Issue: 19180501

Wednesday, May 1, 1918
May, 1918
5
True
92
Friday, December 12, 2014

Articles
cover
643
643
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0001.xml
article
643
643,644
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Using a Ford as an Airplane-Tender
It could be done if the tender were designed to offer the least possible resistance to the air
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Carl Dienstbach
FROM afar comes the rolling thunder of the field guns, heavy blasts marking the rhythm of the heavy artillery. The sharp staccato of the machine guns and the spiteful cracking of the rifles cannot be heard so far behind the battle line. Undisturbed by the distant din and turmoil the birds are singing, feeding and making love as if there were no such things as bloody war and destruction.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0002.xml
article
644
644
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Doing the Washing for Forty Thousand Soldiers
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ONE of the thousand and one problems which confront the military authorities of a belligerent country is the necessity of providing ways and means for maintaining the cleanliness of the troops in camps or cantonments. The soldiers wear shirts, socks and underwear and use handkerchiefs and towels.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0003.xml
article
645
645
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Make Soldiers' Waistcoats Out of Your Old Kid Gloves
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PATRIOTIC women in America may profit by the experience of their British cousins and follow their example, by devoting their attention to the making of "glove waistcoats" instead of the sweaters which their nimble fingers have been knitting heretofore for the soldiers and sailors of our country.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0004.xml
article
645
645
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The Smallest Portraits in the World
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WHAT is believed to be the smallest group of portraits in the world, is exhibited in the National Museum in Washington. The portraits are arranged in the form of a cloverleaf and are enclosed in a circular frame about one-eighth of an inch in diameter.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0005.xml
article
646
646
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Dogs as Patriotic Helpers in a Good Cause
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DURING “Thrift Week” in Los Angeles these two dogs, Spike and Pride, took an active part in the campaign for selling thrift stamps. To say that they were successful only mildly expresses the result of their joint efforts. Spike and Pride made a mute but effective appeal to the patriotism of the crowds.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0006.xml
article
646
646
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No More Rubber Tires in Germany —Except for the Kaiser
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GERMANY had a little rubber in the early days of the war, but she soon became reduced to smuggling in what she could through the mails. Great Britain soon closed this channel, also the traffic in automobile tires which were being imported through Sweden.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0007.xml
article
646
646
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Locating Splinters Made Easy By This Device
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TO one of the New York hospitals, located in a district where the manufacture of clothing is conducted on a large scale, so many workers came every day with splinters, parts of needles, and foreign bodies in their fingers, that it became necessary to provide some simple method of locating foreign bodies without resorting to X-Rays.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0008.xml
article
647
647
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Making a Geological Map of Wooden Pegs and Strings
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THIS map, which is made of wooden pegs and strings connecting them, is six feet and five inches wide and twentyfeet and six inches long and represents the geological structure of several square miles of oil land in California. It is claimed that, by glancing at the map one can tell the depth of any well, its exact location, the thickness of the various strata found in drilling, the location of the spots where oil and water were found, etc. The pegs are painted white and have colored rings indicating the geological formations, sea level and depth.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0009.xml
article
647
647
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Chain Armor to Protect the Eyes from Flying Splinters
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AN ingenious improvement has recently been made to the already familiar steel shrapnel helmet in use “over there.” It is designed to protect the eyes and the upper part of the face from splinters of wood, stone, sand and metal, thrown up by exploding shells.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0010.xml
article
648
648
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As Luck Would Have It
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0011.xml
article
649
649
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How Our Naval Falcons Are Unleashed
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0012.xml
article
650
650,651
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Boston Converts an Armory Into a Wonderful Military Emergency Hospital
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0013.xml
article
652
652
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Sacred as the Apple of the Oriental's Eye
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0014.xml
article
653
653
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And We Thought We Were Cold and Starving!
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0015.xml
article
654
654,655
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New Ways of Using the Military Hand Litter It Can Be Made a Valuable Help to Surgery
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0016.xml
article
656
656,657
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"She Starts, She Reels, She Seems to Feel the Thrill of Life Along Her Keel"
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0017.xml
article
658
658
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Were Children and Dogs Barred There Too?
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0018.xml
article
659
659
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The Savage Headhunters Outclassed
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0019.xml
article
660
660,661
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The Dove of Peace Is Resting, but The Doves of War Are Active Enough
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0020.xml
article
662
662,663
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With Drill, Telephone, and Electric Implements the Modern Surgeon Salves War's Human Wrecks
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0021.xml
article
664
664
[no value]
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A Boy Pathfinder Discovers a Bicycle Short Cut in an Irrigation Ditch
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SCHOOLBOYS who live near El Molino, California, and attend school at San Marino, travel back and forth on bicycles through a half-mile of concrete-lined irrigation ditch. The ditch “highway” cuts off about a mile of their distance to and from school and enables them to avoid several mean hills over which no cyclists can pedal.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0022.xml
article
664
664
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Lack of Safe Harbors on Our Pacific Coast
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IN a recent publication on “The Neglected Waters of the Pacific Coast,” issued by the Department of Commerce of the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey, the Superintendent, E. Lester Jones, calls public attention to the radical differences between the conditions and character of the shore line of the Atlantic and those of the Pacific coast of the United States.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0023.xml
article
664
664
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Trees Stunted by the Wind
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TOURISTS visiting the Rocky Mountain National Park and not afraid of strenuous exercise in mountaineering, often have the opportunity of seeing tree forms like that shown in the accompanying picture. The trees near the timber line seldom grow up straight.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0024.xml
article
665
665
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Constant Friction Made a Freak of Telegraph Key
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THE peculiarly formed knob in the picture was taken from a telegrapher's key used continuously for fifteen years by Mr. W. C. Staib, operator in the general offices of the Lehigh Valley Railroad at South Bethlehem, Pa. It is true, the knob is not of stone, but of hard rubber, and was not worn by dripping water, but by the fingers of the operator, but, after all, the cause of the wear in the case of the stone as well as in that of the rubber knob is the same—friction.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0025.xml
article
665
665
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Banana Fiber Bags for Raw Sugar Containers
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SUGAR planters in the Hawaiian Islands are facing a shortage of bags used as containers for raw sugar. These bags have been imported from Calcutta. Recently machinery was sent to Honolulu from the State of Washington for the purpose of manufacturing the bags from the fiber of banana tree trunks.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0026.xml
article
665
665
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Making a Coaster From Roller Skates
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DO boys like coasting? Just ask them, or what is even better, watch them when they have a chance to give themselves up to that sport. Coasting on roller skates is fun, but coasting on one of the regular coasters with foot-board, steering post and brake is, next to flying, pure bliss.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0027.xml
article
666
666
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Portholes in an Airplane Hull
The engines are carried separately and the pilot occupies the fuselage alone
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EARLY in the war high-powered, weight-carrying airplanes appeared which were driven by two engines. But the engines were not housed in the fuselage or body in which the pilot sits, but were actually separated from it. The system has since been improved, as the accompanying photograph shows.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0028.xml
article
667
667
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To Lock the Ends of a Belt, Slip a Pin Through Two Registering Holes
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SIMPLE in construction, easily attached and quickly disconnected is a new belt connector which consists of a hinge with a removable pin. One half of the hinge is riveted to one end of the belt, and the other half to the other end. After the belt has been placed over the pulleys, the two ends are brought together, and a rawhide pin is pushed through the alined holes of the hinge.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0029.xml
article
667
667
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Watertight Compartments to Protect Ships From U-Boats
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THE submarine war which Germany is conducting against the Allied Powers has caused tremendous losses to shipping already and it is generally admitted that the problem confronting the allied nations is of serious importance. The question, how to check the activity of the submarines is, of course, paramount but next to it comes the question as to how best to protect ships from sinking after they have been attacked by a submarine and torpedoed.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0030.xml
article
668
668
[no value]
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Growing Thirty-Five Bushels of Potatoes in a Six-Storied Box
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TALK about growing potatoes in your back yard! Here is a method by which you can grow thirty-five bushels of tubers in a six-by-eight-foot packing-box. It looks like a big pen, but it is a very old thing in the way of potato farms. The western miners have known about it for many years.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0031.xml
article
668
668
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Sun for Ripening Bananas? Certainly Not—Just Cool Them
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SUNSHINE is not in the least necessary for ripening bananas. All that is necessary is to subject them to a heat of about seventy-eight degrees for about eight or ten hours, and then gradually cool them to a steady temperature of about sixty degrees.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0032.xml
article
668
668
[no value]
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Swinging “Stop” Signal Attracts Your Eye
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ALL the fundamental principles of safety first are embodied in a signal system for use at grade crossings which has been perfected by a Pennsylvania company. It has three different aspects shown in the accompanying illustration. Under normal conditions the “Stop” signal is concealed behind the “Look! Listen!” sign.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0033.xml
article
669
669
[no value]
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The Vegetable Peddler Adopts the Fast Motor-Truck
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THE motor-truck is being used in Southern California as a vegetable store on wheels. For some time prior to the use of the truck for this purpose the lowly horse had been used to draw the vegetable wagon up one street and down the next, but so much more efficient is the truck for this purpose that it is being rapidly taken up by California produce peddlers.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0034.xml
article
669
669
[no value]
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New Automobile Muffler Works on Vacuum Principle
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ALL automobile engineers have admitted that the present type of muffler in which the gases are allowed to expand from a small pipe into the muffler and are then carried back and forth through passageways, is inefficient because it increases the engine back-pressure and prevents a rapid exit of the burned exhaust gases.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0035.xml
article
670
670
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Don't Let Your Baby Suck the Telephone Cord!
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"HELLO! Hello! Is this the complaint department?" A woman's voice, clearly in a state of great irritation, judging from the rising pitch and the increasing explosiveness of her utterance, almost screamed these words to the complaint clerk of the telephone company.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0036.xml
article
670
670
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A New Safety Lock Suitable for Sewing-Machine Treadles
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PROBABLY the greatest element of fatigue occasioned by running a sewing machine is that of exerting a constant foot pressure on the treadle while the machine is in operation. To stop the machine, the operator is forced to elevate the sole and lower the heel of her foot.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0037.xml
article
671
671
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Even a Parasite May Prove to Be Useful to Man
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"BZ-Z-Z-." “Bz-z-z-z-z”—the buzzing sound comes nearer. It is produced by the vibrations of the wings of a most peculiar looking insect. Its body is about two and a half inches in length, with transparent wings marked with dark spots. Hanging straight down from the rear end of the slender body is a thin, hair-like something, about five or six inches long, which seems to interfere with flight.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0038.xml
article
671
671,672
[no value]
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Reducing the High Cost of Building with Camouflage Lions
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MOSES HAMBURGER, of Los Angeles, built himself a new house, and his soul lusted after lions to guard the portals thereof. Accordingly he had built nice inexpensive bodies of laths, fitting them with faces of concrete. Then he planted Virginia creeper with the result that he now has two magnificent camouflaged lions.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0039.xml
article
672
672
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Have You Ever Found a Thing Like That?
