Issue: 19180401

Monday, April 1, 1918
April, 1918
4
True
92
Friday, December 12, 2014

Articles
cover
483
483
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0001.xml
article
483
483
[no value]
[no value]
Fishing Airplanes from the Sky in Nets
An ingenious plan for catching enemy airplane pilots in nets of piano wire
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dientsbach
FOR many years the scientists of European and American weather bureaus have explored the atmosphere kites from which thermometers, barometers, recorders and wind-measurers are suspended. These instruments are like pens in the hands of the air; for the air writes down how hot and cold it is, how much it weighs, how fast it is moving, and how wet it is.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0002.xml
article
484
484
[no value]
[no value]
Consider Joe's Non-Skid Shoes. They're Made of an Old Tire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FURNACE CANYON IS on the edge of the desert, miles from civilization. When Joe Boucek and his three partners were bitten by the Gold Bug about twelve years ago, they began to look around for the most forbidding piece of country in which to prospect.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0003.xml
article
484
484
[no value]
[no value]
Utah Kills Four Thousand Rabbits at a Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN southern Utah the jack rabbits are so numerous that ’they amount to a veritable pest. “Drives” are held two or three times each winter to capture them. The rabbits are driven into corrals and then killed with clubs. Three or four thousand rabbits are shown in the accompanying picture.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0004.xml
article
485
485
[no value]
[no value]
The "Goofa" Is Now a Modern SideWheel Ferryboat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OVER on the River Tigris in Mesopotamia (Eastern Arabia) English soldiers are having unusual experiences in adapting ancient utilities to modern uses. One of the first institutions to receive their attention has been the venerable “goofas,” or ferryboats, which natives have used un - changed for thousands of years.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0005.xml
article
485
485
[no value]
[no value]
Camouflaged Observation Towers Used in Flanders
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN low, marshy Belgium, half flooded as it now is to interrupt the course of the Germans, there is almost no natural cover for observation posts. Camouflage is a necessity. The two observation posts, here illustrated, were erected about a mile and a half behind the front lines, one at an eminence of sixty feet, the other three feet lower.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0006.xml
article
486
486
[no value]
[no value]
How the British Hauled Their Giant Guns to the Flanders Front
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE transportation of one of the enormous guns used in the present war is a task which presents great mechanical difficulties. The weight of the guns and their great length make even their transportation by railroad anything but a simple matter.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0007.xml
article
486
486
[no value]
[no value]
She Weighs One Hundred and Twentysix Pounds, But the Paper Held
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE athletic girl in the picture, Miss Lorna E. Stewart, of Kalamazoo, Mich., is not a motion picture star doing some hair-raising melodramatic “stunt.” She is merely testing the tensile strength of a certain kind of parchment paper by suspending her weight of one hundred and twenty-six pounds from a loop made from a threeinch strip of that paper.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0008.xml
article
487
487
[no value]
[no value]
Listen to the Nose Flute of the Untutored Filipino
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is not an uncommon spectacle to see a colored man play a harmonica with his nostrils. When it is done, however, it always awakens a certain degree of wonder. Among the Filipinos a flute is never played in any other way, and it would create as much surprise in that country to see a man play a flute with his mouth.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0009.xml
article
487
487
[no value]
[no value]
Traveling in the Oilfields with a Possible Earthquake
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RIDING over rough country roads in a spring wagon loaded with nitroglycerin is an occupation that is not likely to appeal to the average man, yet there are those who make it their business to carry explosives and who become so accustomed to the hazardous work, that they scarcely give a thought to the risk of traveling, so to speak, with a potential earthquake.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0010.xml
article
487
487
[no value]
[no value]
Electric Blasting Without Blasting Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE safest and most convenient way of firing charges in blasting is by using the electric spark, and blasting machines for generating the required spark are in general use wherever blasting operations are carried on. Farmers, who often have occasion to do blasting of stumps, rocks, etc.,
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0011.xml
article
488
488
[no value]
[no value]
Off the Paths of WellBeaten Tourist Travel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0012.xml
article
489
489
[no value]
[no value]
Scenes One Finds "Way Out at Back of Beyond"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0013.xml
article
490
490
[no value]
[no value]
Raising Money for the Red Cross
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0014.xml
article
491
491
[no value]
[no value]
Still Other Methods of "Getting It"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0015.xml
article
492
492
[no value]
[no value]
Woman-Power Takes the Place of Man-Power
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0016.xml
article
493
493
[no value]
[no value]
Electrical Eavesdtopping by the Signal Corps of the United States Army
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0017.xml
article
494
494,495
[no value]
[no value]
Where "distance lends enchantment to the view." Here is a group of interesting examples of the fine art of war camouflage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0018.xml
article
496
496,497
[no value]
[no value]
The Seductive Cigar-Evolution from Leaf ette in the Making. Its to Finished Product
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0019.xml
article
498
498
[no value]
[no value]
New York's Food Scouts Commence Experiments
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0020.xml
article
499
499
[no value]
[no value]
The Passing of New York's Coroner's Office
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0021.xml
article
500
500,501
[no value]
[no value]
The Girl Brickmakers, at Peterborough, England
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0022.xml
article
502
502
[no value]
[no value]
No Rest for the Oyster Even in Peaceful Winter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0023.xml
article
503
503
[no value]
[no value]
Shelter Bridges on the Line Near Dixmude
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0024.xml
article
504
504
[no value]
[no value]
Teaching High School Pupils How to Read the Meters
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE indicators of gas and electric meters are no longer mysteries to pupils attending the Woodward High School in Cincinnati. Pupils of the school have constructed large duplicates of the gas and electric meter dials. By the aid of strings attached to the mechanism of the dials, gas and electric consumption readings are indicated at the will of the teacher.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0025.xml
article
504
504
[no value]
[no value]
Safety Bottle in Which to Keep Poisons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
QUICK, a little medicine, sister has fainted!” Many a time at night the cry has thrown the whole household into confusion and excitement. Some member of the family rushes to the medicine cupboard, seizes the bottle standing in the place that had always been reserved for the medicinal brandy and takes it to the sickroom.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0026.xml
article
504
504
[no value]
[no value]
We Are Now Growing Our Own Camphor in Florida
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE first and only bearing camphor plantation of any size in this country is located at Satsuma, Fla. It contains over 2,000 acres of camphor trees which last year yielded over 10,000 pounds of crude camphor. This year it is expected that the yield will be many times this amount.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0027.xml
article
505
505
[no value]
[no value]
Sea-Gulls Betray the Presence of Submarine Raiders
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD H. FORBUSH, the state Ornithologist of Massachusetts, advocates the protection of the sea gulls, because they are useful in detecting and betraying the presence of submarines. The gulls follow in the wake of submarines to pick up their refuse, and thus betray the presence of the U-boat to the watching aviators.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0028.xml
article
505
505
[no value]
[no value]
Anything to Attract Attention-The Masked Sign Girl
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SINCE the suffragettes have paraded and walked the streets in small groups carrying flaring banners, no one ought to shrink from being the ham in a signsandwich; And yet we have some presuffragette conservatism left. We say so, because the shy Miss shown in the illustration hides her charms behind a black silk mask.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0029.xml
article
505
505
[no value]
[no value]
Great Catherine Is Veiled But Not Destroyed by Revolutionists
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IMPERIALISM and its autocratic rule have been dethroned in Russia and slowly, but surely, liberty and order evolve from political chaos by the leaders of the revolutionary factions. There are still a great many things to adjust and the completion of the task will require decades of hard work.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0030.xml
article
506
506
[no value]
[no value]
Our Artillery Shoots at Curling Smoke for Practice
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"SOMEWHERE in the United States” our artillerymen are practising. They have to have something to shoot at. Recently ingenious soldiers rigged up the apparatus shown in the accompanying illustration. It consists of a long pole at the end of which is a container for holding two ounces of black powder.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0031.xml
article
506
506
[no value]
[no value]
It's Beginning to Rain, So Bans! Goes the Window
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN automatic device which takes care of the windows of a house or apartment, and closes them when it begins to rain, has been perfected by L. M. Phelps of Philadelphia. It is quite automatic and its action is said to be positive. In his device a loop lever, connected with a stationary rod attached as a permanent fixture to the lower corner of the upper window sash, is held in position by a narrow strip of blotting paper.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0032.xml
article
507
507
[no value]
[no value]
Introducing the Moropus
Nature mixed up a horse, a rhinoceros and a giraffe and obtained-a moropus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ACENTURY ago, Cuvier, the great French scientist, in laying down what is now known as his “Law of Correlation,” stated that horns and hoofs distinguished only vegetarian animals. Claws belonged to flesh eaters, according to his law, and no animal which subsisted on a meat diet had hoofs.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0033.xml
article
508
508,509,510,511
[no value]
[no value]
The Eyes in the Air
All aboard for a reconnaissance flight over the German lines
What’s That Cloud of Dust?
Camouflage or a Battery—Which?
