Issue: 19171001

Monday, October 1, 1917
October, 1917
4
True
91
Friday, December 5, 2014

Articles
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1
1
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Liggette Myers Tobacco Co.: Chesterfield
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Liggette Myers Tobacco Co.
Chesterfield
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0001.xml
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2
2
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Victor Talking Machine Co.: Victrola
[no value]
Victor Talking Machine Co.
Victrola
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0002.xml
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3
3
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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO.
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THE BRUNSWICK-BALKE-COLLENDER CO.
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0003.xml
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4
4
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SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION
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SOUTHERN CYPRESS MANUFACTURERS' ASSOCIATION
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0004.xml
tableOfContents
5
5,6
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0005.xml
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7
7
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The Oliver Typewriter Co.
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The Oliver Typewriter Co.
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0006.xml
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8
8,9
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0007.xml
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10
10,11
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ALOIS P. SWOBODA
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ALOIS P. SWOBODA
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0008.xml
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12
12
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Michigan State Auto School
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Michigan State Auto School
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0009.xml
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13
13
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QUINN CONSERVATORY
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QUINN CONSERVATORY
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0010.xml
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14
14
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0011.xml
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15
15
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Alexander Hamilton Institute
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Alexander Hamilton Institute
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0012.xml
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16
16
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0013.xml
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17
17
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McGraw-Hill Book Co. Inc.
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McGraw-Hill Book Co. Inc.
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0014.xml
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18
18
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0015.xml
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19
19
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Typewriter Emporium
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Typewriter Emporium
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0016.xml
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20
20
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0017.xml
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21
21
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0018.xml
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22
22
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0019.xml
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23
23
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0020.xml
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24
24
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Frederick J. Drake & Co.
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Frederick J. Drake & Co.
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0021.xml
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24
24
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MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF DRUMMING
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MICHIGAN SCHOOL OF DRUMMING
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0022.xml
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24
24
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University Extension Conservatory
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University Extension Conservatory
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0023.xml
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25
25
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Prof. Henry Dickson
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Prof. Henry Dickson
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0024.xml
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26
26
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0025.xml
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27
27
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Department of Signaling
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Department of Signaling
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0026.xml
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28
28
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THE WORLD’S WORK
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THE WORLD’S WORK
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0027.xml
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29
29
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0028.xml
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30
30
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Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0029.xml
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31
31
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H. J. RAHE
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H. J. RAHE
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0030.xml
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31
31
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I. C. S.
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I. C. S.
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0031.xml
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31
31
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0032.xml
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32
32
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BIRCH MOTOR CARS
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BIRCH MOTOR CARS
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0033.xml
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32
32
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THE AMERICAN CHAUFFEUR
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THE AMERICAN CHAUFFEUR
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0034.xml
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32
32
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American Technical Society
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American Technical Society
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0035.xml
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33
33
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RAHE'S AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR SCHOOL
[no value]
RAHE'S AUTOMOBILE AND TRACTOR SCHOOL
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0036.xml
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33
33
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Perfect Voice Institute
[no value]
Perfect Voice Institute
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0037.xml
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33
33
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FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
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FRANKLIN INSTITUTE
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0038.xml
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34
34
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Burlington Watch Company
[no value]
Burlington Watch Company
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0039.xml
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35
35,36,37,38,39,40,42
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0040.xml
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41
41
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Coyne Trade and Engineering Schools
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Coyne Trade and Engineering Schools
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0041.xml
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43
43
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AMERICAN SCHOOL OF AVIATION
[no value]
AMERICAN SCHOOL OF AVIATION
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0042.xml
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44
44
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0043.xml
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44
44
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WESTERN NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION
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WESTERN NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0044.xml
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44
44
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Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0045.xml
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45
45
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Aero NATIONAL Institute
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Aero NATIONAL Institute
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0046.xml
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45
45
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L. L. COOKE
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L. L. COOKE
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0047.xml
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46
46
[no value]
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American Technical Society
[no value]
American Technical Society
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0048.xml
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46
46
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0049.xml
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47
47
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
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CHICAGO TECHNICAL COLLEGE
[no value]
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0050.xml
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48
48,49
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The Davey Tree Expert Company
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The Davey Tree Expert Company
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0051.xml
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50
50
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Nelson Doubleday
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Nelson Doubleday
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0052.xml
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51
51
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Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0053.xml
article
482
482,483
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Is This the Machine-Gun of the Future?
Aimed and Fired by Mechanism
The men are concealed and the trigger is pulled by machine; the barrel is cooled like an automobile engine; the ammunition supply is continuous
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Edward C. Crossman
MACHINE guns talk in stutters— staccato stutters. They can fire at the rate of six hundred shots per minute, but they can’t keep up the pace. Part of this failure is due to the fact that the ammunition containers are limited in capacity, part is due to the fact that the very first rattle of shots jars the gun off the mark, unless the mark be a very large one.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0054.xml
article
484
484
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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If You Lisp or Stammer Train Yourself with a Mirror or a Candle
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LISPING and stammering are separate imperfections of speech which require entirely different treatment. Lispers, for instance, can be cured in a short time by tongue and palate gymnastics. They “lithp” simply because they do not work their tongue and palate properly.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0055.xml
article
484
484
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
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The Original Motion Picture Film— It Is in the Human Eye
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THAT the human eye and the photographic lens are very much alike in design and operation is a well known fact. If you look through a photographic lens you will see nothing clearly. To perceive the image a piece of ground glass or a plate of film is necessary.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0056.xml
article
484
484
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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A Self-Inflicted Tug-of-War to Increase Your Height
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TO increase the height by a stretching process, to vivify the spine and stimulate the nerves— these are the purposes of an odd machine known as the pandiculator, invented by a chiropractic specialist for use in the practice of that method of treatment.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0057.xml
article
485
485
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Fiber Containers Take the Place of Tin Cans for Preserved Foods
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TIN is scarce. Imports have decreased, due to reduced production and poorer shipping facilities. “Ready-to-eat” foods are prepared in the containers; hence they require tin cans. Many foods, like ripe olives, jams, and spices, can be packed as well in glass jars.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0058.xml
article
485
485
MISCELLANY
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The Umbrella Hat—It Was Invented Years Ago by an American
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THE umbrella hat is not a recent invention, but was familiar years ago to the residents of Seattle, as the particular headgear of Robert W. Patten. He was a picturesque figure on the city streets, and he always wore the hat which he invented while mining in Mexico.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0059.xml
article
485
485
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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A Combination Knife and Fork for the Wounded
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EVEN the ordinary tableware is undergoing changes and improvements to meet the needs of the soldiers who have been wounded. The accompanying illustration shows a combination knife and fork which will enable a man to eat in comfort without having to call on some one else to cut up his food.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0060.xml
article
486
486
PICTURE PAGES
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The Makeshift Refrigerators of the Fighters
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0061.xml
article
487
487
PICTURE PAGES
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Training a Horse for One of the Finest Services in the World—The New York Mounted Police
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0062.xml
article
488
488
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An Ounce of Prevention Is Worth a Pound of Cure
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0063.xml
article
489
489
PICTURE PAGES
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The Anti-Submarine Nets Our Tars Are Making
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0064.xml
article
490
490
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If All the Allies’ Army Blankets Were Rolled Together, End to End!
