Issue: 19180201

Friday, February 1, 1918
February, 1918
2
True
92
Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Articles
cover
163
163
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0001.xml
article
163
163,164,165,166,167
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Plugging a Torpedoed Ship
When a hole is torn in the hull, the apron is unrolled like a carpet and lowered over the side
An Automobile Accident Which Couldn’t Be Avoided
A Shirt Worth Two Thousand Dollars
A Catholic Identification Book for Mortally Wounded Soldiers
Races in Motion Pictures Employ a "Ben Hur" Revolving Platform
Why Monkeys Use Their Fists Instead of Their Hands
Explosives Are Simpler in Composition than They Seem
A Chance for the One-Armed Veteran—Let Him Become a Dentist
An Eight-Day Watch Tells the Date and the Day of the Week
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HOW many ships could be saved for the world’s commerce if there were means immediately available to plug ugly holes in their hulls, caused by torpedoes, mines, explosive shells and collisions? This is the question which confronted a Wisconsin inventor and he straightway set about to answer it by inventing a metal apron which can be rolled up and carried on the ship’s deck and immediately lowered to plug a hole torn in the hull.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0002.xml
article
168
168,169
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How Man Makes Rope and Twine by Hand and by Machine
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0003.xml
article
170
170
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Jonah’s Miraculous Gourd Was Not More Wonderful Than These Which Grow on a Farm in New Jersey
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0004.xml
article
171
171
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English Jackies Go to School Too
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0005.xml
article
172
172,173
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Would You Do It for a Living?
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0006.xml
article
174
174
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Reading Flag Signals from the Sky
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0007.xml
article
175
175
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How Her Jeweled Comb Is Made
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0008.xml
article
176
176,177
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The Germans are Coming! Sound Bombs Soar Into the Air to Warn London of Air Raids
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0009.xml
article
178
178
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England’s Heroines Are in Her Munition Plants
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0010.xml
article
179
179
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Nature in the Role of Wood Designer
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0011.xml
article
180
180,181
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Is the Origin of Our Skyscrapers to Be Found In the Cliff Dwellings of Our Prehistoric Ancestors?
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0012.xml
article
182
182,183
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Making Isinglass from the Swimming Bladder of Fishes. This Product of the Hake Is Used to Clarify Wine and Beer, to Make China Cement and to Provide Court-Plaster Adhesive
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0013.xml
article
184
184,185
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Taking Old Dobbin to the Dentist
Horse-dentistry is not one of the overcrowded professions. It is not a calling for weaklings
How Floating Particles of Dust Cause a Fire
A Clock with Works Encased in a Huge Log
Guns of Ice That Fired Real Powder
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PHILADELPHIA has a dental office for horses. You, or rather the horse in company with you, enter the office through a special doorway and are ushered into the waiting room. Here you may rest and improve your mind with the out-of-date literature usually found in dental establishments, while your equine friend is taken to an operating room in the back.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0014.xml
article
186
186
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Supplying Submarines by Trailer
Carrying fuel and supplies in a tender, a submarine is made lighter and more mobile
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AUTOMOBILES have trailers, motor trucks have trailers—why not submarines? Apparently acting on such an idea, Philippo L. E. del Fungo-Giera, of New York city, has patented a tender or trailer which submarines may frisk over the high seas as unconcernedly as a farmer hauls his milk cans in a two-wheeled vehicle behind his Ford.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0015.xml
article
187
187,188,189
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There’s Food and Drink and Fuel in the Tank
Skating Over Ice and Snow in a Queer Motor Sled
A Whale Which Strains Its Food Through Whiskers
The Steel-Plated, Helmeted Knight of the Trenches
Use Your Hot Radiator Water to Keep Your Steering-Wheel Warm