What the Observer Looks For in Army Reconnaissance
[no value]
[no value]
Aviator Henry Bruno
IN the British Flying Corps there are two kinds of air reconnaissance work— Corps and Army. Corps reconnaissance is carried out by a single airplane and army reconnaissance by squadrons of machines numbering not less than five and as many as thirty.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0034.xml
article
511
511
[no value]
[no value]
Food Animals Killed on One Railroad in a Year Would Feed 70,000 Soldiers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
APLACARD posted on the premises of a certain railroad which runs through the Cotton Belt states that during the twelve months ending June, 1917, 2,792 head of cattle, horses and sheep were killed by the trains. This is the equivalent of one million pounds of food, and would be sufficient to feed seventy thousand soldiers for thirty days.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0035.xml
article
512
512,513
[no value]
[no value]
Submersible Forts to Protect Our Coast
They are conceived as anchored, floating turrets, capable of discharging torpedoes at the enemy’s ships
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is a short time before sunrise. The sea is fairly calm and reflects in undulating patches the gorgeous colors of the sky already visible in the East. The rhythmic sound of a whirling propeller is faintly audible. It is still far away, but approaching rapidly.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0036.xml
article
513
513
[no value]
[no value]
Italian War Dogs Are Well Cared For and Well Trained
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DOGS, at least some dogs, have proved themselves so valuable for military purposes during the present war, that they have been added to the equipment of every army engaged in the struggle. The main purpose for which they are used is the finding of wounded soldiers after an engagement or skirmish in difficult territory, so that they may be carried to the field hospitals immediately behind the lines without delay.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0037.xml
article
514
514,515,516
[no value]
[no value]
Hiding Ships with Paint
How protective coloring causes Fritz much waste of torpedoes. It is camouflage at its best
Mimicry on the High Seas
[no value]
[no value]
Robert G. Skerrett
THE gun afloat, whether upon a naval craft or an armed merchantman, drives the submarine to cover beneath the waves when it approaches its prey close enough to discharge the torpedo. The U-boat commander must, therefore, keep track of his moving target.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0038.xml
article
516
516
[no value]
[no value]
Save Gasoline With This Device for Controlling Engine Temperature
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GASOLINE is not what it was five years ago. It is becoming heavier, so that it is more and more important to control engine temperatures automatically. Otherwise the fuel will not be properly vaporized and gasoline will condense in the manifolds and cylinders and destroy the greasing properties of the lubricating oil.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0039.xml
article
517
517
[no value]
[no value]
The Tick Was the First Insect Disease-Carrier to be Caught
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARSENIC treatment and starvation are gradually destroying the fevertick which has been such a cattle-pest in the southern states. The tick, however, has served a useful purpose. When the Bureau of Animal Industry, of the Department of Agriculture, discovered that this little insect carried disease germs from one animal to another, it was the first step which led to our preventive sanitation, which is putting an end to mosquitoes, house flies, rat-fleas and other disease-carrying parasitic insects.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0040.xml
article
517
517
[no value]
[no value]
Wrapping Taffy by Machine at the Summer Resorts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW many times at the beaches or other summer resorts have you seen girls, and even men, wrapping the famous salt water taffy, kisses, chocolates and other candies? But times have changed, and munitions are more important than candies. Our manpower and womanpower must be conserved.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0041.xml
article
517
517
[no value]
[no value]
Chicago Elks Install a Bronze Memorial Book
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE magnificent bronze memorial book shown in the picture was recently completed by Mr. Robert C. Lafferty for the Chicago Lodge of Elks, No. 4. It stands five feet high and the fourteen pages of it will give space for twenty-one hundred names.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0042.xml
article
518
518,519,520
[no value]
[no value]
Dropping Death from the Skies
The bomb dropper and his murderous winged weapons which deal quick and ghastly death
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
HARDLY had the airplane been adopted as a military weapon some four years before the outbreak of the great European war, when the possibilities of bomb dropping began to be considered. To the general public at least, it seemed easy to wipe out a fort, to demolish a bridge, or to blow up a battleship by the simple expedient of dropping on it a hundred pounds of high explosive.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0043.xml
article
521
521
[no value]
[no value]
A Bazooka Is a Musical Wimwam
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THINGS are not what they seem. This observation of Longfellow’s is borne out by the mysterious looking instrument in the hands of the soldier boy in our picture. It may look to you like a cross between a plumber’s sign and an opium pipe or almost anything else, but it isn’t.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0044.xml
article
521
521
[no value]
[no value]
Even in Turning a Corner the Brakes on the Rear Wheel Take Hold
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you have miraculously escaped injury in a skidding automobile on a slippery pavement, you can readily understand why the rear wheels of a motor truck semi-trailer should have been provided long ago with some form of brakes controlled from the driver’s seat.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0045.xml
article
522
522,523
[no value]
[no value]
Simple Inventions to Make Housekeeping Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0046.xml
article
524
524,525,526,527
[no value]
[no value]
King Weather Rules the War
In spite of all improvements in military art, the elements are absolutely supreme
“Mud Is the Greatest Enemy of the British Army”
They Licked the Moisture on Water Bags—It Was So Hot
A Frozen Fleet Captured by Cavalry
Making a Soldier of the Weather Man
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LAST October a fleet of thirteen Zeppelins left Germany for an air raid over England. These huge and relatively slow craft are at the mercy of the winds to a much greater degree than the small, swift airplanes, and their sailings are nearly always timed by the meteorological conditions present and prospective.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0047.xml
article
527
527
[no value]
[no value]
A Salesman Who Talks to Himself Instead of to You
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOUR money back, ladies, if this furniture polish is not exactly as I claim it to be. “That’s what I said—your money cheerfully refunded if you fail to find this polish the greatest labor-saving— “Look here, mister—you sold me a bottle of that polish last week and I am not at all pleased with it.”
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0048.xml
article
528
528
[no value]
[no value]
Now Appears the Elephant of the Air
The reason for the queer shapes of captive balloons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GUY FAWKES’ Day in England is a holiday which remotely resembles our Fourth of July—a day celebrated to mark the thwarting of a conspiracy. It was the custom to send up on Guy Fawkes’ Day balloons which were effigies of the conspirators. There were also balloons, sent up at county fairs, shaped like pigs and cows.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0049.xml
article
529
529
[no value]
[no value]
Using Minstrels to Sell Automobiles
This is where the oldtime patent medicine quack is completely outquacked
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOUR probably grandfather remembers the traveling patent-medicine “doctor” and his concert wagon. The “doctor” and his artists would locate themselves at some strategic point and after a few songs and perhaps a buck-and-wing dance, would draw a crowd of several hundred people to view the free show.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0050.xml
article
530
530,531,532,533,534,535,536
[no value]
[no value]
Our Annual Coal Drama
Each winter we have a coal shortage. What causes the trouble? Can we cure it?
If Coal Went Over Niagara
What One Railroad Has Done
Prospects for Betterment
Future of Our Coal Situation
[no value]
[no value]
Lloyd E. Darling
WE’VE had a coal shortage this winter—a severe coal shortage. Railroads have been tied up, people have suffered, legal holidays have been declared, troubles of all kinds have developed. Certainly all our troubles are not due to the war alone.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0051.xml
article
537
537
[no value]
[no value]
If You Don't Smell All Right in a Bee-Hive, You're Kicked Out
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL bees smell alike to average mortais, but Dr. N. E. Mclndoo, whose book, “Recognition Among Insects,” has recently been published by the Smithsonian Institution, has trained his nose until he can recognize the three castes of bees—queens, drones and workers—merely by smelling them.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0052.xml
article
537
537
[no value]
[no value]
A Noose Used Not for Hanging But for Life-Saving
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JUST escaped, perhaps, from danger, the half-dazed fire victim often finds descent all but impossible. To make this descent safer, Hulda E. Astarita, of Brooklyn, NewYork,has patented a new device. It is a simple, swinglike seat with a footboard attachment.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0053.xml
article
537
537
[no value]
[no value]
Turn Your Coat Tails Into Trousers for Free Movement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE new coat shown in our illustration affords closer protection for the legs, inasmuch as it can be buttoned tightly around them. This arrangement prevents the flapping of the tails of the coat and makes walking or even running much easier.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0054.xml
article
538
538,539,540,541
[no value]
[no value]
Browning, the Gun Wizard
Old John Browning has produced the finest machine guns for our army ever invented
Who Is Browning?