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0065.xml
article
491
491
PICTURE PAGES
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What It Means to Feed, Shoe and Clothe the Armies of the Allies
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0066.xml
article
492
492
PICTURE PAGES
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France Patrols the Blistering Sahara with Airplanes
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0067.xml
article
493
493
PICTURE PAGES
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Indian Art Is Not Limited to Basketry
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0068.xml
article
494
494
PICTURE PAGES
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Food—Food—Everywhere If We Would Only Eat
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0069.xml
article
495
495
PICTURE PAGES
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Hell Fire Up to Date
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0070.xml
article
496
496,497
PICTURE PAGES
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Dolling Up Your Ford
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0071.xml
article
498
498
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“Count Every Shot and Make Every Shot Count,”
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0072.xml
article
499
499
PICTURE PAGES
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Is the Order Given to the Coast Artilleryman
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0073.xml
article
500
500
PICTURE PAGES
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Building the Foundation for a Wasp Empire
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0074.xml
article
501
501
PICTURE PAGES
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The First Stage in the Life of a Wasp
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0075.xml
article
502
502
PICTURE PAGES
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Three Stages of Growth in a Wasp Colony
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0076.xml
article
503
503,504,505,506
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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Choosing Your Suit of Air
A problem in scientific ventilation and how it is being solved by some interesting experiments
What Is Good Ventilation?
The Findings of the Jury of Specialists
The Nose Is a Pretty Good Judge
Why Even Warm Winds Are Cooling
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George T. Palmer
A PROPER "suit of air" is just as important as a serviceable suit of clothes. A “suit of air” is not imaginary. It is a fact. Our bodies are entirely surrounded by air. Out of doors we can make the air fit us pretty well by taking off or putting on more clothes, or by moving about if necessary to keep warm.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0077.xml
article
507
507
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What a Life of Captivity Does to the Lion
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SOME interesting facts have been revealed from a study showing the differences between wildkilled lions and those which had died in the National Zoological Park in Washington. It was found that captivity changes the normal buff color of the lion to a darker color, the color deepening for each successive moult for five years at least.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0078.xml
article
507
507
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
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A Stylish New Blanket-Coat for the Baby Lamb
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THE greatest obstacle which stands in the way of providing very young or new-born lambs with artificial coats or blankets to protect them from sudden changes in temperature or from storms until their own coats are heavy enough to serve the purpose, is the fact that the covering material is likely to destroy the lamb odor by which the mother recognizes her offspring.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0079.xml
article
507
507
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Firing Shells Charged with Gasoline Which Ignites on Impact
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IN their great attack upon Messines Ridge, the British brought into play a new weapon, the inflammable shell. "We didn't use gas in the attack," said one correspondent, "but every known form of offensive weapon I think we did supply, including a new horror known in the army as ‘oil cans,’ or ‘boiling oil.’
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0080.xml
article
508
508
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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New Jobs for the Motor-Truck and New
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0081.xml
article
509
509
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Additions to the List of Accessories
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0082.xml
article
510
510
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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War Work for Motor-Trucks
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0083.xml
article
511
511
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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New Tools for the Automobile Repairman
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PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0084.xml
article
512
512
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Turning a Car in Its Own Length
It is a mere matter of lifting it and swinging it around on its rear wheels
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THE parking problem would be partially solved by the adoption of the device illustrated, which enables a car to turn around in its own length. It consists of a small wheel carried crosswise of the car between the front of the motor and the radiator.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0085.xml
article
513
513
RAILWAYS
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Can the Baby When You Take a Journey
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THE good news is true. We have been hoping for years that some intelligent inventor would come along with a device to can obstreperous infants during the late hours of the night. We suggested a hermetically-sealed can wrapped in sound-proof material, but Caleb M. Prather, of Evanston, Illinois, who is the inventor of the can illustrated, sidestepped our instructions at several important points.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0086.xml
article
513
513
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Will the Shell Burst When It Is Fired? A Water Test Tells
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A PROJECTILE fired from a gun is subjected to enormous strains which it must be strong enough to withstand; otherwise it might be as dangerous to the gun crew as to the enemy. To assure safety as well as destructiveness, the steel from which the shells are made is subjected to different tests.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0087.xml
article
514
514,515
MISCELLANY
[no value]
From Soup to Nuts
“Who’s who” behind the scenes in a big hotel or restaurant kitchen
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ORDERING a meal at a fashionable restaurant or hotel is simple enough— to the diner. But it is safe to say that few have any idea of what goes on behind the scenes, that is, in the kitchens, after the order has been given to the waiter. As a matter of fact, giving one’s order of, say, oysters, soup, fish, steak, salad, dessert and coffee starts a most intricate process.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0088.xml
article
516
516
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Work the Typewriter Standing and Sitting—It Lessens Fatigue
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THERE is no waste of any kind in the world,” says Frank B. Gilbreth, the motion study expert, “that equals the waste from needless, ill-directed and ineffective motions.” One result of this waste is fatigue. Some fatigue is necessary and some unnecessary.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0089.xml
article
516
516
[no value]
[no value]
Each Salesman Has His Own Telephone in This Grocery
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A CHICAGO grocer increases his business through telephone orders by supplying each of his salesmen with a special telephone on a table bearing the salesman’s name. Thus he avoids the delays and confusion entailed by calling the different salesmen to the telephone.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0090.xml
article
517
517
CHEMISTRY
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Buttons Are Now Made as a By-Product of Beer
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THE spent yeast which collects in breweries and distilleries is put through a process which turns it out in the form of buttons, doorbell plates and knife handles. Formerly this left-over material was considered to be a bothersome waste; now it is utilized, every bit of it.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0091.xml
article
517
517
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
This Truck Loader Will Lift One Ton Ten Inches Per Second
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MECHANICAL loading devices are not rare, but the one shown in the illustration below has several novel features. It is in three parts: a supporting frame, a traveling crane and a dynamo for generating the necessary electricity. The traveling crane comprises a motor, a clutch, a driving mechanism and a lifting winch.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0092.xml
article
517
517
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Gear Wheels Made of Cotton. They Outlast Steel Gears
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GEARS are now being made of ordinary cotton which outwear those made from the finest steel. It seems incredible, but it is true. The very hardness of the metal gears causes the teeth surfaces to scrape over each other when they mesh, producing hideous screeches and groans.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0093.xml
article
518
518
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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The New American Enfield Rifle
A modification of the English Enfield with which our troops will be supplied
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IN order to obtain a sufficient number of rifles with which to arm the new United States army in as short a time as possible, the War Department has decided to supplement its supply of Springfields with a modification of the English Enfield rifle which is being manufactured in this country in large quantities for the British government.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0094.xml
article
519
519
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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That Bit of Butter Left on Your Plate —What Becomes of It?
