Issue: 19180601

Saturday, June 1, 1918
June, 1918
6
True
92
Friday, December 12, 2014

Articles
cover
803
803
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0001.xml
article
803
803,804
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Raising a Sunken Ship with Cork
A way of salving valuable ships which have been torpedoed
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Simon Lake
SINCE the outbreak of the war several thousand ships, ranging in displacement from a few tons to thousands of tons, have been sunk by submarines, mines or shell fire. The loss of the ships and of their valuable cargoes is so great that it is keenly felt by the nations principally concerned.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0002.xml
article
804
804
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Lighting Up East India—How America Helps
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INDIA is making slow but steady progress in introducing more modern lighting methods. All public lighting in the large cities of India is by electricity ; but in smaller cities the methods of lighting, public as well as private, are still very primitive.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0003.xml
article
805
805
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The Martyr Pigeon of the British Navy. He Saved Four Men
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WHERE in the world are we?” roars one of the observers in a huge biplane which is trying to make home after a run into a fog-bank, feared by all airmen. The raw biting air wraps around the four men in the machine, and nothing can be seen but blinding billows of fog.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0004.xml
article
805
805
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You’ve Probably Escaped This Way of Being “Blown Up"
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A BOMB containing enough dynamite to demolish the walls of the building in which he lived was recently found by a resident of the Italian section of New York city. At first glance the object seemed harmless enough. It was apparently a can, about ten inches in length and three inches square, used to contain olive oil.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0005.xml
article
806
806
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Shoes that Prevent the Wearer from Being “Stuck in the Mud"
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ALONG certain portions of the French coast there are extensive flats of mud that the tide leaves uncovered when it recedes. While these are by no means beautiful, they yet provide the habitants with profitable employment in addition to the usual fishing operations by reason of the various mollusks that live in the mud.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0006.xml
article
806
806
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The Process of Making Parchment Paper
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BY immersing paper for a short time in a fairly concentrated solution of sulphuric acid, the cellulose is converted into a gelatinous mass which fills up the pores of the paper, and, on being thoroughly washed, the paper is found to be parchmentized, or converted into a non-porous material resembling parchment (prepared skin of the sheep or she-goat).
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0007.xml
article
806
806
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Raising a Ghost to Prevent Waste of Commodities
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HOW would you like to have the ghosts of your misdeeds and the carcasses of your victims resuscitated for your benefit? This is what a great Pittsburg electrical company did a short time ago as a gentle reminder to its employees that we are at war.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0008.xml
article
807
807
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Hanging Flower-Gardens in Old Gas-Lamps
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OUT on Blair Avenue, in a residential section of Cincinnati, a flower-lover had a happy inspiration. There had been a change made in the street lamps used. The older - style gas - lamps were discarded, the glass globes were removed, and only the old poles and the lampframes were left.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0009.xml
article
807
807
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A Breath-Guard—But Not the Kind You Mean
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A MAN’S breath is often a betrayer of secrets. He may have been out late, sitting up with a sick friend, but when he reaches home his loving wife at once opens up her battery of reproaches. Now comes the news that two inventors in Osceola, Arkansas, have jointly invented a breath-guard of a new pattern.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0010.xml
article
807
807
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Old Age Is Not a Matter of Years, But of Recuperative Power
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IT would seem that the phenomenon of growing old has really nothing to do with the number of years that an individual has lived, but depends principally on the extent to which he has conserved his recuperative powers. The human body wears out in two ways, i.e., either by long-continued use or by long-continued disuse.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0011.xml
article
808
808,809
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Cannon May Kill at Ranges of Five and Ten Miles; Machine Guns May Fire Six Hundred Shots in One Minute; But the Handto-Hand Struggle Still Lives in Modern War —and Our Boys Must be Masters of the Art
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0012.xml
article
810
810,811
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Woodenware and Hardware Hats the Very Latest Thing in Fashion
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0013.xml
article
812
812
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“Cootie” Annihilators for General Pershing's Army
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0014.xml
article
813
813
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Helping the Soldier Boys to Keep Themselves Clean by Means of a 22 HorsePower Portable Laundry
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0015.xml
article
814
814,815
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The Symbol of Each Patriot's Devotion, Three Cheers for the Red, White, and Blue
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0016.xml
article
816
816,817
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America’s Five Million Pleasure Cars Represent a Total of 120,000,000 Horse-Power
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0017.xml
article
818
818,819
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From Logs to Legs:—Converting the Limbs That Grow on Trees Into Limbs for Crippled Soldiers
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0018.xml
article
820
820,821
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Making Game Birds Pay On Your Own Home Farm
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0019.xml
article
822
822,823
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German Supply Station Is Totally Destroyed When a French Airplane Observer Gives the Range
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0020.xml
article
824
824
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Saws Without Teeth to Cut Through Metal
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NOT so very long ago the discovery was made in Germany that metals could be sawed easier and quicker with rapidly revolving smooth disks of steel than with toothed circular saws. It was found that the cutting was done by the heat generated by the friction of the edge of the disk against the metal.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0021.xml
article
824
824
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Cut the String, Blindfolded, and Win a Package of Tobacco
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THERE are times when the soldiers in their camps or cantonments may give themselves up to rest or pleasure. After all, men are but boys grown up and must have their recreation. Realizing this, the military authorities in France provide as much entertainment as possible for the men off duty, but as a rule the men must rely for their amusement upon their own resources.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0022.xml
article
824
824
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Introducing the Busy Honey Bee— Ecclesiastical Architect
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FOR centuries bees have excited wonder and admiration. Their architectural skill is dwelt on over and over again. But did anyone ever hear of their building a church? It’s been done. The accomplished and cultured swarm of superbees that did this belong to Mr. George F. Bowersox, of Portland, Indiana.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0023.xml
article
825
825
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Air Raiders Don’t Like These Lights
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DURING their recent raids on Paris the German aviators were greatly disconcerted by rockets which the French sent up and which discharged, before dropping, parachutes with brightly burning fuses. These parachutes dropped slowly and their fuses cast a brilliant glare upon the hostile airplanes, making them a good target for the anti-aircraft guns.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0024.xml
article
825
825
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Artificial Birds Give a Realistic Appearance to the Flower Bed
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BIRDS are sociable creatures. If one finds a pleasant spot and seems to stay around it, his presence will do more than anything else to attract others. For this reason the use of artificial birds in garden plots and as props on which to train growing vines has found favor.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0025.xml
article
825
825
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How a Floral Urn Was Made From a Boulder
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A LARGE granite boulder hollowed out as a receptable for a potted plant is the ornament which adorns the porch at the home of Paul Brochier, on West Adams Street, Los Angeles. The rock is practically round, except that it is slightly flattened on the base to give it a firm setting.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0026.xml
article
825
825
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Old Tin Cans Figure in Milady’s Costume
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FEW women who are proud of the fact that they wear hosiery, underwear and dresses made of silk, realize that old tin cans contribute from twenty to three hundred per cent. in weight to the glossy silks worn by them. The price of silk has increased enormously and to enable them to sell heavy silks at a price that will yield a reasonable profit and yet be within the means of the average purchasers, the manufacturers resort to the practice of weighting the silk with tin tetrachloride, derived from old tin cans.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0027.xml
article
826
826,827
[no value]
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Some Home Camp Comforts For Those Who Love Life in the Great Outdoors
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0028.xml
article
828
828,829,830
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The Story of a Wireless Hero
How a wireless operator, with great ingenuity and resourcefulness, repaired his apparatus during a terrific gale
The Storm’s Work of Havoc Begins
The Gale Redoubled in Fury
“I Listened and Caught the U. S. S. Proteus”
Asbestos Paste to the Rescue
Resourcefulness Wins an Inning
More Repairs Under Difficulties
At Last a Hopeful Sign
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J. Andrew White
I LIKE to think of Wireless Operator A. S. McKenzie as a hero, although he cannot be placed among those who have clung to a swaying table and sent out frantic appeals for aid as a submarine’s shells screamed by the radio cabin. McKenzie’s battle was against the greater forces of Nature.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0029.xml
article
831
831
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Aquaplane Racing Full of Genuine Thrills
Novel racecourse provides hilarious fun with many thrills but no danger
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DID you ever see an aquaplane race? If you like fun, do not fail to visit the nearest aquaplane racetrack. Of course, you have seen aquaplanes in tow of fast launches, crazily lunging in the turbulent wake of the propeller, while some daring bather made frantic efforts to maintain his balance.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0030.xml
article
832
832
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A Giant Strawberry Shortcake. It Had to be Cut with a Cross-Cut Saw
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EVERY year the little town of Burton, situated on Vashon Island, a few miles from the city of Tacoma, holds a good old-fashioned strawberry festival to which the public is cordially invited. The Island Commercial Club, a “live-wire” in the community, conducts the festivities.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0031.xml
article
832
832
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No Very Great Danger in Making Explosives
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IN a paper read before a medical association in the East, Dr. W. G. Hudson, medical director of E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co., manufacturers of explosives, recently made some interesting statements concerning the risks connected with the manufacture of powerful explosives.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0032.xml
article
832
832
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Use This Detachable Handle to Protect Your Grip
