American sector, north of Toul, a German biplane appears —a giant with three cars. In the central car sit a pilot and two observers; in the side cars are the powerful engines. Such huge, cumbersome machines are usually employed for bombing—rarely for combat.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0077.xml
article
41
41
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Teaching Artillerymen to Handle the Big Guns
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LONG range gunnery with the modern high power guns of large caliber is by no means a simple thing to learn. A great deal of mathematics and physics enters into the study of the complicated technical problems which this kind of gunnery presents.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0078.xml
article
41
41
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
$5,000 for Device to Use Coal-Gas as Automobile Fuel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Automobile Association and Motor Union, Fanum House, Whitcomb Street, London, W. C., is offering a prize of five thousand dollars to the inventor of a method by which coal-gas can be used as fuel for automobiles. The conditions governing the contest are that the container for the coal-gas must occupy not more than nineteen cubic feet of space, its weight must not exceed one hundred and forty pounds, it must contain the equivalent of two or three gallons of gasoline, and its cost to the motorist must not exceed one hundred dollars or a yearly rental of twenty-five.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0079.xml
article
42
42,43,44
[no value]
[no value]
How Zeebrugge Harbor Was Bottled Up
By a daring and brilliant naval raid the British closed that German submarine base
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DURING the night of Tuesday, April 23, of the present year, a British naval expedition under the command of Vice-Admiral Roger Keyes made a daring raid upon the German naval base of Zeebrugge. The raid was cleverly planned and so brilliantly executed, that important strategical advantages were gained, the most important being the blocking of the ship canal connecting Zeebrugge with Bruges.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0080.xml
article
45
45
[no value]
[no value]
Solomon in All His Glory Was Not So Glorious as the Motor Circus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS is to inform prospective patrons that what the press agent calls the “great, grand, gorgeous, glittering, gigantic automobile circus,” which POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY told about a year ago, is again making its way through the country with “six hundred thousand dollars’ worth of pure gold leaf on one hundred and fifty motor trucks.”
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0081.xml
article
45
45
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
A Sammy Wears Nine Pairs of Shoes a Year
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE shipments of shoes for our forces in France, according to General Pershing’s demands, aggregate 18,590 pairs for each 25,000 men a month, or about nine pairs a year for each man. This large supply is to continue only until a reserve store has been accumulated.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0082.xml
article
45
45
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Sticks Give Way to Reel and Line in Marking Out Garden Rows
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you happen to observe your neighbor marking out rows in his garden by the time-worn method of employing two sticks at the ends of a string, tell him that he can save time and energy by using a means devised by J. F. Hatch, a fertilizer clerk in the North Carolina Department of Agriculture.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0083.xml
article
46
46,47
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
The Airplane Becomes a Mole
A single bomb can do more damage to a flying machine than a day’s fighting in the air. Hence the underground hangar appears
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
THE military airdromes with their hangars and repair shops near the fighting front rival railway stations in tactical importance, and, for that reason, are favorite targets for the enemy’s airbombs. More airplanes are destroyed in their hangars by one successful bombing raid than in many days’ fighting in the air.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0084.xml
article
47
47
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Making Believe with Paint and Brush at the Front
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE observer in the airplane tries in vain to locate the enemy gun; his eye, looking through a telescope, fails to detect its muzzle through the foliage. So he flies away and the gun is not attacked. This is an example of camouflage as it is practiced in the European war.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0085.xml
article
48
48
[no value]
[no value]
Link Buttons That Keep Cuffs Up to Avoid Soiling Them
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE wearer of the new link cuff buttons can raise the cuffs as high up the arm as he pleases—to any position. The links automatically open when the cuffs are raised and close when they are lowered. Attached to the links are two small parallel wire arms with oval buttons on the cuff ends and a small flat spring with retaining clasps on the other end. The links form a V-shaped device that spreads apart when the cuffs are raised on the forearm and is drawn together by the spring when they are lowered.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0086.xml
article
48
48
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Making the Small Checking Account Pay. A Bank Problem Solved
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE invention of the unique form of check (herewith reproduced) is due to David B. Wheeler, a machinist by trade. It does away with costly bookkeeping and renders the handling of small checking accounts profitable. When making a deposit, the depositor fills in all the blanks on the face of the check except that for the official’s signature.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0087.xml
article
49
49
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Cooking Under the Ground for British Soldiers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE life of a British soldier in France is not made up entirely of dodging shells and bullets and going “over the top.” He spends some time in looking out for the inner man. For he has learned that a soldier does not fight well on an empty stomach and that properly cooked food is essential to efficiency.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0088.xml
article
49
49
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Miniature Warships Aiding in Liberty Loan Campaign
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the many interesting features of the last Liberty Loan campaign in Boston was the use of miniature copies of a torpedo boat and of a submarine on the Charles River basin. Both ships were manned by United States sailors and attracted considerable attention by their camouflage coloring.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0089.xml
article
50
50
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Doing It with Tools and Machines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0090.xml
article
51
51
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Saving Time and Labor in the Modern Office
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0091.xml
article
52
52,53
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Count That Day Lost Whose in Your Hand No Low-Descending Sun Sees Liberty Bond or Gun
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0092.xml
article
54
54
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION PICTURES
[no value]
The Camera Man Gets into the Group Picture
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"YOU ought to be in this photograph,” is frequently said to the amateur photographer when he is showing a snapshot that he has taken. He could be in the picture, even if it is a snapshot, if he were to use a device which has recently been introduced.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0093.xml
article
54
54
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
A Machine That Strips Tobacco Rapidly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MACHINE invented by William H. Seaver of Agawam, Mass., not only strips tobacco faster than is possible by hand, but at the same time it cuts the stalks into lengths suitable for use in fertilizing the ground. The stalks, fed by hand between two wheels, pass between the stripping wheel and a belt.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0094.xml
article
55
55
[no value]
[no value]
You Cannot Lose or Misplace This Collapsible Funnel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is a spring—let’s stop there for a drink!” At this suggestion of his companion the man driving the automobile steered his machine to the side of the road and stopped within a few yards of the spring. “Now we should give a drink to our horse,” jokingly suggested the driver’s companion, after they had refreshed themselves.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0095.xml
article
55
55
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Making It Easy to Turn the Grease-Cups of an Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE greaseor oil-cups of an automobile need attention from time to time. This adjustment is one of those disagreeable duties that every automobilist has to perform. It is particularly exasperating that the oil-cups are never so rebellious as when the driver is wearing his best clothes.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0096.xml
article
56
56,57
[no value]
[no value]
Running Your Car with Push-Buttons
The device that won the Popular Science Monthly’s automobile labor-saving contest. No effort required to shift gears or to push down on the clutch pedal
The Device That Won the Popular Science Monthly's Prize
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS promised last month we publish a description and pictures of the electrically-operated gear-shifter with an automatic clutch throw-out which was invented by Mr. C. A. Butterworth of Newton Center, Mass., and which won the first prize in the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY contest for the best ideas on labor-saving automobile devices.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0097.xml
article
58
58,59,60
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Now Comes the Cargo-Carrying Tank
It crawls across country so as to avoid the fire to which roads are subjected at night
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Brinker
EXCEPT in great offensives or retreats such as have taken place this spring, it is said on good authority that more men are killed every night in bringing supplies to the trenches than by fighting. This follows from the fact that the troops are fairly well protected in the trenches when under rifle or machine gun fire and in their deep dugouts when the artillery is in action.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0098.xml
article
60
60
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Combination Spark Plug Tester and Cleaner
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MADE of two heavy pieces of emery cloth glued together at one end with two rectangular pieces of copper inserted between the layers at the other, the handy automobile accessory shown in the accompanying sketches serves the dual purpose of testing and cleaning spark plugs. The cloth is cut in a V at the end where the two pieces of copper are inserted.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0099.xml
article
60
60
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Now It’s a Crane and Now a Hoist
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the device shown here is used as a car hoist, the sliding pieces on the arms which engage the car-body are moved up and down by worm-geared wheel operated by a crank. Folding down the slanting arms, and mounting two lifting arms pivoted at the top, changes the device into a crane.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0100.xml
article
61
61
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
A Massaging Machine Replaces the Hand and Never Tires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN apparatus that massages like a human hand is designed by the inventor, William C. J. Guilford, of Harrison, Me., to cure fallen arches. The human hand is resistant and yet yielding; it works fast or slow; this machine secures the same effect with compressed air, and varies the speed of operation by means of a motor.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0101.xml
article
61
61
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Jewel Perfume Trickler in the Form of a Finger Ring
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MODESTY has prevented us from mentioning the fact that now and then we have been vexed to find that the supply of perfume we had taken with us to our office would not last until the day’s end. Imagine then our joy and rapture when we discovered that a United States patent had been granted to William H. H. Griffin, a citizen of Goree, Texas, for an invention which meets our case exactly.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0102.xml
article
62
62,63
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Can an Airplane Jump Straight Up?