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THERE are about sixty-four individual helpings of butter in a pound, each helping equaling about one fourth of an ounce. If the accumulated “scrapings” from the butter-plates after the meal were estimated there would probably be about one “pat” collected each day, in the average household.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0095.xml
article
519
519
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
This Vacuum Cleaner Is Used Like an Ordinary Broom
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[no value]
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[no value]
A NEW vacuum cleaner which operates without electricity combines the features of a carpet-sweeper and ordinary broom with the special vacuum feature. A bellows, which is operated by the backward and forward motion of the cleaner, furnishes suction which draws the dirt and dust up into the retaining bag.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0096.xml
article
519
519
RAILWAYS
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How Print Butter Is Shipped to the Retailer
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THE wholesaler who sends his butter out to the retail trade in neatly wrapped pound-packages or “prints,” runs less risk of having his product spoiled in transit than if the butter were shipped in tubs. The accompanying photograph shows how he manages to keep the butter fresh and in shape until it is delivered.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0097.xml
article
520
520
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
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The Graveyard of Ships that Passed in the Night
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MONNSANTO is the name of a man remarkable not only in character but in occupation. His home is the Island of St. Thomas, recently bought from Denmark by the United States. A visitor to St. Thomas cannot fail to hear about him, and should not miss the opportunity of seeing him.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0098.xml
article
520
520
MISCELLANY
[no value]
What Is It—Pencil or Pen ? It Has Neither Wood nor Graphite
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A WRITING implement composed of a mixture of wax and finely-ground pumice stone containing particles of ink, has been invented by William C. Geer, of Akron, Ohio, to take the place of ordinary and fountain pens, pencils, crayons and all other writing implements.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0099.xml
article
521
521
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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A Shock Absorber for the Soldier’s Kit
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NOT all the difficulty that a soldier has in carrying a pack on his back is due to the sheer weight of it. An equal, if not a greater strain is caused by the constant jolting of the equipment as he walks along. To ease this strain, an Englishman, James A. Pugh; of Cardiff, Wales, has invented a pneumatic shock absorber for the soldier.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0100.xml
article
521
521
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
The Life-Preserver Is More Important Than Meals Aboard Ship
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THE life-preserver is your best friend when you travel on ocean liners these days. Even the captains of ships that steam along the coast insist that you get acquainted with the life-preserver the first hour or so you are on board. Lifeboat drills are now regularly held on all liners.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0101.xml
article
522
522
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Two Ties in One—The Bow and the Four-in-Hand
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[no value]
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D. D. BAILEY, of Coffeyville, Kansas, has devised a method of saving his ties by combining his four-in-hands and bow ties in one tie. Thus he can wear the bow ties as four-in-hands, or the other way around. His first efforts resulted in a folding tie, too bulky to be practical.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0102.xml
article
522
522
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Your Motor Is Known by the Piston Rings It Has
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HOW far and how fast your automobile travels, depends upon the power emanating from the motor, and that power, in turn, depends upon the piston rings. Piston rings are inserted because they increase the motor power of the car, keep the compression at maximum and therefore put more power behind the drive of the piston itself.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0103.xml
article
522
522
MISCELLANY
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It Holds and Presses Your Tie at the Same Time
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A COMBINED necktie holder and press which takes the wrinkles out of your scarfs after you have worn them is the latest convenience for the man who is particular about his neckwear. The holder and press is of veneered maple. It takes the wrinkles out of a scarf at the particular place where they have been caused, by stretching that portion under spring wire clamps.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0104.xml
article
523
523
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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A Crutch Built on the Principle of the Rocking Chair
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A NEW crutch has made its appearance in England, where crutches just now are as numerous as walking sticks. Its principal feature is a rocker at the base, like that of a rocking chair. This is said to make walking easier. Instead of two sticks coming together to form a round stump the sticks of the new crutch are continued parallel from the shoulder-rest to the rocker.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0105.xml
article
523
523
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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Steam Jets Which Save Thousands of Dollars in Large Power Plants
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IN large power plants even little “losses,” if allowed to continue, will produce an annual loss of thousands of dollars. Of all such losses, that caused by soot is one of the most persistent. Collecting as it does in layers perhaps an inch thick about the water tubes in the boilers, it serves to insulate the water from the heat of the fires.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0106.xml
article
524
524
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Nasty Job This—Gleaning Customers’ Ears
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EVIDENTLY the Japanese are a long-suffering people. Take for instance the docility of the occupant of the barber’s chair in the accompanying photograph. He has seated himself there to get his hair trimmed and will pay the price, no doubt. But as part of the tonsorial operation, the barber, with a contrivance somewhat like a series of blunt knitting needles padded on the ends with cotton, proceeds to clean out the ears of his patron.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0107.xml
article
524
524
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Pulling and Pushing to Make the Swing Go
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BECAUSE it was impossible to read the evening newspaper and swing his children at the same time, George A. Netcott, of Independence, Iowa, set about to devise a self-operated swing which would enable a child to swing itself without calling on the parent for assistance.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0108.xml
article
525
525
NATURAL SCIENCE
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This Bird’s Nest Is Evidently a Two-Room Apartment
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BIRDS, like persons, sometimes do strange things. Here is a double nest of a “Chipping” sparrow, an unusual type indeed for this bird. A guess at the explanation would be that a roving bird, probably a cuckoo, which is notoriously lazy and homeless, deposited an egg in the sparrow’s nest while she was taking a bit of recreation.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0109.xml
article
525
525
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
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Which Is It—Boat or Motor Car? It Travels on Both Land and Water
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"DELIA the motor duck” is no doubt remembered by readers of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY. For the benefit of those who did not see her in our issue of March, 1916, let it be said that Delia is a curious vehicle which plunges through the waves as easily as any boat and which runs on land as easily as any automobile; for Delia is both boat and car.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0110.xml
article
525
525
MISCELLANY
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It Takes About 150 Pounds Pressure to Break an Egg
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NATURE executed a wonderful piece of workmanship when she put the shell around the egg. Most of us have an idea that the shell is fragile. It is—sometimes; but scientists have established the fact that the average pressure under which white eggs break is one hundred and twelve pounds.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0111.xml
article
526
526,527,528
MISCELLANY
[no value]
What Makes a Criminal?