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IN order to make it at least very awkward for a thief to steal a bag, Mr. A. C. Aagebery, of Indiana, has invented a detachable handle. This can be fitted to both new and old bags and valises. It is merely a pair of sockets into which the removable handlepiece fits and from which it is removable by pressing a button.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0033.xml
article
833
833
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Unloading Freight Cars by Machinery
No worry then about shortage of labor
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SOME of the congestion of railroad traffic since the outbreak of the war has been partly due to the detention of loaded cars in railroad yards or on sidings. In many cases companies pleaded that the scarcity of laborers made it impossible for them to unload their cars promptly.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0034.xml
article
834
834
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Combining Two Favorite Sports— Croquet and Pool
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CROQUET enthusiasts and devotees of the pool table may enjoy the new game, shown in the accompanying illustration. It may be played either outdoors or indoors. Pockets are fastened in place on the ground exactly as on a pool table, one at each corner and on each of the longer sides.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0035.xml
article
834
834
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Water-filled Roller Combines Scraper and Handle-Lock
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A MANUFACTURER of Berea, Ohio, has recently placed on the market a combination handle-lock and roller-scraper for use with lawn rollers weighted with water. This device holds the handle upright when it is not used, thus making it unnecessary to counterweight the handle.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0036.xml
article
834
834
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Over Fifty Different Woods Are Sold as Mahogany
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THE name "mahogany” is applied commercially to more than fifty different woods. Perhaps half the lumber now sold under that name is not true mahogany, for the demand greatly exceeds the supply. The tree is only native to the limited area between southern Florida and northern South America.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0037.xml
article
835
835
[no value]
[no value]
Making Money Out of Rabbits
How a young woman taught herself fur-raising and tanning and engaged in a business that anyone can learn
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A YOUNG woman in Los Angeles, Mrs. Carl Sherman, has taught herself fur-raising and tanning and maintains a “rabbitry” of three or four hundred choice specimens. She is the founder and instructor of the “Southern California Coney Fur Club,” and has a large established trade both in skins and garments of fur.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0038.xml
article
836
836
[no value]
[no value]
Two Teams of Six Motor-Cycles Have a Tug-of-War
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ARE you ready? Go!" Then follows a series of explosions. "Gr-r-r! Bang! Bang! Bang! Whoosh! Pop! Pop! Pop!" This, coupled with clouds of sand flying, and shouts and laughs from the spectators, gives a slight idea of what recently took place on a California beach.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0039.xml
article
836
836
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Bathtubs for the Eyes. They Have Running Water, Too
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FRIEDRICH MAIER, of Elizabeth, N. J., suffering from some eye trouble, consulted an eye specialist who recommended, as part of the treatment, frequent bathing of the eyes in cold water. Mr. Maier found these baths beneficial, but did not like the manner of taking them.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0040.xml
article
837
837
[no value]
[no value]
Making Soap from Table Refuse
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TO conserve the fats contained in the table refuse and dishwater of the soldiers’ mess, the British military authorities installed grease traps. The fat collected in these traps averages more than one ounce for each man daily. The trap consists of a tin-lined wooden box, divided into two compartments by a partition which does not reach the bottom by about four inches.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0041.xml
article
837
837
[no value]
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This Press Can Make Two Thousand Bricks of Fuel a Day
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THE scarcity of coal in all belligerent countries has imposed upon all nations the necessity of exercising great economy in the use of fuels. Long before the war economic reasons made it desirable to find some method of utilizing coal dust, sawdust, peat and lignites for heating purposes.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0042.xml
article
837
837
[no value]
[no value]
Giant Granite Ball Tells Time with Great Accuracy
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A HUGE shining ball of green granite, weighing more than fifteen tons, is placed at the edge of the campus of Columbia University, New York city, for use as a sundial. It is set on a solid stone base on the upper surface of which are mounted two curved brass plates.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0043.xml
article
838
838
[no value]
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Catching Grasshoppers by the Bushel
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IN a Western State where grasshoppers threatened entirely to destroy farm crops, an inventive farmer made the grasshopper-catcher shown in accompanying illustration. The device consists of a framework over which is stretched canvas.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0044.xml
article
838
838
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How a Woman Makes Money by Putting Nature Under Glass
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A YOUNG woman, dressed for “hiking” and walking with a brisk and elastic step, is approaching from the direction of the town. Her eyes, clear and keen, searchingly wander from one side of the road to the other. At a sandy strip she leaves the roa and begins to gather some of the graceful, feathery whisps of black grass growing there.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0045.xml
article
839
839
[no value]
[no value]
Ornamental Concrete Pools Take Place of Old Swimming Hole
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THE delights of outdoor swimming in summer are made possible in cities by the building of concrete swimming pools. The expense is so small that even residences can afford them. When set among forest trees, a concrete swimming pool is an attraction.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0046.xml
article
839
839
[no value]
[no value]
Making Use of Tomato Seeds and Skins
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TOMATOES are used in enormous quantities in the United States for food purposes and as a condiment, and the industry of canning tomatoes and that of making catsups or soups of them has developed to considerable importance. In the making of soups and catsups only the pulp of the tomatoes is used and heretofore the skins and seeds were discarded as useless.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0047.xml
article
840
840,841
[no value]
[no value]
Housekeeping Made Easy
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PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0048.xml
article
842
842,843
[no value]
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Garage Doors that Save Space and Time
Some fold up like a screen; some swing around a corner; and some can be operated merely by pushing a button
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EVENTUALLY, the automobile owner who builds his own garage is confronted with the problem of selecting a door which will require as little inside space as possible and yet give the least trouble in opening and closing. The old-fashioned swinging doors, like those in our dwellings, are not spacesaving enough to suit modern conditions.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0049.xml
article
843
843
[no value]
[no value]
An Automobile that Got Its Power from the Street Mains
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AN automobile provided with a compressing plant by means of which gas could be taken from mains in the streets and compressed into the cylinders, in which it was stored as fuel for the machine, is the work of W. H. Dunkley of Birmingham, Ala.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0050.xml
article
844
844,845,846,847
[no value]
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Building a Subway Under a Subway
Little do New Yorkers know that they are traveling on a suspended subway even though it is underground
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Howard B. Gates, C. E.
MANY residents of New York city no doubt remember the time when the possibilities of subways as a means of rapid transit were as little realized as the practical application of the airplane, in its present development, is now considered, to our everyday life.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0051.xml
article
847
847
[no value]
[no value]
This Tobacco Pipe Is Built Like a Cornet, But Isn’t Musical
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A TOBACCO pipe of unusual design has been invented by Warren Murray Baechtel, of Hagerstown, Md. Every pipe-smoker knows that the longer the stem of his pipe the cooler will be the smoke. Pipes with stems a few feet long have been in use in different countries for many years, but their awkward length precluded their use outside of the house.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0052.xml
article
847
847
[no value]
[no value]
A Baseball Base Which Moves When It Is Hit
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AN improved baseball base, which is anchored to the ground so that it is secure and yet is able to yield, has been invented by Sydnor M. Falconer, of Washington, D. C. Bases, as they are now fastened to the ground, are often torn from their moorings, or they are so immovable that they injure the player when he strikes them at great force.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0053.xml
article
848
848
[no value]
[no value]
Red Cross Knitters and Sewers, Please Learn How to Use a Cane
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IF you enjoy sewing out-of-doors, but object to a lap-full of the necessary materials, here is a little device which will make sewing in the garden an unalloyed pleasure. And best of all, you may not have to buy a single article in order to have this attractive combination sewingbag and table.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0054.xml
article
848
848
[no value]
[no value]
Soap and Fertilizer from Dead Locusts
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LOCUSTS are plentiful in Uruguay and the farmers of that republic are compelled to keep up a constant war against them. Millions of these destructive insects are killed every year. Recently it was learned that soap, fertilizer and lubricating oil may be obtained from the dead locusts, and in the future they will be utilized for that purpose.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0055.xml
article
848
848
[no value]
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A Soap Bubble Can Be Made to Last for Months
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THE air of an ordinary room is filled with tiny particles of matter which fall on the airy soap bubble, alter the surface tension, and—poof—it is gone. The effect of these minute particles on the stability of bubbles was first brought to light by Sir James Dewar.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0056.xml
article
848
848
[no value]
[no value]
Individual Protective Housing for Delicate Plants
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FOR the protection of transplanted hothouse plants, Mr. John C. Mueller of St. Louis has invented a device which may be described as an individual protective housing with hothouse and irrigation features. The box-like device with a slanting top is placed over the plant which needs protection and is secured by pressing the lower edges of the structure into the ground.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0057.xml
article
849
849
[no value]
[no value]
Who Won the Motor Contest
An interesting collection of labor-saving devices brought forth in the Popular Science Monthly's prize automobile contest
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THE POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY’S motor contest has been a huge success. The first prize of $100 goes to Mr. C. A. Butterworth of Newton Center, Massachusetts; the second prize of $50 goes to Mr. P. C. Haas, of Ann Arbor, Michigan. Both prizes were won by young men in whom invention seems to be a cradle-gift, for neither makes his living as an engineer.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0058.xml
article
850
850
[no value]
[no value]
A One-Wheeled Motor Tractor
A concrete illustration of how the difficulty was solved of making one wheel replace two
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[no value]
[no value]
THAT a onewheeled tractor possesses certain real conveniences over a twowheeled affair has long been recognized, but the problem of working out the practical difficulties encountered were many and not easily overcome. The accompanying illustrations show an ingenious solution of this problem, and give a comprehensible demonstration of how the various difficulties were overcome.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0059.xml
article
851
851
[no value]
[no value]