Recent progress in propellers
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
IN July, 1905, I had occasion to visit the Wright Brothers in Dayton, Ohio, as the representative of a leading aeronautical journal. At that time the two brothers had finally reached a point where the road to success lay open before them. At first they were rather reticent, but gradually they thawed out and told me many interesting things.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0103.xml
article
63
63
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Smoke Cloud to Screen the Movements of Troops
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A HEAVY cloud of smoke suddenly made its appearance over the camp of the enemy, completely hiding him from the view of the opposing forces. The section back of this screen was marked by considerable activity. Big guns were being shifted here and there; troops were hastily moving to new positions; reinforcements were arriving by the thousands —and when small rifts appeared in the smoke cloud the enemy was revealed in a stronger position, ready for attack.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0104.xml
article
64
64
[no value]
[no value]
Turn Him Sideways or Feet Up— He Cannot Fall Out
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE new stretcher perfected by the American Red Cross in France is described as superior to any means for carrying the wounded yet brought into use. Draw a mental picture of a soldier found wounded in No Man’s Land, his bed of rocks and earth being situated so that it is impossible for an ambulance to approach nearer than a mile.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0105.xml
article
64
64
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Building a Home and Business Around a Natural Icebox
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE owner of a plot of ground in western Montana discovered on his property a well which emitted a constant current of cold air which in hottest summer was at about 35 degrees Fahrenheit, the temperature of scientifically regulated refrigerators.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0106.xml
article
65
65
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Talking Gloves for the Deaf and Blind
The system of talking through gloves, as devised and used by Dr. William Terry, is explained and illustrated by a diagram
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the war is over how many thousands of men will be deaf or blind-and-deaf? They must be kept in touch with the world about them. This can be done by a very simple means —the use of a touch alphabet system with a so-called “Talking Glove.” The basic principles of such a system are: (1) The arranging of the letters of the alphabet upon the hand in such an orderly manner that they may readily be memorized by the deaf or deaf-andblind person.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0107.xml
article
66
66
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Royal Terns Caught by the Camera When They Were Not Looking
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE charming scene shown in the picture was taken on a small island near the entrance to Winyah Bay, Georgetown, S. C., and shows a large colony of royal terns at their breeding-place. The royal tern inhabits the tropical and temperate parts of America. It is found principally along the coast, but occasionally also in the interior, as for instance, in Nevada and in the region of the Great Lakes. This unusually pretty bird breeds in large colonies along the Atlantic coast, from Texas to the Middle States.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0108.xml
article
66
66
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Our Earth Has Had Many “Glacial Periods” or “Ice Ages”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE often hears of “the glacial period” or “the ice age” of the earth but, strictly speaking, this expression is not correct. It is now established beyond all reasonable doubt, that this planet has experienced not one but a great many glacial periods.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0109.xml
article
67
67
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Raise Fish On Your Farm
The crappie and the sunfish become farm creatures like the horse, the hog and the cow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN up-to-date farmer has a fish pond, just as he has a chicken yard or a pig pen. Fish can be grown and propagated in natural or artificial ponds, and the quantity of food they furnish should stimulate every farmer in America to have his own little fish preserve.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0110.xml
article
68
68,69,70
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
The Acrobatic Air-Fighter
How the fighting Airplane is designed to meet the demands of the turning, twisting, tumbling air duellist
An Air-Fight Graphically Described
Man’s Limitations Must Be Considered
The Future May Bring Greater Speed
Other Obstacles to Speed
[no value]
[no value]
Ottorino Pomilio
FIGHTING in the air begins over the drafting board of the airplane designer and in the aerodynamic laboratory. Duelling with machine-guns at a height of 20,000 feet is the last phase of the struggle in which two “aces” engage. Unless the designer has produced the best possible type of machine, unless the laboratory tests have demonstrated that his creation is likely to be better than anything previously produced, an air duel may be lost.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0111.xml
article
71
71
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Don’t Wash Under the Faucet. Carry a Washbasin with You
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the plug in the hotel wash-basin is a minus quantity and the basin will not hold water, it is quite a struggle to wash hands and face from the running faucets, dipping first under the hot and then under the cold. It may be even worse—they may be spring faucets! Welcome, then, the collapsible india-rubber wash-basin.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0112.xml
article
71
71
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Machine That Digs, Grinds and Blocks Peat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE growing scarcity of coal has brought many heretofore neglected fuel substitutes, such as lignite and peat, into prominence recently. In parts of Europe peat is used extensively as a fuel; the peat bogs are considered a valuable asset.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0113.xml
article
71
71
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Potato Butter to Reduce the Cost of Living
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOURTEEN ounces of mashed potatoes added to two ounces of butter will produce one pound of a very palatable butter-substitute. It can be colored to improve its appearance, and if kept for any length of time it should have added to it some butter preservative. A pound of potato-butter will cost only about ten cents.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0114.xml
article
72
72,73
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Housekeeping Made Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0115.xml
article
74
74
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Converting the Old Barn Into a Dust-Proof Garage with a Tent
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW, by means of a tent, to convert an old barn into a very serviceable garage has been demonstrated by Herbert C. Goudge, a Los Angeles lawyer. When Mr. Goudge’s horses were supplanted by gasoline, the stable had to house the car. Because the stable was anything but dust-proof, the car had to be cleaned very frequently.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0116.xml
article
74
74
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
This Tire Is Built to Stand Strain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TIRE that lays claim to many points of superiority over ordinary tires— whether pneumatic, solid, or of the so-called cushion variety—has been invented by three men of Roanoke, Virginia: F. A. Krusemark, L. G. Funkhouser and H. G. Carpenter.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0117.xml
article
75
75
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Live Fish Used to Advertise Fresh Fish Dinners
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is no limit to the enterprise of advertisers. The cafe owner of a beach resort in California showed originality in his advertising method, when he had the aquarium shown in the illustration placed above the cafe sign. In the aquarium, which has a glass front and back, two live sea bass are kept, which, by their lively movements in the clear water, attract more attention than any ordinary sign.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0118.xml
article
75
75
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Making the Automobile Mow the Golf Course
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY combining an old horse-drawn lawn mower and a second-hand automobile an inventive member of a golf club in South Bend, Ind., produced a machine-power mower which has since proved highly effective in keeping the golf club’s fair-ways in excellent condition.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0119.xml
article
75
75
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Soldiers Use “Duck Boards” to Avoid Taking Mud Baths
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the Allied forces in Flanders are not battling with the Germans, they are trying to outwit nature. This is the substance of a report brought back from the firing line by Major General Charles Clement, U. S. A. Mud was a source of considerable annoyance to the soldiers.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0120.xml
article
76
76,77,78,79
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Making Boat Builders Out of Carpenters
The failure of the old-time apprentice system leads the Pratt Institute to devise a new plan of training shipwrights
[no value]
[no value]
Richard M. Van Gaasbeek
THE placing of huge orders by the Government and the erection of new plants have created an extraordinary demand for skilled labor, so much so that the United States Emergency Fleet Corporation is straining every effort to obtain an adequate supply of skilled men for ship and boat building.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0121.xml
article
79
79
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Two and Half Million—the Population of a Vacant City Lot
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a little town in Illinois, Mr. George N. Wolcott conducted an investigation to find out how many animals—or, rather, forms of animal life—inhabited an acre of city land. The count in a city lot, obtained by multiplying the contents of a bucketful by the figures required for an acre, disclosed the fact that there were between two and a half millions of grass-hoppers, locusts, crickets, cockroaches, earwigs, lantern-flies, plant-lice, aphids, and other “bugs” in one acre of land.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0122.xml
article
80
80
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Step Into the Guard Cage and Be Safe While Cleaning Windows
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMONG the more hazardous callings, that of the window-cleaner has received its share of attention from inventors of safety appliances of all kinds. The windows of a twenty-story office building are not cleaned without risk. Usually the cleaners wear belts which they hook to special fastenings; but not every building has the necessary fastenings.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0123.xml
article
80
80
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Thowing Light on the Dark Secrets of the Mouth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT will no longer be necessary for a person who desires to count his teeth, or to see whether they need the attention of a dentist, to turn and twist himself before a mirror, with his mouth open till the hinges creak, trying to make the light strike so that he can get a view of his molars and bicuspids and other dental appurtenances.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0124.xml
