Issue: 19180301

Friday, March 1, 1918
March, 1918
3
True
92
Thursday, December 4, 2014

Articles
cover
323
323
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0001.xml
article
323
323,324,325,326,327,328,329,330,331,332,333,334,335,336,337,338,339,340,341
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The Secret of Those Curly Locks
Science steps in and waves the straightest hair
Butchering an Automobile to Make a Tank Holiday
They Can Always Borrow a Few Fine Names from the Patent Medicines
Can the Little Lady Now Bump Her Head? She Cannot
Can You Tell Which Part of These Ruins Is Camouflage?
Let the Flames Roar. He Wears an Asbestos Suit
Here's a New Cutting Steel
Let the Sausage Balloon Speak to You on the Screen
The Original Model for All Baby Carriages Comes from China
Let This New Chair Add to Your Bathing Convenience
A New Automobile Cigar-Lighter
The Germs in a Swimming Pool
Have You Wondered Why So Many Fires and Explosions Occur These Days? Here Are a Few of the Reasons
It's Bombs Such as These That the Kaiser's Agents Have Been Using to Blow Up Our Factories and Ships
Sardines Mean Wealth to Bretons
Armless, But Not Helpless
Bearding the Ice Giant in His Lair— The Glory of Mountaineering in the Alps
Made in Winter's Open Air War Studio
Sampans, the Quaint Fishing Craft of the Far East
Little Wooden Exercisers Make
Wounded Men Agile Again
The Man Who Invented the “Tank”
The Dreadnought of the Battlefield and Its Father
Just As If They Were In Airplanes
Did They Do a Good Job the Last Time They Vulcanized Your Tires? It Is By No Means a Simple Piece Of Work
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FOR years and years, probably ever since Eve’s day, seductive woman has tried to fulfill man’s idea of loveliness. Does he admire blondes? Forthwith the peroxide bottle appears. Does he prefer curly hair? The dear ladies undergo tortures in sleeping on lumpy curl-papers, and burn off enough hair with hot irons to supply the armies of the world with mattresses.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0002.xml
article
342
342,343,344,345
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Would She Be Crushed by the Sea?
How the Navy finds out if submarines may be submerged with safety to great depths
American “Tin Fish” are Tested in Cylinders
Ventilated Costumes for Use in the Arctic Circle
Unlimited Heat—But How Can You Use It?
Here Is Another “Shortest Road in the World”
Steaming Frozen Coal Out of Freight Cars
Time Is with the Allies—The Strange Fate of a Clock
Louisiana Has Adopted Cactus Candy
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Robert G. Skerrett
IT has recently been said that many of Germany’s submarines have been carried to the bottom by reason of inherent weaknesses—structural faults, in brief. This means that the hastily built U-boats have sprung a leak and foundered simply because the defects were not discovered before sending the craft out upon active service.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0003.xml
article
346
346,347
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And Now the Liberty Hospital
Dr. Osborn’s plan contemplates sectional structures adaptable for dwelling purposes after the war
Brrrrrrr ! It’s Gold!
What Kind of a Dog Was It That Went Into Noah’s Ark?
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WE have the Liberty Motor and the Liberty Truck and now we are to have the Liberty Hospital. Heretofore hospital buildings have not served any purpose after their usefulness during war. The new Liberty Hospital as designed by Dr. Henry Fairfield Osborn, President of the American Museum of Natural History, may be converted into dwellings when the war is over.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0004.xml
article
348
348,349,350,351,352,353
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Screen Thrills Are Cheaper Now
How the motion-picture man saves money
How They Fool ’Em
Saving Money on the Screen Thrill
Wire-Netting Instead of Wood for Surgical Splints
Track Insulation Stops the Trains in This Automatic Control System
Glasses That You Can Wear In Comfort
Coat Racks Display Advertising When Coats are Hung
Allies Restrict Use of Gasoline
Mike Has a Nose of Brass, But He Should Worry
Carrying Off Smoke and Foul Air in the Same Smokestack
Fifty-Seven Miles an Hour in a Ford!