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MOTOR sleighs have not yet been perfected, although there is a genuine demand for them in northern countries. It is difficult to get traction on rough ice or in loose and deep snow. But sideslip of the vehicle is the most obstinate source of trouble, and the control on hills, whether going up or down, is precarious.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0016.xml
article
190
190,191,192,193,194,195,196,197
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Up-to-the-Minute Accessories for the Automobile and Its Owner
At Last the Breakfast Egg Has Broken Into Art
Work the Brake—Quick! Or You’ll Hit the Dummy
Forcing an Automobile Into the Air with a Stream of Water
Estimating Ship-to-Shore Distances
Knit, and Let the Red Cross Machine Knit Too
No Oil? Your Car Will Stop Automatically
Beware of Poultry Which Comes Packed in Barrels
Tent Stoves to Keep Our Soldier Boys Warm in the Training Camps
Nature Herself Branded These Cattle
A Fowl and its Feathers Are Soon Parted—With This Machine
Riding a Moose in the Waters of Rainy Lake
How the Pueblo Indians Celebrate Their Thanksgiving
Non-Flying Air Service Needs Radio Men; Opportunities Wide in Range
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THE Nouveau Art movement has reached San Domingo. There is a pine tree in front of the thatched domicile occupied by the dusky family immortalized in the accompanying photograph, but even its own mother would not recognize it now. In an effort to express their feeling for Art in its relation to Life, (observe that we use the customary capitals), these natives have decorated the pine needles with the shells of the eggs which they have eaten.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0017.xml
article
198
198,199,200,201,202,203,204,205
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Making the Frenchman a Fighter
A vigorous course of training in the open makes him physically fit
How the Cavalcade Approaches Behind the Scenes
Ashes From Burned Wood Make a Good Fertilizer
New Key Hole Saw Which Will Not Jam or Bind
A Well That Supplies Two Kinds of Water
Home Portraiture for Snakes.— Try it on a Rattler
New Ambulances Are Shorter Than the Stretchers They Carry
Wire Cutter Attached to Gun
All Kinds of Commotion at This Theater; Electric Signs Cause It
Shells That Burn and Suffocate
Building Eiffel Towers in the Philippine Jungle
The Brainless Drink-Mixer. It Never Makes a Mistake
A Twentieth Century Treadmill in China. It is Run by Man-Power
A Floating Match-Safe Made from a Shaving-Stick Container
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ONE of the military problems France has solved is that of sending back her soldiers-on-leave to the trenches without their having lost any of their value as fighters. In fact, they go back better soldiers than they were before. When the poilus return from the trenches the sense of discipline is suddenly relaxed, to their military detriment.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0018.xml
article
206
206,207
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Fake Messages from the Spirit World
How mediums read "messages" sent them to be answered
Reducing the Egg Loss Due to Breakage in Shipment
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Hereward Carrington
SCENE:—The rooms of a professional spiritualist. The medium asks a number of persons to write out questions on a piece of paper and to fold up the papers. After the papers are gathered up, they are placed on the small table or "altar" in front of the medium.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0019.xml
article
208
208
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What’s the Matter With You?
The illuminated skeleton tells. The organs are indicated by incandescent lamps
Licking Stamps Is Very Unsanitary
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DR. RATLEDGE, of Los Angeles, has a novel and rather startling method of explaining to you what he thinks is the matter with you. He hangs a skeleton in a frame of piping and indicates the positions of the vital organs by means of incandescent lamps.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0020.xml
article
209
209
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You Run This Store Yourself
But there is a cashier at the door
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IN these days of conservation, it is very appropriate that a new grocery store— a wasteless grocery store—has made its appearance. It is the invention of Clarence Saunders of Memphis, Tenn. The grocery which Mr. Saunders has patented, lowers the cost of operation for its owner and lowers the cost of food for the consumer.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0021.xml
article
210
210,211,212,213,214
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Soothing Our Soldiers Electrically
Electric cages will put new energy in them when worn out. Trench-foot and shell shock also to be aided electrically
For Recreation Only—Detroit’s Innovation in Buildings
Just Melt a Snow Bank Away. But It's Not a Simple Process
Your Automobile Can Be Made Into an Ambulance
Beating the Coal Dealer with Paper "Coal."