article
81
81
RAILWAYS
[no value]
Creosoted Railroad Ties Give Double Service
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RAILROAD ties last about eight years under normal conditions, when they have to be renewed, which costs a good deal of money and calls for a large force of labor. It is estimated that treated ties which are first kilndried and then immersed in hot creosote until saturated last twice as long.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0125.xml
article
81
81
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Why Not Water-Polo on Aquatic Polo Ponies?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE mechanically-propelled water horse recently invented by Antonio Alaj opens an interesting perspective in aquatic sports, which, heretofore, have been sadly lacking in variety. Some years ago a game was invented which, for some reason, was given the name of water-polo, although it had little in common with polo excepting the name.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0126.xml
article
81
81
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Side-Tracking a Flood by Means of a Gully
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE little town of McGregor, situated in a pocket in the hills in Iowa, has had literally to entrench itself against invading floods. Because of its peculiar situation, every time there was a heavy rainstorm in the surrounding hills the unfortunate little town used to be swamped.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0127.xml
article
82
82
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Bullet-Proof Shield to Protect Riflemen in the Field
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE bullet-proof shield shown in the accompanying illustrations is the invention of Samuel J. Winn, Jr., of New York city. It is intended to give a fair degree of protection to riflemen firing from the trenches or in open territory, where natural covers are lacking.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0128.xml
article
82
82
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Keeping Live Bait Alive on the Newly Devised Hook
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FISHING without bait is a hopeless undertaking. Certain kinds of fish are so fastidious in their tastes that they can be tempted only by live bait. But, fishing with live bait, as practiced heretofore, besides being unnecessarily cruel to the bait, presented many difficulties.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0129.xml
article
83
83
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
It Works Like a Typewriter, and It Marks Linen with Precision
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHO is not familiar with the blurred illegible mess that very frequently results from the efforts of the laundry in marking linen? The fact that the ink is indelible does not add to the pleasure of the owner of the linen either. Now appears the power marking machine, made by a Cincinnati firm, which will do the work much more speedily, quite as permanently, and infinitely more neatly than any pen and ink, or a rubber stamp, ever used.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0130.xml
article
83
83
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Run It Along the Map and Then Read Off the Inches on a Dial
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR rapid work in scaling blueprints and other representations drawn to a scale, a new rotary measuring device has been invented which makes possible a direct reading in inches of the distance between any two points on the print or map regardless of direction, and it is especially useful for irregular lines such as streams.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0131.xml
article
84
84,85,86
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Solving the Airplane Spruce Problem
How the I. W. W. is foiled; how wood-waste in building airplanes is now avoided and slow air-drying gives place to quick, efficient kiln-drying
No Metal Is as Whip-like as Spruce
Speeding Up the Spruce Gatherers
Cutting Down the Waste
[no value]
[no value]
Frank Parker Stockbridge
THERE are six hundred separate pieces of wood in each military airplane. Ash, hickory, mahogany and other woods are used for the propellers, the body and some of the stiffer members of the wing-frames, but the airplane builder relies mainly upon spruce.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0132.xml
article
87
87,88
[no value]
[no value]
Soon They Will Be Airplanes
A Saving Plan of Drying Airplane Spruce
Exit the Saw—Enter the Edge-Tool
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
There was a time, not so many years ago, when spruce trees were common in this country. They are no longer plentiful. Reckless and wasteful deforesting has nearly eradicated this noble and useful timber. When the requirements of airplane building caused an urgent demand for spruce lumber, it became necessary to draw upon the resources of the Northwest.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0133.xml
article
88
88
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Hypodermic Needles of Gold Instead of Platinum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE war has upset many old standards and set up new ones. One of the curious results of this Upheaval is that gold has been reduced, in some cases, to the rôle of a cheap substitute for other metals. Hypodermic needles, for instance, were formerly made of platinum or platinum-iridium, two metals now practically unobtainable.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0134.xml
article
89
89
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Here’s a Dizzy Pruning Job
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CLIMBING to the top of a eucalyptus tree one hundred and twenty feet high, and only fourteen inches in diameter at the base, in order to do a job of trimming, is the apparently impossible feat recently accomplished by Walter Seidell, a Los Angeles steeple jack.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0135.xml
article
89
89
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Great Sums to be Spent for Roads
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE present railroad situation in the United States has given a great impetus to the building of good roads throughout the country. The staggering total of $263,069,610 is the amount that will be expended on highways during the current year by the National Government and the different States.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0136.xml
article
90
90
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Repairing Automobile Tire Tubes with Matches
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO repair a cut, tear or puncture in the inner tube of an automobile tire, use a match—but the right kind. And what’s that? A new type of vulcanizer made in Wisconsin. No steam, electricity or fuel of any kind is needed to generate sufficient heat to cement together the damaged tire tube and the rubber patch, and there is no opportunity for burning fuel to drip off on your fingers and raise blisters.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0137.xml
article
90
90
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Work a Lever—That’s All the Stevedore Has to Do
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MUCH ingenuity has been expended on vehicles used in loading and unloading freight on wharves or at railroad stations. First came the two-wheeled hand truck, followed by the hand-elevating truck, which was a big improvement. Then came the efficient electric industrial truck, capable of carrying up to two tons and of moving at three or four times the speed of a man.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0138.xml
article
91
91
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Combining the Eagle With the Goose
A machine which is intended to fly like an airplane, to skim the water like a motor boat, and to run on land like an automobile
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
AN airplane must be in motion before it can fly. It must make a preliminary run on the ground or water before it can vault into the air. Here we have a serious limitation in the use of the machine. Not every city has a large park from which the machine can start, nor a nearby water-front.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0139.xml
article
92
92,93
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Motoring Up-to-Date
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0140.xml
article
94
94
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Put On These Webbed Sandals and Swim Like a Duck
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN you have tried to swim fast, haven’t you wished you had webbed feet like a duck? Conrad Schneider of New York must have wished so, too; for he has invented a “swimming sandal”—an attachable web for one side of your foot. To use his invention you must wear a pair of special wooden soled shoes.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0141.xml
article
94
94
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Throw the Life-Preserver Overboard and It Inflates Itself Automatically
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"MAN overboard,” shouts the lookout. Instantly there is great excitement among the crew and passengers on deck, who scurry around for something to keep the drowning man afloat. When nothing can be found suitable for the emergency and the rapidly tiring youth is about to sink for the last time, a passenger suddenly throws him something that looks like a knitting bag.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0142.xml
article
95
95
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Firing Two Guns at Once
An ingenious method of firing both overhead and straight ahead in British fighting airplanes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS readers of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY know, the machine-gun of a fighting airplane is fixed in position. It fires through the propeller, the gun and the propeller being so synchronized that the bullets will not hit the blades. In some Nieuport airplanes as many as five inachine-guns can be fired simultaneously, three of the guns being mounted on the top plane, and two in the usual position to fire through the propeller.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0143.xml
article
96
96
[no value]
[no value]
Why Should a Red Sunflower Have Some Yellow Rays?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE sunflowers of which we publish photographs are remarkable because in one of them three rays (a sunflower’s “petals” are called rays) are yellow and the rest a deep chestnut red, and because in the other, the rays are about half yellow and half red.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0144.xml
article
96
96
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
We Know Some Human Beings Like These Caterpillars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Pine Processionary caterpillar has a strange habit of taking long hikes in search of food. These expeditions are always conducted in a long procession, the caterpillars marching single file, the head of each caterpillar just touching the tail of the one in front.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0145.xml
article
97
97
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Plant Vegetable Seeds in Used Paper Cups
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a paper cup has been used, it is generally regarded as fit only for the waste-basket. But out in Nashville, Tennessee, there is a drug-store proprietor who conceived the idea of making such cups useful for the planting of seedling vegetables of various kinds.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0146.xml
article
97
97
MISCELLANY
[no value]
What to Do with Old Tea-Kettles. Make Them Into Flower Pots