Browning’s Three Wonderful New Machine Guns
Browning’s Airplane Gun
[no value]
[no value]
Edward C. Crossman
AMERICA has finer guns in the Brownmg light and heavy type than any nation now at war. While the members of Congressional military committees vapored and fumed that blue print guns never killed an enemy, and that the unknown Browning gun was an experiment and a doubtful experiment, the officers in the Bureau of Ordnance and the great Browning smiled quietly.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0055.xml
article
542
542
[no value]
[no value]
Why Not Do It with Tools and Machinery?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0056.xml
article
543
543
[no value]
[no value]
Little Helps for the Office Workman
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0057.xml
article
544
544,545
[no value]
[no value]
Boxes of Air to Foil the Torpedo
William T. Donnelly’s ingenious method of making cargo-carrying ships unsinkable
The Boxes and What They Do
Cargo Space Is Not Reduced Much
[no value]
[no value]
Robert G. Skerrett
THE steamship Lucia is unsinkable. At least, such is the opinion of William T. Donneily, a consulting engineer of New York city and a member of the Ship Protection Committee of the United States Shipping Board. Indeed, this belief is shared by his associates on the Board, and for that reason Mr. Donnelly’s special system has been installed upon the ship in question.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0058.xml
article
546
546,547,548
[no value]
[no value]
Hooverizing Daylight
Not advocating a bedless day, but suggesting the readjustment of hours
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE project of advancing the clock in summer in order to persuade slothful humanity to keep early hours at that season, after nearly a decade of unsuccess in getting itself taken seriously, has suddenly come to fruition under the stress of war conditions, and is an accomplished fact over the greater part of the civilized world.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0059.xml
article
548
548
[no value]
[no value]
Electricity Makes the Winding of Bandages Easier
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is only fit that electricity, which is so widely used as an aid in the destructive work of the war should also contribute its share to the efforts of healing the wounds caused by the war. An electrical contrivance shown in the picture, is now used in the workshops of the Red Cross for expediting the formerly slow and laborious work of winding bandages.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0060.xml
article
549
549
[no value]
[no value]
Sample House in a Suit Case for Real Estate Drummers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE drummer or traveling salesman with his indispensable sample case containing specimens of the goods he is trying to sell is a familiar figure everywhere in this country. There are many kinds of salesmen on the road. Some sell dry goods, some offer goods that are not so dry, others sell hardware, groceries, cigars or other merchandise.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0061.xml
article
549
549
[no value]
[no value]
Will You Give the Navy An Eye? They Want `Em Badly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Navy Department in Washington has issued an urgent appeal to all citizens owning binoculars, spy-glasses or telescopes to place these instruments at the disposal of the Government. The Navy is still in great need of such optical instruments.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0062.xml
article
550
550,551
[no value]
[no value]
Prizes for Labor-Saving Automobile Improvements
$100 for the best labor-saver and $50 for the next best. Read these rules
Rules Governing the Contest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MORE than four million Americans own automobiles. Most of these owners run their own cars and make their own repairs. Many of them have undoubtedly invented ingenious attachments about which others would like to know, and some have unquestionably made improvements about which the great automobile manufacturers would like to know.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0063.xml
article
552
552
[no value]
[no value]
Remember That Old Checkered Bedroom Linoleum?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the United States entered the war and hundreds of thousands of young men were drafted into the service of their country many questions arose which had to be solved. The problem of equipping, housing, arming and training the young soldiers and of feeding them in the camps and training quarters and later at the war front, devolved upon the government.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0064.xml
article
552
552
[no value]
[no value]
Inflicting Pain to Resuscitate Victims of Electric Shock
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO the uninitiated, the treatment which a workman suffering from an electric shock receives at the hands of his co-workers is inhuman and brutal. When a lineman, for instance, stringing primary wires, has received a shock, which caused him to lose his balance and fall to the ground apparently lifeless, the first thing his working mates do is to take firm hold of the ankles of the limp body, raise it until the entire weight rests upon the back of the neck and then let it drop again.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0065.xml
article
552
552
[no value]
[no value]
We Shall Eat When We Grow Old and Lose Our Teeth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROGRESS in dental science clearly indicates that we shall be enabled to masticate food in old age more readily than our forefathers could. Inventors are attacking - the problem in various ways, and in some recent experiments the attempt is made to imitate nature by hinging the upper and lower mouth plates in the manner shown.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0066.xml
article
553
553
[no value]
[no value]
Oh, Henry-What Makes Them Go `Round?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PRETTY young girls passing store windows in which a new advertising contrivance is being displayed have asked that question; old people have asked it; everybody asks it. It gets attention from all sides. The machine recently patented by H. J. Herberts, consists simply of a polished cylinder mounted in an upright position, and resembling a restaurant coffee urn in size and general appearance.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0067.xml
article
553
553
[no value]
[no value]
Have You a Supermind? If So, You Can Define These Words
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. LEWIS M. TERMAN, professor of education in Leland University, has introduced a new intelligence test which is said to give good results. The words in the accompanying list were selected at random from the dictionary and arranged according to their approximate difficulty.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0068.xml
article
554
554
[no value]
[no value]
Moving X-Ray Pictures
See your joints move and your heart beat on the screen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MOTION intense radiography, intere t, both a to subject the proof fessional world and to the laity, has been unsuccessfully attempted for the past eight years. Scientists, with the aid of the fluoroscope, have been able to see the inner working of the human body.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0069.xml
article
555
555
[no value]
[no value]
The Forest Skyscrapers of Australia
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE tallest of California’s “big trees” is 325 feet in height, but among the great gum trees of Australia many specimens are more than 400 feet in height, and one, which was felled in southeast Australia, measured 471 feet—the tallest tree on record.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0070.xml
article
555
555
[no value]
[no value]
A Motorcycle as a Vibrationless Tripod
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BREATHES there the photographer who has not at some time or other “lost his religion” because the wind has shaken his tripod and spoiled a plate? John Edwin Hodd, a Los Angeles press photographer who uses a motorcycle for getting about, has overcome this difficulty so far as exterior views are concerned, by the use of a universal jointed kodak fastening attached to the handle bar of his machine.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0071.xml
article
555
555
[no value]
[no value]
Sirens Give Warning of the Ap proach of Raiders
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the French cities warning of German air raiders is given by sirens of different construction, some electric, others worked by compressed air or steam. The sound of these sirens is so powerful and penetrating that it can be heard for miles even under unfavorable conditions.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0072.xml
article
556
556,557,558
[no value]
[no value]
Why Tanks Are Giant Caterpillars
Armor? The Caterpillar has it. Traveling treads? The Caterpillar has them too. Machine guns? It has a poison squirt-gun
[no value]
[no value]
John Walker Harrington
THE motion of the most formidable and terrifying of modern war machines has often been compared with that of the lowly larva from which comes the radiant butterfly. This famed cruiser of the battlefields might never have been, but for the invention of the farm tractor of Benjamin Holt with its caterpillar tread.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0073.xml
article
559
559
[no value]
[no value]
How to Keep the Moislure in Cheese
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHEESE stale and would dry so not quickly get if proper care were taken of it as soon as it comes into the kitchen. If a whole cheese is bought at one time, after the first slice has been taken out of it, the fiat side of a warm knife should be rubbed over the cut surface.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0074.xml
article
559
559
[no value]
[no value]
"Stretching" a Pound of Butter to Make Two Pounds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO pounds of good table butter out of one pound and a pint of milk? Yes, it’s done. The churn which performs the feat was recently placed upon the market. It is square in shape and heavy of glass, and the churning mechanism, entirely of metal, is attached to the glass churn by a metal screw cap.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0075.xml
article
559
559
[no value]
[no value]
They Carried Stoves in Their Arms And Kept From Freezing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THEY sat huddled up together, four chorus-girls, in a freezingly cold New York street-car on one of the days that New York shivered and wondered whether it would ever be warm again. Each girl held in her hands what looked like an ovalshaped can wrapped in some fabric.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0076.xml
article
560
560
[no value]
[no value]
Trinkets and Jewels-Into the Melting Pot to Help Win the War
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the aviation committee of the National Special Aid Society, decided to raise a fund for the benefit of the aviation branch of the American army, the chairman of the committee, Mrs. William A. Bartlett, adopted a novel method for accomplishing the purpose.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0077.xml
article
560
560
[no value]
[no value]
Carry a Stove in Your Pocket and Keep Warm
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Japanese pocket stove has made its way around the world. It consists merely of a metal box with a sliding lid, and covered with cloth. The unique feature of the stove is the fuel, which is sold in the form of sausagelike rolls. These will burn for about three hours without giving off any smoke or fumes.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0078.xml
article
561
561
[no value]
[no value]
Starting the Kerosene Car from the Kitchen Range
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most unusual devices yet invented for heating kerosene fuel when an automobile using such fuel is to be started, consists of a rectangular metal block with holes punched through it.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0079.xml
article
561
561
[no value]
[no value]
The Aerautomotricycle - a Weird Machine Made by a Doctor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR a cool spin on a hot afternoon, the vehicle shown herewith has conspicuous merits. The propeller in front secures an effective and bracing air bath for the driver.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0080.xml
article
562
562,563,564,565,566,567
[no value]
[no value]
Dealing Death with Depth-Bombs
How depth-bombs and new sea tactics are foiling the submarines
Wherein One Submarine Succumbs
Depth-Bombs Are of Many Kinds
Airplanes Use Depth-Bomb
[no value]
[no value]
Lloyd E. Darling
WHAT is the reason submarines have occupied less and less of the limelight recently? How does it happen that their ferocity has proven not so unconquerable as at first thought? It’s a good old American reason—pluck and inventive genius. We should announce at the beginning that the tactics of American destroyers operating in the submarine zone are just the opposite of what has been current practice.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0081.xml
article
567
567
[no value]
[no value]
The War Hath Slain Its Millions, but the Nursery Its Ten-Millions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHO is the safer, a soldier in a Flanders trench, or a baby in an American cradle? Statistics would seem to show that the soldier has much the better chance of living to a green old age. The statement recently made by Secretary of War Baker, and the statistics published by the Prudential Insurance Company of England, both agree that the mortality among the men at the front is just about twenty out of a thousandtwo per cent.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0082.xml
article
568
568
[no value]
[no value]
It Eats Nickels and Dimes and Counts 'Em Too at the Same Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW fare register is being used at subway stations and various other places. It does away with the selling of tickets. The passenger drops his coin into the hopper. It passes on to a revolving drum, and then to a revolving pan having three holes in it.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0083.xml
article
568
568
[no value]
[no value]
Loosening all the Lugs of a Demountable Rim at Once
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you own an automobile you know just what it means to have a tire puncture. You have to unbolt each clamping lug in order to remove the rim and then adjust and tighten each into position when the rim is replaced. If you have six bolts to unscrew and then tighten, each one takes you about two minutes—a total of twelve minutes.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0084.xml
article
569
569
[no value]
[no value]
This Regulator Will Keep Your Apparatus at a Constant Temperature
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN fractional distillation and other chemical operations it is often necessary to keep the material which is being used at a constant temperature for many hours, or even days. This is particularly difficult when electricity is used as the source of heat.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0085.xml
article
569
569
[no value]
[no value]
Helping to Make Los Angeles a Spotlessly Clean Town
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Los ANGELES is on display to expectant tourists so many months of the year that she must always be dressed for company. One man is employed exclusively to paint the water hydrants. This single little item in keeping the city well groomed requires, besides the services of a painter, a specially built buggy in which the necessary equipment is carried in a neat box behind the seat.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0086.xml
article
570
570,571
[no value]
[no value]
Conveniences Which Will Ease the Lot of the Automobile Owner and Driver in Both Work and Pleasure
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0087.xml
article
572
572
[no value]
[no value]
Conquering the Poles by Airplane
Shall we be able to skim to the north pole by airplane? Read Admiral Peary’s prediction
Arctic and Antarctic Are Unlike
Greenland Is Buried in Snow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“IN the very near future,” says RearAdmiral Robert E. Peary in a new book, “Secrets of Polar Travel” (Century Company), “the biting air above both the earth’s poles will be stirred by whirring airplane propellers. The last three years of war abroad have advanced the development of the airplane to such a degree that the time is now very near when airplanes will have such extended radius of flight as will make the preliminary reconnaissance of the unknown areas in the north and south polar regions a matter of a few weeks instead of several years.”