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VISITORS to seaside resorts on the Atlantic coast occasionally find in their strolls along the beach, especially after a storm, strangely formed objects like that shown in the accompanying picture. What is it? Many a stroller has asked himself that question, without being able to answer it.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0040.xml
article
672
672
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Lofty French Observation Point Near Dixmude
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ONE of the essential duties of a soldier is to keep constant watch upon the movements of the enemy. High trees and tall buildings are, naturally, the most suitable places for the establishment of observation posts and are given preference wherever they are available.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0041.xml
article
673
673
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Smoke Your Own Hams with This Portable Smoke-House
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THE German hausfrau has her own smoke-house which she uses in connection with the domestic stove. It is practically a large sheet-iron can, with a neck at the bottom of suitable width to fit the stove. Inside it is divided into two compartments.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0042.xml
article
673
673
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Just the Thing for a Kitchenette —An Electric Cooker
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HOUSEKEEPING in a modern apartment, although its space economy is carried to extremes, can be simplified by the use of the portable cooking box invented by Mr. Leoline Edwards, of Twickenham, England. It is essentially an improved “fireless cooker” of simple construction, in which the heat necessary for cooking, baking, boiling or broiling is supplied by an ordinary incandescent electric lamp.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0043.xml
article
673
673
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Pity the Salt Industry: It Makes Little Profit
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A RECENT investigation by the Bureau of Mines proved that a salt famine in the United States is unlikely. At the same time it was established that owing to the low price of salt and the abundance of its supply there is but little profit in the salt industry, although the American salt works have supplied in recent years practically all the salt consumed in the United States.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0044.xml
article
674
674
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Parlez-vous Francais?—If Not, Learn How with Playing-Cards
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AN ingenious American inventor has recently put on the market a card game invented by him, which is designed to teach French, or at least the rudiments of the language, by means of a game played with a special pack of sixty-one cards. The cards are numbered from 1 to 60 and in addition there is a “joker.”
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0045.xml
article
674
674
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They Hung Little Jessie on the Clothesline to Dry
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THE little girl on the clothesline is not a victim of Boche atrocity, as some might imagine. She is a little American girl, and the condition of suspense in which she finds herself is merely the result of a happy inspiration. It was wash-day and the mother was extremely busy.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0046.xml
article
675
675
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Trapping Salmon in the Far North
The people of the North spear thousands of salmon in dammed streams
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Christian Leden
AMONG many Eskimo tribes, salmon fishing is one of the most important means of existence. The natives along the West Coast of Hudson Bay fish for salmon the year around, only varying their methods to suit the changing seasons. In the Summer, the salmon in the ocean, just beyond the rivers, are caught in primitive nets.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0047.xml
article
676
676
[no value]
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Three Automobile Bodies in One
Here is a car body that can be changed on the road to any of three styles
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"WHICH automobile do you like best?" Ask a woman and she will name the one with the body that most appeals to her. Ask a man and he too will express his taste in terms of the body. For the body is the most exposed part of the car; it expresses a car's individuality.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0048.xml
article
677
677
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The Very High Cost of Writing Letters
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HAVE you ever figured out the cost per letter of your business correspondence? Taking into consideration the cost of stationery and stamps, the salary of the stenographer, cost of all accessories to the typewriter, all overhead charges, and last, but not least, cost of time of the man who dictates the letters, it works out at forty cents per letter, and that is an absolute minimum!
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0049.xml
article
677
677
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That Elusive Keyhole Simply Must Be Found
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THERE are times in the life of most jolly good fellows when they find it quite difficult to find the exact geographical location of that narrowly circumscribed opening into which their latch key is supposed to fit. But even persons not included in the class of good sports often have difficulty to find the keyhole, particularly at night or in cases where the door is located in a dark hall or corridor.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0050.xml
article
677
677
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Oil and Gas Mix, and So They Are Separated Out West
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MANY oil wells yield both oil and gas so, with such a plant as is shown, the flow is forced directly from the well into a large main pipe. The gas separates from the oil and rises to the top of the pipe, passing over through the small inverted U-shaped pipes and into the smaller main.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0051.xml
article
678
678,679
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Making Animals Transparent
We used, as children, to read about invisible cloaks. Read how a rat got his “cloak”
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HG. WELLS once wrote a striking story about an invisible man, who owed his invisibility to the fact that a method had been discovered of rendering the refractive index of his body to light exactly the same as that of the atmosphere. In other words, his body became absolutely transparent and hence invisible.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0052.xml
article
679
679
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The Weight of This Dumbbell Can Be Changed
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FEELING particularly strong and vigorous this morning?—Add another pound or two to each of your dumbbells. You can easily and quickly do that if you own a set of the variable weight dumbbells recently invented. As may be seen in the diagram, each end weight is rounded and attached to the handle section by a long machine bolt with counter-sunk head.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0053.xml
article
679
679
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It Does the Work of Four Men— This Hoeing Machine
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A HOEING machine, invented by Otto F. Ullman of Severy, Kansas, operates several hoe-blades simultaneously. It does the work of three or four men armed with hand-hoes. Only one man operates the machine. The hoe-blades are fixed to the lower ends of arms suspended from a crankshaft.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0054.xml
article
680
680,681
[no value]
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Housekeeping Made Easy
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PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0055.xml
article
682
682
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The Bottle Breaks, But Not the Head of the Villain
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BREATHLESSLY the spectators are watching the bewilderingly rapid development of the drama on the screen. The hero, singlehanded, defies the villain and his henchmen, while the heroine, whom he protects, is hiding her face. Neither she nor the hero notices the sneaky “Greaser,” who, armed with a big whisky bottle stealthily approaches the hero from behind.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0056.xml
article
682
682
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This Pocket Drinking-Cup Folds Up Like a Purse
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AS a matter of sanitary precaution every man, woman and child should carry an individual drinking cup. The health authorities have long recognized the importance of permanently banishing the unhygienic and disgusting public drinking cups and have strongly urged everyone to carry his own cup.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0057.xml
article
683
683
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A Garage, Tennis Court, Skating Rink and Garden in One
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ALFRED AUDET, a Salem, Mass., man, has constructed for his use a combination garden, garage, tennis court and ice skating rink. This roof garden is built into the side of a hill in the rear of the dwelling. The hill was apparently a barrier to further development of the property, but it was eventually an advantage.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0058.xml
article
683
683
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Utilizing the Waste Heat from a Gas-Engine
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FOR a long time the waste steam from steam-engines has been turned to good account, but there have been difficulties in the way of using the exhaust gases from a gas-engine as they readily attack the metal of the conduits. However, the difficulty is being overcome, for a New Jersey candy factory has an installation in connection with a sixty horse-power engine which is used to heat the factory.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0059.xml
article
684
684
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Enjoy Your Snapshots Better by Enlarging Them
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IF you are an amateur photographer with a hand camera for making only small pictures it will add a great deal to your enjoyment of them if you can enlarge them or, still simpler, look at them with an enlarging contrivance like that shown in the picture.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0060.xml
article
684
684
[no value]
[no value]
Grocery Store Has Combination Front and Awning
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN William Judd built his grocery store at Avalon, Santa Catalina Island, he had to have a front to the place, and he also needed an awning. So, instead of going to the expense of providing both, he combined the two. Mr. Judd considered that he didn't need an awning when his store was closed, and when it was open he didn't need a front.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0061.xml
article
685
685
[no value]
[no value]
Cleaning Billiard Tables by an Electric Brush
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE cloth of billiard and pool tables takes up a great deal of the chalk dust that drops from the cues. How can it be removed without ruining the cloth and without merely raising it into a cloud that settles again upon the cloth? When vacuum cleaners came into use, many owners of billiard halls tried them upon their tables, but unsuccessfully.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0062.xml
article
685
685
[no value]
[no value]
A Pair of Socks Every Thirty-Five Minutes—Red Gross Knitters Please Notice
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE enormous demand for sweaters, scarfs, etc., for the American soldiers and sailors made it clear that this war work needed speeding up. So the Comforts Committee of the Navy League of the United States installed in its headquarters several knitting machines and turned them over to the women.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0063.xml
article
686
686,687,688
[no value]
[no value]
The Richest Food in the World
Solving the food problem with the Soya Bean
[no value]
[no value]
Hudson Maxim
IN my book, “Defenseless America,” published three years ago, I called attention to the defenselessness of this country, but in that book I dealt mainly with our lack of preparation in respect of fighting men, fighting ships, and all the munitions and military equipment of war.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0064.xml
article
688
688
[no value]
[no value]
The Burglar Makes a False Step
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE night is dark and cold. Someone is stealthily moving in the shadow of a residence. When the policeman, patrolling the beat disappears around the corner, a man, with his face muffled, slinks up to a house. “What a snap!” he murmurs. Drawing a few skeleton keys from his pocket, he begins operations upon the inner door.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0065.xml
article
689
689
[no value]
[no value]
Dummy Ships That Fooled the Germans
Their “suicide fleet” of imitation dreadnoughts a huge joke
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE sinking of two wooden 'dreadnoughts' by Great Britain, some days ago, to form a breakwater, brings up more evidence of what disposition is being made of the dummy fleet of fourteen battleships with which Great Britain fooled Germany for some fifteen months during the earlier part of the war.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0066.xml
article
690
690
[no value]
[no value]
Jumping Through an Aerial Bonfire
One of the most sensational episodes of the great war
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
THE great war has led to many radical changes in the methods of warfare. Some were discontinued altogether, others modified, still others greatly developed. The trench-warfare, which reached a higher development than ever before, naturally in fluenced the artillery tactics and led to an extensive use of observation bal loons.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0067.xml
article
691
691
[no value]
[no value]
A Beautiful Section Laid Waste by War's Iron Heel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THAT part of Flanders which is located between the Belgian border and the Somme river, was known before the war as one of the most fertile and beautiful agricultural districts of northern Europe. When the British undertook their drive toward Cambrai, the retreating Germans cut down thousands of the trees lining the country roads and placed them across the roads to hinder the progress of the British.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0068.xml
article
691
691
[no value]
[no value]
The Lawn Roller Becomes a Weapon of War
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH conceived primarily as a war machine of unlimited possibilities, the invention upon which J. L. Hyland, of Minnesota, recently obtained a patent, can also lay claim to a wide range of usefulness in times of peace. A hollow cylinder, approximately seven feet long, has a shaft or axle around which it can be rotated.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0069.xml
article
692
692,693
[no value]
[no value]
Truck Service Overland
Congestion of railroads and scarcity of cars causes long-haul motor truck service to be instigated
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Brinker
ONLY a few years ago the plan of establishing a regular freight-carrying service with big motor-trucks over a distance exceeding fifty or, perhaps, seventy-five miles, would have been considered extremely visionary if not impossible.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0070.xml
article
693
693
[no value]
[no value]
See that Your Garage Is Ventilated. It Is Dangerous Otherwise
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DURING the exceptionally cold months of the past winter, many deaths by poisoning from the exhaust of gasoline engines were reported from all parts of the country. In most cases the Victims,; had been, for some time, in a poorly, ventilated or un ventilated garage or other room where one or more gasoline engines were running.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0071.xml