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WATER boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit at sea level. On top of a mountain it boils at a lower temperature, because of the lesser pressure of the atmosphere. You can make water boil at ordinary room temperature with the aid of a vacuum pump. All this explains why the boiling of water in the San Bernadino Mountains in California was a problem.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0147.xml
article
97
97
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Combining the Baby-Crib with the Play Pen for Safety and Comfort
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a novel crib and play pen combined, in which the mother may safely leave her baby while attending to household duties— thus relieving herself of much worry. When asleep, the screened top and sides guard baby effectively against drafts and insects; when awake, the top is removed so as to give the baby free play to use its limbs.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0148.xml
article
98
98,99
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Spectacles to Help You See Under Water
Why you can’t see under water as well as in air and how properly designed spectacles will help you
[no value]
[no value]
Lindley Pyle
PLUNGE the face with open eyes under clear water. Distinct vision is an impossibility; distant and near objects are a like blurred. The immersed eye is afflicted with a formidable case of far-sightedness, and it is powerless to accommodate itself to the extraordinary conditions of contact with a liquid medium.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0149.xml
article
99
99
[no value]
[no value]
The Lesson in Productivity Taught by “Poverty Bottom”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROFESSOR W. SOMERVILLE, an English scientist, has been conducting some highly successful experiments in the reclamation of farms of low productivity. A large percentage of English farms are located on a chalky foundation, with but a thin layer of fertile soil. Selecting one of the poorest of these farms, aptly named “Poverty Bottom,” the scientist found that, by clearing off the gorse, applying basic slag, and sowing clover on the soil he could effect a material improvement.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0150.xml
article
99
99
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
French Fort, Like Anthracite Mine, Has Artificial Ventilation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FRENCH fort at Verdun has artificial ventilation. It is described by Major-General Charles A. Clement, U. S. A., who visited the firing line. A fort, looked on as the best that French engineering skill could build, was made of reinforced concrete, extending many feet under ground, and stood near the site of the stronghold referred to.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0151.xml
article
100
100,101
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Revolutionizing the Collar Industry
An indestructible collar appears. It is soft but stands up as if starched
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STARCHED collars are complicated in the making, uncomfortable, short-lived, and expensive because of the laundry charges entailed. Hence the increasing use of the soft collar. Now the starched collar is neat—the soft collar is not. Wanted: A collar which is soft but starchless, which looks like the conventional starched collar, which can be cheaply laundered without skill, and which can be manufactured simply and inexpensively.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0152.xml
article
101
101
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
Nuts Equal Round Steak in Food Value
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
POUND for pound, walnuts, butter-nuts, chestnuts and hickory nuts are the equal in food value of a juicy steak, contain more protein (tissue building) food than white bread and but one-third less than eggs. In these days of food scarcity and high prices, it is likely that the vast crop of native American nuts will receive the recognition that they deserve.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0153.xml
article
101
101
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
The Butler’s Glove Appears—A Japanese Invents It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A JAPANESE in Los Angeles has patented a glove which in his opinion will prove invaluable to the “buttling” fraternity for all kinds of service where a dust cloth or polishing cloth is generally used. The glove is made of any suitable material in the manner of an ordinary glove.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0154.xml
article
101
101
ARCHITECTURE
[no value]
“U. S.” Spelled by the Illuminated Windows of an Office Building
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR the Fourth of July or other patriotic celebration many cities might well copy the plan devised by an ingenious Californian who lighted up the windows of one of the large office buildings so as to form on a large scale the letters “U. S.” The only requirement was the lighting up of the proper rooms in the building.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0155.xml
article
102
102,103
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
The Farmers’ Motor Express
How motor trucks help to solve the food problem in Maryland by making the return trip profitable
Rural Express Companies Are Licensed
Solving Washington’s Food Problem
Picking Up Live Freight in Passing
Number of Handlings Are Reduced
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Brinker
THE motor truck, operated as a rural express carrier, promises to contribute materially to the solution of the food problem and of some other difficult problems, which owe their origin to the exist_ ing war conditions. The system has already been tried out in Maryland with results which are highly satisfactory.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0156.xml
article
103
103
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
Your Silk Socks May Once Have Been a Tree
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE method by which most of the artificial or imitation silk is made at the present day, the so-called viscous process, was invented by two English chemists, C. F. Cross and E. J. Bevan. As the basis of this process there is used wood pulp, prepared by the maceration and chemical treatment of wood.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0157.xml
article
104
104
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
New Tool Makes Ford Valve Removal Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS lever-principle tool automatically compresses the Ford valve spring when pushed down, so that the pin at the bottom of the valve stem can be removed easily and the valve taken out for grinding. The cup-shaped part placed around the spring keeps the latter in a compressed condition until the valve is put back.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0158.xml
article
104
104
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
When Your Gasoline Gets Low the Bell Will Ring
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REV. R. A. GOODWIN, of New Hampshire, has invented an attachment for registering the amount of gasoline in the tank of an automobile, and also for ringing an alarm bell when a predetermined minimum of two or three gallons has been reached. The device consists of two floats in an adjustable iron frame in the gasoline tank, and an indicator and bell outside.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0159.xml
article
105
105
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION PICTURES
[no value]
Developing, Fixing and Washing Several Film Packs at One Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY devices have been invented for the convenient handling of photographic rolls during the developing, fixing and washing process. Mr. Clen M. Dye, of Minneapolis, Minn., has added another to the list. His device, which will enable photographers using film packs instead of film rolls, to develop, fix and wash one or more packs of films at the same time, without handling each individual film separately.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0160.xml
article
105
105
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
The Advantage of Camouflaging Transatlantic Ships
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE ship that is well camouflaged, that has no masts or funnels, that is driven by oil engines instead of steam, furnishes a poor target for the U-boat. It has been estimated that if all transoceanic ships were thus disguised, our enemies would need at least fifty submarines to patrol effectively a sea lane five hundred miles wide.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0161.xml
article
105
105
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Spineless Cactus Leaves Become Attractive Sign-Boards
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A LOS ANGELES nurseryman, who has an agency for the supply of spineless cactus, used as cattle feed, has hit on a novel method of advertising his wares. The plants themselves serve as a sign-board, the advertising matter being written on the leaves.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0162.xml
article
106
106,107,108
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
With Fin, Foot and Wing
Records of the swiftest animals
Crabs Not Famous for Their Speed
The Swallow Holds the Record for Speed
The Speed of the Soaring Birds
The Snail the Slowest of All
The Tortoise—a Classic Example of Slowness
Slow, but Sure, Is the Motion of the Ox
[no value]
[no value]
Clifton Harby Levy
IT was long claimed that the fastest animal in the world was the eider-duck, which cleaves the air at the rate of 150 feet each second. The ordinary wild-duck travels only at the rate of seventy feet per second, while the record of a carrier-pigeon is 124 feet a second established in a 100-mile flight in 1900.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0163.xml
article
108
108
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
Naming Trenches After Manhattan’s Streets and Avenues
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT must have been the trench-like condition of the streets of Manhattan during the progress of constructing the subway systems that suggested the propriety of naming the trenches of the training camp at Spartanburg, S. C., after the streets and avenues of New York city.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0164.xml
article
109
109
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Storing Maps and Plans in an Ingenious Rack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS county engineer of Erie County, New York, Mr. George C. Diehl naturally has to keep by him for immediate reference a large number of road plans, maps, etc. Finding that the number was growing out of all proportion to the space at his disposal, he cast about for a more compact means of storing them.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0165.xml
article
109
109
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
A Pencil That Will Write Your Name on Your Shears
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE office worker whose shears or paper-knife disappears mysteriously sometimes to reappear on the desk of another, sometimes to vanish altogether, will welcome the electrical engraver. It is a device which will enable him to write his name— just as he would use a pen or pencil—on any article of steel.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0166.xml
article
110
110,111
[no value]
[no value]
When Man Plays the Role of Hun in His Warfare Against Rats He Gases Them and Traps Them in Regular Teutonic Fashion
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0167.xml
article
112
112
INDUSTRIAL PROGRESS
[no value]
Keeping Out Heat
Insulation is the great problem in cold storage— How cork is used to cover the pipe lines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is a fact, although not generally well known, that three-quarters of the work of the refrigerating machine in any cold storage plant is spent in removing or neutralizing the heat that seeps in through the floors, walls and ceilings. Only one-fourth the work is spent to cool the goods in storage.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0168.xml