Reaching the minds of those who habitually rob and kill
No Hope for the Feeble-Minded
A Laboratory Where Criminals Are Studied
How the Criminal Is Tested
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[no value]
Dr. L. E. Bisch
A YOUNG man of eighteen and a companion entered a tenement building. They seemed to be peddlers. They knocked at a door and entered a flat. Within was an old man, confined to a chair, helpless, and stone blind. One of the two peered about to find out if the old man was really alone.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0112.xml
article
529
529
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
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She Launches Seaplanes and She’s Unsinkable
A ship which is built to serve as a starting platform for airplanes and to combat the submarine menace
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IF water is reasonably clear, a submarine, not too far submerged, can be seen from an airplane. Unfortunately an airplane cannot rise from rough water. Hence, even when used as a scout for a battle fleet in order to determine the number and position of an enemy’s ships, the seaplane has its limitations.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0113.xml
article
530
530,531
AERONAUTICS
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The Charge of the Lightest Brigade
The men in the airplanes swoop down and rake the trenches of the enemy with machine-gun fire—a new military maneuver
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[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
CONSIDER well the photograph reproduced at the bottom of this page, showing French soldiers engaging in a new kind of target practice. They are learning how to shoot at swift, low-flying airplanes. It is an historic document— this photograph.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0114.xml
article
531
531
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Let Cheese Be Your Principal Meat Substitute
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A POUND of cheese supplies more than twice as much energy as a pound of fowl or round steak and almost twice as much protein as the same amount of fowl or ham. It is, pound for pound, more nourishing than any meat. Why, therefore, do we not use it as a substitute for meat?
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0115.xml
article
532
532
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Put These Webbed Gloves on and Swim Like a Duck
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[no value]
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HOW would you like to be able to swim as fast as a duck, and with as little effort, with webbed hands and feet to push your way through water? It is not at all impossible, now that Dr. A. Kandor Zawadski, of Honolulu, has invented his swimming glove.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0116.xml
article
532
532
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Statistically, What Is Your Chance of Being Killed in This War?
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IF you, a drafted man, believe that statistics tell the truth, you will feel as safe in France as you usually do in the streets of New York. So says Roger W. Babson, the eminent statistician. Furthermore, he says that the man who is connected with the heavy field artillery is no more likely to be killed than one in the employ of a railroad.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0117.xml
article
532
532
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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The Small Caterpillar Tractor Rings the Death Knell of the Industrial Railroad
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[no value]
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A SMALL tractor of the conventional caterpillar type which is designed as a substitute for the narrow-gage industrial railroads operated in connection with large plants, has recently made its appearance. It can move material rapidly from one department of a factory to another and pass obstacles, since it does not require roads or tracks for its operation.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0118.xml
article
533
533
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Lowering the Life-Boats by Means of Gear-Operated Davits
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TO make possible the rapid lowering of lifeboats, Everett W. Myers and Aaron E. Sharpley, of Key West, Florida, have devised gear-operated swinging davits. Each davit is provided near its shank and close to the deck with a gear, with which a bevel gear carried by a crank shaft meshes.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0119.xml
article
533
533
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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The Camouflage Soldier—A Decoy for the German Sharpshooter
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WE have heard of tin soldiers but it has remained for J. Burgess, an officer in training at Fort Sheridan, Illinois, to bring to our attention a camouflage soldier of papier mâché. His plan is to place a large number of these dummy soldiers beside the regular troops on the firing line, to serve as decoys for the Germans.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0120.xml
article
534
534,535
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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Do It With Tools and Machinery
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[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0121.xml
article
536
536
ELECTRICITY
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His Lighting Bill Is Twenty-Five Cents a Month
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AN old water wheel on the estate of Frank B. Moore, at Trenton, N. J., is made to run an electric light plant and to pump water for three acres of trucking ground at an approximate expense of twenty-five cents per month for lubricating oil—the water doing the rest.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0122.xml
article
536
536
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Maltreating a Rubber Water Bottle to Test Its Strength
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NO; the photograph shown below is not a thriller intended for the motion picture screen. It is merely a record of a test made by a rubber goods manufacturing company to find out how much strain their hot water bottle would stand. First a girl was allowed to have fun with it after it had been filled with water, by using it as a punching bag.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0123.xml
article
537
537
MISCELLANY
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How You Light Your Cigar When Traveling in Italy
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THE Italian substitute for the neat and convenient cigar lighter found in every American cigar store is a long rope lighted and placed outside of the tobacco shop. It is made of cheap hemp, of rope waste, and even of rags twisted roughly into shape and held together by strings of twine.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0124.xml
article
537
537
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Stamping Two Thousand Letters an Hour with a New Machine
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GONE would be the stamp-licker and the wet sponge were every office furnished with this new mechanical stamper having a capacity of two thousand letters per hour. This machine differs from others of its kind in that it moistens the envelope instead of the stamp and in this way does away with the possibility of the stamps gumming and thereby preventing the successful operation of the machine.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0125.xml
article
538
538
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
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A Houseboat of Marble Built to Amuse Chinese Royalty
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THE most beautiful and perhaps the most costly houseboat in the world is the one illustrated on this page. It is made entirely of marble and served to amuse the household of Chinese royalty. When the boat was built no one knows. It floated on a small lake within the precincts of the “Forbidden City” in the last days of the Manchu dynasty.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0126.xml
article
538
538
ELECTRICITY
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"Do It Electrically" Also Applies to the Up-to-Date Barber
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AN electrically operated hair cutter which entirely eliminates the shears has been devised. It consists essentially of a light standard with cross-arms at the top to support a small electric motor connected with the clippers by a flexible cord three or four feet long.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0127.xml
article
538
538
AERONAUTICS
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The Airplane to the Rescue of Storm-Tossed Mariners!