article
694
694
[no value]
[no value]
Swimming Harness Will Keep the Kiddies Afloat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO the numerous devices for the protection of children and grown persons against the danger of drowning a new one has recently been added, which offers some notable advantages. It consists of an inflated circular tube or tire Which is fastened to the body of the person using it by a harness arranged in such a manner that it prevents the buoyant tube from slipping down or over the head.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0072.xml
article
694
694
[no value]
[no value]
Cook Soup, Coffee, and Beans in One Vessel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN unusually compact and practical mess kit, suitable for soldiers, campers, automobilists and hunters has recently been placed on the market. The kit consists of ten pieces, cleverly nested. It weighs less than two pounds. Alcohol in solid cubes is used as fuel.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0073.xml
article
694
694
[no value]
[no value]
The Large Amount of Food That Goes Up in Smoke
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAVE you ever thought how much of the country's food is consumed by fire rather than by human beings? One fire which occurred recently in a grain elevator destroyed 700,000 bushels of corn and 300,000 bushels of oats. Frequent explosions in grain separators also cause an enormous loss of foodstuffs.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0074.xml
article
695
695
[no value]
[no value]
Planting Tobacco with a One-Man Planting Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE old way of setting-out tobacco, tomato, cabbage, and similar plants, was to wait for a showery day, when the ground was damp, take up the plants, and feverishly and laboriously go over the ground with a “peg” and replant them before the ground got dry again.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0075.xml
article
695
695
[no value]
[no value]
Rolling Down a Ship's Side to Safety in a Lifeboat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SHIP which is torpedoed rarely sinks on an even keel. Whether it lists to starboard or port depends on the location of the injury. The crew and passengers rush to the high side, clamber into the lifeboats, and drop to safety if they can. We say “If they can” because frequently the boats strike not the water, but the iron plating of the ship's side.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0076.xml
article
696
696
[no value]
[no value]
Euclid Never Thought of This Way of Studying Geometry
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE study of geometry, especially of the more advanced branches of spherical and descriptive geometry makes demands upon the imaginative power of the students. Perspective drawings upon the blackboard are grasped only by the more gifted students.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0077.xml
article
696
696
[no value]
[no value]
New Uses Have Been Discovered for Blue Glass Electric Lights
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
New uses are constantly being found for the blue glass electric light in-can descents which already have a wide range of uses. A big laundry in the South has installed blue bulb lights for the reason that this light makes the yellow stains in cloth show up plainly, and therefore enables the workers to do better laundry work.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0078.xml
article
696
696
[no value]
[no value]
A Picture Frame and Easel for the “Girl I Left Behind Me”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS photograph frame is for the soldier boys. The triangular flaps are folded back, and the loop ribbon provided is slipped around the corner of one of the flaps. The oval opening is large enough to accommodate a picture 1⅜×2⅜ in. The photograph is slipped between the frame and its back through a slit at the top.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0079.xml
article
697
697
[no value]
[no value]
Simple Adding Machine Convenient to Handle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH no keys to press and no levers to manipulate; the simple adding machine shown in the accompanying illustration is particularly adaptable to the work of accountants and bookkeepers. The device consists of a base with seven notched dials representing cents, dollars, and tens, hundreds, and so on up to $99,999.99.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0080.xml
article
697
697
[no value]
[no value]
Heating Tar and Gravel Separately But in One Operation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EMULATING the famous hunter of the olden days who killed two birds with one stone, a New Jersey manufacturer has recently brought out a combination tar and gravel heater that heats these two dissimilar materials quite independently but with one operation.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0081.xml
article
698
698
[no value]
[no value]
Training Sea-Gulls to Become “Spotters” of Submarines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NAVAL officers have frequently had the opportunity to observe that swarms of sea-gulls follow in the wake of submarines. The birds are, attracted by the unusual spectacle of a whalelike monster moving through the water, and are eager to pick up garbage.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0082.xml
article
698
698
[no value]
[no value]
Insulating a Hot Rifle for Bayonet Use
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
APPRECIATING the fact that a rifle barrel, heated with much rapid fire, is not a particularly inviting article to handle, and that nevertheless it must be handled when it is required to use the bayonet, Mr. Henry Brewer, of Connecticut, has invented an insulating device.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0083.xml
article
699
699
[no value]
[no value]
The Mechanical David
Centrifugal force propels the bullets towards the enemy with terrific force, at the rate of 20,000 a minute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE present world war has brought out so many striking reversions to primitive principles and methods of attack and defense that the invention of a gun based upon the same principle that enabled David to lay low the mighty Goliath, should, by rights, cause no particular surprise.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0084.xml
article
700
700
[no value]
[no value]
Beware! The Tanks are Coming— Under the Table
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OUR picture shows a toy tank with its young commander. This is a most realistic toy, although it is very inexpensive. The sides and body are made of wood, and the gun turrets are merely other scraps of wood nailed to the sides.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0085.xml
article
700
700
[no value]
[no value]
Novel Idea of Converting Shell-Cases into Shoe Protectors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRENCH life is extremely hard on shoes. That has been definitely proved. Rough usage and exposure to mud and water quickly wear them out. For a long time the men in the trenches have tried to devise some method of prolonging the life of soles and heels.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0086.xml
article
700
700
[no value]
[no value]
Why Isn't It Hotter Nearer the Sun Than Away From It?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHY is the air generally much colder a mile above the earth than near the ground? The heat of the atmosphere comes from the sun, but by a somewhat indirect process. The incoming sunbeams are only slightly absorbed by the dry air at high levels, and so have little effect on its temperature.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0087.xml
article
701
701
[no value]
[no value]
Folding Steering-Wheel Locks Automobile and Makes It Easy to Get Out
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE latest comfort-giving automobile accessory consists of a folding steering-wheel which performs the dual purpose of making it easy for the driver to get into his seat and of locking the car in place so that it cannot be steered if thieves should attempt to make off with it.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0088.xml
article
701
701
[no value]
[no value]
Carrying Automobile Sedan Parts Without Rattling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY of the convertible sedan automobile bodies carry the side window and door sashes in pockets in the body sides and doors. The result is considerable car rattle, especially when the car is traveling over rough roads. To offset these difficulties, several manufacturers are making the glass panels integral with the frames so that they may be entirely removed and placed in a wider and roomier compartment back of the rear seat, as shown in one of the accompanying illustrations.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0089.xml
article
701
701
[no value]
[no value]
Liberty Motor-Cycle to be Worthy Follower of Liberty Airplanes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WELL, we have the Liberty engines, the Liberty airplanes, and the Liberty motor-trucks. Now we are going to have Liberty motor-cycles. The motorcycle is one of the most important factors to the intelligence departments on account of its speed, handiness, and ability to go where an automobile cannot.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0090.xml
article
702
702
[no value]
[no value]
An Enterprising Photographer “Shoots” Draft Army
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT was an event to be remembered when the 10,000 men, forming the New York contingent for the selective draft army marched in parade on Fifth Avenue, New York City, on Washington's Birthday, during a blinding snowstorm. In spite of the unfavorable weather, photographers managed to get many excellent pictures of the parade.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0091.xml
article
702
702
[no value]
[no value]
High-Water Street Cars Recently Used in Cincinnati
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
wHEN the Ohio River is on a rampage, the streets in the lower section of Cincinnati, in the levee district, are often flooded and many times traffic on the car lines has had to be stopped. To remedy this condition the engineering department of the traction company devised the high-water cars shown in the accompanying illustrations.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0092.xml
article
703
703
[no value]
[no value]
Extinguishing Fires in Coal Piles with Bicarbonate of Soda
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT has long been known that as the result of spontaneous combustion fires often originate in the interior of large coal piles, especially when the coal is fine and contains a large percentage of sulphur. Some of the recent coal-pile fires have demonstrated, however, that under favorable conditions spontaneous combustion is liable to take place even in piles composed of coal in large lumps.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0093.xml
article
703
703
[no value]
[no value]
Why It Is That Bricks Are Made with Straw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERYONE is familiar with the story of how Pharoah commanded his taskmakers to increase the burdens laid on the Israelites by withholding from them the straw wherewith to make bricks; and doubtless many have wondered wherein the hardship lay.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0094.xml
article
704
704
[no value]
[no value]
Shooting Hawks from a Fast Motorcycle While Traveling at Speedz
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERETT COLBURN, a Los Angeles taxidermist, has evolved a new method of hunting hawks and other birds of prey which is spectacular and hazardous, but nevertheless efficient. Mr. Colburn, who is also a motorcyclist, noticed that often when he was touring over the country highways, hawks would frequently sit on telegraph or fence posts at the side of the road and allow him to pass on his machine.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0095.xml
article
704
704
[no value]
[no value]
The Windows Fold Back Out of the Way and Let in the Air
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW type of casement window, shown on the house in the accompanying illustration, overcomes several of the ills that casements are heir to. While the windows are held rigidly at both the top and the bottom, they may be easily moved from side to side.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0096.xml
article
705
705
[no value]
[no value]
A Floating Invitation to Suicide
It's a mine with an imitation periscope projecting from the water
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"PERISCOPE in sight!" calls one of the lookouts on the starboard side, excitedly pointing to a small object a few hundred yards away, which his keen and well-trained eye has just discerned. A dozen glasses are trained upon that object a moment later and as many observers, firmly convinced by what they see, that they have the periscope of a hostile submarine before them, begin to fidget in anticipation of the coming events.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0097.xml
article
706
706
[no value]
[no value]
How to Change an Ordinary Chair Into a High Chair for Baby
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. L. FARRER, of Welland, Ont., had three little children of high-chair age in his family, but only one high chair. This set Mr. Farrer thinking and eventually the idea of constructing a contrivance for temporarily changing a low into a high chair took definite form in his mind.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0098.xml
article
706
706
[no value]
[no value]
Feeding and Watering the Chickens Automatically
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DON'T scatter chicken feed by hand. It is a waste of time nowadays. Nikilas Lappas, of Salem, Massachusetts, has patented a machine which does the work and never forgets. At regular intervals his apparatus delivers measured quantities of water and feed for poultry without the aid of a human hand.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0099.xml
article
707
707
[no value]
[no value]
Even Fruit Skins Are Utilized Now. This Machine Does It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN apparatus which will dexterously peel everything from limes to large grapefruits (the first stage in the extraction of useful oils from the peels) has been developed by the experts of the Department of Agriculture. With a battery of these machines placed in a factory, many thousands of dollars worth of by-products can be utilized.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0100.xml
article
707
707
[no value]
[no value]
Them There Pesky Tobacco-Chewin' Bugs Ag'in
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE tobacco is recognized as a valuable insecticide which will kill most insects, there is at least one that lives in it and on it and thrives exceedingly—far too exceedingly, to be pleasant. This tobacco beetle, as he is called, is very epicurean in his tastes and prefers the better brands of tobacco.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0101.xml
article
708
708
[no value]
[no value]
Canvas Wheels Reduce Noise and Save Floors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WE have steel tires, pneumatic tires and solid rubber tires, each with its place on some sort of vehicle, but the latest is a canvas tire designed for factory trucks, hand trucks, electric industrial vehicles and other portable objects such as hospital beds, operating tables, oil and gasoline tanks and a score of other devices.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0102.xml
article
708
708
[no value]
[no value]
Tire Repairing Made Easy with a New Spreader
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN accessory designed to make easier and lighter the work of repairing automobile tires has recently been put on the market. It consists essentially of two parts—a buffer plate and a working stand on which the tire cover is held. The buffer plate, which is convex, is applied to the outside of the cover at the place where it is desired to make the repair, and is held in place by a clamp.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0103.xml
article
709
709
[no value]
[no value]
School Trains Women for Railroad Service
Some Wonderful Changes Wrought by the Draft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE war has created in all belligerent countries a scarcity of male workers in occupations which heretofore have been considered unsuitable for women. Thousands of the young men employed in the shops and factories, the offices, yards and round houses of the various railroad lines of the country have been drafted into the army or navy and many thousands more are sure to be drafted if the war should continue for a long time.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0104.xml