The High Pressure System Applied to the New York Fire Department
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Lloyd E. Darling
OF course, you wonder what the picture on our cover means. You see a medical officer operating electrical apparatus, and also a marine inside of a cage. What’s the marine in for? So we introduce to you a little known development in the field of science.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0022.xml
article
215
215
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Pounding a Building to Pieces
How a huge iron ball was used to demolish a concrete structure
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POUNDING a reinforced concrete building to pieces with a one-thousand-two-hundred-pound iron ball was the novel method used by a Chicago wrecking company. The building in question was an eight-story structure. It was designed to carry heavy printing machinery, and was unusually strong.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0023.xml
article
216
216,217,218,219
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Fifty Thousand Operations to Make a Car
How they are performed on the minute by means of the wonderful "Control Board"
Stopping That Draft from Ford Pedal Slots
The Champion Single-Handed Noise Producer of the World
Ears Rust Out More Quickly than They Wear Out
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Reginald Trautschold
THE automobile is now so familiar to us that we have ceased to realize how complex a machine it really is. Fifty thousand or more manufacturing operations are required on a car, and each operation must be performed at exactly the right time. As a guide for the issuance of orders, and as a standing record of progress made in the shops, Major George D. Babcock, production manager of a great automobile company, has devised the "control board."
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0024.xml
article
220
220,221,222,224,225,227,228,229
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The Hell-Trench of the Piave
How an attacking German force was electrocuted as it rushed a second line of trenches
The Seal Which Is Used on Our Paper Money
Don’t Light a Match. Read Your Clock in the Dark
Loading Bullets Without a Mistake in the Weight of Powder and Shot
A Very Busy Sun Dial
A Sled Brake Which Will Not Throw You Headlong Into the Snow
How Many Motion-Picture Tree-Top "Close Ups" Are Taken
Cook a Breakfast for Six for One-fourth of a Cent
Which Cylinder Is Missing Fire ? Find Out from the Seat
Mandolin Music Via the Tuneful Molar
Mother Goose, John Potter, and All the Rest Attended Toy Town Show
A New Cure for the Capers of Hot-Air Furnaces
Removing a Fuse from the High-Tension Mains without Shock
A Bridge Built on a Single Line of Posts
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E. T. Bronsdon
WHEN the Italians stopped, a few weeks ago, with their backs to the Piave River, in northern Italy, with the intent of delaying the Austro-German advance as much as possible, an incident occurred which illustrates the scientific resourcefulness of the Italians and also shows how much of a factor the unexpected can become, even in this warfare of to-day.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0025.xml
article
230
230,231
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Wasting Two Millions
Loss awaits the shipper who packs goods neither wisely nor well
A Spring-Driven Automobile for the Youngsters. It Runs Just Like Dad’s
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BEFORE the war, the loss and damage to merchandise on a single Eastern railroad cost more than a million dollars a year! This year it will reach two million dollars—a year in which the Nation is supposed to act as a unit in the prevention of waste.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0026.xml
article
232
232,233
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Giving France the Locomotives She Needs
Six hundred and eighty engines and six thousand cars are ordered for France
Conserve Your Gasoline—By Pouring Water Into It
You Can Now Practice Putting In Your Own Parlor
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WITHOUT an adequate system of railways to move troops and supplies to the front and distribute ammunition to the big batteries on the firing line, fighting, as it is done nowadays, would be an impossibility. Germany has made the world marvel at her railway system.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0027.xml
article
234
234,235,236,237
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Canopus—A Mighty Celestial Furnace
It is so far away that we see it by the light that left it in the 15th century, and it is 139 times bigger than our Sun
How Small Is Our Mighty Sun!
What is the Biggest Star?
Canopus — Mightiest of Suns
When the Fighting Relaxes the Bayonet Becomes a Periscope
Why Is the Sun Bigger On the Horizon ?