He Holds the Light So That the Hands Are Free
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Prescott Lecky
IN the early days of the motion picture industry, directors were thrifty to the point of parsimony—for money was scarce. Then came an era of wild extravagance—for money was plentiful. And now, having swung too far both ways, the financial pendulum has finally settled down to a business range.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0005.xml
article
354
354,355
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Safety-First in Mine-Sweeping
How it is secured with a recently invented Swedish under-water kite
The Under-Water Kite and How It Works
In Case of Fire, Take the Cornice Elevator
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DRAGGING the sea for mines, charged with from four hundred to nine hundred pounds of T. N. T. and liable to explode when a little glass tube of acid is broken, is probably the most dangerous occupation in which a brave man can engage. It has not even the redeeming feature of being romantically interesting.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0006.xml
article
356
356,357
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The Graveyard of Automobiles
The Open Grate Fires We Love Are Very Wasteful
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SOME makes of cars have a large proportion of the rarer metals concealed within them; some have starting and lighting systems; some have magnetos; and some nothing. The “junkie” knows just what a rumbling scrap-heap is worth. Hair from the cushions sells for fifteen cents a pound at present prices.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0007.xml
article
358
358,359,360,361
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Deep-Sea Fish with Lanterns
Some fish carry their own power plants, searchlights, lenses and dimmers as if they were living automobiles
It’s Deep Where They Live
Glands Furnish Light
They Look Like Moving Signs
Housekeeping Made Easy
Housekeeping Made Easy
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Dr. E. Bade
DEEP-SEA fish have been strangely influenced by that total darkness in which they live. Their eyes have lost their responsiveness to light and are therefore practically sightless. These blind fish are the inhabitants of those profound depths into which not even an infinitesimal ray of light can penetrate.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0008.xml
article
362
362,363,364
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What About Potash?
A Gasoline Engine Used to Load Sugar Cane
Mount Horses on Boards. Then they Can’t Sink Into the Mud
Let 'Em Come—This Outpost Will Account for Itself
Weep No More, Landladies. The Light-Wasting Roomer Is Checked
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THE farmers of the United States and of other countries are dependent on Germany for cheap potash. Germany’s famous potash beds are unique. These salt beds constitute an important geologic formation, for there are no other similar deposits in all the earth, and potash is indispensable to agriculture and industry.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0009.xml
article
365
365,366
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Fighting Off Aviators with Shotguns
What Won’t a Ford Do If Properly Coaxed ?
When Your Clothes Catch Fire'
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UNCLE SAM has decided that the shotgun is, under some conditions, as deadly as the machine gun, and his Chief Signal Officer has ordered that instruction in the use of the shotgun be given at every one of the sixteen aviation schools now running, or about to be established.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0010.xml
article
367
367,368,369
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Selecting Men Made Easy
A Gun Which Will Lie Down
Magnetized Birds? Another Explanation of Accurate Migratory Flight
Don’t Throw Away Waste Paper. Bale It !
The Human Polar Bears. They Bathe in Icy Water—Br-r-r.
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THE experience of England and France early in the war clearly proved the importance of keeping a detailed and intelligently indexed record of every man in the army and navy and their auxiliary branches. It also showed the need of a system that would make the grouping of the men, according to certain qualifications, a simple, possibly automatic, process.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0011.xml
article
370
370,371
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Learning to Duel in the Sky
How the towed target balloon is used in machine-gun practice
How Dueling in the Air Is Taught
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Lieutenant Henry A. Bruno
A FEW weeks after America entered the war plans were made for the immediate training of thousands of air-fighters. Some of the best army men in the United States service were sent to Canada to find out something about the science of training men for aerial warfare.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0012.xml
article
372
372,373,374,375,376,377,378,379,380,381
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Baring the Super-Zeppelin’s Secrets
What the French found when they examined the L-149 which fell into their hands after an air raid on England
How Fuel Was Sacrificed to Carry Bombs
Zeppelins Are All Ribs and Machinery
Wireless Signals from Germany Guide the Zeppelins
An Immense, Naked Hull of Perfect Form
“A Gigantic Piece of Lacework,” said the French
The Gloomy Boardwalk
Identification Tag of Indestructible Metal for Naval Men
The War Is Causing a Decrease in the Number of Lunatics
Rolling Roads with Gaspipe
Clopperty, Clopperty, Clopperty!— The Hobby Horses Are Galloping !
Sailing Over the Tempestuous Macadam Road
What Imitation Leather Is Made Of
Making Two Wheels Take the Place of Three
Shock-Absorbers for Eggs on Freight Cars Fill a Great Need
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Carl Dienstbach
IT was the oddest sort of an accident that preserved the L-49 intact for French inspection. She was one of a fleet of super-Zeppelins which had successfully eluded the airplanes and anti-aircraft guns of Great Britain, only to come to grief on French soil.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0013.xml
article
382
382,383,384,385,386,387
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Unclogging the Railroads to Get Coal
How New York’s coal famine was relieved and how the Government is running the railroads
Manhattan—A Cork in a Bottle
What Railroads Are Now to Carry
Why Not Take Your Nightly Rest in Your Library Table?