article
710
710,711
[no value]
[no value]
Our War Sugar Bowl
Sugar is a quick-action food, and that is why armies must have it to restore energy
The German Army Fights with Sugar as Well as with Bullets
Australians Have the Sweetest Tooth of All
America Is Not Saving Much Sugar
[no value]
[no value]
John Walker Harrington
SWEETS are the true food for fighting men, as sugar is almost instantly converted into heat and energy. It is pure fuel for the human furnace and it burns without ashes. Mosso, the distinguished Italian physiological chemist, through experiments in Naples many years ago, proved this with the ergograph, a contrivance which measures the fatigue that ensues when the hand is opened and shut, for example.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0105.xml
article
712
712
[no value]
[no value]
The “Fulton Market” Hair Cut in Your Own Home
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAVE you ever heard of the “Fulton Market” haircut? After the barber has trimmed your back hair as closely as he can with the shears, he strops his razor and proceeds to shave your neck, as if he suspected you of a desire to grow whiskers where they ought not to be.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0106.xml
article
712
712
[no value]
[no value]
A Maker of Relief Maps Who Has Few Competitors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are only a few men in this country who devote their time to the making of relief maps. One of the most noted makers of such maps is Fred Burgie, a French Swiss, who learned the art from his father, Professor Joseph Burgie, formerly a famous European maker of relief maps.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0107.xml
article
713
713
[no value]
[no value]
Bacteria Cannot Live in the Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF we cover with black paper one-half of a petri dish (a small circular glass tray with cover) in which bacteria are growing and then place the dish in a light warm place for a few days, the growth of bacteria in the light part of the dish will be found to be checked, while growth continues in the covered part.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0108.xml
article
713
713
[no value]
[no value]
Underfeed Pipe That Loads from the Bottom
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE accumulation of moisture laden tobacco in the bottom of the bowl of the pipe is unknown in a style that is fed from the bottom. When more tobacco is to be put into the pipe, the bottom is removed, the new tobacco inserted from below, and the bottom replaced; consequently no part remains for days to soak up moisture and juices.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0109.xml
article
713
713
[no value]
[no value]
Two Thousand United States Marines Form Their Emblem
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO thousand marines, quartered at the training station of the U. S. Marine Corps, at Paris Island, S. C., are shown in the accompanying picture grouped in such a way as to form the design of the service emblem of the Marine Corps, a globe showing the western hemisphere, an American eagle perched on top and an anchor crossing it.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0110.xml
article
714
714,715
[no value]
[no value]
What a $50 Liberty Bond Will Buy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0111.xml
article
716
716
[no value]
[no value]
Giant Cars to Help in Solving the Coal Problem
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the reasons given for the coal shortage during the past winter was the lack of transportation facilities. The coal-carrying railroads of the country have tried for some time to solve this serious problem by substituting larger cars for the old style coal cars of limited capacity. One of the southern railroads is now trying out several , gigantic coal cars, which hold the record as the largest of their kind in the world.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0112.xml
article
716
716
[no value]
[no value]
If You Own a Walnut Tree These Days You're in Luck
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WALNUT, walnut, walnut. That is what your Uncle Sam is looking for just at present. What does he want it for? Why gunstocks. Walnut is and always has been the wood par excellence for the manufacture of stocks. It is easy to work, will not easily crack, and will not splinter.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0113.xml
article
717
717
[no value]
[no value]
Carelessness and What It Means in Forest Fires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DURING the year 1917 our National forests were devastated by 7,814 forest fires. According to the report of the Forest Service of the Department of Agriculture all these destructive fires, with the exception of 2,132, which were caused by lightning, could have been prevented; 952 were undoubtedly incendiary fires, while the rest were due to pure carelessness of campers, hunters, railroads, settlers or travelers.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0114.xml
article
717
717
[no value]
[no value]
Applying the Fireless Cooker Principle to the Delivery Wagon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERYONE, nowadays, knows the principle of the fireless cooker. Interpose a sufficient layer of insulating material between the atmosphere and the food which is to be kept hot and you reduce the amount of heat radiated. The principle is also applied in keeping chilled food cold.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0115.xml
article
717
717
[no value]
[no value]
Dental Practice on Teeth That Never Ache
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BEFORE dental students are permitted to practice upon patients in the clinic they must undergo a thorough training in the science and technique of dentistry at their college. In order to give a dental student the experience of working upon a model closely resembling human jaws and under conditions such as would confront him in his work at the clinic, Dr. F. H. Volland of Iowa City, la., has invented the device shown in the accompanying illustration.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0116.xml
article
718
718
[no value]
[no value]
Conveniences and Novelties in Office Equipment
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0117.xml
article
719
719
[no value]
[no value]
Do It with Tools and Machines and Save Time and Muscle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0118.xml
article
720
720
[no value]
[no value]
Chimney Crashes Through Three Floors of a Factory
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WEAKENED by a terrific gale, a three by four-foot brick chimney towering above the roof of a box factory at Lynn, Mass., suddenly fell and crashed through three floors of the building, killing three of the employees and injuring others. Several persons were carried down with the falling brick and timber to the floors below.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0119.xml
article
720
720
[no value]
[no value]
Are You Stifling Your Feet? Let Them Breathe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SUPPLY air to the feet and foot ills would vanish is the belief of a New Jersey manufacturing company. To prove its point it has introduced a little device to ventilate your shoes. The device was invented by Mr. E. J. Devlin of Newark, and consists of a little perforated button which is made so that it will clip into a hole in the instep of the shoe like an eyelet.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0120.xml
article
721
721
[no value]
[no value]
Highways and Automobiles in Warfare
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN discussing the importance of good highways and of automobiles in modern warfare, Major Amos A. Fries, Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, brought out some interesting facts. Basing his statements upon the experiences of the French military authorities, he expresses the belief that in case of an emergency it would be possible within a few days to get together 200,000 automobiles, which would be able to carry 600,000 to 800,000 men with their equipment and rations to any desired place.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0121.xml
article
721
721
[no value]
[no value]
Locking Gear Lever in Neutral Position to Prevent Theft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the latest of the locking devices which is to be attached to an automobile, which will prevent the car from being run under its own power but which will not prevent its being stolen by the towing method, consists of a small lever-type lock inserted in the ball-ended handle of the gear-shifting lever.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0122.xml
article
721
721
[no value]
[no value]
A Queer Improvised Ambulance In Use in France
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN addition to the large number of regular ambulances, constructed for that purpose, which are in use behind the West Front in Flanders, there are many that were improvised with more or less success from vehicles of every kind. The accompanying picture shows one of these ambulances, improvised from an automobile of the coupé style.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0123.xml
article
722
722,723,724,725
[no value]
[no value]
Wind, Weather and the Airman
The Invisible Perils of the Whirlpools, Gusts, and Eddies of the Ocean in which Men Fly
There Are Winds and Winds
The Autograph of a Gust
Fog—the Airman's Dread
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AIR navigation, in its relation to weather, is repeating the history of marine navigation. The slow sailing-ships of early days were the sport of wind and waves; the great ocean liner of today pursues the even tenor of its way regardless of the elements.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0124.xml
article
725
725
[no value]
[no value]
A Thousand Dentists Will Be in the United States Army
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DENTISTS are just beginning to come into their own in the Army. Even yet their importance is insufficiently recognized. According to the latest reports we are to have only one dentist to every thousand men. Yet there are to be eight horseshoers to every hundred horses.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0125.xml
article
726
726
[no value]
[no value]
Ringing Out the Victory of Cambrai from the Great Bells of St. Paul's
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOT every one can ring the great bells in church towers. It takes skill and it takes strength. In the accompanying illustration we see the bell ringers of St. Paul's, London, preparing to ring joy bells in honor of the successful Cambrai offensive.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0126.xml
article
726
726
[no value]
[no value]
When Is a Feather Not a Feather? When It's a Hair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OUR picture shows several midground types of feathers in course of evolution. They are midway between scales and feathers. Crossing in the center are two hairlike forms called “filoplumes.” Sloping up to the right is one found in abundance on poultry.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0127.xml
article
727
727
[no value]
[no value]
Cooking Your Meals While You Drive
Using the exhaust heat of your engine to prepare luncheon while running at twenty-five miles an hour
[no value]
[no value]
Albert Marple
THE manifold stove is new. It fits beneath the hood over the exhaust manifold of the automobile engine and may be used for baking potatoes, heating canned goods, and water. The device costs only about a dollar to manufacture, uses heat that would otherwise be wasted and is a valuable time saver.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0128.xml
article
728
728,729
[no value]
[no value]
Letting Gasoline Do It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0129.xml
article
730
730
[no value]
[no value]
"Making Believe" You're Miles Standish to Learn American History
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the State Normal School, situated in Salem, Massachusetts, a new method has been adopted to teach kindergarten children through pictures. Frederick W. Whitney, the art teacher in the school, conceived the idea of using drawings in colored chalk upon the blackboard to illustrate and make clearer the stories read to the children.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0130.xml
article
730
730
[no value]
[no value]
In Trying On That New Hat You May Get Something Besides the Hat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE doctor, who sees bacteria everywhere—even though they are invisible—warns you now against trying on hats in a hat-store. Most men try on three or four hats before they get what they want, and it was discovered, by actual observation, that two per cent of them have noticeable eruptions on their faces and foreheads.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0131.xml
article
730
730
[no value]
[no value]
How Many Cubic Feet in a Ton of Coal?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERE is a little information which will help you to solve the vexing problem that is apt to be a hardy annual, i. e., how much coal to order in order to fill the bunkers, but without having to put some in an old barrel in the outhouse. A ton of egg coal contains from thirty-two to thirty-eight cubic feet, averaging about thirty-five.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0132.xml
article
731
731
[no value]
[no value]
Grading Machine Does Work of 125 Men
It digs to grade and loads six hundred wagon loads in a day
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOT SO long ago a huge machine made its appearance on a Milwaukee street which had to be graded. The machine had creeper feet in front that reminded one of the tread of a tank on the Western Front, and in the rear a roller. There was a huge wheel on its front which tore up the dirt precisely to the depth wanted—no more and no less—with the relentlessness that never could be equalled by hand shovels.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0133.xml
article
732
732
[no value]
[no value]
A New Can for Handling Gasoline to Prevent Waste
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MUCH gasoline is wasted every year by evaporation and spilling. Now a Chicago firm has introduced a new can designed to prevent this waste. It is fitted with a hinged spout cover, closed by a spring. This seals the spout the moment the pressure of the thumb on the lever is released, thus preventing evaporation and also loss by splashing out or spilling.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0134.xml
article
732
732
[no value]
[no value]
It Walks Through the Field, and Drags a Plow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE tractor here shown is a small, inexpensive one that can be used very profitably on farms of less than one-hundred acres. The little mechanical worker is only four feet high and three and a half feet wide, but it will plow four acres a day with a fuel consumption of less than two gallons an acre.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0135.xml
article
733
733
[no value]
[no value]
How Would You Like To Be in the Place of the Man in This Picture?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE spiderlike silhouette near the apex of the angle formed by the falling top and the majestic trunk of the magnificent Douglas fir in the center of the picture is that of a man, the logging foreman of a lumber company on Puget Sound. These giant firs are greatly needed for the keels, frames and other parts of the big wooden ships now building for the Government and are supplied almost exclusively by the forests of Washington and Oregon states.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0136.xml
article
733
733
[no value]
[no value]
Here Are Some War Breads You Have Never Known
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OWING to the shortage of wheat the powers that be have been experimenting to see whether satisfactory bread cannot be made from other cereals. They have come to the conclusion that they can— very much so. The chief grains which the researches have added to our food-stuffs are cottonseed meal, kafir corn, feterita, grain sorghums, and milo.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0137.xml
article
734
734
[no value]
[no value]
The College-Trained Elephant as a Circus Attraction
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“LADIES and gentlemen,” begins the official barker at a side show, “it is your privilege to see before you the only living college-trained elephant in captivity, engaged at an enormous expense by the manager of this incomparable aggregation of world-famous artists and animal shows!”