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[no value]
MORE than a hurricane on the high seas do sailors fear even sixty - mile gales near a rocky coast. To the life savers, also, a rocky coast is most dangerous. In any attempt of theirs to reach a vessel that is doomed, what is to keep their puny shell from being dashed upon the rocks?
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0128.xml
article
539
539
[no value]
[no value]
Throwing Out the Lifeline by Airplane
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[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0129.xml
article
540
540
AERONAUTICS
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The Bomb-Droppers Are Coming! Hug the Ground
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THIS is the advice which is being given to the school children of Sussex, England. They are being drilled daily in dropping suddenly face downward and remaining perfectly motionless on the ground, just as our school, children are put through the fire drill.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0130.xml
article
540
540
[no value]
[no value]
If Your Eyes Are Weak Use a Less Brilliant Desk Light
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you have a sense of faulty vision it is a natural inclination to seek a very strong light by which to read or study. This simply adds to the eye strain. The best light is an indirect, diffused light of sufficient strength to make the letters on the page stand out in uniform distinctness.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0131.xml
article
540
540,541
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Torpedoed! But the Cargo Floats Off Safely
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE question of saving the cargo of food-stuffs on a torpedoed ship has received what seems to be a practical answer by W. G. Durant, of Jacksonville, Florida, who proposes to seal up the cargo in galvanized iron containers which will float on the surface of the sea after the ship has sunk.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0132.xml
article
542
542
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Protecting the Airplane with a Fire-Proof Coating
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW varnish or coating for airplane surfaces which makes them fireproof has been introduced by W. R. Weeks, of New York city, who is interested in the treatment and waterproofing of fabrics. Of late there have been a number of so-called fire-proof paints and varnishes proposed for the airplane.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0133.xml
article
542
542
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Forty-Three Bombs in a Freight Car Load of Scrap Iron
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FORTY-THREE bombs hidden in a freight car loaded with scrap iron bound for the furnaces of a big foundry in Chicago, were discovered by the keen eyes of Government agents recently. The discovery was made through the watchfulness of George Marmann, the man shown in the photograph, who became suspicious when he noticed the round objects mixed with the scrap material.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0134.xml
article
543
543
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
The Rising Price of Automobiles—Charge It to the War
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[no value]
THE policy of automobile manufacturers of yearly reducing the price of their cars has received a severe jolt. With steel, copper and rubber going out of the country as they have, the rising cost of these materials promises to sweep the price of the cars up with them.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0135.xml
article
543
543
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
The Overdriven Nail and the High Cost of Living
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE wooden packing case is required with every twenty-four of the billions of cans that America uses in her canning industry each year. The expense of the cases, when everything is added up, is so great that packers are availing themselves of every invention or idea which promises to reduce it.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0136.xml
article
543
543
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
A Substitute for Forms in Concrete Roofs and Floors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE necessity of erecting temporary wooden forms for concrete roofs and floors is avoided by the use of a metal support which becomes a part of the permanent structure and which not only takes the place of reenforcing material but also helps carry the load.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0137.xml
article
544
544
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
An Iron Worker’s Steel Glove. It Is As Flexible As Leather
[no value]
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[no value]
[no value]
A GLOVE which will give as much protection to a man’s hands as a glove of rigid steel, yet which is as flexible as any glove of leather, has been developed by a Western manufacturer. It is not the quality of the steel which is responsible for these properties; but it is the clever way the ribbon steel is interwoven in the leather.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0138.xml
article
544
544
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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The “Red Cross” for the Soldiers; the “Red Star” for Their Steeds
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[no value]
WITH the advent of the United States into the war, the American Red Star Animal Relief Association springs into prominence. It is an organization which does for the horses what the Red Cross does for the soldiers. The association has branches in most of the European countries and its work is authorized by the Secretary of War.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0139.xml
article
544
544
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Inspecting the Six-Mile Gunnison Tunnel by Automobile
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[no value]
[no value]
SOME time ago we printed an account of the inspection of a sewer by motorcycle. Now comes a description of a trip through the Gunnison tunnel by automobile. The trip was made by Fred D. Pyle, of the United States Reclamation Engineers, and its object was to inspect the work on the automatic gages in the tunnel.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0140.xml
article
545
545
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Air Scouts Learn to Sketch Battlefields
Instruction in making drawings which will show accurately the enemy’s positions, is given to every air scout
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[no value]
[no value]
IMAGINE yourself flying in an airplane a thousand feet over a battlefield, with instructions to make a drawing of what you see. You have but a minute or two to make your drawing, yet you must sketch in the enemy’s gun positions, his lines of trenches, his transport roads, and all details of military significance.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0141.xml
article
546
546,547
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Our First Scouting Dirigibles
We have copied the British “Blimps.” Here the construction is explained
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN German submarines began to render even the high seas dangerous to shipping, England found herself in a very perilous position. To patrol the waters around England by small craft was the immediate remedy adopted. But the area to be covered was so vast that literally thousands of vessels would have been required.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0142.xml
article
548
548
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Potted Plants as a Part of a Plumber’s Equipment
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT often happens that plumbers are compelled to tear up sidewalks and streets, and otherwise muss things up in making repairs or pipe connections. Usually they are little concerned about the appearance of the street during the repairingprocess.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0143.xml
article
548
548
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Delivering Tires by Motor-Truck from Akron to Boston
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW era in vehicular transportation has been inaugurated by one of the large tire companies of Akron, Ohio, which is now running a line of five-ton motortrucks between that city and Boston, Mass., a round trip distance of 1,540 miles.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0144.xml
article
549
549
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Advertising By Motor-Truck
Traveling curtains, like moving pictures, attract the attention of the passerby to the continuous story
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE very latest mode of advertising is a glass-sided and ended motor truck from which are flashed at fifteen-second intervals the advertisements of ten well-known products. The fleet of trucks run over the most crowded of New York streets from noon to midnight, each-carrying its advertising message to the thousands of pedestrians instead of making them travel to the signs.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0145.xml
article
550
550,551
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Photographing the Jolts of an Automobile
How you can tell what shock-absorber is most efficient
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EVERY one of the hundred odd manufacturers of shock absorbers, tires, and springs claims that the application of his particular device to the automobile will give the greatest possible ease of riding. Now comes Mr. W. C. Keys, an experimental engineer, with a method of visibly recording the effect of jolts on a car and of ascertaining to what extent shocks are absorbed.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0146.xml