A Fabric With Diagonal Reinforcing Threads, Useful for Automobile Tires
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Frank Parker Stockbridge
Why You Receive Popular Science Monthly Late
THE taking over by the United States Government of all the railroads of the nation, in December, 1917, and their operation as a single system, for the duration of the war, is the most sensational and interesting industrial episode of the war to date, so far as the United States is concerned.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0014.xml
article
388
388
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Indirect Fire from Springfields
A periscope attachment and a twenty-five-shot magazine are two of the important improvements
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Edward C. Crossman
PERISCOPE attachments for the rifle are an old story from the days of 1915 when Tommy Atkins put a rude contrivance of sticks and pocket mirrors on his LeeEnfield and went to potting at the Germans across the way. Periscope, in case you've forgotten, means in this connection merely an arrangement of two mirrors, one up in the line of sight on the barrel of the rifle, the other down at the level of the eye, well below the trench parapet, enabling the soldier to aim and fire the rifle while remaining far below the line of the barrel.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0015.xml
article
389
389
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Germany Plows With Electricity
Men are becoming so scarce that all mechanical helps possible must be used
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TO such straits is Germany reduced for men that she must make maximum use of the few who can be kept at home to till the soil. Her difficulty may be conceived when it is considered that even in time of peace women had to plow, sow, and reap. Now she has been compelled to adapt electricity to farm work.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0016.xml
article
390
390,391
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Giving the Motion Pictures a Larger Frame
Each picture will be one-third higher and one-half wider than the old standard size
Turning an Eyesore Into a Dignified and Imposing Structure
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ANEW form of motion picture which moves horizontally instead of vertically and uses a picture twice as large as the present standard has made its appearance. The new picture, made on the standard motion picture film, is exactly twice as wide as the present picture is high, and its height is equal to the width of the present picture.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0017.xml
article
392
392,393,394,395
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Making a Million Out of a Sunken Ship
The problem of the Gut Heil, a German tanker that lay on her side at the bottom of the Mississippi
Do It with Tools and Machinery and Speed Up Your Job
Some Little Conveniences For Busy Office Workers
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Robert G. Skerrett
FIVE years ago, a double collision sent the German tanker Gut Heil to the bottom of the Mississippi a half mile below Baton Rouge, as she was outward bound with 3800 tons of oil. As a ship, she was worth about $300,000; and $125,000 was spent afterwards in an unsuccessful attempt to refloat her.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0018.xml
article
396
396,397,398
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Marionettes Extraordinary
An ancient art brought up-to-date
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A. M. Jungmann
This question was more easily asked than answered. But after several years* hard work on the part of Mr. Sarg, the puppets are here to speak and act for themselves. To design natural-appearing puppets requires, among other things, a knowledge of anatomy, mechanics, art, the principles of the drama, and the craft of the costumier.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0019.xml
article
399
399,400
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Motor Trucks Pull Subway Cars
Construction work is facilitated by trusty gasoline tractors that rush materials where needed
Did He Join the Army or Navy? This Service Flag Tells
The U.S.S. New York as She Appears in Pipes and Pipe Fittings
The Merits of the Wooden Barrel are Obvious
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MOTOR trucks are today running in New York’s subways. To be sure, they are not carrying passengers, because the portions of the tubes in which they are utilized are not yet completed. Still, they are performing the very good service of rapidly transporting earth and rock, or bricks and steel, from one point in the system to another.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0020.xml
article
401
401
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Launching Concrete Boats Bottom Up
Norwegians are shipbuilders of old. Now they've devised a new way of building and launching vessels
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LAUNCHING a two-hundred-ton concrete vessel bottom up may sound fantastic, but it has recently been done with success by a shipbuilding company in Norway. The vessel was a reinforced concrete lighter (concrete strengthened by a skeleton of steel strips), and consisted of an inner hull of wood which served as a mould for the whole structure.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0021.xml
article
402
402,403,404,405
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Varnish and Varnishing
Strange gums and oils and how they are made into protective coatings
Varnish Making Begins in New Zealand
China Contributes a Wonderful Oil
How the Varnish Is Made
The Ball-Bearing Creeper
We Are Making Our Own Indigo Now
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H. M. Beattie
VARNISHES are of two kinds. Spirit varnishes are made by dissolving a gum, such as shellac, in alcohol, but oil varnishes, in which class are most of the varnishes we know commercially, are made by cooking resinous gums in oil, and adding thinners, such as turpentine, or a petroleum product.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0022.xml
article
406
406,407
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Tuning Airplane Wires
A Metal Bottle-Cover That Never Wears Out
This New Self-Loading Wagon Makes Road Grading Easy
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ONE of the most common troubles on all airplanes has been the difficulty of correctly adjusting the tension of the wires used for bracing the wings. Some of the wires may be tauter than others, after a few hours’ flying. There has been no ready means of correcting this fault.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0023.xml
article
408
408,409,410,411,412,413,414,415
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What Is Mean Sea Level?