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0138.xml
article
734
734
[no value]
[no value]
Is a Compass Necessary? Not if You Have a Watch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WERE you ever out in the “wild,” carrying your map but without a compass? Your watch answers the purpose just as well. Disregard the minute hand altogether. Then note the arc that the hour hand makes with the noon of the day—not the midnight—and draw an imaginary line bisecting this arc.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0139.xml
article
735
735
[no value]
[no value]
Here, Now, Is the “Tappoon”— a Portable Flood-Gate
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
UNTIL very recently it has been the practice among ranchmen when irrigating a field to dam up the ditch with mud in order to make the water flow into the lateral ditches. Howard R. Wallace, a ranchman who lives near Long Beach, California, changed all this by devising a portable irrigation flood-gate.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0140.xml
article
735
735
[no value]
[no value]
Fish at Night with an Electric Light on Your Line
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the fishing fever has fastened upon him and is at its height, the enthusiastic angler would lengthen his day, if he could, to fully forty-eight hours. One ingenious American, probably spending anall-too-short vacation in the woods, devised a plan for illuminating the end of his line and thus tempting the fish to rise even on the darkest night.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0141.xml
article
736
736
[no value]
[no value]
Put the Tree in the Barn, Put the Cat Out, and Go to Bed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE'S no accounting for taste. Here is an instance where sooner than cut down a fine old tree a new barn was built around it, the trunk passing through the roof. Whether this is due to conservation or to sentiment we are not aware. It undoubtedly is a pity to cut down beautiful old trees, but just the same one would imagine that a tree in the barn would be, to say the least of it, inconvenient.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0142.xml
article
736
736
[no value]
[no value]
Ef Ye Cain't Shoot the Critters, Dynamite 'Em
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AVERY simple and cheap method of destroying wood-chuck burrows has been discovered by a farmer. He takes a stick about three-quarters of an inch thick and about ten feet long, and ties a stick of dynamite to the end, ready capped and with two feet of fuse.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0143.xml
article
736
736
[no value]
[no value]
The Battle of the Bath-Tub Fought with Toy Submarines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A TOY submarine that really runs under water has been recently put on the market. It is fifteen inches long and is constructed of wood and metal. As equipment it carries steering and diving planes, a deck gun, and a torpedo. The motive power is derived from elastic bands, and the boat will travel from twenty to forty feet under water, at any desired depth, either straight ahead or in a circle.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0144.xml
article
737
737
[no value]
[no value]
The Farm Tractor As an Aid in Road Building
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN Atkinson, New Hampshire, the farm tractor has been successfully used in making and repairing roads, doing away with horses. A twenty-horsepower tractor, as shown in the picture, was used in conjunction with the regulation road-machine for rounding off the surface of the road and cleaning out gutters.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0145.xml
article
737
737
[no value]
[no value]
Trapping the Wise Old Crow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SINCE time and experiment have proved that the average crow is perfectly able to decide whether or not an object in a field can handle a gun, traps to lure the bird are now being tried out. One of the most successful of these traps assumes the form of a nest fastened securely to the branches of trees, or to any convenient support in the locality to be protected.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0146.xml
article
738
738
[no value]
[no value]
A Fork and Spoon in One—Part of the Soldier's Kit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LIKE other mortals, soldiers and sailors, in training or on active duty at the front, must eat. It is not often that they object to the punctual fulfillment of this duty, provided the “grub” is fit. Uncle Sam sees to it that it is “fit” and that there is plenty of it.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0147.xml
article
738
738
[no value]
[no value]
Catching Fish Without the Use of Hook or Net
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE scarcity of meat and the consequently increased demand for sea food has made the whiting, which is also known in different parts of the Atlantic coast as “frost fish” and “silver hake,” extremely popular. This fish usually begins running along the New Jersey coast in November and remains until the following May.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0148.xml
article
738
738
[no value]
[no value]
A Baby-in-the-Tree-Top Hammock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE jingle about the baby in the tree top, which represents the height of juvenile comfort, might serve very well as an advertisement for the hammock illustrated. Made of open mesh which enables the air to circulate about the body, and equipped with a mosquito net and sun blind, it will accommodate a child up to four years of age.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0149.xml
article
739
739
[no value]
[no value]
Have You Weeds on Your Lawn? Kill Them With Gasoline
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE complete elimination of dandelions, rag-weed, quack grass, and troublesome weeds that grow on the lawn is made easy by a device that eliminates all back-breaking stooping. The instrument consists of a slender tube filled with a liquid and provided with a sharp point that is pushed into the heart of the weed; the liquid then automatically runs out, and the weed is killed beyond the power to grow again.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0150.xml
article
739
739
[no value]
[no value]
Efficiency Has Come to the Garden Rake
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
oNE day, Charles F. Reiter of Minneapolis, Minn., lost his patience when raking his lawn—and who wouldn't, when the leaves seemed to take extraordinary pleasure in sticking between the teeth of the rake. After Mr. Reiter had bent down and pulled the leaves out so many times that his back ached, he threw down the rake, went into his house and invented a temper-saving, backresting device which cleans the rake automatically.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0151.xml
article
740
740,741,742
[no value]
[no value]
Homes for War Workers
A new type of standardized dwelling which can be built by unskilled labor in two weeks
[no value]
[no value]
John Walker Harrington
WAR workers' dwellings may be built at about half the usual cost and in half the customary time by a novel method originated by Mr. Alfred C. Bossom, a New York architect, according to estimates submitted by him to the Council of National Defence.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0152.xml
article
742
742
[no value]
[no value]
Real Lights for the Automobiles in Motion Pictures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MR. LANGDON McCORMICK of New York thinks that the present motion picture representations of night scenes are not sufficiently realistic, especially in their lighting effects. It is his belief that representations of light on the screen, such as lamppost, automobile, and locomotive lamps, should be lights in reality, instead of pictorial representations.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0153.xml
article
743
743
[no value]
[no value]
Killing Bugs with Dust
This new way of exterminating insects in orchards is fast superseding the old spraying method
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT was formerly the custom to mix the poisons intended to kill orchard insects with water. A new method is now employed. The trees are dusted with the powdered mixture. The tremendous advantages of the dusting method, and its success in controlling the insect pests and diseases have led to its adoption by many growers of fruits, especially in New York.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0154.xml
article
744
744
[no value]
[no value]
A Safe Ladder Appears. You Can't Break Its Rungs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES J. BROWN, of River Falls, Wis., is the inventor of a new ladder which combines many advantages and novel features. His ladder is light yet strong, and its rungs, which are of metal, are so fastened to the wooden rails of the ladder, that the structure becomes perfectly rigid.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0155.xml
article
744
744
[no value]
[no value]
Chemicals and Machines Supplant Men In This War
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS is the most scientific war ever fought. There is less dependence on man-power and more on machinery than at any time in the history of the world. We pin our faith to high explosives, poison gases, tear shells, gas masks, liquid fire, etc., all of which are applied chemistry, and to machine guns, heavy artillery, automobiles, submarines, airplanes, and so forth, which are very much refined mechanics.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0156.xml
article
744
744
[no value]
[no value]
Place-Finding on Maps Is Made Easy by New Device
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE system of using index letters and numbers to enable one to find any spot on a map by referring to an index has been amplified by a device primarily designed for wall-maps, but could doubtless be adapted to smaller ones too. A rod slides along the top edge of the map and carries a movable indicator.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0157.xml
article
745
745
[no value]
[no value]
Warming Both Engine and Car Body
An apparatus that will keep you warm and avoid cracked cylinders too
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE problems of keeping the engine of an automobile warm during freezing weather so as to prevent cylinders from cracking, to make starting easy and to heat the body interior for comfort are solved by the combination engine and body heater shown in the accompanying illustrations.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0158.xml
article
745
745
[no value]
[no value]
German Tires are Filled with Rags
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RUBBER tires for automobiles are reported to be practically unobtainable in Germany and Austria and to give to the wheels some kind of protective elastic cushion, tire casings are stuffed with any material that affords some degree of resiliency, like cork, paper, rags, etc.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0159.xml
article
746
746
[no value]
[no value]
A Simple and Effective Heat-Economizing Stove
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT a recent exhibition of heating appliances in Paris, a simple heating stove of sheet iron was shown, which, it is claimed, greatly economizes heat and fuel. The stove is intended for burning vegetables, fuels of low heat value, such as wood, peat, sawdust, bark, etc.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0160.xml
article
746
746
[no value]
[no value]
Paint That Barn by Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MR. F. L. BENEDICT, of Baltimore, has perfected a device for spraying paint and distributing it over a surface by means of rotating brushes. The device consists, in its main features, of two rotating brushes with a space between them, sufficient for the paint to be sprayed on to the surface to be painted.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0161.xml
article
747
747
[no value]
[no value]
Tilting End-Pieces for Your Eye Glasses
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARE you one of those unfortunates who are compelled to go through life with spectacles before their eyes? If so, a clever little device recently patented, will be of interest to you. The device consists of a friction hinge connecting the end-pieces with the lenses in such a manner that by a slight turning of the frame of the glasses the lenses may be brought into any angle relative to the eyes and held in that position as long as it is desired.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0162.xml