article
113
113
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Washing Machine for Boats. It Does the Work of Two Men
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NO electric motor is attached to the boat-washing machine, but the device, as perfected by a liveryman of Devil’s Lake, Michigan, is just as useful as an elaborate washing machine of any kind. The machine consists of two beams four-inches square, held a few inches under the water and attached to a lever made of two two-by-four beams, which, when the machine is in position to receive the rowboat, stand almost upright.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0169.xml
article
113
113
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Bumping the Bumps for the Fun and the Exhilaration It Gives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOTHING makes a playground more attractive for the kiddies than one of these wavy coaster slides shown in the picture. In two lines the children file up the divided stairs. Having reached the platform at the top, they slide down again on one of the two slides which lead to the ground in opposite directions.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0170.xml
article
114
114
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Coat of Mail? No, It’s a Canvas Shield for the Iceman
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE lithe Italian who handles ice in summer and coal in winter does so with utter disregard of wet and dirt. Charles G. Sagerstrom, of Chicago, is trying to market a shield for protecting the iceman’s clothes. This shield consists of two waterproof breast pieces which are thrown over one shoulder and strapped into place. A double canvas shoulder strap connects the two pieces at the top. The steel epaulet has teeth cut into it to prevent the burden from slipping.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0171.xml
article
114
114
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Gasifying Kerosene in the Farm Tractor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL motor-vehicle and motor-tractor owners would like to use kerosene as a fuel instead of gasoline because of the cheapness of kerosene as compared with gasoline. Unfortunately, engineers and inventors have not been able to design satisfactory means whereby kerosene can be burned with as good results as gasoline.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0172.xml
article
115
115
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Ship’s Billiard Table Like a Carpenter’s Level
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN FRANCIS BOOTH, of New Zealand, has obtained a patent upon a device invented by him, in which he makes use of the principle of the spirit level to give a billiard table on board of a ship a horizontal level undisturbed by the rolling and pitching of the ship.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0173.xml
article
115
115
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Building a Fence to Keep Out the Old Newspapers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT one of the popular resorts, during the season, the proprietors of the various restaurants and beach establishments found that they were suffering from an invasion—not from anything of flesh and blood, it is true, but from newspapers.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0174.xml
article
115
115
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
Wood Fiber Used in the Making of Gas
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN France and Switzerland sawdust and wood have lately been experimented with for gas-making. Ten per cent of sawdust added to coal, it is reported, has given good results in Geneva; and logs of wood have likewise proved satisfactory for the same purpose.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0175.xml
article
116
116
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
How Motor Trucks Are Packed to Save Shipping Space
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE scarcity of cargo space in our transatlantic steamships confronted the Government with the important problem whether it would be best to ship our army trucks across the ocean com-completely mounted or to take them to pieces and pack them in boxes.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0176.xml
article
116
116
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Oil, Heat and Water Do Not Affect This Engine Chain Belt
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE owner of a Ford car invented a new type of chain belt for the cooling fan, which is said to possess many advantages over the familiar leather or canvas belts heretofore used. Leather and canvas are affected by the oil, heat and water to which fan belts are invariably exposed.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0177.xml
article
117
117
MISCELLANY
[no value]
That Dripping Varnish Brush— How to Gather Its Wipings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE man who frequently uses varnishes or paints knows how drippings from the brush, containing hair, or cobwebs or dust contaminate the contents of the pail and prevent him from doing clean work. Even the housewife who only occasionally touches up a piece of furniture or a strip of flooring has experienced the same difficulty.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0178.xml
article
117
117
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Electrocuting Flies—the Newest Way of Swatting ’Em
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a little device which should be installed in every home. It is a little trap made of wire and charged with current from any lighting socket. The amount of current used in killing a fly is infinitesimal —not enough to cause the slightest discomfort to a human being.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0179.xml
article
117
117
WAR MECHANICS
[no value]
The Self-Sacrificing Engineers of the Army
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IS engineering work in the European war dangerous? This question is answered by Major-General Charles A. Clement, U. S. A., who has returned to the United States from the front. He says that the engineering work back of the salvage dumps is not extremely perilous, but if the engineer is called on to lay out a line of front line trenches, the minimum loss of lives is one hundred and fifty per cent.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0180.xml
article
118
118,119,120
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Must a Crew Row Together?
An engineer proposes a new method of racing which is based on a new principle
[no value]
[no value]
Marius C. Krarup
IN ROWING a boat, the error of jerky-power application which oarsmen are trying to correct is counted indispensable in the main scheme of the movement but a fault to be corrected in its details. All the oars pull together and give the boat a strong push ahead during about one-half of the power stroke, and the speed gained dies down toward the end of the stroke and while the oars are taken back through the air.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0181.xml
article
120
120
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
The Ford Delivery Wagon Can Be Used for Sunday Outings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“WHAT are you going to do Sunday afternoon?” “I intend to take the family to my brother’s farm.” “Why, that is at least sixty miles from here. How do you expect to get there and back in one afternoon?” “Nothing simpler, in my little Ford.” “But—I did not know you had two machines!” “I haven’t!” “Well, you surely aren’t going to take your family in—” “My delivery truck, you mean? Not much! Come on and I’ll show you.”
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0182.xml
article
121
121
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Clip to Hold the Regulation Campaign Hat on the Head
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DUDLEY HESS
THE regulation campaign hat must be kept on the head at all times during active service, and for this reason a chin strap is attached to each hat. This strap is not easily adjusted, so that the hat may be worn as an ordinary piece of headgear while the wearer is on a furlough or taking a trip to town.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0183.xml
article
121
121
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Using a Breast Drill to Coil Wire and for a Grinder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS a mechanical expedient, in the absence of a lathe, an ordinary breast drill, secured horizontally to a table, and manually operated, may be employed as a highly useful substitute for a lathe; especially for such light work as winding springs or spool magnets, or for knife or tool sharpening and polishing operations, as well as for small turning jobs.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0184.xml
article
122
122,123,124
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Helping Out the Farmer—Prize Contest
Tell the readers of the Popular Science Monthly about the simple, helpful devices you have invented for your own use, and try to win a cash prize
Rules Governing the Contest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GOOD farmer is a good mechanic. He has to be if he is to run a traction engine efficiently, chop wood by power, drain bottom land economically, and perform the thousand-and-one duties of the farmer with as little effort as possible. The difficulty of obtaining farm labor and the constantly widening use of machinery have made it more and more imperative to exercise ingenuity.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0185.xml
article
124
124
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Making a Tool for Cutting Holes in Cork
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE accompanying illustration shows a very satisfactory tool for boring into cork. It may be constructed easily from a steel tube of the right size, sharpened at one end. The cutting end may be sharpened frequently by rubbing it on an emery board, made by fastening a piece of emery cloth to a suitable block of wood.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0186.xml
article
124
124
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Combined Tool Case and Trunk for the Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
N. O. MOORE
A VERY serviceable combination case and trunk for the automobile can be made of veneer boards covered with light sheet steel. In size it can be adapted to any automobile, but the one shown is 1 ft. wide, 1 ft. deep and 30 in. long. The corners are finished with regular trunk hardware and the whole is painted to match the color of the automobile.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0187.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Making Decorations by the Spatter-Work Method
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH spotted work is by no means new, still few persons know what it is, and for what it can be used. Spotted work is an art that every person can quickly master. In fact it is extremely easy and demands no artistic ability. Decorative work can be made on boxes as well as on paper.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0188.xml
article
126
126,127,128,129,130
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Open Canoe Cruising
IV.—A canoe-cruising outfit for the one-night and permanent stand. Choice of tents, cooking equipment, clothing, food, tableware and beds
[no value]
[no value]
E. T. Keyser
CANOE-CRUISING outfits fall into two classes, the light, compact equipment for the week-end encampment or the extended cruise where one-night stands are the rule and where every bit of duffle must be unpacked and arranged at the close of each day’s journey, and the more comfortable and elaborate layout of the permanent vocation camp from which the canoeist makes short day trips.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0189.xml
article
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