If there were no disturbing influences the ocean would be of one equilibrium
Between Stokes, He Knits for the Red Cross Unashamed
Wherein a Head and a Little Ingenuity Save Much Work
Castor Oil Is Going Up
And Still They Come ! Some Novel Uses, Comforts, Efficiency Devices, Conveniences and Economies for the Automobile and Motor Truck
Try These Devices to Make Your Automobile or Your Motor Truck More Efficient
These Are the Trapeze Artists Among Telephone Poles
How Would I Look in That Suit? This Device Tells You
Steel Wheels Are Becoming Popular
Light Up Both Roads When Your Automobile Turns a Corner
Is Coal Scarce? Use the Newspaper Log.
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William Bowie
WHEN one speaks of the elevation of a place, he has in mind the vertical distance above an imaginary surface. The surface is generally that of the oceans imagined to extend inland under the point considered. If there were no disturbing influence by the sun and moon, the force of the winds and the varying pressure of the air, then the surface of the oceans at all places would be one of equilibrium.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0024.xml
article
416
416,417,418
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Night-Moths and Their Guiding Flames
Electric lights and gasoline flares to help the night-flyers land in safety
Heavy non-breakable plate glass
Raising Sponges on a Bed of Cement. The Sponges Like It
Why Not Hooverize by Eating Lizards and Alligators?
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Lieutenant Henry A. Bruno
A NEST of the German machines that make frequent air raids on London when the weather is favorable was discovered by a solitary airman of the British Royal Flying Corps, who had been on coast patrol and, as often happens, lost his way in the darkness.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0025.xml
article
419
419,420,421
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Gunning for Aircraft—How the Italians Do It
the pieces must be fired at their targets point-blank, just as a duck hunter fire at birds on the wing
Going, Going! The Steeple Bows to Business in Portland
Pasteurizer and Ice-Box Combined— A New Convenience for Milk-Dealers
The Nasal Flute—You Blow Your Soul Into It
A New Type of Hydro-Generator. It Moistens Gas Engine Fuel
Canned Music for the Hindus in Their Native Language
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WHILE it is true that no European strategist foresaw the important part that aircraft were destined to play in the present bloody conflict, it was at least realized that a man in the air had reconnoitering possibilities. Krupp even developed anti-aircraft guns to be carried on automobiles—weapons so clumsily mounted that they were of not much avail against a swiftly moving flying-machine.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0026.xml
article
422
422,423,424,425,426,427
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Living in a Giant Life-Buoy
Within are accommodations for a dozen shipwrecked passengers
The Thief’s “Hands Up!” Is Answered by the Telephone’s “Help!”