article
747
747
[no value]
[no value]
Remarkable Photograph of an Actual Battle Scene
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most remarkable war photographs taken by the official photographer of the British army in France is reproduced in the accompanying picture from the excellent enlargement, eight by fifteen feet in size, which was recently placed upon exhibition.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0163.xml
article
748
748
[no value]
[no value]
The Traveling Brush-Burner. Orchardists Please Notice
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the simplest and yet the most convenient devices built for orchardists is the sheet-iron brush-burner built by Wm. Miller, of Gypsum, O. Mr. Miller had this constructed for use in his own orchards and therefore did not have it patented.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0164.xml
article
748
748
[no value]
[no value]
Static Electricity Drawn From Paper by Alternating Charge
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most annoying sources of trouble to printers is static electricity in the paper. It causes the sheets, during the process of printing, to adhere more or less firmly to the cylinder or the delivery mechanism of the press and to other sheets.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0165.xml
article
749
749
[no value]
[no value]
Here's the Way to Acquire Pickford Curls
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FEMININE hair is usually curled by “kid” curlers. That designation has no reference to the age of the young lady but to a type of construction involving kid leather wrapped about and sewn upon thin flexible metal rods. The leather rods are wrapped about strands of hair at night.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0166.xml
article
749
749
[no value]
[no value]
Los Angeles Values Her Trees and Conserves Them
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the city of Los Angeles recently cut North Broadway through Holgate Square there was a clump of fine old pepper trees directly in the path of the grading. So the city, rather than cut the trees down, built an “island” around them. An unusual feature of the island is an ornamental drinking fountain which was built for the purpose of supplying thirsty motorists and pedestrians with a refreshing draught of Adam's ale.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0167.xml
article
749
749
[no value]
[no value]
The Life of an Airplane Is Short
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE number of German airplanes destroyed by the French aviators and the members of the Lafayette escadrille for the ten months ending October, 1917, was one hundred and twenty over the French lines, and three hundred and ninety-seven over the German lines—all total wrecks.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0168.xml
article
750
750
[no value]
[no value]
Brick Manufacturers Find This a Great Labor Saver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE conveyor system illustrated in the pictures has been installed in many brick-yards in various parts of the country, and, as the owners of the yards willingly testify, has proved a valuable labor-saver. It is estimated that for a yard with a capacity of about 50,000 bricks the installation of this conveyor would mean a saving of four or five men.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0169.xml
article
750
750
[no value]
[no value]
Protecting the Aviator's Camera Bellows from the Wind
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TAKING photographs from an airplane with an ordinary folding pocket camera is utterly impossible if the leather bellows is not protected from the wind, as the aviators are exposed to the terrific draft created by the revolving blades. Add to this the breeze created by the machine flying along at ninety or one hundred miles an hour and you can see why, if an ordinary folding camera is unfolded in an airplane, the wind immediately flattens the leather bellows.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0170.xml
article
751
751
[no value]
[no value]
Some Do's and Don'ts for Automobilists
Economy is in the air these days. To automobilists this means saving fires, gasoline, oil, and everything else
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Don’t keep your engine racing and banging away when you are waiting for traffic to move Don’t adjust non-skid chains so loose that they fall off, nor so tight that they won’t take hold Don’t use chains on dry days to tear up the road-way; the Roads
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0171.xml
article
752
752
[no value]
[no value]
Transporting Oil Tanks Intact One Hundred Miles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO convey over a distance of one hundred miles three big oil-tanks weighing in the aggregate two hundred and ten tons, without taking them to pieces, was the novel engineering feat accomplished on Vancouver Island, by Mr. S. Doe, a Victoria contractor.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0172.xml
article
752
752
[no value]
[no value]
Have You Got Any Use for an Abandoned Locomotive?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ABOUT twenty-seven miles from Yuma, Arizona, a sorry looking locomotive has been abandoned in the Colorado Desert. The engine was left at a gravel pit, and a flood swept away most of the track between it and the main line. Inasmuch as the locomotive is worth but ten thousand dollars and the cost of rebuilding the track would be something like fifteen thousand dollars, it is obvious that it will not be reclaimed.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0173.xml
article
753
753
[no value]
[no value]
Handling Hot Firebricks with Asbestos Mittens
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN it becomes necessary to repair the firebrick arch in the fire-box of a locomotive the fire is knocked out and steam blown down to about half-gage pressure. Then the blower is turned on and a man enters the fire-box to make the necessary repairs.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0174.xml
article
753
753
[no value]
[no value]
Telephone and Telegraph Service in Argentina Held Up by Spiders
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DURING the dry season in Argentina a certain species of spiders' webs collects on the telephone and telegraph wires in enormous quantities. As soon as the sun sets they become soaked with dew and cause short circuits between the wires. Eleven pounds weight have been swept from four wires over a distance of six miles.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0175.xml
article
753
753
[no value]
[no value]
Leglessness Is No Drawback
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Frenchman is nothing if not ingenious. Here is a poilu's answer to the embarrassing question of how to do without legs. It consists of a kind of tricycle with very exaggerated handlebars, and a wicker seat, comfortably mounted on springs between the two back wheels, in place of a saddle.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0176.xml
article
754
754
[no value]
[no value]
Braking an Airplane While Flying
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BRAKING mechanism for airplanes has recently been introduced. This consists of two rectangular planes of small area, mounted on a shaft that runs along the rear edge of the main plane, and passes through the fuselage. The control is by means of a handwheel and connections, which act in conjunction with a hand-brake.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0177.xml
article
754
754
[no value]
[no value]
Even the Laumdrymen Are Affected by War Conditions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NOW it is the laundrymen's turn to feel the pinch of war conditions. They formerly used caustic potash in combination with soap for bleaching purposes. But now that potash is almost unobtainable, a good substitute has become necessary.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0178.xml
article
754
754
[no value]
[no value]
War Sees Return to Ancient Weapons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the remarkable features of the present world war is the revival of weapons, methods of attack and of defence which originated a long time ago. Trench warfare is nothing new, but merely a modern elaboration of one of the oldest methods of defence known.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0179.xml
article
755
755
[no value]
[no value]
As Flexible as India Rubber but Infinitely Stronger
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A WONDERFUL pipe-metal is now in use which seems to be able to stand any amount of rough usage. Our illustration depicts instances of torture to which it has been subjected without destruction. The section that looks like a piece of crumpled rag was in an Oklahoma oil well when it was “shot” with one hundred and seventy quarts of nitro-glycerin.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0180.xml
article
755
755
[no value]
[no value]
Lengthen Your Cast with the Mercury Fishing Line
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NOVEL improvement in fishing lines is one which is made half of mercury. The process by which it is prepared is one which makes the fibers of the line absorb a mercury compound. This compound is many times heavier than the fiber of the line itself, so that the finished fishing line will be considerably heavier, though of even less diameter, than the ordinary.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0181.xml
article
756
756,757
[no value]
[no value]
Picking Cotton with a Vacuum Cleaner
This machine does the work better, quicker, and without the waste of hand pickers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ACCORDING to Government figures, hundreds of millions of dollars are yearly wasted by the careless picking of cotton. In some cases 50% of the crop is left on the plants. That explains the two thousand patents for mechanical cotton pickers that have been taken out.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0182.xml
article
757
757
[no value]
[no value]
This Tree-House Is in Massachusetts, Not in Africa
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A MAN in Salem, Massachusetts, has built a playhouse in a tree for his children. It was given its lofty position in order to add novelty to its other attractions. An old tree with two branches extending straight out in two directions lent itself admirably to the purpose, but in order to make the location doubly secure, props were put under the limbs and a rod was run through the main branch of the tree and through the little house itself to the support in the rear.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0183.xml
article
758
758
[no value]
[no value]
Less Risk in Kerosene Than in Gasoline
But sand or sawdust should be kept near both of them as an extinguisher
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE vapors of gasoline as well as of kerosene, when undiluted or unmixed with air, burn after ignition gradually and without explosion, but explode with great force when mixed with air in certain proportions. In the case of gasoline there will be no explosion if less than 1.4 parts by volume of gasoline are contained in 100 parts of the mixture, or more than six parts.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0184.xml
article
759
759
[no value]
[no value]
No Race Suicide Among the Bacteria
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"BACTERIA reproduce with almost incredible rapidity," says George W. Hunter in “A Civic Biology” (American Book Company). It is estimated that a single bacterium, by a process of division called fission (dividing itself into two parts) will give rise to over 16,700,000 others in twenty-four hours.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0185.xml
article
759
759
[no value]
[no value]
War Provides an Expensive Clothes-Rack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE queer thing in the middle of the picture, which resembles a monster porcupine used as a clothes-rack, is the stump of a tree which grew “somewhere in France” until a German shell struck it and cut the trunk of the magnificent tree in two. The exploding shell splintered the wood in such a manner that the stump, with its radiating big splinters was used by the French soldiers encamped there as a rack upon which they hung their clothes and military equipment.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0186.xml
article
759
759
[no value]
[no value]
Army Horses Must Be Good-Tempered