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0088.xml
article
573
573
[no value]
[no value]
When Airplanes Whizz Over the Pole
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0089.xml
article
574
574
[no value]
[no value]
A Phonograph for Lazy People. It Changes Its Own Records
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GLORIFIED phonograph has been patented by a young man in California. His phonograph will do everything but go out into the dining-room and mix a cocktail when the music is over. Harry Scott, the inventor, gives the fruit of eight painstaking years to indolent humanity.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0090.xml
article
574
574
[no value]
[no value]
The Desert Dry? Read This
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WOULD you believe that the air in an average schoolroom is drier than the air in the deserts? That is what recent tests indicated. However, there is nothing to be alarmed over, as the drying power of air does not depend so much on its humidity as on its being in motion.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0091.xml
article
574
574
[no value]
[no value]
"Come Seven! Come Eleven." Honest Deal Always
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HONESTY in the manipulation of the dice is assured by a new dice box provided with a conical bottom and spiral ridges around the inside walls, as these make it impossible for the player to prevent the dice from turning over at every throw. The box is moulded from one piece of tough but flexible leather so that dice with the finest surfaces are not injured.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0092.xml
article
575
575
[no value]
[no value]
How Would You Like to Wear a BellShaped Helmet With Shutters?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CLARENCE L. STOCKS, of Blue Ridge, Georgia, has invented a helmet which offers complete protection to a soldier’s head. It is bell-shaped and consists of an outer and inner casing, the latter having attached to its interior two head bands to conform with the shape of the head.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0093.xml
article
575
575
[no value]
[no value]
The Amazing Nanny. Her Milk Is Worth Fifty Cents a Quart
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Doctor, I have tried everything!” When some anxious mother whose baby is suffering from under-feeding makes this rash statement, the medical gentleman appealed to is likely to smile encouragingly and ask, “What about goat’s milk?” Then in reply to the woman’s curious or repelled expression he may explain the interesting experiments which took place at the Michael Reese Hospital in Chicago, where sick babies were fed on goat’s milk with astonishingly good results.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0094.xml
article
576
576
[no value]
[no value]
The One-Man Animal Ambulance and What It Does
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ambulance for animals which was recently placed into active service by the Humane Animal Commission of Los Angeles, California, presents many novel and ingenious features. The ambulance body is mounted on a motor truck, with the driver’s seat in front, and the enclosure for the animal patients in the rear.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0095.xml
article
576
576
[no value]
[no value]
Wood That Gives a Wonderful Fluorescence to Water
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RECENT investigations have led to the rediscovery of two species of trees known centuries ago, but never definitely identified and subsequently forgotten, the wood of which gives to water a most remarkable fluorescence. One of the trees with the scientific name Eysenhardtia, polystachya, is a small bushlike tree with small, fragrant white blossoms and is found in Mexico, while the other, Pterocarpus indicus, known to the natives under the name of narra or naga, is a giant tree growing in the forests of the Philippine Islands.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0096.xml
article
577
577
[no value]
[no value]
Detecting Glucose in Jellies, Jams, and Kindred Confections
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GLUCOSE in fruit preserves may be discovered as follows: In the case of jelly a teaspoonful should be dissolved in two tablespoonfuls of alcohol contained in a glass vessel. In the case of jam or marmalade the same process is carried out, but it is necessary to filter off the solid matter by running the mixture through a piece of muslin.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0097.xml
article
577
577
[no value]
[no value]
Chain Your Automobile to a Hydrant If the Electric Lock Doesn't Hold
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ADMITTEDLY, the stealing of automobiles has become a serious problem. John F. Hendrickson of Wollaston, Mass., would prevent it by installing on every car an electric lock. This shuts off ignition circuits, current to the starting motor, and also locks the steering wheel when the owner withdraws the key and leaves the machine.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0098.xml
article
578
578
[no value]
[no value]
Spotting the Submarine From the Observation Balloon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE man who, in his youth was adept at climbing ropes, performing on the trapeze and in indulging in other acrobatic feats finds limitless field for the use of his skill in this war. Here we have a French observation-bal-loonist sliding down a rope from his basket to a steamer that has been towing him around.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0099.xml
article
578
578
[no value]
[no value]
Using a Maxim Silencer as an Automobile Muffler
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF, said one western manufacturer, the Maxim silencer will deaden the sound of a gun explosion, why would it not deaden the noise of the automobile engine’s exhaust? Convinced of the soundness of this argument, the manufacturer has just placed on the market the Maxim muffler shown in the accompanying illustration.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0100.xml
article
579
579
[no value]
[no value]
A Side-Piece for Eye Glasses Which Will Not Break
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the new devices for glasses, of interest to the person who uses the style with sidepieces, is a very flexible sidepiece which does not break even when it is subjected to considerable bending. The new side-piece, beside resisting breaking, does not get out of shape.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0101.xml
article
579
579
[no value]
[no value]
Focusing the Locomotive Headlight With a New Adjusting Device
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE electric headlight of a locomotive can be focused with a very high degree of precision by means of an improved micrometer focusing device. It provides for vertical, horizontal, and lateral movements of the lamp, each independently of the other, so that compensation may be made for non-symmetrical reflector curves and irregularities of lamp manufacture.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0102.xml
article
580
580
[no value]
[no value]
“Educated” Ants the Latest Thing in Animal Training
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is a great fascination to many persons in the difficult task of training animals and it is remarkable how wonderful has been the success of some trainers, especially of animals noted for their high intelligence. But, the efforts of the training enthusiasts have not been altogether confined to the higher animals; they have included some of the less gifted creatures, and have even interested themselves in the pesky flea.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0103.xml
article
580
580
[no value]
[no value]
The Air Pilot’s Flying Log Book and How It Is Used
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOU have heard of ship’s log books, but here is a new kind of log—a small, tan, leather-covered book, seven and one-quarter inches long and four and three-quarters inches wide. On the cover is the title “Pilot’s Flying Log Book.” Every airman in the British Royal Flying Corps has one of these books issued to him the day he takes his first lesson in piloting an airplane.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0104.xml
article
581
581
[no value]
[no value]
The Motorcycle as a Valuable Asset in War Operations
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM the arrival of the British Expeditionary Force in Belgium in the late summer of 1914 down to the present time, the motorcycle has steadily gained in importance in different branches of the military service. Its use has not been restricted to the Allied armies.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0105.xml
article
581
581
[no value]
[no value]
Supplying Water to the Thirsty Rootlets of Potted Plants
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE device illustrated, once installed, will reduce to an absolute minimum the work of keeping the potted plants supplied with the required amount of water. It consists, in its main feature, of small tubes containing sponge or some other water-absorbing material, which protrudes from the tube at both ends.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0106.xml
article
582
582
[no value]
[no value]
The Automobilist’s Automatic Pathfinder on the Steering Column
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERYONE who has ever toured to any extent over unfamiliar roads in an automobile, knows how inconvenient it is to have to stop every few miles and compare the reading of his speedometer with the distances as given in his route book. Even if a member of the party sat on the front seat and called off the mileage readings and the landmarks, it is often necessary to slow down or turn back to find one’s bearings.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0107.xml
article
582
582
[no value]
[no value]
Electricians Should Wear Straw Hats While at Work
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASUGGESTION has recently been made by a prominent engineer, that all persons employed in and around electrical stations should wear straw hats with stiff brims all the year round while at work. Straw is a better insulator than felt and the stiffness of the straw gives an additional advantage, as it gives more emphatic warning to the wearer of the hat when he comes in contact with a wire or apparatus carrying electricity of high tension.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0108.xml