How Our German Prisoners of War Amuse Themselves
Safety First! Install a Bubble Fountain in Your Home
No Automobiles or Bucking Bronchos for Him. He Rides to Town on His Ox
Enlist in the U. S. Air Service
The Wise Potato. It Refuses to Produce Unnecessary Seeds
Saving Man Power in Loading Freight Cars
Another Inventor Renders a Service to Humanity
Making the Pesky Gopher Commit Suicide
Cutting Down Engine Weight
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UNDERNEATH, the ship’s engines vibrate steadily, the big propellers at the stern driving all on board nearer and nearer England. Then comes a roar—a thud. All through the ship runs a great shudder. There is a violent rending and tearing, and up from the boiler-room comes a huge puff of smoke, the hiss of escaping steam, the shriek of dying stokers and the smell of fire.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0027.xml
article
428
428,429,430,431
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Balancing Crankshafts With Air-Turbines
An Antique Chinese Water-Wheel Irrigates a Modern Colorado Orchard
A Corrugated Hull Increases the Speed of a Ship
New Farm Tractor Driven by All Four Wheels
Honey of Grapes—An Attractive Sounding Substitute for Sugar
Look into the Mysteries of a Mold with an Electric Trowel
Here It Is! The Adjustable PlayerPiano-Bench and Record-Holder
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IN the early days, when the problem of the automobile manufacturer was to make a car run at all, rather than run economically and smoothly, balanced crankshafts were unthought of. But as the buying public began to demand cars with smooth-running engines, in order to reduce the unpleasant effects of excessive vibration, the automobile engineer had to devise some method of equalizing the power impulses transmitted to the driving shaft of the automobile at each cylinder explosion.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0028.xml
article
432
432,433,434,435
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Raising Birds for the French Hunter
Pheasantries are maintained at great expense so that the bird-hunter may have his sport
Use This Match-Box to Light Your Cigar in the Strongest Wind
Cook With Acetylene Gas on the Farm
Cultivating Nerve by the Rope Bridge Route
The Tintinnabulation of the Electric Tubes—Playing Chimes by Electricity
U. S. Government Tested Much War Machinery in 1917
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THE pheasant, which is commonly bred in France for stocking the woods for the hunters, is raised, in a general way, like the common fowl, but it requires much more careful feeding. The pheasantry is located on some dry, slightly elevated ground not far from the woods where the birds are to enjoy their short span of life.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0029.xml
article
436
436,437
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Keep Your Engine Efficient
A Novel Tea-Table Made From a Mill Stone
A French Inventor Improves the American Harvester
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ONE of the large makers of motor trucks in this country equips all of his truck engines with thermostats (thermometers that control the temperature of hot fluids) in the water line to control the heat of the water in the cylinder jacket, so that at all times the engine is operating at its most efficient temperature.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0030.xml
article
438
438,439,440
[no value]
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Your Out-door Shooting
How to Waterproof Your Boots
An Electric Lantern Which Will Stand Rough Use
Heating Low-Grade Gasoline with Exhaust Gases
Yawning Fishes. Evidently They Have Brains Enough to be Bored
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CONSIDER the small boy who finds a nice, smooth, flat rock. If the chances are not more than even for breaking a window—and getting caught—he curves index finger around one side of its periphery and lays thumb against the other. Then with a long swing of his arm, keeping the rock horizontal, he sends it scaling flatways through the air.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0031.xml
article
441
441,442,443,444,445,446,447,448,449,450
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FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
Using a Piece of Wool to Detect Dye in Jam
Rubber Roofing Used for Packing in Steam Joints
Deodorizing Naphthaline for Medicinal Purposes
Trick of Brushing Ten-Cent Piece from the Palm
Positive Traction Wheel for a Motor Plow
Things To Be Remembered When Washing an Automobile
A Convenient Metal Holder for Milk Bottles
A Work Bench Clamp to Hold Boards for Planing
Solution for Cleaning Polished Brass Quickly
How to Make a Watch-Charm of Marble, Agate or Granite
A Small Steam Engine Used as an Air Compressor
A Portable Board Roller for Circular Saw Feed
Disappearing Clothes Rack for the Closet
A Combination Straight and Folding Step Ladder
A Rustic Seat Made from an Old Tree Stump
Admitting Air to a Pullman Car Without Creating a Draft
A Test Which Tells You When Butter Is Not Butter
Hotbeds in Which Safely to Start Early Plants
Properly Lubricating Automobile Spring Bolts
How to Economize in the Use of Coal Gas
How to Make the Economizer
Making Diagrams for Lantern Slides
A Glass of Water, Some Magic Passes, and Lo ! The Water Is Wine
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SOME of the jam sold at the present time is dyed to give it an attractive color. Happily, it is easy to find out whether or not the jam has been treated in this way. The first step is to mix a little of the suspected article with some water, then dip into it a piece of clean cotton wool.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0032.xml
article
451
451,452
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A Cheap Toboggan
The Mystery of Freezing Water Instantaneously
Stop to Prevent Snow from Entering Under a Garage Door
Exterminating Ground Hogs with Explosive Fumes