A Simple Supporter Takes the Place of Suspenders
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Scriven Bolton
IF we took up our abode at a distance equal to one of the nearest stars, say Alpha Centauri, long before arriving there our world would be totally invisible, even if we carried with us a powerful telescope. The ratio which it bears to the visible universe of stars is inconceivably less than that which a single drop of water bears to all the oceans of the world united.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0028.xml
article
238
238,239,240
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Do It with Tools and Machines—a Baker’s Dozen of Efficiency Devices for the Mechanic and Factory Man
Fighting Fires With Searchlights
A Car For Use Where Man-Power Is Cheap
Japanese street car is propelled by a coolie’s shoving one foot along the ground
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0029.xml
article
241
241
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Firing a Cannon From a Cannon
An inventor’s ingenious plan to bring down aircraft flying at great heights
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ONCE upon a time, so an old fairy tale runs, a lunatic wanted to bombard the moon. He invented a shell that was in itself a cannon. During its flight, this projectile-cannon would discharge another shell, which was also a cannon. And so by firing successive cannons within cannons the lunatic thought that he might cover the space of 260,000 miles that separates us from our satellite.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0030.xml
article
242
242,243,244,245,246,247,248,249
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Submarines to Foil Submarines
The Germans showed us how to meet the submarine menace and we haven't learned the lesson they taught us yet!
How the Submarine Takes Advantage of Her Low-Lying Hull and Keeps the Big Ship in View While She Is Herself Unseen
Why a Cargo-Carrying Submarine Can Cross the Atlantic Ocean Without Danger of Being Torpedoed
At Last! A Noiseless Telephone
Even Milk Bottle Openers Are Problems in Mechanics
A New Portable Electric Light for Manhole Work
How One Man Can Both Tow and Steer a Disabled Automobile
Cleaning Five Hundred Blackboard Erasers at a Time
You Don’t Spear Eels in Winter— You Hook ’Em
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Simon Lake
DURING the months of September and October, the German submarines sank only twenty vessels a week, according to the dispatches. Only twenty ships per week! How many realize that this is the equivalent of 2,808,000 tons in a year, assuming that the average vessel is about 2,700 registered tons?
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0031.xml
article
250
250,251,252,253,254,255
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The Single-Track Hanging Railway
It saves money in building and it uses the middle of the street
Making the Desert Bloom like a Flower-Garden
Punching Holes in Steel Plates— A Machine Used by Shipbuilders
Another Use for Tree Roots. Make a Fence of Them
Cost of Placing Roadway Stone Reduced by Simple Spreader
A Boy Can Lift a Two-ton Car with This Worm-driven Jack
The Dogs Were Hungry and So They Ate the Church
The Bag Within the Garbage Can. It’s Sanitary and Sensible
You Can’t Fool the Law of Gravity, But the Motion Picture Can
One Inner Tube More Than Holds Up an Automobile
Little Winston-Salem Is Our Biggest Tobacco Center
Skating Along a Railroad Track
This Trailer Elevates Its Own Body
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THE airplane and the submarine were born years ago. In their early youth they were unable to prove how powerful they would be in later years, and most people scorned their promise for the future. Inverted railways, so called, because the cars hang from the rails, must fight the same battle for recognition.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0032.xml
article
256
256,257
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Softening Water by Filtering It
For domestic use a water softener is an absolute necessity to prevent waste
Armless—But Able to Paint Pictures and Signs for All That
Shipping Ore by Monorail Over a Two-Mile Gap
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THE production of absolutely soft water (water of zero hardness) is one of the most notable recent achievements of industrial chemistry. A little more than half a century ago two English chemists, Clark and Porter, discovered that the addition of lime and carbonate of soda would reduce the hardness of natural waters.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0033.xml
article
258
258,259,260,261,262,263,264,265,266,267,268,269
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Housekeeping Made Easy
The Giant Periscope. It Peeps Over Tree Tops Like a Giraffe
An Ambulance with Its Own Traveling Kitchen
Killing the Boll-Weevil with a Deadly Gas
Driving Eight Hundred and Fifty Rivets a Minute in a Trunk
A Lovely View of this Thermometer May Be Had Through a Periscope
Feeding Cattle from Railway Cars to Fatten Them
If Coal Is Too Expensive, Burn Sawdust, as They Do in France
We Fish for the Clam with Dynamite
For a Perfect Private Secretary, There’s Your Watch
The Pig Subway and Why It Was Invented
Cooling Engine Water in Wooden Chimneys
Prolonging the Life of a Motor by Protecting Its Insulation
This Device Protects Your Check From the Forger
The Electric Stevedore Distributes the Mail
How Cutting Tools Are Doing Their Bit
Keeping the Radiator Water Warm During Freezing Weather
Ventilating a Huge Building Covering Forty Acres
"Transfer, Please," Is Answered by An Automatic Machine
Use Your Ladder Properly and Avoid an Accident
Can Yourself for the Night and Turn On the Heat
Lifting a Rowboat Out of the Water by a Twist of a Lever
Setting President Wilson’s Portrait in Type
What is It—Jitney or Railway Coach?