article
582
582
[no value]
[no value]
And Now We Wash Ourselves in the By-products of Garbage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW York city’s' plant on Staten Island for the reclamation of garbage produces the necessary fat for ten million cakes of soap yearly, and also the nitrogen and glycerin for the manufacture of seven hundred thousand pounds of high explosive.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0109.xml
article
583
583
[no value]
[no value]
Novel Application of the Service Flag Idea on a Girl’s Belt
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the latest applications of the service flag idea was displayed recently in public by Miss Evelyn Grieg of New York and attracted favorable attention. Upon her broad patent leather belt she displayed four stars in token of the patriotic devotion of four members of her immediate family who have joined up to help make the world safe for democracy.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0110.xml
article
583
583
[no value]
[no value]
Orange Tree Made Riverside Rich
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN 1872, United States Consul to Bahia, Brazil, Mr. W. F. Judson, was told by the natives that some sixty miles inland, up the Amazon, were native orange trees bearing fruit without seeds. Accordingly he sent natives after tree shoots and some of the fruit.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0111.xml
article
583
583
[no value]
[no value]
Heavy Artillery Is the Correct Weapon for Shooting Canaries
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DURING some recent mining operations beneath the German trenches, some canaries were, as usual, taken into the excavation to indicate the presence of noxious gases. One of these little songsters escaped and flew to the middle of “No Man’s Land,” where he perched on a shrub and began to sing.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0112.xml
article
584
584
[no value]
[no value]
Using Absorbent Cotton Over Again
France has not enough cotton for her wounds, so a chemist invents a cotton rejuvenator to cleanse the old
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MAKING use of absorbent cotton that has been soiled by a wound, no matter how sterile it may become by any process, seems repulsive. But, to paraphrase General Sherman, war is war, and a French chemist, B. Villey, has undertaken, successfully, to supply his country’s wants.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0113.xml
article
585
585
[no value]
[no value]
The Metal Hose Man and How He Was Manufactured
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT the recent auto11 mobile show in New York, an exhibit of a Newark manufacturing company attracted much attention. Its exhibit was a man-shaped figure composed entirely of specimens of its various kinds of hose. The height of the figure was three feet.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0114.xml
article
585
585
[no value]
[no value]
What a Woodpile! It’s Three Hundred Feet High
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PR O B A B L Y the biggest woodpile on record, shown in the accompanying picture, is to be found at Berlin, New Hampshire, the center of an important papermanufacturing district. The pile, which forms a respectable hill, plainly visible from a great distance, is composed of more than seventy-five thousand cords of wood which are to be made into paper.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0115.xml
article
586
586
[no value]
[no value]
New Method of Mounting Unbreakable Watch Crystals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO overcome the inevitable loosening of the crystal in watches suitable for soldiers’ wear one manufacturer clinches the rim into the crystal as shown in the accompanying illustration. The crystal employed is likewise made of a compound that will not burn, thus forming an ideal device for wear in the open or where the watch is liable to receive hard knocks.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0116.xml
article
586
586
[no value]
[no value]
Acetylene Trench Gun—It’s a Great Thrower of Shells
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ACETYLENE gas does not work well as an engine fuel. It is too explosive. However, a Paris inventor, R. A. Brévaire, would turn this to good use in a trench-gun. The lower part of his machine consists of a chamber into which air is forced under pressure, or sucked in by the rush of an outgoing shell.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0117.xml
article
586
586
[no value]
[no value]
Poisonous and Harmless Mushrooms Difficult to Distinguish
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a special bulletin published by the U. S. Department of Agriculture special emphasis is laid upon the fact that there is no simple test for distinguishing between edible and poisonous mushrooms. Many of the alleged distinguishing marks used by farmers, dealers and purchasers of mushrooms to differentiate between edible and poisonous mushrooms are considered by the experts of the Department entirely fallacious or too unreliable to be used with safety.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0118.xml
article
587
587
[no value]
[no value]
Torpedo-Proofing Ships with Air Tanks
Air-cushions to run along sides of ship are proposed as a protection against torpedoes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SINCE the beginning of the Great War, and particularly since Germany adopted the submarine policy, the brains and ingenuity of inventors of all classes and ratings have been directed toward finding some means of counteracting the destructive effects of the torpedo.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0119.xml
article
588
588
[no value]
[no value]
Giving Fords a Greater Pulling Power for Heavy Loads
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH in passenger car service the Ford car generally has adequate pulling power for all kinds of hills, there are times when it is used as a delivery truck that still greater power at low speeds would be advantageous. This device is inserted in the regular Ford driving shaft just forward of the rear axle and consists of a small case enclosing a series of gears which are always in mesh.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0120.xml
article
588
588
[no value]
[no value]
The Motion-Picture Scene-Shifter Enters the War
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
POOR Fritz will never again believe what he sees, or believe what he thinks he sees. “When is a tree not a tree,” is going to become a more terrifying conundrum to him every day. This is the reason why:—Moving picture men are going into the “camouflage” business.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0121.xml
article
589
589
[no value]
[no value]
A Sweet Potato Digger That Lifts the Potatoes and Cuts the Vine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANOVEL potato digger for sweet potatoes, invented by Oliver Cordrey, of Laurel, Delaware, digs deep under the potatoes and lifts them out, leaving the ground level with the vines on top for a cover through the winter, instead of turning the vines under a furrow as a plow would do.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0122.xml
article
589
589
[no value]
[no value]
An Effective and Humane Method of Weaning a Calf
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RUSTIC ingenuity has devised a number of contrivances to prevent calves from nursing while they are in the same stable or the same pasture with their mothers, but most of these devices are extremely clumsy and awkward. The device shown in the picture avoids most of the objectionable features of the older appliances.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0123.xml
article
590
590,591
[no value]
[no value]
“Mothers” for Airplanes at Sea
How the Atlantic Ocean or the war zones can be protected with relays of seaplanes
Patrolling the Ocean with Sea Planes
[no value]
[no value]
A. L. Aldey
AERIAL convoys for transports and merchant vessels crossing the high seas, aerial protection for harbors, aerial raiding bases for sea attacks, and transoceanic aerial patrol service—by these uses of air-craft might perhaps be given the vital blow to the German submarine.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0124.xml
article
592
592
[no value]
[no value]
“Let’s Build a Bicycle Track’’— And They Did
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ingenious crowd of boys in Los Angeles have made a very good bicycle track on a vacant lot. One of the boys’ fathers was a contractor and this lad superintended operations. The track was first laid out with chalk and stakes, and then the bunch turned to and did the digging.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0125.xml
article
592
592
[no value]
[no value]
How to Keep the Windshield Clear by Heat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO Chicago inventors. have recently patented a device for keeping the windshield of an automobile or the window glass in front of a trolley motorman clear by means of an electric incandescent bulb. The heat generated by this bulb is sufficient to heat the glass so that snow, sleet, moisture or ice will at once be turned into water and run off or dry off, thereby enabling the man behind it to see through without difficulty.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0126.xml
article
593
593
[no value]
[no value]
Caging the Airplane Propeller in Case He Gets Too Wild
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE propeller of a modern flying machine rotates at the rate of about fifteen hundred revolutions a minute. It is mounted directly on the shaft of the powerful motor by which it is driven. When the engine is started, the roar is deafening— so much so that in testing an airplanepower plant before it is mounted in a machine, the men who conduct the test must wear earprotectors, similar to those used by the crews of our big coast defense guns.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0127.xml
article
593
593
[no value]
[no value]
Kerosene Can Be “Cracked” to Produce Gasoline
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF crude oil yields different liquids when heated to different temperatures, what would happen if the separate distillates were treated again in the same way? The experiment has been carried out with astonishing results by different chemists— Doctor Burton, Doctor Hall, and Doctor Rittman .