A Simple Way to Distinguish Iron from Steel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE repairer of machinery often has to select pieces of metal from the scrap heap to make repairs on various machines, and is at a loss to know whether the metal he has selected is iron or steel. By using the following methods, wrought iron, cast iron and mild steel are easily distinguished from each other.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0190.xml
article
130
130
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Easy Removal of Exhaust Valves from Motorcycle Engines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NORMAN WUNDERLICH
GREAT difficulty is often encountered in removing exhaust valves, on account of the spring. To extricate them a piece of U-shaped steel may be used with considerable ease. Turn over the engine crank until the valve is wide open, then insert the piece of steel between the tappet guide and the washer on which the spring rests.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0191.xml
article
130
130
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Brush Shield Made of a Rubber Washer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
A SMALL rubber washer slipped on the handle of a small brush, as shown in the illustration, will prevent any paint from running down the brush handle and will also keep it from smearing any surface on which it may be placed when not in use. Such a washer can be cut from a piece of rubber tire that has been discarded.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0192.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Ornamental Fern Basket Made in Lattice Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES SCHADEL
THIS basket is one of the prettiest fern holders made for the lawn or flower garden. It consists of a box which is smaller at the bottom than at the top and has strips nailed on it as shown. Two of the strips are bent for the handle and a number of short pieces nailed on it cross-wise.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0193.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Perforating Paper Sheets with Sharpened Cog Points
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. K. CAPPS
ONE day in the office I needed to perforate a sheet of paper, and as I had no special device for the purpose, I looked for a way out of my difficulty. By taking an old common clock cog wheel, which was in the bric-à-brac on the desk, sharpening the points of the cogs a little with a file, and then inserting a pencil through the cog wheel and rolling it over the paper, the sheet was perfectly perforated.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0194.xml
article
131
131
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Finishing a Rough Stick To Imitate Burnt Bamboo
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
TO prevent a rough stick from warping it was wired to a square iron bar and run through a gas flame to give it a burnt finish. Upon removing the stick from the rod, the surfaces under the wire loops were found to be little fire-worn and as they were higher than the burnt surfaces they suggested the joint divisions of a bamboo rod and the stick was finished for one.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0195.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Novel Arrangement for an Iceman’s Sign
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HUNTINGTON BAKER
IT IS the custom in some cities for the local ice companies to furnish their patrons with pasteboard placards to be displayed in a conspicuous place on or near the house, where it may be seen from the street, on those days when a supply of ice is required for the refrigerator.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0196.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Method of Loosening Tight Nuts or Bolts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PETER J. M. CLUTE
IF the nut or bolt is rusted so tightly that no amount of manual energy will loosen it, then chloroform it. A few drops of this drug, placed on the nut or bolt, so that it can soak into the threads, will loosen them so that the nut may be turned quite easily.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0197.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Masking Device for a View Finder on a Camera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK HARAZIM
AMATEUR photographers, taking a picture, when locating the person to be taken in the view finder, often include the view in the space A, and when the negative is developed find that part of the picture is missing. The photographer has forgotten that only the view indicated within the dotted lines will show in the picture.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0198.xml
article
133
133,134,135,136
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Simple Designs for Sheet Metal Working
XIV.—Radial line development of patterns for pipe fittings that are parts of scalene cones
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
THE problem presented in this issue will be the last in which “radial lines” are used as a means of developing the patterns. In the March, 1918, issue radial lines were used for the first time in this series. All of the other “radial line” developments have been parts of “regular cones,” that is, cones in which all of the sides are equal, as shown in Fig. 1.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0199.xml
article
136
136
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Making a Shirt-Waist Box with Inclosed Tray
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE F. PETERS
MATERIAL for the box and cover should not be less than ⅝ in. thick. The tray, levers and stops are made of stock not over ⅜ in. thick. Poplar is a very good wood for this box; but any soft wood may be used with good results. The inside measurement of the box is 40 in. long, 18 in. wide and 16 in. deep, and the cover is the same length and width and 5 in. deep.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0200.xml
article
136
136,137
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
Chemical Action That Apparently Changes Wine Into Water
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MAKE a deep purple solution of permanganate of potash in cylinder A by placing in the bottom one or two small crystals of the substance and filling with water. Fill cylinder B with colorless sulphur dioxide gas from generator C. Pass the gas through a perforated cardboard at the top of the cylinder and being heavy it will settle and displace the air.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0201.xml
article
137
137
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Handy Portable Fence Built in Sections
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
MANY styles of portable fences have been devised, but the one illustrated is of such a pattern that the panels may be used for a great variety of purposes. The panels are 8 ft. long by 3 ft. high for general purposes; but, of course, the measurements can be changed to suit the conditions under which they are to be used.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0202.xml
article
137
137
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Paper Stencil for Painting a Bicycle Head
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WM. THOMLE
WHEN the bicycle is to be repainted and it is desired to have the head a different color the V-shaped painting on the frame tubes presents considerable difficulty to the amateur painter. The illustration shows how this may be done by using a piece of paper with pointed notches to fit around the frame tubes.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0203.xml
article
137
137,138
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Polarity Determination for Plating Batteries
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PETER J. M. CLUTE
STUDENTS of electricity, when first they become acquainted with the subject, often find difficulty in remembering the polarity of the two poles of a battery or electrodes of an electroplating bath. First, consider the battery. Instead of trying to remember the polarity of both zinc and copper, concentrate the attention on one only.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0204.xml
article
138
138
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Blocking the Skeleton Key in an Ordinary Lock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. W. BENTLEY
THE common skeleton key will open almost any of the ordinary door locks on the market. The writer had occasion to look into this after a friend’s room had been entered and robbed of some fairly valuable tools. Removing and dismantling the lock, a small screw was inserted and tightened as shown by the illustration.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0205.xml
article
138
138
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Temporary Repair on a Boat Engine Shaft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JACOB HARSEN
WHILE on a cruise, the coupling on the main shaft of the boat broke and we had to be towed into port. To make a permanent repair would have cost considerably in money and time, to dismantle the plant and move the shaft, so we simply joined the coupling as shown.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0206.xml
article
138
138
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Treating a Clothes-Line to Prevent Its Stretching
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS can be accomplished by boiling an ordinary rope clothes-line in water. A new line thus treated will not stretch but will retain its firmness.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0207.xml
article
139
139
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Child’s Play Tent Made Out of Awning Covers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. P. TONSOR
HAVING some old awnings stored, which were too old to put on the windows, a householder made use of them to construct a play tent for his children, as illustrated. The frame for holding the awnings was made from fence pickets 5 ft. high. The width of the frame from A to B depends on the width of the awnings.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0208.xml
article
139
139
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
An Efficient Substitute for an Automobile Jack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN case a tire goes flat on the road and, when about to repair it, the jack is missing—having been left in the garage at home, lost or otherwise—and no poles, blocks or other implements may be found to raise the unfortunate corner of the car, proceed as follows: Scrape up enough rocks, pieces of wood, etc.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0209.xml
article
139
139,140
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Extinguishing Materials for Fires Caused by Electricity
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PETER J. M. CLUTE
THE time element is a very important consideration in the extinguishing of electric fires, and there is a good opportunity for the display of good judgment and prompt action. First, if possible and if conditions warrant it, the current should be cut off from the affected part before the fire is attacked. Although their use is limited, sand and powdered soda bicarbonate are found to be good extinguishers in certain kinds of electric fires.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0210.xml
article
140
140
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Making a Round Cement Cover for a Cistern
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. ALDEN
THE boy of the house can make a substantial cistern cover by making a study of the illustration. The form for shaping the cover is the top portion of a wash tub. Fill the tub with gravel or clay, leaving 4 in. of the top unoccupied, smooth and pack the surface of the filling.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0211.xml
article
140
140,141
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