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT'S a weary, wicked world if you are an army horse. You may or may not approve of shoes, but you've got to have them just the same. The French authorities have an ingenious contrivance which so pinions a horse that he has absolutely nothing to say in the matter.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0187.xml
article
760
760
[no value]
[no value]
Marking a Point on the Continental Dividing Range
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE big sign shown in the illustration was erected by the State of New Mexico to mark an interesting point of the continental divide. It stands near Corona, N. M., on the transcontinental highway, and attracts much attention from tourists traveling over that road.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0188.xml
article
760
760
[no value]
[no value]
One Man Handles Collapsible Form
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A REMARKABLY clever device has been placed on the market and promises to revolutionize the construction of concrete box culverts. It is a collapsible metal framework in sections, which forms the support of the wooden casing for the concrete.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0189.xml
article
761
761,762
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Birds Take Their Own Picture with an Electric Shutter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO take animal pictures in the open, the camera is placed where from previous observation the animal was frequently seen. If the animal in question is a bird, the camera is focused upon a nest, or a specially made bird-house or bird bath, which the bird has regularly visited for at least a few days.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0190.xml
article
763
763
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Holding a Board with the Weight of a Newspaper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AVERY singular experiment can be carried out with a board about 3 ft. long and a piece of paper. A newspaper will do. The board is placed on a table with one-third of its length projecting over the edge. Cover the part of the board that is on the table with the newspaper, then ask one of your friends what will happen if you give the projecting end of the board a sharp blow downward with the fist.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0191.xml
article
763
763
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Homemade Wrench for Turning Small Inaccessible Nuts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE little wrench shown in the illustration was made of an old foot pump handle. The parts being round it was only necessary to drill holes through the movable jaw and the adjusting clip then cut threads of the latter as well as on the handle for making the wrench complete. Two nuts hold the adjusting piece on the outer jaw end. This wrench is an excellent one to use when making repairs on an automobile because it turns small nuts placed in places that are otherwise INACCESSIBLE.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0192.xml
article
763
763,764
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Homemade Hectograph for Making Copies of Letters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERMAN NEUHAUS
A COPYING pad is indispensable to those who wish to make a limited number of copies of writings or drawings. One which is practical as well as inexpensive may be constructed in the following manner; Procure 1 oz. of the best gelatine; cover it well with cold water, and allow it to stand over-night, care being taken to see that all of it has swollen.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0193.xml
article
764
764
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Folding Bicycle Stand for the Home Shop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. D. GARFIELD
THIS bicycle stand not only forms a secure means for holding the “bike” in position when not in use, but also has proven itself of wonderful convenience during the arduous operations of cleaning, oiling, and tire inflating. The ease with which the rear wheel and crank shaft may be rotated to reach all parts of the sprockets and chain while the bicycle is maintained in its supported position, as shown in the illustration, make the device particularly useful, and as the stand folds, this removes the objection which its “set-up” bulk might occasion.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0194.xml
article
764
764
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Homemade Lifter for Gasoline Engine Valves
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
N. A. Dow
THE illustration shows a lifter made of metal modeled somewhat in the shape of a carpenter’s vise. The ends of the jaws are flattened into a wedge-shape and slotted to fit over the valve stem. With the spring between the jaws the screw clamp can be turned to compress it for removing the holding pin. Such a tool can be easily made by the home blacksmith.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0195.xml
article
765
765
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Do You Grow Roses? Here Is a Little Information
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE real secret of success in rose culture is watchfulness. The rose, more than any other plant, has enemies which, if given a chance, prey upon it and spoil its loveliness. Therefore, eternal vigilance is the price that must be paid for the rose garden.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0196.xml
article
766
766
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Reflex Attachment for Use on a Hand Camera
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN extremely simple focusing device which actually transforms the ordinary view camera into a reflecting camera, is made from card-board or ordinary box-board, and is readily secured to the camera by a stout rubber band, no other fastening being required.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0197.xml
article
766
766
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Fastening a Breather Cap Securely to Prevent Its Loss
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE breather cap on an automobile engine is very easily lost, especially when the car has been in use for a considerable length of time. This is due, in many cases, to the thread on the inside of the cap wearing out and losing its holding power.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0198.xml
article
766
766
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Spreading the Air Currents from a Desk Fan
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. G. PRATT
THE oscillating electric fan costs almost twice as much as the regular fan and the air currents from it are not steady and uniform, the breeze being driven first in one direction for a short time, immediately changing to another direction.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0199.xml
article
767
767,768,769,770
[no value]
[no value]
Open Canoe Cruising
II.—Description of the lateen rig and why it is best suited for the open canoe for cruising, sail-making, masts, etc.
[no value]
[no value]
E. T. Keyser
THE canoe lateen, when set, resembles a leg-of-mutton sail. Its advantages over the leg of mutton type are that it requires a shorter mast, needs no mast hoops, which are prone to jam, and that the peak sets far enough aft of the mast to give good driving power.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0200.xml
article
770
770
[no value]
[no value]
Freezing a Glass Tumbler to a Block of Wood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SELECT a small, planed block of hard wood and place upon it a few drops of water and then a glass tumbler having a smooth bottom. Pour about 1 in. of water into the tumbler and add powdered ammonium nitrate, stirring the mixture constantly. As the ammonium nitrate goes into solution, it absorbs heat, producing a low temperature which quickly freezes the tumbler fast to the block, so that the latter will not fall when the tumbler is lifted from the table.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0201.xml
article
771
771,772
[no value]
[no value]
Building a Model Airplane Kite
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. S. Zerbe
KITES and airplanes are associated in the mind of the present-day boy. The former came down to us from great antiquity; but the flying machine, as we know it, is of such recent origin that the wonder due to its performances has not yet abated. It is singular that the one great weakness in airplanes is lack of control—the inability to stabilize the floating device.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0202.xml
article
772
772
[no value]
[no value]
A Fine-Toothed Rake With Detachable Tooth-Holder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
FINDING the ordinary garden rake too coarse to use among the plants just appearing, I made a rake and used it where I could not handle a larger rake. The illustration clearly shows the whole construction. Wire nails placed as far apart as suitable. The tooth-holding section should have the tooth-holes bored out to prevent splitting when the teeth are driven in.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0203.xml
article
773
773
[no value]
[no value]
Cabbage Root Maggots and How to Control Them
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CABBAGE and related crops frequently suffer severe injury from the cabbage maggot. Young plants are most seriously affected, the maggots eroding the outer surface and boring into the interior of the roots, devouring the tender rootlets and frequently penetrating the lower portion of the stalk.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0204.xml
article
773
773
[no value]
[no value]
Cutting a Heater Pipe with a Can Opener
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
WHILE replacing some hot air heater pipe a householder found it necessary to cut off part of a section. Lacking a pair of tinner's shears, he used an ordinary can-opener in the manner shown. The starting cut was made with a chisel. The can opener, while cutting, also produced a nice, uniform flare, very convenient for the insertion of the end of another SECTION.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0205.xml
article
774
774
[no value]
[no value]
The Color of Gasoline Does Not Denote Its Quality
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT one time the refineries turned out yellow kerosene and gasoline and the methods used made the liquid some-what dangerous. For this reason, the public demanded a pure white gasoline. But the new cracking process produces a perfectly safe gasoline which has a slight yellowish tinge.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0206.xml
article
774
774
[no value]
[no value]
Converting a Porch Swing Into a Baby’s Bed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. A. FITZPATRICK
A PORCH swing can be easily converted into a cool, as well as a safe bed for the baby by attaching a swinging apron to the edge of the seat. The apron consists of a frame made the same size as the opening between the two arms of the swing and covered with wire screen.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0207.xml
article
774
774
[no value]
[no value]
Making a Lawn Leveling Tamper of Wood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK L. MATTES
TO make a handy tamper for leveling lawns, paths, etc., first procure a 12-ft. piece of 2 by 4-in. scantling, and a section of planking about 10 by 12 in. in size. From the scantling cut four pieces each about 10 in. long, four pieces about 12 in.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0208.xml
article
774
774
[no value]
[no value]
Removing Yellow Stains from Piano Keys
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PIANO keys, by use, will turn yellow. To restore the original whiteness, put 1 oz. of nitric acid in 12 oz. of soft water (pour the acid slowly into the water—do not reverse this or the acid will fly up into your eyes) and apply the liquid to the ivory with a brush, taking care that no acid gets on the woodwork.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0209.xml
article
775
775,776,777,778
[no value]
[no value]
Simple Designs for Sheet Metal Working
XII.—Interesting pattern problems developed by means of radial lines
Government Proportions for Graduating Liquid Measures
LIQUID MEASURES
FLARING PAILS
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
IN the last issue, one of the problems developed was the pattern for the hole in the shield of a hopper. The illustration Fig. 1 shows the method of developing the shield for a “jack pipe” or bath room ventilator pipe coming through a roof, (in the illustration the roof is drawn very small).