An Ideal Industrial Locomotive: No Smoke, No Steam, No Coal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH coal scarce and gasoline highpriced and much in demand for all of our war activities, the oil-fired steam locomotive, burning heavy grades of distillate or crude oil, is now winning favor in plants where switching engines haul goods over short distances.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0060.xml
article
851
851
[no value]
[no value]
Death Traps in Seemingly Unoccupied Fields at the Front
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE precautions taken by the officers of the allied forces in order to prevent their men from falling into German traps during the excitement of an attack are brought out in a statement made by Major-General Charles M. Clement, of the United States Army, who visited the firing line in France.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0061.xml
article
852
852
[no value]
[no value]
Inventions to Reduce Muscle Work in the Office
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0062.xml
article
853
853
[no value]
[no value]
Do It by Aid of These Labor-Saving Tools and Machines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0063.xml
article
854
854,855
[no value]
[no value]
Sinking U-Boats with a Sub-Sea Barrage
The Isham shell, which does not ricochet, is the latest destroyer of the submarine
High-Angle Fire and Its Drawbacks
It Dives and then Explodes
[no value]
[no value]
Robert G. Skerrett
THE diving shell is the latest thing for attacking hostile submarines. It is the depthbomb improved and therefore more potent. Indeed, in the opinion of many experts the diving shell is the most formidable instrument yet devised for battling with the foe’s U-boats.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0064.xml
article
856
856
[no value]
[no value]
The Penguin Seaplane—It Swims But Doesn’t Fly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DO you know what a penguin is? You may have read of it but probably have never seen one. The penguin is an aquatic bird found in the polar regions. It is remarkable for its peculiar structure. It has only small stumps in place of wings and, for that reason, is unable to fly.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0065.xml
article
856
856
[no value]
[no value]
This Baby Caterpillar Tank Looks Dangerous But Isn’t
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE miniature caterpillar tank shown in the accompanying illustration is not an instrument of war, nor is it intended to become one. It was made at the request of the Red Cross organization of Stockton, California, by a local manufacturer of caterpillar tractors.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0066.xml
article
857
857
[no value]
[no value]
Deep-Sea Fishing with a Little Submarine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY fisherman knows that some of the most desirable fish to be found in the ocean never run closely enough to the shore to be caught with line or net from one of the piers. These fish like deep water and the fisherman who wishes to catch them must go out to seek them in their haunts.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0067.xml
article
857
857
[no value]
[no value]
Breeches for Parachuting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN order to check the constantly increasing number of fatal aeronautical accidents a humane inventor has patented a pair of parachute breeches. Will they prevent your being dashed to the ground? We don’t know. The fabric, cut, and workmanship are matters of choice, and your tailor will be pleased to suit your particular form and taste.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0068.xml
article
858
858,859
[no value]
[no value]
How Inventions and Machines Speed Up the Work of the Red Cross in New York And Make Easier the Work of the Devoted Women Who Take Care of War Sufferers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0069.xml
article
860
860,861
[no value]
[no value]
The Hawks of the Royal Flying Corps
What contact patrol means in the fierce fighting on the western front
They Carry Bombs, Armor and Machine-Guns
What’s That ? A Regiment of Germans ?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CONTACT PATROL-“A flight of one or more planes over the lines to give General Headquarters information regarding the position of Allied and German troops and also to take offensive action against enemy troops on the ground.” The average reader who sees this definition probably concludes that contact patrol is as uninteresting as it sounds.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0070.xml
article
861
861
[no value]
[no value]
Submarine Saws for Water Weeds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SUBMARINE saw is used to clear weeds from irrigation canals on the project of the United States Reclamation Service at Orland, California. It is five-sixteenths of an inch wide, one-fiftieth inch thick, and the teeth are spaced seven-sixteenths of an inch apart.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0071.xml
article
862
862
[no value]
[no value]
Plowing with Coal-Gas on English Farms
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE war is compelling the substitution of coal-gas for gasoline as a means of motive power for automobiles in England. Tractors carrying balloon-like containers in which to store the gas are not uncommon sights in the fields, soldiers being brought from the front to operate the machines.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0072.xml
article
863
863
[no value]
[no value]
A Tunnel Is Coming. On with the Fresh-Air Mask
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L0C0M0TIVE engineers of trains which pass through long tunnels or snow sheds often suffer from lack of pure air. The smoke and the exhaust gases pollute the stagnant air in the tunnel and make it almost suffocating. To remedy this condition an engineer of the Southern Pacific Company invented a device which is shown in the accompanying illustration.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0073.xml
article
863
863
[no value]
[no value]
Fold Up the Propeller When You Want to Row
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NAVIGATING small motor boats in the waters of Hudson Bay and the contributory rivers is not easy. Shoals mean frequent portaging. The situation has stimulated a Canadian inventor to bring out a small engine for rowboats, the propeller of which can be lifted up into the boat by the twisting of a handle.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0074.xml
article
863
863
[no value]
[no value]
This Isn’t the Only War Which Has Caused Prices to Soar
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN these days of tribulation, when everything rises but father’s wages, we all very consistently bemoan the high cost of living. But this is not the first and only time that prices have been high. During the Civil War wages ran from $1.12 a day for laborers, to $2 a day for skilled workmen.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0075.xml
article
864
864
[no value]
[no value]
A Compact Zigzag Platform for Loading Wagons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LET us introduce you to the zigzagedge platform. Although its name suggests associations of Coney Island, it is a misnomer, for this platform was designed for use in staid mercantile pursuits. It will be employed, in fact, to facilitate the loading and unloading of vehicles.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0076.xml
article
864
864
[no value]
[no value]
Getting Under Your Automobile by Hoisting It Up
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOT only makers and repairers but also private owners of automobiles will be interested in the hoisting frame for automobiles invented by J. A. Weaver of Springfield, Illinois. The accompanying illustration clearly shows the simple construction of the device.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0077.xml
article
865
865
[no value]
[no value]
Signaling System Is Employed in American Barrage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOME details of how the American troops in France lay down a barrage before an attack is made by infantry are related by Major-General Charles M. Clement, U. S. A., who has returned from an inspection trip to the front. A somewhat elaborate system of signaling is employed in connection with the barrage.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0078.xml
article
865
865
[no value]
[no value]
This Submarine Raises Money Instead of Killing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS is the story of a submarine that invaded Scarborough, England, penetrating the very heart of the city without causing the loss of a single life. Furthermore, it was the means of helping to raise $500,000. It was at first planned to have an undersea craft anchor in the harbor in order to spur persons to give to the fund.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0079.xml
article
865
865
[no value]
[no value]
Nature Carves a Queer Snow-Cave in the California Sierras
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE accompanying picture is a June snow-scene in the high sierras of California. During the progress of a government survey the engineers found the peculiar cave formation in the end of a bank of snow which was rapidly melting away under the rays of the sun.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0080.xml
article
865
865
[no value]
[no value]
Forts Built by Vauban Are All That Remain of Ypres
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE only things left standing in Ypres after the German attacks are the forts built by Vauban early in the seventeenth century. This was one of the comments made by Major-General Charles M. Clement, U. S. A., regarding conditions that attracted his attention on the firing line in France.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0081.xml
article
866
866,867
[no value]
[no value]
Teaching Machine-Gunners to Fire at Art
How paintings worth thousands, the work of famous artists, are used to develop skill in gunnery
Artificial Landscape Targets
Distance and Proportion
Grain Field a “ Nest of Death ”
Useful in Estimating Trajectories
[no value]
[no value]
John Walker Harrington
EVERY war has called in artists to help the fighters. Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and Benvenuto Cellini did their bit in their time, and now come the Academicians of our own day, whose ambition it is to paint landscapes at which soldiers will be glad to aim either cannon or machine guns.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0082.xml
article
868
868
[no value]
[no value]
A Derby Hat Used in Place of Camera Tripod
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PHOTOGRAPHER desiring to make photographic copies of certain paintings in the Corcoran Art Gallery, wrote to the superintendent of the institution and received the necessary permission, but upon arriving at the gallery he found that they did not permit tripods to be erected upon the marble floors.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0083.xml
article
868
868
[no value]
[no value]
Handless—And Yet He Is a Champion Billiard-Player
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE H. SUTTON, the veteran billiard-player, has demonstrated to the world that a man may become an excellent billiard-player without hands. Sutton lost both hands when a boy by coming in contact with a circular saw. This did not prevent him, however, from taking up billiards, first as an amusement and later, when he had acquired remarkable skill in the manipulation of the balls, to enter the class of professional “shortstops.”
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0084.xml
article
869
869
[no value]
[no value]
He Outswims the Ducks in His New Diving Dress
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON a recent gray Saturday afternoon, in London, the fussy little tugs and launches were puffing about their business on the Thames, and every now and then a lumbering Thames barge would pursue its unbeautiful bullying way down the river. The whistles were hooting, and a few gulls wheeled about, picking up scraps from the oily water—in short, it was just a regular, misty, gray London afternoon.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0085.xml
article
869
869
[no value]
[no value]
The Service Stamp is the Latest Patriotic Device
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN these days of rapid introduction of various kinds of new stamps it is not surprising to hear of the service stamp. These stamps are made in sheets of one hundred with one, two or three stars, as circumstances require, and are designed for use in the same way as the Red Cross seals.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0086.xml
article
870
870
[no value]
[no value]
Chinese Women Working on Railroads in California
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is well known throughout the country that the people of the Pacific coast states take anything but kindly to Oriental labor. But at the present time there is such a serious shortage of white labor throughout the United States that even our Western brethren have had to down their prejudices and accept the inevitable.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0087.xml
article
870
870
[no value]
[no value]
An Alibi for the Bee in the Orchard
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THAT bees injure fruit is a common belief in some quarters, but investigations recently carried out in Italy prove it to be without foundation. Bees cannot perforate the skin of fruit, and the damage attribbuted to them is really due to birds, wind, hail, hornets, wasps, and certain other insects.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0088.xml
article
870
870
[no value]
[no value]
Mexican Corn Bins Look Like Old-Fashioned Sugar Loaves
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT first sight the objects . that form the subject of our illustration look as though they were the twin spires of a sunken church. As a matter of fact they are corn bins on the Hacienda St. George, in Coahuila, Mexico. They are constructed of adobe or sun-dried bricks, and are plastered on the outside.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0089.xml
article
871
871
[no value]
[no value]
Wouldn’t This Puzzle the Enemy?