The Economical Use of Gasoline in Automobiles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DURING the past few years gas and gasoline engines have taken the place of steam engines in many power plants and, together with the enormous expansion of the automobile industry, have greatly increased the demand for gasoline. Before the time of automobiles gasoline was considered a by-product in the oil industry and many means were devised to make use of it.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0212.xml
article
141
141
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
An Inexpensive Field Desk for the Army Camp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE M. PETERSEN
THE accompanying illustration shows the simple construction of a field desk. This desk was designed so that it can be made from old lumber or packing cases. The parts are cut from 2 by 4-in. material 2½ ft. long and braced with a 2-in. rail about 8 in. from the lower ends. The upper ends are joined with a 6-in. rail on which the top board is fastened. The top is 1½ ft. wide and 4 ft. long. The desk part is built up 1½ ft. high with a sloping cover.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0213.xml
article
141
141
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Breakage Groove in Cylinder Head Studs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. R. MINTER
IT sometimes happens that when cylinder heads are blown off a part of the cylinder is broken out, due to the studs being stronger than the metal in the cylinder. This causes a delay in either replacing the cylinder or welding the piece in place.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0214.xml
article
141
141
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Clamping Pieces for Gluing on a Bench Top
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN fastening two or more pieces of wood together, it is usually difficult to hold the pieces tightly together, especially if the work is very wide and no clamps are available. This difficulty can easily be overcome by placing the work between pieces of wood fastened securely to the back of the bench and a bench-stop in the vise. The vise can be tightened until the pieces are in position and then fastened.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0215.xml
article
142
142
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Runway Guide Tracks to Facilitate the Entering of a Garage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
PRIVATE garages are commonly placed on a back corner of a lot. It is usually a difficult place to enter with an automobile, and a more difficult one out of which to back a car. For this reason, I made guide tracks, as shown in the illustration. Trenches about 2 ft.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0216.xml
article
142
142
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Secret Door Lock for the Executive’s Private Office
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KARL M. WEHINGER
EXECUTIVES often desire privacy, but find it difficult to keep visitors and employes from entering their offices. Of course a clerk stationed at the entrance can somewhat relieve the situation. It would not be feasible to have the door locked at all times, as it would give the impression that the executive’s door was not open for visitors, and it would make it rather embar rassing to all concerned should some one, who has authority to enter unannounced, try to get in during: the assistant’s absence.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0217.xml
article
142
142
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Butter-Chip Fork for Use in Restaurants
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. O. HELWIG
IN every restaurant where the practice of serving meals in a hurry is the main feature it is necessary to have everything needed for the usual table requirements in their proper place. In serving the butter chips, or rather in putting them on their respective small dishes from the butter tubs, requires the use of a fork for handling the pieces.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0218.xml
article
143
143,144,145
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Helps for a Sane Fourth-of-July
Novelties in the way of kites with streamers; the use of sparklers in the air and on the ground
[no value]
[no value]
C. M. Miller
PATRIOTIC exhibitions are very popular these days and especially so as we near our great National holiday. How shall we celebrate this year? In the daytime we may well turn our attention to kites and kindred air devices, the national colors being exclusively in vogue.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0219.xml
article
146
146
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Concrete Cistern Used for Water Pressure Supply
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. FRUDDEN
THE cistern illustrated is located above ground or at some convenient place or high spot on the farm so that it will be possible to have water under pressure in all the departments of the farm. The water is pumped into the cistern by the farm windmill or gas engine.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0220.xml
article
146
146
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Solution to Make Drill Point Bite Into Tempered Steel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE worker in steel often finds it desirable to bore holes in parts of machines that have been tempered. By using the following solution on the drill point, a hole can easily be bored through a tempered steel spring or other machine part. Make up a strong solution of camphor in turpentine, shaking the bottle until the camphor is dissolved.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0221.xml
article
147
147,148,149
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Electrical Devices and How They Work
VII.—Electrochemical Decomposition
ELECTROCHEMICAL EQUIVALENTS
[no value]
[no value]
Peter J. M. Clute
WHEN a quantity of electricity is passed through a dilute sulfuric-acid solution, using platinum electrodes immersed in the acid, gas is evolved at each electrode. These gases may be separately collected in tubes filled with the solution and inverted over the electrodes, as shown in Fig. 1.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0222.xml
article
149
149
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Taller Towers at Nauen Station Increase Sending Range
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IMPROVEMENTS made in the wireless station of the German government at Nauen enable it to transmit signals 6,200 miles. It now has several additional towers, ranging in height from 890 to 360 ft., which are employed in transmitting wireless messages.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0223.xml
article
150
150
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
The Construction of a Sanitary Bank Barn
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. FRUDDEN
THE old-fashioned stable under a bank barn is always warm in winter and cool in summer, but it is usually so damp that it is an unhealthy home for the stock housed within its walls. The illustration shows the old style bank barn, and also a way to construct a sanitary barn that will be warm or cool in the proper seasons, yet light and well ventilated from all sides.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0224.xml
article
150
150
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Grease-Filling Pump for the Automobile Rear Axle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
THE average car owner always dreads the operation of putting light grease or heavy oil into the differential housing. It is always a slow process with a small hand grease gun to put 4 or 5 lbs. of grease through a 1½ or 2-in. hole. A pump can be easily made that will greatly aid in doing this work in a cleanly manner.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0225.xml
article
150
150
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Telephone Receiver Used to Detect Grounded Armature
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SIMPLE method for locating a grounded coil in an armature will appeal to all electricians having to care for motors or generators. The test described can be made without removing the armature. Remove all the brushes from the commutator with the exception of the two located diametrically opposite.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0226.xml
article
151
151,152
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
“Digging In" and Making Army Field Fortifications
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE M. PETERSEN
AS looked upon by the general public, intrenchments and field fortifications in general require considerable time to build and the remark is often heard, “I wonder how they could intrench at that point.” Certain types of fortifications in the field do require considerable time, but the most commonly used trenches are built or can be built under fire.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0227.xml
article
152
152
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
How to Make an Efficient Hydrostatic Micrometer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. S. MYERS
IN the construction of this gage an ordinary micrometer must be used. A hollow chamber, A, with an attached hub is accurately turned from a piece of machine steel l¼ in. in diameter, to the dimensions given in the illustration. A hole is drilled in the hub to fit over the hammer or spindle of the micrometer.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0228.xml
article
152
152
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Shattering a Tumbler Without Touching It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLOYD L. DARROW
PROCURE some Prince Rupert drops, drawn-out globules of molten glass, which have solidified in the form shown in the illustration. Your local druggist can supply you or they may be obtained from any scientific supply company. Then set a thin-walled tumbler full of water on a support, placed in a pan.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0229.xml
article
153
153,154
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Wireless Work in Wartime
XII.—How the radio receiver works
Tuning the Antenna Circuit
Increasing the Received Voltage
Converting the Radio Currents
[no value]
[no value]
John V. L. Hogan
SINCE in the articles for the past few months we have studied various forms of spark transmitters for wireless telegraphy, and thus seen how radio waves are sent out from one station into the ether and along the earth’s surface in all directions, we should now look into the ways and means available for receiving the messages.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0230.xml
article
155
155
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Telegraph Speed Practice with an Endless Ribbon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. C. ARNOLD
THE following scheme is one I recently designed to aid a young student of wireless telegraphy to work up speed in operating. It will adapt itself, however, to a great variety of uses, such as learning a shorthand alphabet, a foreign-language vocabulary, typewriter keyboard, etc.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0231.xml
article
155
155
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Save Hard Putty by Grinding and Making It Over
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. M. THAYER
HARD putty can be made as good as new by simply putting it through a common household size food or meat grinder, using a fine cutter, and then mixing it with the proper proportion of oil to make it pliable.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0232.xml
article
155
155,156,157
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Things to Know in Using a Hone and Strop to Sharpen Tools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. ASHMUN KELLY
AS a tool the razor will interest more men than any other tool known, not excepting the pocket knife. How to sharpen it is, therefore, a very vital matter. A good hone or stone is the first thing of importance. It must be neither too coarse and gritty nor too fine.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0233.xml