article
551
551
RAILWAYS
[no value]
What’s This? A Mosque? No, Just a Flagman’s Shelter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A FLAGMAN’S shelter house, made up of old locomotive parts, guards a street crossing on the Southern Pacific at San José, Cal. The shelter was constructed by the consulting engineer from old engine wheels, springs, tires and other parts of discarded locomotives.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0147.xml
article
551
551
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
The Army Medical Museum’s Giant Skull
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COMPARED with the man standing beside it, the huge skull shown in the accompanying photograph would appear to have belonged to a person about thirty feet high and to be reminiscent of the times when “There were giants in those days.” As a matter of fact, it is not a real skull, but a papier mâche representation of one, a little over four feet high.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0148.xml
article
552
552,553
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Housekeeping Made Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0149.xml
article
554
554
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Loading Trucks Without Disturbing Sidewalk Traffic
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN order to save many steps between their wagons and the loading platform, the truckmen have a habit of backing their vehicles against the shipping platform or against the curb-stone and spanning the intervening sidewalk with a board or chute.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0150.xml
article
554
554
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Even a Battleship Would Sink If It Were Not Cleaned
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of our big warships was brought into dock the other day for a cleaning. Two hundred men worked all day scraping off six hundred tons of animal and plant growth from its sides and bottom. This tremendous quantity of sea life had accumulated in less than two years, during which time the ship had traveled many thousand miles.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0151.xml
article
554
554
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
The Carrier Pigeon Still Holds Its Own as Trusted Messenger
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DESPITE the convenience of the telegraph and wireless, carrier pigeons are still used to a great extent in sections of the war zones where the telegraph and wireless are not available. The accompanying photograph was made in Salonica, and shows a dispatch bearer and the special basket in which he carries his pigeons.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0152.xml
article
555
555
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Shoot or Stab This Dummy, and You’ll Be Blown Up
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"BOOBY traps,” as the British call them, are dummy soldiers containing a large amount of high explosive. They are death traps set by the Germans for their enemies. Scientifically and painstakingly constructed, the dummy shown would have blown to pieces anyone who touched it.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0153.xml
article
555
555
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
The By-Products of the Grapefruit Obtained from the Culls
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the fruit-grower has marketed his finest and best specimens of grapefruit there are likely to remain many inferior specimens which would be wasted unless utilized to obtain the by-products. These by-products have been found to be numerous. Citric acid is obtained in great quantities from the culls, especia11y from the early winter fruit. Sugar is obtained at the rate of about 4.4 per cent in the early winter fruit and 8.5 per cent in the spring fruit.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0154.xml
advertisement
555
555
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
Popular Science Monthly
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0155.xml
article
556
556,557,558,559
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
One-Piece Ships of Stone
Already a company has been formed and financed to design and build concrete ships of 4,500-ton capacity
The Concrete Vessel Is Not New in Shipbuilding
Advantages of Concrete Ships
How the Ships Will Be Built
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Brinker
CONCRETE ships are possibilities. They may be built in addition to steel and wood vessels to offset the acute submarine peril. According to authorities, the German U-boats are sinking Allied and neutral tonnage much faster than it can be renewed.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0156.xml
article
559
559
[no value]
[no value]
Clang! Clang! Make Way for the Chinese Ambulance
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the reasons why the people of the Occident are generally disposed to agree with Bret Hart that “the heathen Chinee is peculiar” is the unusual method of the Chinese in handling the sick. Notice the ambulance in the photograph, in which a dying man is being transported.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0157.xml
article
560
560
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Lifting a Car to Stop It
A brake which raises the rear wheels clear off the ground. Of course the car has to stop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN unusual type of automobile emergency brake stops the car by lifting the rear or power wheels clear off the ground. It consists of two flat semi-circular steel shoes thick at the top and tapering off at the bottom. These are placed between the body of the car and the inside of the rear wheel on each side.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0158.xml
article
561
561,562,563
ARCHITECTURE
[no value]
Like a Spider in His Web
So the guard sits in one of the new circular cell houses of Joliet Prison. He can keep watch over two hundred and forty-eight cells
[no value]
[no value]
Fred Telford
OCCASIONALLY earns the title of genius somebody by transplanting into action what others regard as impossible or lack the perseverance to carry through. Seemingly this is what fate has in store for W. Carnys Zimmerman, of Chicago, the architect of the new state penitentiary in course of erection near Joliet,. Illinois, which is not only built along new lines but is the last word in prison construction.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0159.xml
article
564
564
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
The Massaging Chair. Sit in It and Let Two Rollers Knead Your Spine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY means of a chair that has recently been invented by Halbert L. Hoard, of Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, a person suffering from spinal trouble or from any of the numerous complaints due to “nerves,” is enabled to perform the otherwise difficult task of massaging the back and especially the spinal column without the assistance of a professional.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0160.xml
article
564
564
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
How One Furnace Can Save a Big Slice of the Country’s Coal Bills
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FULLY one fourth of the coal used in heating our country’s homes is wasted, simply because the average furnace is not properly designed to burn the highly combustible gases that are contained in the coal. The greatest part of our country’s coal supply is what is called bituminous, or soft coal, which contains on an average forty-five per cent of highly combustible gases which in themselves form a large portion of the heat value of the coal.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0161.xml
article
565
565,566
RAILWAYS
[no value]
Safeguarding Our Bridges
The cushion gate and the yielding barrier are two effective remedies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RECENT accidents in Boston, Chicago and Vancouver have at last aroused the public to the realization that changing conditions have made obsolete devices used at the present time to protect bridge approaches and railroad crossings. A cushion barrier gate devised by the Chicago bureau of engineering seems to have solved the problem of the improperly protected bridge approach and the yielding chain barrier for railroad crossings promises to do much to lessen the number of accidents.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0162.xml
article
566
566
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
We Burn Coal Lavishly, But We Have Plenty of It to Burn
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE it is true that the United States is the largest consumer of coal in the world, using nearly forty per cent of the world’s total production, it is something of a comfort to know that we have not yet consumed more than one-half of one per cent of the total quantity which geologists estimate is at present contained within our borders.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0163.xml
article
567
567
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Shifting Gears by Electricity
It requires but one operation to shift from neutral to high gear
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a patent recently granted to John C. Brackett, of Copper Cliff, Ontario, a mechanism is described which electrically controls the entire range of the speed of a gasoline automobile without recourse to shifting the change gears by hand.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0164.xml
article
568
568