A mine or torpedo that zig-zags under water to find its prey
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMINE which travels under water in a zig-zag fashion, somewhat like a drunken man on the sidewalk, and which therefore makes a terrible nuisance of itself, has been invented by a foreign officer, a noted authority on mines and explosives who is co-operating with the U. S. Government.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0090.xml
article
872
872
[no value]
[no value]
Worse Than the Shinplasters of Civil War Fame
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CURIOUS condition of affairs with respect to money prevails in the department of Nariño, the southernmost department of Colombia. This region is isolated by poor means of communication from the central government and has regulated its own affairs to a great extent.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0091.xml
article
872
872
[no value]
[no value]
Moon and Earth Help French to Aim Cannon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE French engineers in the European war have reached a high degree of perfection in mathematics, according to MajorGeneral Charles M. Clement, U. S. A., who made an exhaustive study of conditions on the firing line. These sappers of the French army have figured out the influence of the earth on a shell traveling out of a cannon, how much farther it will shoot north than south, and to what extent the moon will deflect the shot.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0092.xml
article
872
872
[no value]
[no value]
This Is a Farm Gate, No Doubt
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PERHAPS it was his passionate love for farming, perhaps a dawning sense of art, or pride in the paternal acres which had come down to him through many generations of tillers of the soil, that induced the owner of a farm in Moulton, Northampton, England, to put the quaint gate shown in the accompanying picture at the entrance to the driveway leading to his farmhouse.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0093.xml
article
873
873
[no value]
[no value]
How the Boilers of the “Bear” Were Salved
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE steamship Bear of the American Geodetic Survey stranded near Cape Mendocino, on the California coast. When it was found impossible to save the ship all efforts were confined to the salvage of the valuable contents, including the boilers and machinery.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0094.xml
article
873
873
[no value]
[no value]
A Lilliputian Rival of the Popular Wrist Watch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF the ponderous old grandfather’s clock, with its weights and wheels, could do so, it would doubtless raise its hands in surprise at sight of the ring watch, the smallest member of the time-keeping family. This tiny record-keeper of the minutes and hours adorns, and is adorned by, a finger-ring studded with jewels.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0095.xml
article
874
874,875
[no value]
[no value]
First Heal the Wounds, then Hide the Scars by Covering Them with Artistically Shaped Masks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0096.xml
article
876
876
[no value]
[no value]
Wafting Five Tons About as Though They Were Thistledown
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"ALL ready below there?" "Yep, let 'er come." There is a whirr and the rattle of a running chain, and a huge packing-case floats airily out of a second-story window and smoothly descends towards the flat-car which is waiting below to receive it.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0097.xml
article
876
876
[no value]
[no value]
This Moving Van Loads From the Side
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOUSEHOLD goods and pianos, as well as other things that had to be moved for some considerable distance, formerly went by railroad. Recent railroad congestion, however, and the difficulty of getting box-cars for anything that does not come under the head of war necessities, has brought home to many people the fact that it is often cheaper and handier to have their household furniture moved by vans.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0098.xml
article
877
877
[no value]
[no value]
Going “Over the Top” with the Soldiers at Camp Upton
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE accompanying photograph shows what the camera registered when the photographer took a snapshot of soldiers at Camp Upton while they were going “over the top”—which is only one feature of the physical training which the Camp Upton men undergo in preparation for the fighting “over there.”
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0099.xml
article
877
877
[no value]
[no value]
Learning to be a Blue-Water Sailor on Dry Land
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE training of a man-of-war’s man is not a simple matter. In days gone by it used to take almost as many years as it now takes months. The methods of instruction and of training have undergone wonderful changes; they have become much more intensive and to the point, and the results obtained prove the efficacy of modern methods.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0100.xml
article
878
878,879
[no value]
[no value]
Driving Your Car Through a Stream of Oil
This new transmitter solves the dual problem of power-waste and leakage of oil
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLEXIBILITY of operation is the great outstanding factor of power transmission by means of fluids, so far as the automobile is concerned. Fluids transmit power through the pressure exerted by the fluid on the part to be moved. The fluid is pumped by some means into chambers containing the parts to be moved, and since the fluids used are practically in compressible, the degree of pressure exerted is almost proportional to rate of flow or the pressure represented by that flow.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0101.xml
article
879
879
[no value]
[no value]
Making It Easy for Old Dobbin to Eat Out of the Feed Bag
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE feed-bag support invented by William Meier of Jersey City, N. J., is designed to overcome the difficulties invariably connected with the use of the feed bag. This bag is provided with a spring so that it will adjust itself when the food gets out of reach of the horse as it diminishes in quantity.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0102.xml
article
879
879
[no value]
[no value]
Practicing the Head-Hold with a Wooden-Headed Adversary
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BOXING with a dummy which can’t be knocked down is a wellknown and recognized form of training for pugilists, but hitherto wrestlers have been rather unprovided for in this respect. Now, however, Mr. B. C. Sandow, of Rochester, New York, has brought out a dummy head to train a man to give enormous pressure in the head-lock.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0103.xml
article
880
880
[no value]
[no value]
You Can Carry It in Your Hand and It Saves Fuel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is expensive as well as uncomfortable, in warm weather, to use a gas oven when the same result can be obtained by using one of the burners on the top of the stove. But how can you roast on such a burner, you ask? The answer is found in an efficient cooker which has recently made its appearance.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0104.xml
article
880
880
[no value]
[no value]
No Footprints Are Left by the Gasoline Lawn-Mower
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE lawns of the golf-club need trimming and the horse-drawn mower has been at work since early morning. Up the gentle slopes and down again on the other side old Dobbin is pulling the heavy cutter. When the blades of the mower encounter thicker grass, Dobbin slows up and the increase of resistance caused by a little hummock is sufficient to make him stop altogether, until a sleepy “Gidap” from the driver stirs him to a renewal of his labor.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0105.xml
article
881
881,882,883,884,885
[no value]
[no value]
When the Moon Darkens the Sun
What astronomers will look for during the June total eclipse of the Sun
The Sun’s Glorious Corona in Total Eclipse
A Case Where the Moon Obscures the Sun
The Moon’s Shadow a Fast Traveler
Scientists Will Test New Theory
[no value]
[no value]
Calvin Frazer
A TOTAL eclipse of the sun is one of the most awe-inspiring spectacles in the whole repertory of Nature. Its overpowering effect upon the human mind is illustrated by an episode which the present writer recalls in connection with the eclipse of May 28, 1900, as seen at Norfolk, Virginia.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0106.xml
article
886
886
[no value]
[no value]
Something to Lose Sleep Over— Can Fish Hear?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CAN the humble minnow, or any of his larger brethren, hear? He has ears, but are they any use to him? Some scientists have experimented and said “Yes!” while others have experimented and said “No!” However, recent study seem to indicate that fish do hear.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0107.xml
article
886
886
[no value]
[no value]
Crowns On Their Tails. The Queer Forms of Some Flies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"UNEASY lies the head that wears a crown,” doesn’t apply to the larvae of certain soldier flies; for their crowns are at the ends of their tails. The adults (as one of our pictures shows) are rather stout-bodied, unfamiliar insects, although about as many species as there are horseflies occur in this country.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0108.xml
article
887
887
[no value]
[no value]
Automobile or Railway Car— Which Is It?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CALIFORNIA inventor has devised a method which will enable an ordinary automobile omnibus to run on railroad rails as well as on city pavements and country roads. It’s an old idea, of course, but with modern “improvements.” The Californian bolts a flanged railroad carwheel and a conventional solidtired truck wheel together, with the rail wheel on the inside.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0109.xml
article
887
887
[no value]
[no value]
Extending the Use of the Sidecar
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MOTORCYCLE dealer in Riverside, California, finds the sidecar arrangement improvised by him to change ordinary motorcycles into delivery trucks very useful in his own business to carry crated motorcycles from the nearest distributing point, Los Angeles, to Riverside, a distance of fifty miles.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0110.xml
article
888
888,889
[no value]
[no value]
New Ideas in Automobiling and Trucking New Ideas in Automobiling and Trucking
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0111.xml
article
890
890,891,892
[no value]
[no value]
Railways That Run Under Water
Visit the fishes in their homes as you travel on the Aquarium Circuit
Underwater Railways
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS tunneling is costly and often very difficult, the idea of running railway cars upon the bottom of a waterway has its attractions. Air is more easily supplied to the passengers of an under-water car trip lasting, say, one hour than for submarine boats.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0112.xml
article
892
892
[no value]
[no value]
Sleep in Your Automobile and Hang Up the Baby for the Night
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A RESIDENT of Tropico, California, has devised the novel automobile bed equipment shown in the accompanying illustrations. It accommodates two grown-ups and a child, adds not more than twenty pounds to the outfit and takes up no more room than an ordinary “camper’s” roll of bedding.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0113.xml
article
892
892
[no value]
[no value]
The Secret of the Wily Snake’s Sinuous Glide
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DID you ever watch a snake gliding over the ground in graceful curves and did you ever stop to think of the mechanical principles involved in its motion? The snake moves along the ground in undulating curves produced by the contraction of the longitudinal system of muscles in alternate sections of its body.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0114.xml
article
893
893
[no value]
[no value]
No Double Exposures with This Device