Canvas Is Painted More Quickly When Wet
An Ingenious Carafe Used by the Eskimo
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NOTHING is more enjoyable and exciting than a toboggan slide down some steep incline. No one need forego this pleasure when a toboggan, as here described and illustrated, can be so cheaply constructed. The essential part is the snow shield, which consists of a curved wooden piece, as shown.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0033.xml
article
453
453,454,455,456
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Tricks of the Trade
Attachments for Using a Vise as a Punch Press
Drying Shoes with Heat from an Electric Globe
Cutting Adhesive Cloth to Make Bandage Supports
Combination Tandem Seat and Tool Box
Chemical Composition to Make Uninflammable Benzene
A Leaky Tire Valve and Its Method of Repair
Cements for Securely Fastening Celluloid Parts
Making a Substitute for Brass Paper Weights
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SMALL duplicate articles are ordinarily made in punch presses, but for the home workshop or a small jobbing shop such a press is too expensive. Ordinary punching or forming in 3/16-in. sheet metal may be handled in a vise with the power of the screw, by attaching the specially constructed parts to the jaws as shown in the illustrations.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0034.xml
article
457
457,458,459,460
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Simple Designs for Sheet Metal Working
X—Radial line development of patterns for cones and parts of cones
Deodorizing Benzene for Dry Cleaning Purposes
A Book Shelf and Trough Made of Soft Wood
Glass Cements for Commercial or Domestic Use
A Good Elastic Varnish for Coating Blue Prints
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Arthur F. Payne
MOST of the patterns developed in this series up to the present time have been for objects cylindrical in shape. The majority have been elbows and tees. These cylindrical patterns all belong to the parallel line group, that is all the lines in the drawing are parallel lines as in Fig. 1, which was demonstrated in the June, 1917, issue.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0035.xml
article
461
461,462,463,464,465,466
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A Small Sewage Disposal Plant
The Department of Agriculture tells in a bulletin how to construct a sewage disposal plant for the country place. This article is an extract from that bulletin
Lighting an Alcohol Lamp with a Glass Rod
To Prevent Mildew in a Damp Clothes Closet
Cleaning a Bowling Ball Quickly Without Injuring Its Surface
A Primer for Carrying in a Motorcycle Tool Box
How to Make a Flashlight of Dazzling Brilliancy
Supplying a Rib-Holding Piece to an Umbrella
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EXPERIENCE has shown that, in a small sewage disposal system, a dark, airtight tank of sufficient capacity and so constructed that sewage may remain in it entirely at rest for a period of from 18 to 24 hours, gives the best results. The solid matter settles out in such a tank and, according to the theory at present accepted, it is partially liquefied, deodorized and destroyed by countless numbers of bacteria, which thrive without air.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0036.xml
article
467
467,468
[no value]
[no value]
The Amateur Electrician And Wireless Operator
A Speed Indicator Will Count the Turns for Your Coil
The Electro-Deposition of Copper on Insects and Flowers
An Electric Bell Signal to Indicate Falling Snow
Making Silver Contact Points for a Spark Coil
Electric Toaster to Operate on Dry Batteries
German Wireless Plotting Muffled by Band Music
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[no value]
[no value]
IN winding coils on a small lathe, a speed indicator may be used to count the number of turns. As the only means of connection furnished with the indicator are a number of rubber tips, it is difficult to fasten the indicator to the lathe spindle.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0037.xml
article
469
469,470,471,472,473,474,475,476
[no value]
[no value]
Electrical Devices and How They Work
Principles of Electromagnets—III.
The Sleeper Must Get Up to Stop the Alarm
Making Small Generators from Telephone Magnetos
An Improved Design for a Grounding Switch
Killing Woodchucks with Deadly Dynamite Fumes
A Few Tips on Splicing Fuse for Discharging Dynamite
[no value]
[no value]
Peter J. M. Clute
IT is evident that an electric current and a magnet exert a mutual force on each other. Since a magnetic field is a region in which a magnetic needle is acted upon by a force tending to turn it in some direction, it follows that the space surrounding a conductor, when an electric current is flowing through it, is a magnetic field.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0038.xml
article
477
477,478,479,480
[no value]
[no value]
Wireless Work in Wartime
VIII: The Power Circuits of the Transmitter
The Simple Spark Transmitter
The Power Circuits
Connections of the Motor
The Generator Circuit
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[no value]
John L. Hogan
IN last month’s article a general review of the technical fundamentals of radio communication systems was given. The two basic methods of producing alternating current were described in brief, and two types of radio transmitter were shown.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0039.xml
article
481
481
[no value]
[no value]
72 Cents
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“United we stand, divided we fall,” has a new significance. Now, as never before, this country should strive for national unity. Yet Congress has passed a law that will split up the country as surely as though Chinese walls divided it into sections.
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0040.xml
article
482
482,483,484
[no value]
[no value]
Netted!
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19180301_0092_003_0041.xml