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Megaphoning the Reveille—The Latest in Military Efficiency
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the training camp at Fort Riley a huge megaphone has been erected on a stand to enable a field bugler to sound reveille with such a vim that it will be irresistible, as well as to put punch into the retreat which is sounded at evening parade after the band ceases its music.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0165.xml
article
568
568
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The More You Pay for Your Clothes, the More They Suffer in the Wash
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE price that we pay for cleanliness is, to a large extent, paid to the laundry man. According to an investigation made by the Mellon Institute of Industrial Research, at Pittsburgh, Pa., only forty-three per cent of the life of a collar, for instance, is consumed in the actual wearing of it.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0166.xml
article
568
568
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Here Is the Fountain Spot-Remover. It Works Like a Scrubbing Brush
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY means of a small cloth-covered brush containing a fountain filled with cleansing liquid, spots may be taken out of clothes at home. The woolen bottom of the cleanser serves to wash out dirt and grease without at the same time scraping off the nap of the garment, thus overcoming a common trouble in spot removers.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0167.xml
article
569
569
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
She Was Torpedoed but Her Cargo Plugged the Hole
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most unusual salvages yet recorded in these days of submarine warfare is that of the Norwegian steamship Kongsli, whose cargo of grain swelled to such an extent on the inrush of water through the ragged hole torn in her side by a torpedo, that the hole was clogged up and the water prevented from flowing in and sinking her.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0168.xml
article
569
569
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Making a Fortune Out of Dust from a Cement Factory
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE United States Bureau of Mines has lately issued a statement in regard to a Portland cement plant at Riverside, California, which shows how an apparatus, installed to avoid nuisance and save the health of the workers, has become the central feature of the whole establishment.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0169.xml
article
570
570
RAILWAYS
[no value]
Putting Driving Wheels Under the Locomotive Tender
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO climb a steep stretch of track sixty-nine miles long on the Southern Railroad between Asheville, N. C., and Hayne, S. C., seven giant locomotives, with driving wheels under the tender as well as under the cab and boiler, are used. This novel arrangement makes it possible for a single engine to have no less than sixteen driving wheels, giving it a tractive power much greater than that of the ordinary locomotive.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0170.xml
article
570
570
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A Little Bit of Egypt on a California Ostrich Farm
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT! Has the hand of the West desecrated and commercialized the historic pyramids of Egypt? Does the over-decorated entrance shown in the illustration below, with its advertising signs printed in English and just visible behind one of the columns, mean that the ancient Pharaoh has been ousted from his last resting place?
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0171.xml
article
571
571,572
MISCELLANY
[no value]
And These Are Not Leather?
They feel like seal, morocco, and cowhide; but suitcases, pocketbooks, bags and automobile seats, are made of cotton nowadays
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DO you suppose that the luxuriant upholstery of a modern automobile and the seats and backs of most library chairs are made of leather? If you do, you must change your notions entirely. Things are not always what they seem. Your silk socks were once part of a tree that grew in a forest; leather is nowadays as often a form of downy cotton as the tanned hide of a steer.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0172.xml
article
572
572
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
If You Had No More Teeth Than an Elephant You Couldn’t Be a Soldier
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you have ever had the opportunity to look inside an elephant’s mouth you have your own personal opinion about the reason why it grows a trunk so long that it covers the mouth completely and conceals the interior even when the mouth is open.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0173.xml
article
573
573,574,575
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Buying a “Used Car”
Among all liars we take off our steel helmets to the sellers of old cars
“You Never Can Tell”
Always Consult the Agency
[no value]
[no value]
Edward C. Crossman
WITH the enormous depreciation in value of the used motor car, and the ignorance of the average person of even primary automobile mechanics—and the ways that are dark of some gentlemen in the used car game—the average seeker of a satisfactory used car is apt to be fooled.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0174.xml
article
576
576
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Blowing Stumps Away with Air—An Agricultural Shortcut
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE gasoline engine will play an important part in clearing two hundred million acres of cut-over land in some thirty states of the Union. Gasoline engines have for a decade or more been successfully used as power for stump-pullers, but the new method recently evolved promises greater efficiency.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0175.xml
article
576
576
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
An Owl with Eyes of Scissors and Backbone of Paste
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WISE old Mr. Owl may sleep during the day and fly by night in his natural element, but when the manufacturers get him in their clutches they reverse the order of things. The accompanying illustration shows what they did to a wooden owl. His back is a tube of paste; those are scissors around his eyes.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0176.xml
article
577
577
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
Photographing Sunken Ships
A giant electric camera is used for locating sunken ships and treasures
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN electric submarine camera for deep sea photography has been invented by H. Hartman, a civil engineer of New York city. With it a sunken submarine or a wrecked vessel may be located and pictures of its condition projected for study on a screen in a few hours.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0177.xml
article
578
578
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
“Blind ?” No, Said the Motion Picture
Its testimony proved that a “blind” man could see, and thus reversed the decision of the court
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
"ARE you the owner of this property ?" asked a passer-by of Peter Zyla, who was busily engaged in his poultry yard on the outskirts of Chicago, negotiating a sale of pigeons to a teamster who seemed hard to suit in the matter of the color and markings of the birds.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0178.xml
article
579
579
[no value]
[no value]
Making Spectacular Displays with the Aid of Toy Balloons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE latest idea in illuminated displays for garden parties, for patriotic gatherings, and the like, is an electrically lighted balloon to be used in place of the old Japanese lantern. These balloons cannot be blown out by the wind, nor can they catch fire; they will give just as spectacular an effect as Japanese lanterns.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0179.xml
article
579
579
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Teaching the Truth About the Misunderstood Snake
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN California the Lorquin Natural History Club of Los Angeles is starting a campaign of snake education. As the accompanying photograph shows, a sign telling passersby that harmless snakes should not be killed—that they destroy disease-bearing rodent pests, is the medium used.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0180.xml
article
580
580
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Fighting a Gas Attack in the Trenches
How it feels when the green-yellow cloud steals on you
Donning the Gas Masks
In the Folds of the Green-Yellow Cloud
When the Wind Dispersed the Gas
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a new book entitled “Over the Top” (G. P. Putnam’s Sons), Arthur Guy Empey, “machine gunner serving in France,” takes you into the trenches and makes you feel what it is to fight under modern conditions. Here is his account of a gas-attack : Three days after we had silenced Fritz, the Germans sent over gas.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0181.xml
article
581
581
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Speaking of “Catgut”
The sheep is guilty: it is the only animal that makes a racket after it is dead
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHERE’S where we the get cat our farm supply from of catgut? The answer is: There isn’t any cat farm. Cats’ intestines can’t be profitably utilized. If not cats, then what furnishes the raw material for musical instrument and tennis strings?