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"BLESSED If I can remember," exclaimed Oscar, “whether or not I’ve wound the film after taking that waterfall a little while ago! I think I’ll give it another turn for good luck!” When the film roll was developed Oscar found a blank next to the negative of the waterfall and a double exposure in another part of the film.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0115.xml
article
893
893
[no value]
[no value]
Knitting Is Not by Any Means Confined to the Ladies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OF course Sister Susie’s been sewing shirts for soldiers for some time now, and has also been knitting sweaters, socks, scarfs, etc.; consequently she has got a good start. Still, she must look to her laurels, for there is a valiant host of rivals springing up— the boys are taking a hand.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0116.xml
article
894
894
[no value]
[no value]
Notch the Curb to Keep Out Automobiles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CALIFORNIA automobilists frequently mistook a motorcycle for an automobile garage and drove in with their machines. When the drivers learned their mistake they turned around and left, frequently knocking over and damaging some of the motorcycles in the garage.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0117.xml
article
894
894
[no value]
[no value]
Putting Overalls on Automobiles for Protection
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OWING to war conditions automobile manufacturers meet with increasing difficulty in securing box cars for shipping their automobiles to their dealers and agents. Many concerns are compelled to deliver nearly all their cars by running them overland to their destination.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0118.xml
article
895
895
[no value]
[no value]
Here Is That One-Hand Cigarette Case You Want
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
REMEMBER that time when you were in the car, dying for a smoke, and the traffic so thick that you couldn’t take your hands off the wheel for an instant? Of course you could carry your cigarettes in the packet in your vest pocket, but they are crushed and they dry out.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0119.xml
article
895
895
[no value]
[no value]
Use Folding Bunks to Economize Space on Trip “Over There"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OWING to the lack of ships the transports taking the American soldiers to France have to be loaded to their full capacity. In day time it is a comparatively easy matter so to distribute the men that there is no overcrowding in any part of the ship.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0120.xml
article
896
896
[no value]
[no value]
Every Farmer May Be His Own Soil Chemist
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY available acre must be made to yield to its full capacity if the United States and our allies are to win the war. Many soils fall short of their full productive capacity because they are sour or acid. This condition can be remedied by applying a sufficient amount of lime.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0121.xml
article
896
896
[no value]
[no value]
A Camouflaged Well-Curb
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOND memories of his childhood days on the old farm in Vermont induced R. E. Sperry, a resident of Inglewood, California, to place a replica of his father’s well-curb in the garden of his California home. The curb, roof supports, roof, and even the “old oaken bucket,” are made of concrete.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0122.xml
article
897
897
[no value]
[no value]
Holding the Screw to the ScrewDriver with a Vise-Grip
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CARPENTERS, wood workers, machinists and other workers who use screw-drivers frequently have to do their work under conditions which make it impossible to use both hands at the same time in starting a screw. For many years the need was felt for some device that would hold the screw firmly against the edge of the screwdriver, that could be quickly put on and taken off and that would fit screwdrivers and screws of any size.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0123.xml
article
897
897
[no value]
[no value]
Electric Sparks Peel the Tomatoes. Here’s How It’s Done
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM H. CHAPMAN, of Portland, Me., discovered that electric sparks, if allowed to strike the skin of a tomato, will puncture it and, by expanding the air underneath the skin, loosen it from the pulp. He thinks that he has solved the tomatopeeling problem for canners.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0124.xml
article
898
898
[no value]
[no value]
Parachute Safety Device for Airplanes
A new attempt to revive the late Sir Hiram Maxim’s idea of twenty years ago
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OF his first machine Sir Hiram Maxim said, over twenty years ago, that, completely stalled in the air, it would “pancake” down with the velocity of a fall of four feet. But these old machines were loaded barely more than one pound to the square foot, and their center of gravity was far below their carrying surface.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0125.xml
article
899
899
[no value]
[no value]
Trench-Dwellers Cherish the Barber’s Ministrations
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRY to imagine yourself in the place of a soldier who has spent two or three weeks or months in the trenches, cut off from every comfort and at all times exposed to the risk of being killed or maimed by bullet, shell or shrapnel. The excitement of the first few days gradually wears off; but the discomforts of trench-life remain and become more irksome from day to day.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0126.xml
article
899
899
[no value]
[no value]
Making Things Harder for the Forger of Checks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN unusually clever device protecting checks from being raised by forgery has been invented by C. W. Elrod, of Lincoln, Neb. The accompanying illustration clearly demonstrates the idea and its application. At the top of the check is a double row of figures indexing dollars, another double row indexing cents.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0127.xml
article
900
900,901
[no value]
[no value]
Spitball Myths
Why pitched baseballs curve and why the spitballs are scientifically foolish
[no value]
[no value]
P. A. Vaile
ries definite of the explanation spitball or of the “shine” vagaball has ever, so far as I am aware, been given. I have seen many generalizations, but no specific explanation, and so I am now essaying the task in the hope that it may prove interesting, and possibly serviceable, to players of baseball.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0128.xml
article
901
901
[no value]
[no value]
Nerve Shock Due to Detonations Less Wearing Than War Strain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE term shell shock has misled many persons to believe that it is due to the profound impression or shock produced on the nervous system by the detonations of high explosives. No doubt, there are cases of actual brain or nerve injury due to concussion of the air accompanying shell explosions, but these mechanical causes are a great deal less frequently responsible for war neuroses than the mental effects of general war strain.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0129.xml
article
902
902
[no value]
[no value]
Nothing Troubles This Drydock. It Can Repair Even Itself
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE big floating drydock in the harbor of Tacoma, Washington, was rammed in a dense fog by a passenger ferryboat, and one of its four sections driven in. The ferryboat was of the old-fashioned river type with a draft of only three feet. In the winds and currents of Tacoma’s open harbor it was notoriously unmanageable.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0130.xml
article
902
902
[no value]
[no value]
Does a Locomotive Wheel Travel Slower or Faster than the Train?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is an interesting point to consider that on a locomotive wheel, the circumference is continually traveling at different speeds. First a point on the circumference of the wheel will go faster than the rest of the locomotive; then that same point will go slower; at still other times, the point will travel at a speed equal to that of the locomotive cabin.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0131.xml
article
903
903
[no value]
[no value]
What Makes the Rumble of Thunder?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHY does thunder rumble? The path of a lightning flash through the air may be several miles in length. All along this path the sudden expansion of the heated air—a true explosion—sets up an atmospheric wave, which spreads in all directions, and eventually registers upon our ears as thunder.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0132.xml
article
903
903
[no value]
[no value]
Making Window-Cleaning Safe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR the benefit of window cleaners and painters, Paul Wolff, a Hungarian in Pittsburgh, Pa., has invented a window chair or scaffold, which rests upon the window sill, extending outward and providing the workman with a secure support. The device is so arranged that it can quickly be clamped to the window frame and just as readily removed.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0133.xml
article
903
903
[no value]
[no value]
Giant Kite for the Crown Prince of Sunny Japan
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE the Crown Prince of Japan was on his winter vacation at the palace of Numazu he had the huge kite, which is the subject of our illustration, made for his amusement. This monster is in the form of a bird and it measures twenty-four feet from wing-tip to wingtip.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0134.xml
article
903
903
[no value]
[no value]
Half Million Words in English Use
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE English vocabulary has grown to great size, according to Professor Clark S. Northup, of Cornell University. “The number of words found in old English literature does not exceed thirty thousand; recent dictionaries have listed more than four hundred thousand.”
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0135.xml
article
904
904
[no value]
[no value]
Solving the Railroad Problem
Connecticut does it by making the return trip profitable for motor trucks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
autumn, when the railroad congestion became acute, the State of Connecticut, which is the heart of the small arms and ammunition industry of the United States, found itself in a desperate situation. Ammunition partly finished in one plant must be hauled to other plants for different machining operations before it is completed.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0136.xml
article
905
905
[no value]
[no value]
Beware of the Perils of the High Heel
Listen to the warnings of Professor Quénu and Doctor Ménard
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
one of the recent sessions of the Academy of Medicine of Paris an interesting communication upon the subject of high heels was submitted by Prof. Quénu and Dr. Ménard, closing with the ominous warning : “ Ladies, if you value your health, give up the high heels of your shoes!”
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0137.xml
article
906
906
[no value]
[no value]
The “Little Church of the Flowers” and How It Got Its Name
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE latest thing in churches is to be found in a southern California town, in the way of growing plants. Two rows of seats and a center aisle comprise the middle of the building. On each side beyond these seats are beautiful arches, from which large fern baskets are suspended, and beyond these arches, on both sides of the building, is a sloping roof of sky lights.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0138.xml
article
906
906
[no value]
[no value]
This Device Will Take Care of Your Street Clothes at the Theater
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DID you ever, dear reader, have the misfortune to reserve seats at the theater and not arrive there until after the performance had started? Do you remember taking your coat off in the lobby and carrying it on your arm down to your seat? And then the wild scramble past all the other people in the row, with the resulting frenzied grabbing of hats and coats and wraps so that you would not accumulate them in your career as a snowball grows as it rolls down a hill ?