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0210.xml
article
778
778
[no value]
[no value]
Do Not Use Fuel Savers. Regulate Your Dampers Instead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN old fireman says, “Not one person in ten operates the draughts of his furnace properly or handles his coal to good advantage.” It will be found that the coal savers, of which there are many, are accompanied with a set of rules, which, if observed, without using the saver, would go a long way toward conserving fuel.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0211.xml
article
778
778
[no value]
[no value]
Bracing for Belt Guard to Cover Floor Countershaft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
A BELT guard frame to cover a floor countershaft was built of pipe and; fittings, with wire cloth stretched over them. This caused the two parts to be pulled together at the top. The braces to hold the upper parts at the right distance from one another were made of flat iron, 1¾ in.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0212.xml
article
778
778
[no value]
[no value]
Carrots Used as a Substitute for Eggs in Puddings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN these days of high prices, anything that can be used as a substitute, and give good results at the same time, will be a welcome addition in helping to keep down the high cost of living. Boiled carrots, when properly treated, form an excellent substitute for eggs in puddings, etc.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0213.xml
article
779
779
[no value]
[no value]
Here Is a Combination Fence and Lawn Sprinkler
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS W. BENSON
IRON pipe ¾ in. in diameter is extensively used for protecting the small grass spots between the sidewalk and the street curb, also between the sidewalk and the building, providing the space is not large. These plots are very difficult to keep watered in dry seasons.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0214.xml
article
779
779
[no value]
[no value]
Changing Ink Into Water. This Is Black Magic
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE performer introduces to the audience a glass or bowl of ink which is covered over for an instant by a lady's handkerchief, during which time it becomes changed to clear water. This trick can be performed with any sized glass from a miniature tumbler up to a large fish globe.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0215.xml
article
780
780
[no value]
[no value]
Arrangement of a Stenographer’s Desk for Accessibility
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AFTER receiving a large number of suggestions from various customers a typewriter firm has worked out an efficient and handy arrangement for a typewriter desk in which all of the various letter and bill heads as well as other supplies may be kept within reach of the stenographer.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0216.xml
article
780
780
[no value]
[no value]
Do You Want Your Tires to Last? Then Fill Up the Cuts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE service of tires will be abbreviated to a considerable extent, if cuts, punctures, and snags are neglected. Too much care cannot be exercised in avoiding injuries of this nature as much as possible or, at least, in giving them the proper attention within a reasonable period.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0217.xml
article
781
781,782
[no value]
[no value]
A Bucket Type Wind Motor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
O. B. Laurent
THE necessary power to drive small machinery in the repair shop may be obtained by the use of a wind-motor as shown. Such a motor may also be used to operate pumps and electric generators for charging storage batteries. The device is easy to construct and is inexpensive, the material being obtained from any hardware store.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0218.xml
article
782
782,783
[no value]
[no value]
Making an Adding and Subtracting Machine of Cardboard
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. P. THORNTON
IF our brains performed arithmetical labors in the same way that calculating machines do their work we should certainly have wheels in our heads, for circular motion is the basis of every practical calculating device. Since our system of numbers has ten for a basis almost all the engaging wheels of computing machines have teeth that are ten or a multiple of ten in number for convenience.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0219.xml
article
783
783
[no value]
[no value]
A Simple Sawdust Deflector for a Circular Saw Bench
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
TO do away with the confusing spray of dust which a circular saw throws up, particularly when cutting heavy lumber, a wheelwright made the adjustable sawdust deflector, shown in the illustration, to cover his circular saw. A length of narrow tire steel was bolted to an overhead beam and bent so as to bring it over to the saw as shown.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0220.xml
article
784
784
[no value]
[no value]
A Balancing Ladder for Use in the Home Gymnasium
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE balancing ladder was designed for indoor use. In making it care should be taken to have all the parts properly finished so that it will look neat, as well as give good service. The base consists of a frame made of 2 in. plank and when finished it forms a rectangle 30 by 48 in.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0221.xml
article
784
784
[no value]
[no value]
Mounting Photographs So That They Will Not Curl
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are very few amateur photographers who have not encountered the unpleasantness of pasting photographs on mounts and have them curl up, mount and all. The dry mounting method overcomes this difficulty, but one must have a hot iron.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0222.xml
article
785
785
Tricks of the Trade
[no value]
Homemade Power Tapping Machine for Rapid Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN L. ALLEN
AS it was necessary to tap several thousand ¼-in. holes in many cast iron fittings some means of driving the tap had to be provided. There was no tapping machine in the small shop, but the foreman was equal to the occasion and quickly made the tap driver shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0223.xml
article
785
785,786
[no value]
[no value]
A Homemade Bench Vise for Small Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
THE illustration shows a cheap and quickly-made small vise for the model maker. It is suitable for any medium and light work. The vise is made from two pieces of band iron 1½ in. wide and ⅜ in. thick, with the jaw A bent as shown and the jaw B cut straight, with two holes drilled in it.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0224.xml
article
786
786
[no value]
[no value]
An Easily Operated Clamp for Concrete Forms
[no value]
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K. M. COGGESHALL
MANY uses may be found for the clamp shown in the illustration. There are no screw threads to bother with and there is but one moving element. A contractor can have a number of these made by the local blacksmith or machine shop and use them in construction work of any character.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0225.xml
article
786
786
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A Receptacle for Holding Graphite in a Clean Way
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EVERYBODY knows how hard it is to pour graphite from any ordinary container without having it spill or come out too fast and make everything black. If the graphite is put in a discarded tooth-powder can (the kind with the regulating slot in the top) not only can its flow be regulated but it is kept clean and dry.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0226.xml
article
786
786
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[no value]
A Simple Homemade Sun Drier for Fruits and Vegetables
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SUN drying is undoubtedly the simplest and most inexpensive method of preparing fruits and vegetables for winter storing. A simple drier that can be made at small cost consists of a shallow box with a sash or piece of glass fitted over the top.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0227.xml
article
787
787
The Amateur -Electrician And Wireless Operator
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A Clip for Removing Insulation from Wires Quickly
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[no value]
PETER J. M. CLUTE
IN the accompanying sketch is shown a handy device for making the operation of removing the cotton or other insulation from electrical conductors easy and efficient. The clip is very simple to make as it merely consists of a piece of steel 1/16 in. thick and ¾ in. wide, bent into the required shape, as shown, then ground and tempered at the cutting edge.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0228.xml
article
787
787,788
The Amateur -Electrician And Wireless Operator
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A Depth Indicator for a House Water Tank
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THIS depth indicator was built to automatically gage the depth of water in a small house tank and was built entirely of odds and ends of the kind found about any work bench or household. A drum was made of a cylindrical piece of wood 2 in. in diameter furnished with two rims of cigar-box wood 2½ in. in diameter.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0229.xml
article
788
788
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A Combined Microphone and One-Way Telephone
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A SIMPLE, but fairly powerful microphone may be constructed by the amateur very inexpensively. It may also be used as a one-way telephone for experimental purposes. The base is constructed from white pine, and is 3 by 4½ by ⅝ in. The edges are beveled, and a groove is cut on the top to receive the sounding board.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0230.xml
article
788
788,789
[no value]
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Restoring Bichromate of Potash Used in Battery Solutions
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BICHROMATE of potash used in electric batteries can be restored so that it can be used over again. The bichromate of potash battery in whatever form, is one of the most powerful and handy electric batteries to use where high-voltage and large current are required for a short time, for general experimental work.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0231.xml
article
789
789,790
[no value]
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A Delicate Sound Amplifier for Telephone Receivers
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TWO Danish inventors have patented in this country an interesting sound amplifier for telephone receivers. Though sound amplifiers are not new, the simplicity of this particular instrument has much to recommend it. Youthful investigators along electrical lines may want to make one like it with a view to learning something about the attractive field of sound and sound amplification.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0232.xml
article
790
790
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Switchboard Constructed for Use in the Laboratory
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T. I. DEKLE
THE illustration shows a simple combination of switches that can be used to flow a current of electricity in different strengths for making tests in a laboratory. The switches can be connected with the ordinary commercial line carrying 110 volts.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0233.xml
article
790
790,791
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Alternating Current Charging Without Rectifier
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E. F. HALLOCK
IT is not absolutely necessary to have a rectifier with an alternating current for charging storage cells. Imagine that we have a 6-volt storage battery in need of charging and that the house mains provide current at 110 volts A. C. We hook in a bell transformer stepping down the voltage to nine volts as shown by the sketch, and then connect six ordinary dry-cells—new ones—in the secondary circuit, the dry cells being in series with the storage battery to be charged.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0234.xml
article
791
791
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Some Methods of Construction for Telephone Wires
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GEORGE M. PETERSEN
AT the right side of the illustration Fig. 1 is shown a way of running a rural line along the top of a fence, the line wires being carried on insulators secured to the top of the fence posts. In the main part of Fig. 1 is shown how the wires are carried past a gate, and in Fig. 3 is shown how the wires are fun through water-supply tunnels and large sewers; while Fig. 2 shows how large trees are sometimes used to support the wires and eliminate the cost of pole line construction.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0235.xml
article
792
792
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An Electrically Heated Inhaler for Respiratory Troubles
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SEVERAL home remedies for respiratory troubles are inhaled in the form of steam. The medicine is placed in boiling water, and the fumes are breathed through an inverted funnel. A much more satisfactory way of doing this, particularly at night, is to heat the fluid by electricity in the manner illustrated.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0236.xml
article
792
792
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Ignition Hookup for Use on Automobile Circuits
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PETER J. M. CLUTE
ELECTRICAL ignition systems are generally operated on low voltages from primary batteries, storage cells, or small low pressure generators. The seriesmultiple connection shown in Fig. 1 is generally used. If additional cross-connections are made, as illustrated in Fig. 2, it will be found that a loose connection in one series of cells will not render the entire series USELESS.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0237.xml
article
793
793,794,795
[no value]
[no value]
Electrical Devices and How They Work
V.—Principles of the induction coil and transformer
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Peter J. M. Clute
IF a coil of insulated wire is wound around an iron core, as shown in Fig. 1, and connected to a battery circuit, and if another coil is wrapped about the same core and its terminals connected to any current detector, as shown in the illustration, it will be found that when the key is closed, the deflection of the detector needle indicates a temporary current induced in one direction through the left coil.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0238.xml
article
795
795,796
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Here Is an Interesting and Artistic Electric Battery Tester
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THE battery tester shown is designed to show the condition of electric batteries and will indicate roughly the amount of energy left in any cell. It is very easily constructed, and if the work is carefully done, the instrument will make a handsome and useful addition to any amateur’s set of electrical appliances.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0239.xml
article
797
797,798,799
[no value]
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Wireless Work in Wartime
X.—The Non-Synchronous Gap Radio Transmitter
The Disk Rotary Gap
Non-Synchronous Operation
How the Condenser Discharge Time Is Varied
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John V. L. Hogan
HAVING taken up, in the previous article, the general operation of the spark gap and primary oscillation circuit of a typical radio sending station, further and more specific types of spark gap may now be considered. In the illustration Fig. 38, printed last month, was shown a simple fixed air-cooled gap; and the accompanying Fig. 39 shows a type of rotary spark gap which has had wide use.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0240.xml
article
799
799
[no value]
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How to Make an Efficient Weather-Proof Goose-Neck
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CHRIS. BACH
AVERY efficient weather-proof goose-neck wall bracket can be easily constructed as shown in the illustration. It consists of a piece of ½-in. conduit bent in the shape shown and fastened into the wall with a locknut. The outer end has a wood block or disk attached with a lock-nut and rubber gasket. On the under side of this disk is an inverted pie plate to which the lamp sockets are securely ATTACHED.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0241.xml
article
799
799
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A Temporary Repair for a Slipping Magneto Shaft
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P. P. AVERY
ABOUT the most annoying mishap a driver has to contend with on the road is that of a magneto shaft slipping endways so that the gears will be out of mesh. One cause of this trouble is the pump wheel shearing its pin and allowing the shaft to slip endways and out of mesh with the gears.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0242.xml
article
800
800
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Cleaning Spark-Plugs with Phonograph Needles
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PETER J. M. CLUTE
THE usual way to clean spark-plugs is to take them apart and scrub them with a brush after scraping them with a knife. An easier and quicker method is here described. Secure a small cylinder open at one end, into which is fitted a bushing with threads corresponding to those on the ends of the plugs.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0243.xml
article
800
800
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A Good Permanent Base for Small Battery Switches
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WALTER B. WEBER
NO doubt many an experimenter and many a student in an electrical school has had the misfortune to break the frail wood base of a battery switch. A switch made like the accompanying illustration will last almost indefinitely. Take a piece of ½-in. fiber, 2½-in. square and place it in the chuck of a small lathe, and recess the bottom 2 in. in diameter and ¼ in. deep, as shown in the sketch.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0244.xml
article
800
800
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This Lighthouse Sends Radio Fog Warning Far Out to Sea
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POINT JUDITH LIGHT, near Newport, R. I., is now equipped with a radiophone fog-warning machine. The words “Point Judith Light!” are repeated every five seconds and can be heard anywhere within a radius of about eight miles. After every third warning the words “You are getting closer; keep off!” are sent out.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0245.xml
article
800
800,801
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Opera Hat with Enclosed Electric Light for a Sign
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FROM a French inventor comes an advertising sign in which an opera hat is its housing. The sides of the hat are cut so that letters are removed that spell out the words of the sign. These letter holes are covered over with a thin light fabric of the same color as the hat.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0246.xml
article
802
802,803,804
[no value]
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Salvaging Ships Sunk by Submarines
Raising a Hull by Pumping a Buoyant Mixture Into It
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Salvage ships on the surface and section of sunken ship of usual cargo-carrying type below. Connection is made, extending through all three hatchways of the ship to its hold, by a flexible tube secured within another flexible tube and continued within a metal pipe coupled to the latter.
PopularScience_19180501_0092_005_0247.xml