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0128.xml
article
594
594
[no value]
[no value]
Seen from Above, This Picture Would Look Different
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASCENE like the above, wherein two Vitagraph comedians leap fifteen feet across an alley, cannot fail to give us a slight gasp. Well, how do they do it? Listen. If you were up above the explanation would stare you in the face. For these laughable gentlemen would not be half so laughable if they were making the jump with nothing but their own two legs.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0129.xml
article
594
594
[no value]
[no value]
Whale’s Tail-Bones Made Into an Attractive Sign
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Coronado Islands, off the coast of Lower California, not far from San Diego, have always attracted tourists because of the great numbers of whales, sea elephants, sea lions, and other large aquatic creatures, that disport themselves off the rocky shores.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0130.xml
article
594
594
[no value]
[no value]
We Are Presenting Germany with Two Hundred Aviators a Year
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Germans claim to have brought down a thousand Allied airplanes during the past twelve months. It is estimated that with better physical training a fifth of these need not have been lost. As the training and equipment of these men would cost about $3,500,000, according to Alan R. Hawley, President of the Aero Club of America, apart from the inestimable value of the men themselves, it would seem that we are paying rather dear for lack of attention to physical fitness.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0131.xml
article
595
595
[no value]
[no value]
Two Boards Studded With Pins Make Bandage Folder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RED CROSS workers are greatly interested in a device for folding bandages, which has been invented by Edward J. Seeber, of Rochester, N. Y., and which is so simple that it may be made by anyone with the tools found in practically every household.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0132.xml
article
595
595
[no value]
[no value]
Like a Trip to the North Pole Is RailRoading in a Blizzard
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT the terrific and widespread blizzards which raged through the middle western and eastern parts of the United States in the first week of January meant in handicapping the railroads and depriving large cities of coal and food is shown by the accompanying picture.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0133.xml
article
596
596
[no value]
[no value]
Automobile Body That Packs Within Chassis Space
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
YOU have seen the advertisement pictures of knock-down bungalows and small cruising launches? The various parts are first put together, then marked, taken down, and finally packed one inside the other for shipment. The same idea has been applied to reduce the cost of shipping automobile bodies by packing them in fifty per cent of their usual space.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0134.xml
article
596
596
[no value]
[no value]
Use Fruit Trees Instead of Shade Trees or Even Ivy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A CONSERVATION of land space movement, in Germany, some time ago, resulted in the utilization of dwarf varieties of fruit trees instead of much of the shrubbery planted merely for ornamental purposes, and in the planting of small trees close against the walls of brick or stone houses so that the branches could be trained over the walls in the manner of ivy.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0135.xml
article
597
597
[no value]
[no value]
A Floral Tank Struck a Warlike Note at the Pasadena Carnival
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT the annual Tournament of Roses in Pasadena, Cal., a marked change in the character of the floral decorations and floats was noticeable. Some of the floats in the parade introduced a warlike note. One of the most interesting was a facsimile of a British tank.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0136.xml
article
597
597
[no value]
[no value]
An Industrious Whittier Made This Endless Chain Out of a Board
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE chain shown in the picture constitutes a remarkable monument to the patience, industry and skill of Nicholas Burton, deceased, of DuBois, Pa. Burton conceived the idea of making an endless chain out of a single board. He selected a board twelve feet long, seventeen and a half inches wide and seveneighths of an inch thick, and, with no other tool but his jack knife, carved this board into an endless chain of 4,522 links, with a total length of 305 feet.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0137.xml
article
597
597
[no value]
[no value]
Have Your Collar Stiffened Once for All and Eat the Starch You Save
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE separate starched collar was invented about ninety-two years ago by the wife of a blacksmith of Troy, N. Y., who made one for her husband. Since then it has grown in popularity until there is probably nobody who has not worn a starched collar at some time or other.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0138.xml
article
598
598
[no value]
[no value]
It’s Raining, But the Glass Umbrella Keeps the Record Book Dry
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE numbers of the freight cars leaving or entering a depot, have to be recorded rain or shine. How to enter figures in a book during wet weather without blurring the pages has been a problem. Now comes the “book umbrella,” a small, oblong glass box, open at the underside to allow the number-taker to insert his hand.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0139.xml
article
598
598
[no value]
[no value]
These Home-Made Tools Save the Cost and Keep of a Horse
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the home-made garden tools shown in the accompanying illustrations a man at San Jacinto, California, cultivates five acres of ground without the aid of a horse. On his grounds ornamental shrubs grow. A horse could not be driven close without injuring them.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0140.xml
article
599
599
[no value]
[no value]
Bullets That Shoot Through Steel
Medieval armor was revived, but it now bids fair to become once more obsolete
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BRITISH sniper lay behind his shield of quarter-inch hardened steel at the Ypres salient and smiled when a bullet from a vigilant German sniper crashed against the protection. He knew that nothing less than a couple of shells from some faroff field gun could bother him.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0141.xml
article
600
600
[no value]
[no value]
If You Work Hard, Eat More Pancakes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is a common mistake to suppose that to get the necessary strength to do hard manual labor, a heavy meat diet is necessary. This is far from correct. Muscular labor does not materially affect the demand for minerals and proteins, but rather for starches, fats and sugars.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0142.xml
article
600
600
[no value]
[no value]
England Must Have Its Tea, Even If It Is Wartime
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are tea-parties and tea-parties. Some, like the Boston variety, have become historically famous; others have not. The tea-party in the picture, with its unconventional setting and sitting, is not exactly a “pink tea” patronized by the upper-ten-dom.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0143.xml
article
600
600
[no value]
[no value]
How Finger Prints Are Studied With a Handy Portable Desk
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FINGER prints of criminals are photographed and filed away for reference. A filing cabinet which makes it easy to handle the photographs has a board hinged to the top which can be set at any desired angle. A place is provided for a magnifying glass through which the finger prints may be studied.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0144.xml
article
601
601
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Chemical Preparation to Preserve Cut Flowers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF a little saltpeter, or carbonate of soda, is added to the water in which flowers are left standing, they can be kept comparatively fresh for more than two weeks. Another method is to add a small amount of ammonium chloride, or camphor, to the water.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0145.xml
article
601
601
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Simple Construction of a Useful Range Finder
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the simplest range finders ever devised consists of a short tube, one end closed by a cap pierced with a pin-hole, the other end covered with a wire screen of square meshes. The manipulation is as simple as the construction of the instrument.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0146.xml
article
602
602
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Self-Contained Hot Water Foot Warmer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT has been shown that a certain combination of salts brings about the generation of heat. By applying this chemical phenomenon, a cheap and efficient warming bottle may be formed. First of all mix together sodium acetate and sodium hyposulphate in water, using one part of the former to nine parts of the latter salt.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0147.xml
article
602
602
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Circulating Air in a Room to Warm It Evenly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE temperature of a heated room is several degrees warmer at the ceiling than at the floor. To equalize the temperature, it is necessary for the air to be in circulation. This may be accomplished with an electric fan, but to prevent any unnecessary draughts, the blast from a fan should be confined.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0148.xml
article
602
602
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Inward Flaring Cover for an Oil and Plumbago Can
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. W. BENTLEY, JR.
THE photograph and drawings illustrate a very handy “dope” can which is convenient in many ways to the mechanic. The mixture, more commonly known as “dope,” being a combination of plumbago and oils, is used on thread joints to prevent them from rusting and being difficult to remove.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0149.xml
article
603
603
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Portable Brush Burner Carried on a Truck
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE accompanying illustration shows a labor-saving device which is used by fruit growers in a western valley. It is a portable brush burner used mostly in young orchards where there is less danger of damaging the overhanging branches. In older orchards, where the trees occupy a larger space, it is customary to gather and haul the brush out of the orchard, to be burned.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0150.xml
article
603
603
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
It’s Easy to Blast Trees or Timbers with Dynamite
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE M. PETERSEN
IT is a very simple matter to blast almost any kind of timber work with the aid of dynamite, without danger, if certain simple rules are followed. To blast trees or timbers a charge of ⅛ lb. per square foot of sectional area is placed in holes in the same cross-section, which will be sufficient to cut off trees and round or square timbers of ordinary proportions.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0151.xml
article
604
604
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cement Flower Boxes Made in Mud Molds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. R. SCHMIDT
MOST of the really artistic and beautiful flower vases and boxes of pottery and stone for use on verandas and lawns are very expensive. But the boxes illustrated may be easily made from a from clay soil. The beauty of the finished products rivals that of the most expensive flower vases and boxes of stone and pottery, and their cost is almost nothing.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0152.xml
article
605
605
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
A Revolving Washtub Stand Made of Cart Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY KLAUS
AS the lady of the house asked for a washtub stand, the scrap pile was given a thorough search to find boards enough to make one. While doing this two discarded cart wheels were discovered and immediately these suggested the idea of building a rotating stand.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0153.xml
article
605
605
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Proper Cooling for Engines of Motor Boats
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
N. C. HELMS