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0139.xml
article
907
907
[no value]
[no value]
A New Use for the Little Tractor: Spotting Freight Cars for Large Plants
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SMALL industrial “creeper” tractor can “spot” a carload of coal having a total weight of 45,000 pounds. The illustration proves it. One of these tractors has taken the place of a switchengine or a gang of workmen with pinch bars for spotting or switching cars at a large industrial plant in Ohio.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0140.xml
article
907
907
[no value]
[no value]
Sandbags Used as Protective Covering Even on War Ships
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE use of sandbags or wicker baskets filled with sand as a protection against hostile projectiles in warfare is by no means new, but the present war has probably seen the most extensive use ever known of this means of defence. Against the enormous force of the modern explosives neither steel nor concrete offers adequate protection.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0141.xml
article
908
908
[no value]
[no value]
Flexible Coupling Takes Side Strain Off Shafting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNLESS there is perfect alinement of the propeller shaft with the engine or reverse-gear shaft there is sure to be trouble in any engine-propelled marine craft. Binding bearings, with resulting friction, hot journals and loss of power, or excessive vibration and consequent wear are the natural results of the side strain caused by the imperfect alinement.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0142.xml
article
908
908
[no value]
[no value]
A First Aid to the Singing-Teacher. It Analyzes the Voice
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY tone of the human voice is composed of fundamentals and overtones, according to the musical authorities. It is the presence or absence of the overtones which decides whether a tone is musical or otherwise. Hence overtones constitute the essentials of the singing voice.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0143.xml
article
909
909
[no value]
[no value]
Canned Ostrich Eggs May Find a Market in London
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SIGNS reading “Newly canned ostrich eggs for sale” may soon meet the eyes of the housewife looking into the windows of grocery stores in London. This statement is based on the fact that ostrich eggs are being packed experimentally in South America for shipment to England in liquid form.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0144.xml
article
909
909
[no value]
[no value]
Kneeling in Cotton Fields Made Comfortable by This Pad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COTTON pickers have to work for hours at a time kneeling upon the damp ground. They suffer tortures. To relieve them, Robert T. Jenney and Rudolph J. Langer of Monticello, la., invented a knee-protector. After the invention was perfected, it became apparent that it would be equally beneficial to miners, cement workers, carpenters and gardeners.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0145.xml
article
909
909
[no value]
[no value]
Ride This New Underwater Bicycle —It’s Great Sport at the Beach
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT the average bathing each about all you can do is swim, or paddle around in an old canoe. And so P. Kraemer of Jersey City, N. J., devised the underwater bicycle here illustrated. With this bicycle you can make as much as six or eight miles per hour, which is fast for swimming.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0146.xml
article
910
910
[no value]
[no value]
Home-Training for Wireless Heroes
A phonograph and book of rules will help to qualify you for a radio operator’s post
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE wireless operator of the future who may, during the din of battle, receive a message that will result in victory for his country, or, from the deck of a ship, pick up an appeal that will save hundreds of lives, can prepare himself for such heroic acts by sitting in his home and listening to the records of a phonograph.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0147.xml
article
911
911
[no value]
[no value]
Looking Through Your Hand
An optical illusion and at the same time a valuable test
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a recent issue of “La Nature” H. Volta speaks interestingly of an instrument which he calls “The illusion of the hole through the hand” and incidentally points out the value of that experiment as a clinical test for cross-eyes and other defects of vision.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0148.xml
article
912
912,913
[no value]
[no value]
Photographing Holland in California
New motion picture trickery, how it is done and how pleasing the results
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the legitimate stage wishes to produce a scene laid in some foreign country all it relies on is a few painted sets and appropriate furniture. In motion pictures, however, the director has to find some means of building a real duplicate.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0149.xml
article
913
913
[no value]
[no value]
What the Twenty-Dollar Gold Piece Has Been Through
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE twenty-dollar gold piece has had an interesting career. Jewelers melted it for their fine gold work, some forty years ago, and were very successful until the Government experts discovered the practice and stopped it in short order by “peppering” the gold with iridium.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0150.xml
article
914
914
[no value]
[no value]
Turning a Bicycle Into a Railway Hand Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“ FLAG train No. 71, southbound, before it crosses the creek and make it back into siding to let southbound Special pass.” Such was the order conveyed by the ticker in the little wayside station. “By George,” exclaims the station agent, “this is an ugly fix! The creek is five miles from here and No. 71 is due here in half an hour.”
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0151.xml
article
914
914
[no value]
[no value]
Making a Wind-Proof, Rain-Proof Chicken House from Piano Boxes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the United States Department of Agriculture is urging that every back-yard be the home for a flock of chickens, an inexpensive and novel plan of converting two piano boxes into a poultry house becomes at once practical and advisable.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0152.xml
article
915
915
[no value]
[no value]
A Four-Hundred-Foot Ship in a Three-Hundred-Foot Dock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE unusual feat of dry-docking a ship of four hundred and forty-six feet in length and a displacement of 9,300 tons in a dry dock only three hundred feet long and with a lifting capacity of 4,500 tons, was accomplished a short time ago, when the Japanese first-class cruiser Azuma, the propeller of which had been damaged, was docked for repairs in a floating dry dock at Honolulu.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0153.xml
article
915
915
[no value]
[no value]
Thirty Million Collisions in a Day—the Earth’s Record
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASTRONOMERS have collected a great deal of material in recent years which seems to prove that there is an enormous mass of non-luminous comet or meteorite material scattered through stellar space. It is estimated that as many as twenty or thirty millions of such bodies collide with the earth every twenty-four hours.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0154.xml
article
916
916
[no value]
[no value]
How the French Developed Their Newest Type of Battleplane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR a long time the principal French reconnoitering and bombing airplanes were only slight modifications of the early Henry Farman type, well known in America. That airplane was stripped down to the last essentials: ailerons, elevator, rudder and a simple fourwheeled landing gear with rubber shockabsorbers (then a novelty).
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0155.xml
article
916
916
[no value]
[no value]
Appropriately Enough — A Band of Brigands Were the First“Chauffeurs”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a justification for a bit of our American slang. It seems that the word chauffeur means “scorcher.” Over a century ago, some particularly brigandish brigands lived on the borderland between France and Germany. To force ransoms from their captives, these desperadoes grilled the soles of their victims’ feet before a fierce fire.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0156.xml
article
917
917
[no value]
[no value]
A Package Handle That Saves Your Time and Cord
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A COMBINED package carrier and tier invented by Friedrich 0. Vontobel, a Swiss resident of New York, promises to be of considerable interest. The pictures clearly illustrate the construction of the device and its application. At one end there is a flat loop of wire in the same direction as the handle, at the other end a flat loop at right angles to the direction of the handle with another bend at right angles to it near the middle of the loop.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0157.xml
article
917
917
[no value]
[no value]
The New Dandelion Extractor. You Can Work It Without Stooping
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW device for pulling dandelions has been invented by Hans C. Johnson, of Fort Bragg, California. It has a curved scoop for penetrating the earth adjacent to the plant. Pivotally attached to the shank of the scoop and opposed to it is a small toothed digger, which, when it is swung to closed position, impales or binds the plant against the scoop so that it can be readily extracted from the earth.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0158.xml
article
917
917
[no value]
[no value]
Fasting Is Not What It’s Cracked Up to Be, Experiments Show
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is impossible to stop eating and not feel the pangs of hunger. If you have been led to believe differently by the stories of men who have undergone fasting tests listen to the words of Professor Carlson of the University of Chicago. He found as a result of observation on man during prolonged intentional starvation, that the view that hunger mechanism fails early does not hold as a general rule.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0159.xml
article
918
918
[no value]
[no value]
Making a Gas Attack on the Pesky Ground Squirrel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FULLY a score of men, each carrying a mysterious long-handled container resembling a churn with an end of hose attached, have reached the field. They do not march in close formation, but scatter in every direction, apparently in search of something.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0160.xml
article
918
918
[no value]
[no value]
Saving Time in Insulating Electric Cables
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY motion picture studio uses hundreds of yards of electric cable. It is important that the cable shall not be damaged when it is walked on or when a truck should run over it. Electric cables are therefore wrapped to protect them— an expensive business.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0161.xml
article
919
919
[no value]
[no value]
Making Water Pump Itself
A novel water wheel obtains its motive power from the current
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CURRENT power wheel for raising water from running streams, which is said to be both efficient and inexpensive in operation, has been invented by H. C. Berry, of Portland, Ore., and has been successfully tested. The wheel is primarily intended for irrigation in the arid districts along the swift-flowing streams of the West.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0162.xml
article
920
920
[no value]
[no value]
Which Is the “Dead” Lamp on a Series Circuit? An Automatic Cut-Out Tells
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN an incandescent lamp which forms part of a series circuit burns out or when its filament breaks, all other lamps on that circuit are extinguished. The circuit must be bridged around the defective lamp. As all the lamps of the circuit are extinguished, it is a tedious task to find the exact lamp which caused the break.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0163.xml
article
920
920
[no value]
[no value]
The Fifty-Seventh Variety of Armor for the Modern Soldier Appears
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE soldiers of old went forth to fight clad in cumbersome and expensive armor, which, while serving as a protection, nevertheless hindered them from putting forth their best fighting strength. To-day, Martin Jelalian, an inventor of Rhode Island, has made it possible for a soldier to be protected by armor.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0164.xml
article
921
921
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
How to Make an Air Operated Metal Punch for the Shop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE junk pile around a shop usually affords parts that may be of use from time to time. The punch here illustrated was made from such material. As it was necessary to punch a great many holes in some braces used in cars at a railroad shop, the master mechanic made up plans for using an old 8-in. brake cylinder for the power which was taken from a wrecked freight car.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0165.xml
article
921
921
[no value]
[no value]
Keeping Foods and Eggs Fresh on Camping Trips
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAVING a touring car rigged out for camping, it became a problem how to keep butter and meat fresh. This problem was very satisfactorily solved by taking a single fireless cooker and clamping it to the running board of the car.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0166.xml
article
922
922,923
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Automobile Bearings and How to Care for Them Properly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE bearings of the automobile are, to many motorists, as a closed book, into which they have never ventured to peep—they have been content to let the garage man “turn the trick.” In a way this may be a wise course, but, after all, it is more satisfactory for the motorist to learn and know his own car than to motor in a depend-on-someone-else manner.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0167.xml