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THE old French saying, "Be silent; your enemies are listening!" might well be paraphrased by the Germans to read, "Lie low; the English are looking!" Like the person "from Missouri," the British officer must see his way very clearly. For this reason, perhaps, the periscope is put to more strenuous service among the English troops than among any of the other belligerents.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0034.xml
article
270
270,271
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Because Transportation Is Civilization the World Is Preparing Itself for Commercial Domination of the Air
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0035.xml
article
272
272
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A Track-Laying Tractor
Its front wheel lays a track and the whole machine turns in a ten-foot circle
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OUT in California, where the small, farm tractor has been more highly developed than in any other part of the world, an unusual tractor has appeared. It has three wheels like many other tractors. But in this case, to give great pulling power, the front or steering wheel is a track-laying wheel.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0036.xml
article
273
273
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Why the Horse Is An Aristocrat
He is the product of an ancestry that goes back three million years
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THE earliest known ancestor of the horse, called the Eohippus or "Dawn Horse," is believed to have existed more than three million years ago, in what is known as the Eocene Age, hundreds of thousands of years before the coming of man. Fossil remains of that animal were found in certain rock strata in this country.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0037.xml
article
274
274,275,276
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Drawing Twenty Shades at Once
The stereopticon operator pushes a button and presto! the shades are raised or lowered
Wood Flour Is a New Product Made from Sawdust
A Lawyer’s Brief Case Is the Engineer’s Knapsack
Here Is a New Tool for Grinding Your Automobile Engine Valves
Simple Home Tests for Tea and Coffee
There Is An Increasing Wastage of Adult Life
The Blind Have a Deck of Cards All Their Own
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THE inconvenience of having to draw each window shade separately in an assembly room when motion pictures or stereopticon views are to be shown, has been overcome by an electrical device, which makes it possible to draw all the shades simultaneously by simply pushing a button.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0038.xml
article
277
277,278
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Two Hundred-Yard Drives in Your Parlor
"Fore" you yell, as of old, and hit the golf ball as hard as you like
A Sandpaper Label for the Poison Bottle Gives Warning in the Dark
A Trolley Hoist for Handling Coal
To Make Your Shoes Last Longer, Oil Them Occasionally
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PARLOR golf would, in theory, seem to have all the benefits and thrills of parlor baseball, as both games are supposed to require much room, but you can make no inventor believe this. The very latest endeavor to harness down the game to the confines of the largest apartment in your residence, is a machine which lets you whack the ball with all your might and which indicates not only the length of the drive, but also the elevation and deflection, so that you can judge what the ball might have done in the open air, untethered to an unromantic contraption of springs and things.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0039.xml
article
279
279,280
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"Ninety Degrees" says the Regulator
And that will be the unchanging temperature of your bath
Making a Ram Drive a Cream Separator
A Six-in-One Article—A Revelation in Usefulness
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AT the top of the contrivance here illustrated, a little lever slides over a small, circular and graduated scale. Set this lever at any point you like— the scale reads in degrees Fahrenheit—open a valve and forth with your bath water comes out at the right temperature.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0040.xml
article
281
281,282,283,284,285,286
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FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
Fish Bowl with Folding Stand for the Magician
Unequally Adjusted Rear Wheel Brakes Cause Skidding
A Bench Holder for a Large Pair of Tinner’s Snips