A CONSIDERABLE improvement can be made by motor-boat owners in the proper cooling of the engines as installed by the makers, that will result in increased enjoyment and comfort in the use of their craft. As the water for cooling the motor is taken from outside the hull there is always a plentiful and cool supply to draw from, and the boat owner never has to worry about a leaky radiator or an overheated engine as does the autoist.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0154.xml
article
606
606
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Dissecting a Rubber Plant to Make It Grow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO transplant rubber plants successfully requires careful work on the part of the inexperienced horticulturist. The rubber .leaf should be cut off with a part of the plant attached to the leaf stem, as the accompanying illustrations show.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0155.xml
article
606
606
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cold Rolled Steel and Cold Drawn Steel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALMOST every person in the mechanical trades is familiar with steel that is smooth and has a bright finish. This steel comes in bars, rolls and shafts, and most of us call it “cold rolled steel” or “cold drawn steel.” As a matter of fact there is a wide difference between the two, in the process of making, in the nature of the steel, and in its use.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0156.xml
article
607
607,608,609,610
[no value]
[no value]
Buckboard Driven by Motor Wheel
Detailed description of how to make a buckboard to be propelled by a push-motor wheel
[no value]
[no value]
Frank W. Vroom
NATURALLY, the first part of the work upon this buckboard is the frame. The material to use is perfectly dry, straight-grained ash. If this wood is not obtainable, well-seasoned hickory ⅝ in. thick may be used. It will require five pieces of ash, each 5½ ft. long, 2 in. wide and ⅞ in. thick. These are joined together at the ends with cross pieces, the front cross cross piece should be 18 in. long and the rear one 24 in. long; both should be 3 in. wide and ⅞ in. thick.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0157.xml
article
610
610
[no value]
[no value]
Priming an Automobile Engine to Start It Easily
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN winter weather a primer for the automobile motor is very essential and the idea here illustrated combines practicability with simplicity at small cost and is convenient as the hood over the engine does not need to be raised. It is made as follows: Drill a ¼-in.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0158.xml
article
611
611
[no value]
[no value]
Affixing a New Bearing Surface to an Engine Crankshaft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
WHEN a bearing becomes slightlyworn it not only wears faster, but it may do a great deal of damage to the other wearing parts of the machine in which it is located. There is no part of an automobile that can cause damage quicker than the crankshaft of the engine, and one loose bearing will soon cause wear on all the working parts.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0159.xml
article
611
611
[no value]
[no value]
Small Wood-Working Clamps Made of Skate Parts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
KINGSLEY GREENE
THERE are lots of little jobs in the shop where clamps are needed— gluing up small pieces of wood, for instance—and the ordinary clamps are too large. For such work, the clamps from old roller or ice skates can be used. Take the two clamps and the screw and use the skate key to tighten them on the work.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0160.xml
article
611
611
[no value]
[no value]
Shaping a Bottle Cork to Make a Medicine Dropper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLOYD L. DARROW
AVERY convenient form of medicine dropper may be made by any one upon a moment’s notice by simply cutting two small notches in the sides of a cork, as shown in the illustration. When inserted in the neck of a bottle the liquid may be poured out in a regular intermittent flow of drops as slowly or as rapidly as desired.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0161.xml
article
611
611
[no value]
[no value]
How to Repair a Worn Wash Bowl Plug
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
ABRASS bowl plug had been in constant use for a long time and the wear rounded the edges on the underside as shown at A, the edge being a mere shell from the wear. The worn part was filed down as shown at B, next a screw terminal, C, taken from the end of a battery-carbon was soldered on as shown at D. With this attachment, two leather disks were secured to the surface with a nut.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0162.xml
article
612
612
[no value]
[no value]
Systematic Control of Water in a Bath Tub
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
ARESIDENT of a small city, wishing to eliminate the final sponging with clear water, necessary to remove the previously applied coating of soapy liquid, decided upon this method of keeping the water constantly clean. As the tendency of the water was to carry the soapy matter to the end farthest away from the bath overflow, two overflows and plugs were fitted at the opposite end, thereby providing for two water levels.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0163.xml
article
612
612
[no value]
[no value]
A Cement for Firmly Holding Glass on Metal
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the best cements for joining glass to other substances consists of a mixture of gum arabic and calomel. Its adhesive power is great. It is prepared by putting the very best and purest gum arabic into a small quantity of water, and allowing it to stand overnight so that it attains a glue-like consistency.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0164.xml
article
612
612
[no value]
[no value]
Fastening Cases to Railing in Historical Museum
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
THE method used in placing the manuscript cases in the Historical Society building in a small city is shown in the illustration. It is a good example of economy in space. The gallery running around the upper section of the library room has a pipe railing to keep the clerk from falling off to the lower floor.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0165.xml
article
613
613,614,615
[no value]
[no value]
Simple Designs for Sheet Metal Working
XI.—Radial Line Method of Developing Patterns for a Ventilator and a Scale Scoop
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
FOR problems those explained who have in developed the last issue, the Fig. 1, “pattern for ventilator on roof with one-third pitch” will merely be an easy review of the principles involved. Before starting on the pattern development it is necessary to explain the meaning of the term “one-third pitch” as applied to a roof.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0166.xml
article
615
615
[no value]
[no value]
Cutting Asphalt After Removing Metal Covering
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE C. PECK
ASPHALT is usually shipped in tin barrels. The metal is stripped off and the asphalt rolled up to the stopping board; the wire shown, attached to the winding drum, is passed over and around the asphalt to a piece of pipe under and ahead of the stop board.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0167.xml
article
615
615
[no value]
[no value]
Intensifying Under-Exposed Blue-Prints with Hydrogen Peroxide
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN under-exposed blue-print can be intensified by moistening its surface with a sponge dampened with peroxide of hydrogen. Old blue-print paper which would otherwise produce an indistinct copy need not be thrown away if treated with peroxide after the print has been exposed and “fixed.”
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0168.xml
article
616
616
[no value]
[no value]
Making a Simple Press of Boards for Trousers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. ADLON
WHY not let this simple board device press your trousers while you sleep ? Two pine boards, cleated as at A, are hinged together, and the inside surface covered with canvas. The latter is slightly dampened before the trousers are put in. The bolts, B, are tightened by means of wing nuts, which rest upon washers, as shown.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0169.xml
article
616
616
[no value]
[no value]
An Interesting Demonstration of Spontaneous Combustion
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AVERY simple and effective demonstration of spontaneous combustion can be made as follows: Dissolve a piece of yellow phosphorus, about the size of a pea, in a small bottle containing a tablespoonful of the liquid carbon disulphide. Pour the solution over a small, thin piece of porous paper.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0170.xml
article
616
616
[no value]
[no value]
Temporary Repair on a Broken Front Wheel Spindle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
IF a front wheel spindle of an automobile, or any axle of a similar type, or a shaft or rod becomes broken, a semipermanent repair may be made by the following method. Remove the axle or spindle A by disconnecting the steering arm from B and removing the spindle bolt from the hole C.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0171.xml
article
617
617
[no value]
[no value]
An Adjustable Radius Turning Tool for Lathes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. E. ANDERSON
EVERY mechanic has at some time experienced trouble in making a true radius on a lathe. The tool illustrated, was designed for this special work and has proven a success, especially for tool room mechanics. The holder is made to receive the small high speed steel cutter in a revolving turret controlled by a worm on a shaft through the arm or tool post end of the holder.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0172.xml
article
617
617
[no value]
[no value]
Protecting the Soles of Shoes with Ordinary Varnish
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the ever-increasing cost of footwear, it behooves the user to get as much service from his shoes as possible. To do this the leather must be protected. The soles are the first to suffer, but if the uppers are not impervious to water they will get damp even when the walks are not very wet, and will eventually crack.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0173.xml
article
617
617,618
[no value]
[no value]
A Metal Clip Formed with One Die and One Operation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
S. B. ROYAL
DUPLICATE parts are quickly made in a punch press by several operations, but how many persons would think that a piece like the one shown in Fig. 1 could be made with one tool in one operation? Such a shaped piece of metal is used as a catch on breast pins, class pins and similar jewelry.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0174.xml
article
618
618
[no value]
[no value]
A Wood Mold for Casting Miniature Car Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY WEDDE
To make a number of cars with which to equip a miniature railway, many wheels just alike will be required. To cast these from metals of low melting temperatures in sand molds, it is necessary to make a great many of them. If care is not taken they will come out rough and will need more work to prepare them for use on the cars.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0175.xml
article
618
618
[no value]
[no value]
Compasses Made Into a Combination Drawing Tool
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALBERT E. JONES
PERSONS who do considerable drawing or lettering, sooner or later find the so called railroad pen and railroad pencil an absolute necessity. These are expensive tools, however, and an excellent substitute may be produced cheaply. Procure two of the compasses such as are here shown and use one pair complete.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0176.xml
article
619
619,620,621,622,623
[no value]
[no value]
Open Canoe Cruising
I.—This article describes the open, canvas-covered canoe, its economy in first cost and maintenance and its allaround possibilities as a paddling, cruising and sailing craft
[no value]
[no value]
E. T. Keyset
THESE many wartime with the days fact have which impressed a comparative few realized years ago: that the ability to travel comfortably with light equipment, to keep dry and comfortable in wet and cold and to be able to cook a meal quickly and easily with little fuel and few utensils is an accomplishment.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0177.xml
article
623
623
[no value]
[no value]
An Attractive Heat-Driven Window Display of Gas Fixtures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
NOT long ago an establishment dealing in gas fixtures, displayed in its window a gaily colored pasteboard clown holding in one hand a well-known type of gas light, while apparently balancing on his nose a lighted lamp, the colored shade of which revolved continuously.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0178.xml
article
623
623
[no value]
[no value]
Permanently Fastening Joints Held with Screw-Unions
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you desire to fasten pipes or pipe fittings together permanently, thoroughly clean the parts to be fastened and cover the threads with a strong solution of salt and water. The salt will rust the threads together, fastening the parts.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0179.xml