article
923
923
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Strengthening Hammer Handles with Steel Strips
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CLAW hammer of the usual kind with a wood handle may be made very strong for heavy work, such as pulling very large nails. This can be done by sawing out an opening in the handle from the hammer head back past the center of the handle an inch or two and inserting a strip of very narrow old steel buggy tire and securing in place by drilling small holes through both handle and buggy tire strip.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0168.xml
article
923
923
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Wall Hanger for the Ordinary Electric Lamp Stand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. L. CLARK
THE illustration shows a simple device for using an adjustable electric stand lamp as a wall lamp at the head of bed or couch. The device consists of three strips of wood screwed to the wall in the shape of a half hexagon and three narrower strips nailed on to them so as to extend over the inner edge, forming a groove into which the base of the lamp can be inserted and held firmly.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0169.xml
article
923
923
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
An Inexpensive and Effective Aluminum Polish
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE following is a fine polish for aluminum ware. It is made by mixing ammonia and water in equal quantities, and then adding the mixture to sufficient borax to make a paste about as thick as paint. Apply with a thick soft cloth and polish with canton flannel.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0170.xml
article
924
924
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Constructing a Convenient Table for the Porch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PORCH furniture to be worthy of a place on the bungalow porch should possess individuality of type. The table described here is different from the conventional porch table and has a distinction of its own. The following bill of material gives the required pieces in lengths to make a cutting fit.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0171.xml
article
925
925,926
[no value]
[no value]
A Garden Barbecue
An outside fireplace with the added feature of grids for grilling fresh meat
[no value]
[no value]
Huntington Baker
THE out-of-door fireplace has become a popular feature with many of the more luxurious dwellings of the West. This is usually designed to form a part of the terrace or veranda of the house, and its purpose is manifestly to combine the cheer and comfort of the open fire with the fresh, free air of the outside.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0172.xml
article
926
926
[no value]
[no value]
Cow Horns Effectively Used in Library Table and Chair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. N. JOHNSON
A NOVEL use for cow horns has been discovered by an ingenious craftsman. He has found a means to use them for making furniture. The illustration shows that the result is not only practical, but presents a unique and decidedly ornamental library table and chair.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0173.xml
article
927
927,928,929,930
[no value]
[no value]
Open Canoe Cruising
III.—The construction of the lee boards, their location for handling the canoe under sail. Stowing outfit, making a landing and the canoe as a fishing craft
[no value]
[no value]
E. T. Keyser
IN order to sail to windward, lee boards will be needed. Square up two pieces of ¾-in. mahogany, oak or cherry, each 30 in. long by 12 in. wide. On the lower left edge, make a mark 1½ in. from the lower left corner. Lay a line from this point to the lower right corner and saw along this line.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0174.xml
article
930
930
[no value]
[no value]
Wing Attachments on Shoes to Aid the Swimmer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BEING denied the privilege of entering into a swimming contest because he was too young, a boy determined to beat the winner at least and this is the way he did it: To an old pair of tennis shoes he attached the wings as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0175.xml
article
930
930
[no value]
[no value]
A Fishline Float Made of an Ordinary Thread Spool
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH a float of this type I find the operation of taking on and off a line, as well as of setting for depth, is accomplished much more quickly than with other floats I have used. A small or large spool, Fig. 1, is trimmed out as shown by the dotted lines, into the shape of Fig. 2. A fine saw cut is made until it connects with the hole in the spool.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0176.xml
article
930
930
[no value]
[no value]
Convenient Material for a Bait-Catching Net
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE fisherman who angles only occasionally usually neglects to supply himself with a bait catching net, and so at the last minute has to seize on the nearest fabric that will not hold water. If, however, he visits the nearest produce market or grocery store and for a few cents buys one of the ventilated sacks in which onions are shipped, he will have material for either a bait catching net or landing net. These bags are strongly woven in ⅛ in. mesh and will furnish a square of material about 3½ ft. by 3½ ft., which can be conveniently attached to any net frame.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0177.xml
article
931
931
[no value]
[no value]
Banding a Tree Trunk to Catch and Destroy Moths
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the codling moth larva has done its best to destroy the appearance of the ripest and rosiest fruits it can find, it seeks a place to spin a cocoon, and for this purpose it generally crawls up or down a tree trunk. Hence the usual method of trapping the moth is to wrap a band of burlap around the tree trunk.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0178.xml
article
931
931
[no value]
[no value]
Cleaning the Gilded Portion on Picture Frames
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GILT picture frames and chandeliers will, in the course of time, get dirty and turn black. Procure a box of wall paper cleaner and rub some of it over the gilt frame or chandelier. This removes the grease and dirt. Next boil some onions in water so as to get a strong solution.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0179.xml
article
931
931
[no value]
[no value]
Cooling Camp Food by the Evaporation Method
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOS. W. BENSON
AWAY from an ice supply it is often difficult to keep the food in good condition when no spring is near. However, a very efficient refrigerator that will go a long way in keeping the camp food fresh can be made from a small wood box mounted on stilts as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0180.xml
article
932
932
[no value]
[no value]
A Rocking Board See-Saw for Children’s Playground
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS excellent piece of furniture for the playground or porch may be easily made of a board and segments of rims from a discarded carriage wheel. The board is rounded as shown and the segments set in the board edge. Supporting strips may be used under the board and across the lower part.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0181.xml
article
932
932
[no value]
[no value]
Old Tin Fruit Cans May Be Used over Again
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. GERMAINE
OWING to the scarcity of tin, patent cans for preserving fruit will be expensive for a time at least and difficult to obtain. If one is careful in opening the cans of fruit and vegetables purchased from the grocery store the cans can be used in the following manner: Thoroughly clean and dry the cans as soon as contents are removed and store them away in a dry place to keep them from rusting.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0182.xml
article
932
932,933
[no value]
[no value]
An Overhead Dove-Tail Suspension for Table Drawers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE method of hanging a drawer here illustrated will be found a simple and satisfactory way out of a difficulty which is often encountered. This way is practical anywhere where a light drawer, such as is used in library tables, sewing cabinets, and the like, is to be placed in a limited space and a bottom slide and rail are either not possible or undesirable.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0183.xml
article
933
933
[no value]
[no value]
How to Make a Pocket Plumb and Level in a Block
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
THE only materials necessary to make this most serviceable little tool are a plain level glass and a small hardwood block. The block should be from ½ to ⅝ in. thick and triangular in shape, the angle of one corner being a right angle and the sides equal.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0184.xml
article
933
933
[no value]
[no value]
Making Camp Hammocks from Gunny Sacks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GALE PINCHNEY
PERSONS contemplating camp life during vacation in almost inaccessible spots may, with a little forethought, provide themselves with some of the luxuries of the home. For instance, the hammock, which is difficult to carry, can be made from large bran or peanut sacks in which the outfit may be packed for transports.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0185.xml
article
933
933
[no value]
[no value]
A Cement for Mending Valuable China Dishes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VALUABLE china may be mended with the following mixture, and when dry it will resist hot water and ordinary usage. Mix a teaspoonful of alum and a tablespoonful of water. Place in a hot oven until it is quite transparent. Wash the broken pieces in hot water, dry and put them into the oven until they are warm; and while still warm coat the broken edges with the mixture thinly and quickly as it sticks instantly.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0186.xml
article
934
934
[no value]
[no value]
Stakes with Guide Lines for Hoeing Garden Beds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
FREQUENTLY the gardening enthusiast plants the seeds and then forgets all about them. When next he views the patch he is unable to tell the weeds from plants. Here is a sure plan that will enable him to hoe out all the weeds possible without cutting the little plants.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0187.xml
article
934
934
[no value]
[no value]
A Combination Camp Kitchen Cabinet and Table
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE combination cabinet and table illustrated was the result of the refusal of my family to take a long outing unless they could carry some conveniences with them. “Roughing it” did not appeal to them. The table will accommodate four persons comfortably and extra compartments may be added as required.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0188.xml
article
935
935,936,937,938
[no value]
[no value]
Simple Designs for Sheet Metal Working
XIII.—Other interesting problems developed by means of radial lines
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
THOSE of you who have worked out the radial line problems as demonstrated in the last two issues will have acquired an understanding of the fundamental principles of the methods of pattern development by means of radial lines, that will make these more complex problems easy to understand and develop.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0189.xml
article
938
938
[no value]
[no value]
Making a Lattice Trellis for Roses and Vines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LOUIS M. WAHRER
A GOOD trellis for roses and vines may be made as follows: Procure as many l½-in. by ¼-in. strips of wood as there are feet to the width and of the right length, and also as many for every foot in length and proceed as follows. First lay out marks 12 in. apart on the strip to be used as a base, then tack the pieces that are to be used upright to these, each alternating piece on the other side from that nailed last, then interlace the cross pieces in these lengths as in weaving.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0190.xml
article
939
939,940
[no value]
[no value]
How to Make an Efficient and Inexpensive Fireless Cooker
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE materials needed are a box, or some other outside container, some good insulating material, B, a kettle for holding the food, a container for the lining of the nest in which the kettle is to be placed, and a cushion or pad of insulating material for the cover on top of the kettle, and a cover, G. For the outside container a tightly built wooden box as illustrated is the most satisfactory.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0191.xml
article
940
940
[no value]
[no value]
A Driver for Holding a Screw While Turning It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E.L. GRIFFITH
TAKE a round piece of wood, something like a lead pencil, of the required length, run a fine saw lengthwise through the end of it; then take a discarded clock spring, cut two pieces of equal lengths and insert them in the saw with the curves out.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0192.xml
article
940
940
[no value]
[no value]
Extension Holder for Hauling Long Stock on Express Wagon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES E. NOBLE
THE holder is made of two bars, each 9 ft. long and ¾ in. in diameter. They are bent at right angles on one end to make an upright 16 in. high. These pieces are joined together with another piece of the same stock welded in as at B. The length of this piece will be regulated by the width of the express wagon box on the inside.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0193.xml
article
941
941,942
[no value]
[no value]
A Rope Suspension Bridge for a Garden
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE M. PETERSEN
SUSPENSION bridges present a very artistic structure for spanning small streams or a brook on the grounds or in a park. The illustration gives the details of such a bridge and tables of proportions for construction of the different lengths.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0194.xml
article
942
942
[no value]
[no value]
Starting a Very Small Screw with Adhesive Tape
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M KANE