A Homemade Focusing Hood for a Hand Camera
An Indestructible Paper Weight and Blotter
Making Bone Black from Scraps of Leather
A Sled Driven by a Motorcycle Engine and Airplane Propeller
Qualities of Steel and Wrought Iron for Plumbing
A Screen Cover for an Ordinary Flower Holder
Removing the Stains of Silver Nitrate From Cloth
Soldering a Crack in an Old-Style Copper Bathtub
Rebuilding a Wrecked Automobile To Make a Racing Car
Making an Oak Footstool in Mission Style
Asbestos Used in Place of Copper for Laboratory Hoods
How to Make a Force Pump of Pipe and Fittings
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W. E. DAY
CHAS. CLAUDE WAGNER
W. S. STANDIFORD
HENRY KLAUS
GEO. M. FOX
W. S. STANDIFORD
J. E. PETTIBONE
JAMES M. KANE
FLOYD L. DARROW
C. H. THOMAS
THIS very serviceable fish bowl is really of a collapsible variety. Contrary to appearance, it can be folded upwater, fish and all—and carried beneath your coat. To substantiate this statement it can be said that this bowl is the invention of one of the world’s greatest "eye foolers"—an old-time magician named Hartz.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0041.xml
article
287
287,288,289,290
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Homemade Pair of Skis
A simple method of making skis without having to bend the wood
How to Make Knitting Needles in a Speed Lathe
Making a Lock Washer from a Coil of Spring Wire
A Heater for the Sidecar of a Motorcycle
Caring for Rubbers to Make Them Wear Longer
A Practical Ventilator for the Dairy Barn
Making Briquettes for an Alcohol Stove
Homemade Hot Air Intake for a Carbureter
Adjusting the Foot Pedal to Prevent Wear on Gears
Circulating Water in a Gas Holder to Prevent Freezing
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PETER J. M. CLUTE
DANIEL GREEN
N. DRYNAN
W. E. FRUDDEN
W. S. STANDIFORD
P. P. AVERY
JAMES M. KANE
BY following the design here illustrated, it is comparatively easy to construct a pair of skis with which one can travel on the surface of the softest snowdrift without sinking. Procure two hardwood boards about 6 ft. long, 4 in. in width, and ½ in. thick.
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article
291
291,292,293,294
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Tricks of the Trade
Under this head each month there will appear one or more articles describing methods and short cuts in shop work practice
Burning Holes in Patterns
Tempering a Chisel to Cut Stone or Bricks
Mercury Used for a Thrust Bearing on an Upright Shaft
Hand Sled Propeller Made of Discarded Buggy Wheels
The Most Convenient Way to Lock a Motorcycle
How to Straighten a Bent Rim on a Headlight
How to Make an Aquarium for Tropical Fish
A Secure Fastening for an A-Shaped Sign
Using Shingles to Make a Thatch-Like Effect at Eaves
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C. E. STONE
DR. E. BADE
G. P. LEHMANN
PATTERN makers and other wood workers are often at their wits end to find a way to make smooth, tapering holes, especially in a piece of wood which is cross-grained, or in which the hole has to run diagonally with the grain. Ordinarily a sharp taper reamer may do the work, but one of just the right size, is not always at hand, and when a hole of a particular size and bevel is required, the taper reamer will not do the work.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0043.xml
article
295
295,296
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Simple Designs for Sheet Metal Working
IX.—Development of patterns for approximate spheres
Developing the Pattern
A Simple Method of Developing the Pattern
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Arthur F. Payne
THE name "Approximate Sphere," given to the problem illustrated, will very likely need explanation to some of the readers of this series. The common names for this problem are "Gored Ball" and "Slab-sided Ball." A sphere is an object that presents a perfect circle from all points of view.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0044.xml
article
297
297,298,299,300,301,302
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Sound Advice on Coal Saving
To the man with the shovel
A Motorcycle Engine used as an Air Pump
A Block of Wood for Holding the Clothes Line Taut
Making a Barometer from a Burned-Out Electric Globe
How to Make a Windshield for the Motorcycle Messenger
How to Make a Strong Glue That Will Withstand Moisture
Another Card Trick—the Inseparable Jacks and King
Making Simple Life Slides for Microscopic Work
Cane Chair Seats and How to Weave Them
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J. W. WOODMAN
FRANK L. MATTER
K. M. COGGESHALL
GEO. STENCHAM
H. J. GRAY