article
624
624
[no value]
[no value]
Little Ways in Which You Can Save Gasoline
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DO not use gasoline for washing or cleaning; use kerosene. Do not allow your automobile engine to run when car is standing. Have your carbureter adjusted to use leanest mixture. See that bearings run freely and are well lubricated. Keep tires fully inflated.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0180.xml
article
624
624
[no value]
[no value]
Discovering a Card Chosen but Not Taken from the Pack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIRST notice the bottom card, then take the pack in the left hand, holding it with the fingers on one side and the thumb on the other. Secretly draw down the bottom card about ½ in. Let the right hand approach the pack, and with the first and second fingers draw down the cards, one by one, ½ in., beginning with the top card and so on, inviting your audience to stop you at any card they choose.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0181.xml
article
624
624
[no value]
[no value]
Rejuvenating the Ribbon on an Adding Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE writer was unable to secure, without considerable delay, the proper bichrome ribbon for an adding machine. The one in use, though not badly worn, was too dry to give a satisfactory impression. As the fresh color of the ribbon indicated that the pigment was still in the fabric, it was decided to see if an application of oil would not loosen it up.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0182.xml
article
625
625
Tricks of the Trade
[no value]
A Foot-Power Punch Press for Light Work
An entire homemade punch operated by foot power. How to make laminated wood pulleys
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. BUTTERWORTH
THIS foot-power punch press was made almost entirely of 2-in. pipe and fittings, built on a wood base 2 in. thick, 12 in. wide and 3½ ft. long. The ram A consists of a piece of 1-in. cold rolled steel 2 ft. 1 in. long. The bushings BB, in which the ram works, are short pieces of pipe lined with babbit, as shown in the detail Fig. 1.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0183.xml
article
625
625,626
Tricks of the Trade
[no value]
Homemade Laminated Pulleys for the Small Shop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN practically every shop cone-pulleys and plain pulleys are needed at some time or other, but for the mechanic of ordinary means they are expensive to buy. They can be turned from solid blocks on a lathe, but a lathe is not always available and even then the cost is considerable.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0184.xml
article
626
626
Tricks of the Trade
[no value]
A Lawn Mower Converted Into a Handy Truck
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EARL R. GASKILL
LAWN mowers serve their original purpose only about four months of made to serve two purposes with the board attachment shown. It is well known that pushing an inverted lawn mower throws the gears out of mesh. The board attachment may be easily made and put on the inverted mower so that it may be used for hauling small loads or sacks of grain.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0185.xml
article
626
626
Tricks of the Trade
[no value]
A Dam to Prevent Top Soil from Washing Away
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. FRUDDEN
A SIMPLE and inexpensive method of preventing a field from becoming cut up by gullies is shown in the drawing. Some lengths of sewer pipe and a few hours work in the building of a small concrete dam across each gully is all that is required. The drawing shows how the dam operates.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0186.xml
article
627
627
The Amateur -Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
Electric Alarm Signal for Transmission Ropes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TRANSMISSION ropes in continual service eventually wear so that a break begins. The simple electric device shown sounds an alarm as soon as the first strand breaks, or begins to unravel. Immediate repairs can be made before the break becomes a serious one that would necessitate a new rope.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0187.xml
article
627
627
The Amateur -Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
To Prevent Leather Belts from Slipping on Pulleys
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the machine shop, slipping belts are a source of constant annoyance, and tightening does not always remedy the difficulty. Powdered resin is bad for the belt, though unfortunately it is widely used. Its tendency is to dry and crack the leather.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0188.xml
article
627
627
The Amateur -Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
Mounting a Porcelain Base Electric Light Receptacle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WALTER B. WEBER
EXPERIMENTERS and students who are using porcelain receptacles for experimental and practice work, find that they very often break off the porcelain lugs which are used to hold the receptacle to the wall. A very good and cheap method of eliminating this waste is to mount the receptacle on a piece of ¼-in. fiber, 3 ½ in. by 3 in., with 8-32 machine screws, as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0189.xml
article
628
628
The Amateur -Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
Tightening Electric Wires Under Wood Cleats
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERYONE realizes how difficult it is to tighten a number of wires under wood cleats. Using the method shown in the illustration, it becomes a very simple matter. The wires on the end or corner cleats of a run should be wrapped around and securely fastened to the cleats.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0190.xml
article
628
628
The Amateur -Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
Mounting a Glass Plate Without Drilling Holes In It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HERMAN NEUHAUS
THE method herein described for mounting a glass plate is much simpler than drilling, and in most cases it is to be preferred. The procedure may be utilized by the amateur for plates not having a greater diameter than 2 ft. To mount the piate, it is necessary to place itupon marked paper that has been made for template, to enable one to determine the center.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0191.xml
article
628
628
The Amateur -Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
Changing the Tone of an Electric Bell by Sawing It
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AVERY good method of changing the tone of a bell is to saw a slot A in the gong B with a hack saw; the bell will then have a tone similar to that of a cow bell. The deeper the slot, the duller the tone. Another method of changing the sound of a bell, is by placing two bells close together so that the hammer of bell C, on its forward stroke, strikes the gong D.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0192.xml
article
629
629,630,631
[no value]
[no value]
Electrical Devices and How They Work
IV.—Theory and Fundamental Principle of the Condenser
[no value]
[no value]
Peter J. M. Clute, B. E.
IF a metal plate A is mounted on an insulated stand and connected with an electroscope, as in Fig. 1, and if another plate B, similarly mounted, is connected to the ground, then, when an electrostatic charge is placed on A, it will be observed that the leaves of the electroscope collapse as B is brought close to A and diverge farther as B is moved away from A.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0193.xml
article
631
631
[no value]
[no value]
Securing Wood or Metal Molding to Plaster Walls
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE electrician will find, when putting up wood or metal molding, that by drilling two holes, A,1 in. apart, instead of one hole, every 3 ft., that not only will time be saved but the molding will be more secure. The reason for this is that if the hole B was used and the screw went through the plaster between the laths, it would be a simple matter to put a screw in hole C and to strike a lathe into which the screw could easily be fastened.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0194.xml
article
631
631
[no value]
[no value]
Now We Reach the Philippines Directly by Wireless
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE last link in a long chain of wireless stations, reaching from Arlington, near Washington, to the Philippine Islands, was recently forged. Cavite, this latest station, situated near Manila, has been building for some time. At its opening Admiral Knight, commander of the Asiatic fleet, sent a message of greeting to Secretary Daniels.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0195.xml
article
631
631
[no value]
[no value]
A Small Storage Battery Made With a Sponge
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM HARRIER
A STORAGE battery can be made from two lead plates and an old sponge, that will give good service for lighting a small lamp or running small motors. The battery is made with a onepint glass fruit jar. A, two lead plates B, ⅛ in. in diameter and as long as the jar, are bent to set opposite each other, each covering one-fourth the inside circumference of jar.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0196.xml
article
632
632,633,634
[no value]
[no value]
How the Zeppelin Raiders Are Guided by Radio Signals
An ingenious system not unlike that of the flashing light which guides mariners along the rocky coasts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A ZEPPELIN which is sent from Germany to England on a bomb-dropping expedition must travel by the shortest route. Only a limited amount of fuel is carried in order that the load of bombs may be as great as possible. But how does the captain of the ship determine that route?
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0197.xml
article
634
634
[no value]
[no value]
Fishing Electric Wires Through Tubes in Fixtures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN fishing wires through a fixture, which has a sharp angle, a piece of chain A from a pull chain socket can be used to good advantage. If a wire is used it may get caught at point B, while the flexible chain readily passes around this bend. A strong cord can then be attached to the wire which is easily drawn through the fixture.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0198.xml
article
635
635,636,637,638,639
[no value]
[no value]
Wireless Work in Wartime
IX.—The Primary Oscillation Circuits of the Spark-gap Transmitter
The Voltage Applied to the Condenser
The Charge in the Condenser
How the Condenser Discharges Through the Spark-Gap
Detailed Study of Condenser Voltage
Mechanical System for the Conversion of Frequency
Controlling the Oscillation Frequency
A Successful Cooled Spark-Gap
[no value]
[no value]
John V. L. Hogan
THE March article of this series discussed the power-supply circuits of the spark-type radio transmitter, showing how alternating current energy was supplied to the power transformer and converted to a higher voltage suitable for charging the primary condenser.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0199.xml
article
639
639,640
[no value]
[no value]
A Simple Compact Short Distance Wireless Telephone
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VARIOUS methods have been devised by which one can talk without wires to a person over four thousand miles, but it is not generally known that in 1882 Prof. Alexander Graham Bell constructed an apparatus with which he was able to transmit the voice several miles without metallic conductors.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0200.xml
article
640
640
[no value]
[no value]
A Keyless Electric Lock for Lise on a Panel Door
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS W. BENSON
I HAVE attached a secret lock to the door of my room which does not require any key to open it. The lock itself is an ordinary electric lock, but it is the way that the contact is made through it in opening the door that makes my scheme different from others.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0201.xml
article
640
640
[no value]
[no value]
A Simple Method of Silvering Brass and Copper Articles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you desire to coat the surface of brass or copper articles, the following method is very simple and the results are exceedingly satisfactory. Procure some scrap silver from a local jeweler and dissolve it in strong nitric acid, diluted with about half its bulk of water.
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0202.xml
article
641
641,642,643,645
[no value]
[no value]
Do You Want to Split Up the United States?
Soaring High with Borrowed Wings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NO, are of helping course to you do don’t. it right But now you by not writing a letter of protest to your Congressman and your Senators about the Zone System for magazine postage recently passed by Congress. How quickly would the States be broken up into separate countries if we had to pay import taxes on all goods shipped between states?
PopularScience_19180401_0092_004_0203.xml