article
157
157
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Chalk Holder for Wood Workers’ Beam Compasses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE insertion of a brass rifle shell, sufficiently large to hold a piece of chalk, in an old-fashioned beam compass increases the efficiency of the instrument. A screw section from an old gas globe holder, soldered on, provides the fastening device.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0234.xml
article
157
157
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Light Two-Wheeled Luggage Carrier for the Camper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
FOR transporting your supplies from one camping place to another, or for a two-weeks’ hike, a small twowheeled, rubber-tired, weather-proof cart as shown, is very handy. The usual method of carrying a suit case filled with grub, cooking utensils, cartridges, moccasins, and all the other miscellaneous junk that campers are heir to, is entirely inadequate for the lone camper and sportsman, for he frequently finds a pleasant camping-ground and stays there a day or two, and then, when the spirit moves him, travels to another.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0235.xml
article
158
158
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
The Swinging Target Is Not Difficult to Hit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAROLD C. RIDGELY
IT is a strange thing that the novice will almost invariably try to hit the bull’s-eye of a swinging target when it is at the center or in the lowest position. The expert knows better. He knows that the time to shoot is at the end of the swing. In fact, anyone will arrive ultimately at the same conclusion, for a little thought will convince him that a target is the more easily hit when at a standstill, or at the end of a vibration.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0236.xml
article
158
158
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Emergency Repair to a Broken Oil Pipe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. W. BENTLEY
THE writer was recently out on a trip which ended several miles from any garage or repair shop. A flat bronze collar broke off the oil pipe next to the carbureter. The illustration shows how it was patched up to finish the trip. By means of a small punch found in the tool box, the pipe was flared to hold the collar, after which a few turns of light cord were wrapped behind it and drawn tight by means of the nut as it turned up. It afforded a perfectly tight joint and lasted until a new joint could be made in the shop, which could not be done until some days later.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0237.xml
article
158
158
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Simple Wind-Proof Lamp Used by Lumbermen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN lumber camps a wind-proof candle-lamp is made by sticking the candle upright to a shingle with melted candle grease. A wind shield is made by placing a lamp-chimney over the candle as shown in the illustration and securing it air-tight to the shingle also by the melted candle grease.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0238.xml
article
159
159,160
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Centrifugal Whirler Offers a New Water Sport
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A new, interesting sport at the seashore or lakeside always attracts the crowd. The “whirler” here described offers a distinct novelty in water sports, is comparatively easy to build, and, although a thriller, is harmless. It can be mounted on a raft or on posts driven into the ocean bed; in fact anything can be used for a support as long as the support is completely surrounded by water.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0239.xml
article
160
160
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Heat Test That Shows the Quality of Wrought Iron
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY person who uses wrought iron for important parts of machines likes to know the quality of the metal he is using. By the simple test given in this article any workman can tell whether he is using first-class metal. Heat the bar to a cherry-red and plunge it into water heated to 82 deg. F. The bar is then bent cold around another bar of twice its own diameter or thickness.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0240.xml
article
160
160
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Fence Stock Guard for an Automobile Road
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PAUL E. THOMAS
IN a western community where a great many horses are raised there are many gates to open when traveling from place to place. When touring in an automobile, it was necessary to get out to open a gate and close it after passing through. As this took a great deal of time the owners of ranches built a guard, as shown in the illustration, to do away with the gates.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0241.xml
article
160
160
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Signal Light Connection for a Telephone Receiver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON several occasions when an executive’s assistant desired to converse with his superior the former was busy on the telephone, so he had to wait. To open the door every few minutes for the purpose of looking in or to have the operator notify you when the receiver has been hung up is both annoying and time-consuming.
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0242.xml
advertisement
101A
101A
[no value]
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0243.xml
advertisement
102B
102B
[no value]
[no value]
Du Pont Fabrikoid Company
[no value]
Du Pont Fabrikoid Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0244.xml
advertisement
103C
103C
[no value]
[no value]
WINCHESTER
[no value]
WINCHESTER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0245.xml
advertisement
104D
104D
[no value]
[no value]
The B. V. D. Company
[no value]
The B. V. D. Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0246.xml
advertisement
105E
105E
[no value]
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
NATIONAL CARBON COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0247.xml
advertisement
106F
106F
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0248.xml
advertisement
107G
107G
[no value]
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0249.xml
advertisement
108H
108H
[no value]
[no value]
EXCELSIOR MOTOR MFG. & SUPPLY COMPANY
[no value]
EXCELSIOR MOTOR MFG. & SUPPLY COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0250.xml
advertisement
108H
108H
[no value]
[no value]
CORBIN SCREW CORPORATION
[no value]
CORBIN SCREW CORPORATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0251.xml
advertisement
108H
108H
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0252.xml
advertisement
109I
109I
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0253.xml
advertisement
110J
110J
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0254.xml
advertisement
111K
111K
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0255.xml
advertisement
111K
111K
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0256.xml
advertisement
111K
111K
[no value]
[no value]
The Williams Foundry & Machine Company
[no value]
The Williams Foundry & Machine Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0257.xml
advertisement
112L
112L
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0258.xml
advertisement
113M
113M
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0259.xml
advertisement
114N
114N
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0260.xml
advertisement
115O
115O
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0261.xml
advertisement
116P
116P
[no value]
[no value]
STROMBERG MOTOR DEVICES CO.
[no value]
STROMBERG MOTOR DEVICES CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0262.xml
advertisement
116P
116P
[no value]
[no value]
Hill-Smith Metal Goods Co.
[no value]
Hill-Smith Metal Goods Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0263.xml
advertisement
116P
116P
[no value]
[no value]
TWIN FIRE SPARK PLUG CO.
[no value]
TWIN FIRE SPARK PLUG CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0264.xml
advertisement
117Q
117Q
[no value]
[no value]
APPERSON BROTHERS AUTOMOBILE COMPANY
[no value]
APPERSON BROTHERS AUTOMOBILE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0265.xml
advertisement
118R
118R
[no value]
[no value]
Indian Refining Company: HAVOLINE OIL
[no value]
Indian Refining Company
HAVOLINE OIL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0266.xml
advertisement
119S
119S
[no value]
[no value]
STUDEBAKER
[no value]
STUDEBAKER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0267.xml
advertisement
120T
120T
[no value]
[no value]
GOODRICH
[no value]
GOODRICH
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0268.xml
advertisement
121U
121U
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0269.xml
advertisement
122V
122V
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0270.xml
advertisement
123W
123W
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0271.xml
advertisement
124X
124X
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0272.xml
advertisement
125Y
125Y
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0273.xml
advertisement
126Z
126Z
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0274.xml
advertisement
127AA
127AA
[no value]
[no value]
RICHARD B. OWEN
[no value]
RICHARD B. OWEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0275.xml
advertisement
127AA
127AA
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN INDUSTRIES, INC.
[no value]
AMERICAN INDUSTRIES, INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0276.xml
advertisement
127AA
127AA
[no value]
[no value]
LANCASTER & ALLWINE
[no value]
LANCASTER & ALLWINE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0277.xml
advertisement
128AB
128AB
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0278.xml
advertisement
129AC
129AC
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0279.xml
advertisement
129AC
129AC
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
POPULAR SCIENCE
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0280.xml
advertisement
129AC
129AC
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0281.xml
advertisement
130AD
130AD
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0282.xml
advertisement
131AE
131AE
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0283.xml
advertisement
132AF
132AF
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0284.xml
advertisement
133AG
133AG
[no value]
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
WITTE ENGINE WORKS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0285.xml
advertisement
133AG
133AG
[no value]
[no value]
BENCH LATHE
[no value]
BENCH LATHE
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0286.xml
advertisement
133AG
133AG
[no value]
[no value]
CLOCK COMPANY
[no value]
CLOCK COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0287.xml
advertisement
133AG
133AG
[no value]
[no value]
The L.S. Starrett Co.
[no value]
The L.S. Starrett Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0288.xml
advertisement
134AH
134AH
[no value]
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.
[no value]
BROWN & SHARPE MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0289.xml
advertisement
134AH
134AH
[no value]
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0290.xml
advertisement
134AH
134AH
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0291.xml
advertisement
135AI
135AI
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0292.xml
advertisement
136AJ
136AJ
[no value]
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER CO., INC.
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER CO., INC.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0293.xml
advertisement
137AK
137AK
[no value]
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
S. C. JOHNSON & SON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0294.xml
advertisement
138AL
138AL,139AM,140AN
[no value]
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180701_0093_001_0295.xml