BEING without the necessary tweezers to handle a very small screw I took a match-stick and put a piece of adhesive tape on it as shown, then wrapped it with another piece to hold it to the stick. The screwhead adhered to the tape well enough to permit its being placed in position and given a couple of turns before it was necessary to use a screwdriver.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0195.xml
article
942
942
[no value]
[no value]
A Scaffold for Holding in Place with a Pole
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. A. KELLY
THIS device I saw in use by some country plasterers who were replastering the very high end of a farm house. Each one was made of two pieces of 3 by 4-in. stock, about 3 ft. long for the upper part, and 4 ft. for the other side of the angle. To make it, nail the two pieces together to form an angle.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0196.xml
article
942
942
[no value]
[no value]
Holding Photographic Plates from Tray Bottom
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE developing of plates in a flat tray in a darkroom is often a very bothersome task, because the plates stick to the bottom of the tray when one wishes to remove them for examination and at the end of the development period. An excellent plan to avoid this trouble is to stretch a rubber band loosely over and round each end of the tray through the developer and then lay the plates on the sagging rubber bands, which will prevent the plates from sticking and improve the general results.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0197.xml
article
943
943,944
[no value]
[no value]
A Convenient Summer Cottage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. M. Tomlinson
THE cottage proper is 18 by 24 ft.; an 8 ft. screened-in porch at each end makes the total length 40 ft. The low cost is made possible by choosing the dimensions so that stock sizes and lengths of lumber, doors, sashes, etc., may be used. With a little care in buying there is little waste, and in many cases no cutting is required.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0198.xml
article
944
944
[no value]
[no value]
How to Make an Automobile Spring Leaf-Separator
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ADOLPH KLEIN
THE body springs of an automobile should be periodically lubricated. This will result in greater comfort to the occupants as well as in quieter riding. A common practice on the part of the average driver is to separate the leaves of the springs with the aid of a hammer and chisel or a screw-driver.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0199.xml
article
945
945
[no value]
[no value]
Self-Measuring Wheelbarrow for Concrete Aggregates
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SELF-MEASURING wheelbarrow designed to promote convenience, rapidity and accuracy in handling concrete aggregate, is shown in the accompanying sketch. It consists of an ordinary steel body wheelbarrow pan with a transverse wood gage of the same shape as the inside of the pan.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0200.xml
article
945
945
[no value]
[no value]
Applying Grease to Working Gloves to Make Them Wear
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FRIEND of mine who does heavy work of various kinds which requires gloves, and heavy leather gloves at that, advises me that gloves can be made to wear almost like iron by applying axle grease sparingly and being very careful not to get it on the cloth stitching, as the axle grease may disintegrate it somewhat.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0201.xml
article
945
945
[no value]
[no value]
Making a Photographic Timer out of an Ordinary Watch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE PARKE
A SIMPLE adaptation of an ordinary watch to use as a timer of value in long photographic exposures by photoengravers and printers, or for use in timing action of developer, can be made by painting a narrow line on the under side of the edge of the watch crystal.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0202.xml
article
945
945
[no value]
[no value]
Joining the Ends of Carpet Rags Without Sewing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
AN old backwoodsman used this method of joining carpet rags end to end, without sewing the strips together. He mounted a strong knife blade, previously shaped like a crochet needle, as shown in Fig. 1, on the bench he used for a seat. The point and upper edges of the knife were sharpened as shown in Fig. 2.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0203.xml
article
946
946
[no value]
[no value]
An Inexpensive and Effective Water Cooler
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN D. ADAMS
IN the usual gas-engine installation the water is circulated through a large tank where it is cooled by radiation. Ordinarily this process answers every purpose, but in the case of small ice plants, now becoming rather common, a much greater cooling effect is desired.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0204.xml
article
946
946
[no value]
[no value]
Renewing a Worn Artist's Brush by Repointing It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
THE points of sable or camel's-hair brushes such as are used by artists rapidly wear away, thus rendering them practically worthless. An apparently worthless brush may be restored by dipping the bristles in glue, pointing it as well as possible at the time. When thoroughly hardened the brush is repointed on a sharpening stone the same as if it were a steel point. It can be done even more rapidly by holding against a slowly revolving emery wheel.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0205.xml
article
946
946
[no value]
[no value]
A Spring Lock for the Cover of a Garbage Can
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
THIS lock is for attaching to an ordinary garbage can, built like a pail having a bail. The spring catch, as illustrated, is riveted to the can cover, the upper part snapping under the bail when it is in an upright position for carrying.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0206.xml
article
947
947
THE Amateur Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
A Cleat for Holding Temporary Electric Wires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE accompany illustration shows a simple means for holding temporary wiring in place. The cleat is nothing more than the handy little glass push pin that can be purchased at any stationery store. It is very easy to attach, does not mar the surface of the wall and, being glass, is of course an insulator.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0207.xml
article
947
947
[no value]
[no value]
An Electrically Driven Toy Tank That Goes “over the Top"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. E. BRIMMER
THIS caterpillar tank will crawl along the ground, go “over the top” of miniature trenches, plunge through wire entanglements, and push aside or climb anything that is in its path. It is a small model of the latest machines that the British Army has been using so successfully.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0208.xml
article
948
948
An Electrically Driven Toy Tank That Goes “over the Top"
[no value]
Durable Terminals for Electrical Conductor Cords
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOS. A. REYNOLDS
THE terminals of flexible conductor cords often become frayed with use, a condition which results in poor connections and short circuits. A good terminal is made as follows: Peel back the insulation on the cord until a clean surface is obtained; then cut it off squarely and bend the end into a symmetrical loop. Dip the loop first into soldering flux and then into molten solder, holding it until the solder “takes.” This forms a solid terminal which can be screwed down tight without injury and will prove Satisfactory.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0209.xml
article
948
948
[no value]
[no value]
Shocking Device That Works on the Commercial Current
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN electrical shocking device which gives an even, soothing effect to the nerves is preferable to those which produce slow, intermittent discharges. An apparatus for producing the soothing current is quite easily made. The source of current is an 110 volt A.C. which is reduced by resistance.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0210.xml
article
948
948
An Electrically Driven Toy Tank That Goes “over the Top"
[no value]
Locating and Repairing ShortCircuited Armature Coils
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PETER J. M. CLUTE
TO locate a short-circuited armature coil, pass a current from a battery of dry cells, or a storage battery, through the armature, using the brushes of the machine for terminals. Using a lowreading voltmeter, touch its lead wires to one pair after another of the adjacent commutator segments.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0211.xml
article
949
949,950,951,952
[no value]
[no value]
Electrical Devices and How They Work
VI.—Electrical metering instruments
[no value]
[no value]
Peter J. M. Clute
ELECTRICITY is manifested to us only through certain effects which it produces. These may be mostly classified under chemical, thermal, magnetic, and static effect Chemical effect is manifested by the decomposition of a solution when a current of electricity passes through it.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0212.xml
article
952
952
[no value]
[no value]
A Combined Electric Night-Bell and Flash-Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALBERT E. JONES
IN rigging up a bell for an invalid it was decided to add an extra wire and have a flash-light as well as a bell. The bell and light are independent of each other, although one of the bell wires is also used for the light and the same batteries work them both.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0213.xml
article
952
952
[no value]
[no value]
A Thimble Used as a Ferrule on a Tool Handle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN old thimble makes an excellent ferrule for a small screwdriver handle or a similar tool. A notch is filed in the thimble end to admit the rectangular shank of the tool like a flat file. Round shanks may be fitted into a drilled hole or the thimble end cut off entirely for tools like an awl or chisel.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0214.xml
article
952
952,953
[no value]
[no value]
A Self-Translating Telegraph Line for Amateurs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHAS. HORTON
THOSE electrical experimenters who have possessed a private telegraph line know what fascination there is in communicating with a friend by this means and also know what a wonderful possibility of misunderstanding there is in such a device when the operators have only a speaking acquaintance with the standard telegraph code.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0215.xml
article
954
954,955
[no value]
[no value]
Interesting Method of Learning the Telegraph Code
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN learning either of the telegraph codes one finds it easy enough to learn to transmit correctly without the aid of any other person, but, when it is desired to learn to receive, it becomes absolutely necessary either to have a teacher or some kind of apparatus to take his place.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0216.xml
article
955
955
[no value]
[no value]
Home-Made Electric Furnace for Heating with Arc Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN electric furnace of the arc type can very easily be made by anyone from the following materials: fire clay, asbestos fiber and water glass. A mixture of these ingredients will quickly dry and harden into a fireproof mass of low heat conductivity.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0217.xml
article
955
955,956
[no value]
[no value]
A Simple Way of Cutting Mica V-Rings to Fit on an Armature
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN armature winder often experiences much difficulty in cutting a V-ring from a sheet of mica so that it will fit properly. A simple method of getting an exact fit is as follows: We will assume that the bevel surface to be covered with mica is a section of a cone, the apex of which would extend to the heart of the shaft at a point which would be the intersection of two lines, drawn as the continuation of the beveled surface of a V-ring, toward the heart of the shaft.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0218.xml
article
956
956
[no value]
[no value]
A Holding Clip for Making Tests on Spark Plugs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN testing the spark on a set of exposed sparking plugs most car owners feel the need of special clips to grip the plugs, which have a habit of tumbling out of contact, more particularly when single plugs are being tested with the engine running.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0219.xml
article
956
956
[no value]
[no value]
Controlling an Oil Cup by Means of an Electromagnet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PETER J. M. CLUTE
THE magnetically operated oil cup described herewith will be found to be a very convenient means of controlling oil feed in partially inaccessible places. An electromagnet is used in this scheme, as shown in the sketch. To open the oil cup, energize the magnet by control switch or push button.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0220.xml
article
957
957,958,959
[no value]
[no value]
Wireless Work in Wartime
XI.—Radio transmitters using synchronous and quenched gaps
Operation of the Synchronous Gap
Construction of the Quenched Gap
Production of Radio Waves
[no value]
[no value]
John V. L. Hogan
IN last month’s article the non-synchronous operation of a rotary gap in the wireless transmitter of Fig. 41 was decribed, for conditions which gave two or three sparks for each half-cycle of alternating current power. The curves of condenser discharge are shown in Fig. 42, where the divisions along the horizontal line represent six-hundredth parts of a second.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0221.xml
article
959
959,960
[no value]
[no value]
Mind Reading by Wireless—Try It on Wise Friends
[no value]
[no value]
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THE mind reader bounds up every few months. The feats he can perform are little short of marvellous. William Dubilier of New York has given the following details to the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY of how many of these mind readers work. Any wireless enthusiast can set up equivalent apparatus and obtain equally good results.
PopularScience_19180601_0092_006_0222.xml