WITH trillions of tons of coal in the ground, America is hard-pressed to furnish coal for munitions factories and steel plants; for the Army and Navy; and for domestic consumption. There are not enough coal cars to transport coal needed for American consumption and for the maintenance of our Allies.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0045.xml
article
303
303,304,305,306
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A RIFLE RANGE
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Geo. M. Petersen
IN these times, when efficiency for military service is the principal requirement of men, it is well for everyone to understand thoroughly the handling of firearms and how to use them most effectively. Not only is such knowledge a protection, but the Government gives increased pay to those men who can qualify as sharpshooters or experts.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0046.xml
article
307
307,308,309,310
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The Amateur - Electrician And Wireless Operator
Use of a Permanent Magnet with the Audion
Signal Light to Show Gas Turned Off at Oven
Constructing a Dry Cell Which Can Be Renewed
How to Make an Electric Laboratory Furnace
Thermostat Made from a Brass and an Iron Strip
Finding the Polarity of Electric Wires with a Potato
A Spark Plug Tester with an Inclosed Spark Gap
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H. W. OFFINS
PAUL JUSTICE
HERMAN NEUHAUS
HERMAN NEUHAUS
F. E. BRIMMER
W. S. STANDIFORD
FLOYD L. DARROW
MANY articles have been published in electrical publications regarding the use of permanent magnets in connection with vacuum tube detectors. Some authors state that the intensity of signals is greatly increased, by the use of magnets, while others find that no advantage is gained by their use.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0047.xml
article
311
311,312,313,314,315,316
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Electrical Devices and How They Work
Secondary Cells; Storage Batteries—II
Making a Wet Battery from Ordinary Dry Cells
Coating a Tin Oil Can to Prevent Rust
A New Condenser to Protect Wireless Generators
Increasing the Range of the Ground Wireless Station
Where Fiber May be Used as a Fireproof Material
A Telegraph Sounder Made from Old Bell Parts
A Secret Code of Colors for Transmitting Messages
Only Uncut Diamonds Are Used to Dress Emery Stones
Practicing the Telegraph Code Without a Battery
The Normal Running Temperature of Electric Machines
A New Use for Fogged Photographic Plates
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Peter J. M. Clute
F. M. WAGNER
JAMES M. KANE
E. T. JONES
E. T. JONES
ALEX V. POLSON
W. S. STANDIFORD
IN the primary cell, electric current is produced by the decomposition of the electrolytic solution and the consumption of a zinc electrode. In other words, the varying natural potentials of two substances, such as zinc and copper or zinc and carbon, constitute the original impulse to a succession of reactions whereby chemical energy is transformed into continuous electrical energy.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0048.xml
article
317
317,318,319,320
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Wireless Work in Wartime
VII.—Fundamental Principles of Radio Apparatus
The Elements of Signaling Systems
The Basic Process of Radio Telegraphy
Audio and Radio Frequencies
Machine Generation of Alternating Current
Generation by Condenser Discharge
A Simple Radio Transmitter
Two-Circuit Spark Transmitter
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John L. Hogan
THE six preceding articles of this series comprise a fairly complete set of instructions in learning wireless operating, from the simple viewpoint of telegraphing. Memorizing the code, reading Morse signals by sound, and practice in overcoming the difficulties of "station" and atmospheric interference have been taken up in some detail.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0049.xml
article
321
321
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Splitting Up the Country
Penalized for Where You Live
What You Should Do About It
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DO you know that the postage on your magazines is to be increased by several hundred per cent beginning July 1st, unless you and other intelligent citizens protest strongly enough? It is a huge tax on intelligence. For many years one cent has carried a pound of publications to any place in the country.
PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0050.xml
article
322
322,323,324
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Man-made Beauty—Electrically Baked Curls
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PopularScience_19180201_0092_002_0051.xml