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0182.xml
article
582
582,583
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Up with the Storm Signals!
The language of the weather bureaus of the world is one of flags, lights and cones
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE invention of the electric telegraph made it possible for meteorologists to gather reports of simultaneous weather observations over extensive areas, enter the data on charts, prepare forecasts and Storm warnings, and issue such information to the public; all within a period of time short enough to make the predictions useful for practical purposes.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0183.xml
article
583
583
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
A Huge Clothing Sterilizer on Wheels for the Armies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE barber’s eternal question, “Hot towel, sir?” is answered in a novel way in France just now. A giant sterilizer on wheels takes care of the towels and other articles of the men who return from the fighting front and puts them through a steam bath which both cleans and disinfects them.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0184.xml
article
584
584
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Welding Ten Miles of Pipe for a Skating Rink
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO make ten miles of continuous pipe was the problem that confronted the builders of a large ice-skating rink at San Francisco. Investigation had shown that in many ice rinks where ammonia systems were built with screwed fittings, leaks frequently developed in joints supposed to be leak-proof and trouble-proof.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0185.xml
article
584
584
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Convenient Device for Keeping Your Razor Blades Clean
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT takes nearly as much time to remove safety razor blades, clean and replace them after using, as it does to shave. And if a man’s in a hurry, there is an imminent danger of cutting the towel—or his fingers—in the operations. A device which will save both your time and your temper and eliminate the danger of cutting your hands, is shown in the accompanying illustrations.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0186.xml
article
585
585
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A New Zinc Product Which Is a Substitute for Tinfoil
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM Breslau, Germany, comes a report of a substitute for tinfoil which has been successfully manufactured from zinc by a German experimenter. The zinc product is so similar in appearance and general characteristics to the tinfoil that the two are scarcely distinguishable.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0187.xml
article
585
585
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
This Tire Pump Gets Power from the Engine Crankshaft
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AUTOMOBILISTS, take notice of the tire pump illustrated. It fits any make of car and particularly cars which were not originally fitted with power tire-pumps under the engine hoods. It is merely slipped over the end of the engine crankshaft extending out in front of the radiator.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0188.xml
article
585
585
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Moving Targets to Quicken the Eye and Steady the Aim
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RIFLE clubs are adopting the moving field targets so popular in British shooting ranges to quicken the eye and add zest to rifle and revolver practice. The “deers” used are generally five feet long and are constructed of heavy plaster-board, painted a light brown and suspended by two wires which ride on a trolley wire which is about thirty yards in length.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0189.xml
article
586
586
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
Aim and Pull the Trigger to Photograph an Enemy from the Air
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE scout in an airplane must have something better than his eyes. Anti-aircraft guns compel him to fly at not less than six thousand feet. The ground below is so far away that it is impossible to distinguish make-believe guns from real guns, or to identify the thousand and one concealments practiced by the enemy.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0190.xml
article
586
586
[no value]
[no value]
Making a Mule Push and Pull at the Same Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE L. COVERT, crippled so that he must always use a wheelchair, is traveling from New York to the Pacific coast in a queer way. He sits in his wheel-chair and is pushed ahead by means of a shaft of his own invention. The shaft is fastened to the back of the wheel-chair and also to a mule’s collar.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0191.xml
article
587
587
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Sowing Tree Seed in the Snow
As the snow melts the seed sinks deeper and deeper and finally buries itself in the ground
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO keep our national forests, which are scattered from Alaska to Porto Rico, up to standard, twelve to fifteen thousand acres have to be reforested or planted each year. The bare lands must be made productive and the thin stands of wood must be improved.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0192.xml
article
588
588,589
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Let the Birds Save a Billion Dollars a Year
A quail can eat 2,000 Hessian flies in a day and a prairie chicken four times as many. Let them keep insects off the farm
[no value]
[no value]
Robert H. Moulton
CHARLES E. WHITE, of Chicago, grain broker during his business hours and bird protector during his leisure, believes that it is possible to lop a billion dollars off of the Nation’s cost of living by the simple expedient of feeding insect-eating birds.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0193.xml
article
590
590
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Harrow-Like Brake for Mountain-Climbing Automobiles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY deaths have occurred in mountain touring due to the engine going dead while on a steep grade because of the driver’s attempt to go up in a higher gear than he should. When the engine stops, the car slides backwards and in many cases goes over the edge of the road if the brakes are not in the best possible condition and the driver does not apply them without losing his head.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0194.xml
article
590
590
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
A Water-Cooling and Purifying Pipe for the Fastidious Smoker
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE smoker will welcome the appearance of a pipe which not only cools the smoke before it reaches the pipe stem but purifies it as well. Clarence J. Graham and Joseph A. Farris, of Chicago, Ill., are the inventors. The secret of the cooling and purifying pipe is the bowl of water situated directly below the bowl which contains the tobacco.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0195.xml
article
591
591
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Gold-Plated Teeth for Sheep Are Common in Scotland
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE sheep of the western islands of Scotland are almost as stylish as the dogs that ride in automobiles on our own Fifth Avenue, in New York city. The canine aristocrats have occasional cavities in their teeth filled with gold, but the Scottish sheep have their entire set gold-plated before they have any chance to decay.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0196.xml
article
591
591
MISCELLANY
[no value]
To Keep Out Burglars, Leave Your Key in the Door
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ED. E. CURTISS, of Spokane, Washington, has invented a key-hole guard. Leave your key in the door at night, and it will be impossible for anyone to insert another key in your door. The guard can be fitted to any door. It consists of a plate which slides horizontally just in front of the body of the lock, and in the inner side of the door.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0197.xml
article
591
591
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Overall Has Entered the Fashion Sheets
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR the first time, perhaps, since the days when Indian women tilled the land while their lords and masters hunted or fished or fought, American soil has felt the pressure of the feminine foot on spade and fork. It has been no light, inefficient pressure, either, nor is it hampered by skirts.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0198.xml
article
592
592
RAILWAYS
[no value]
A Lift Deck for Automobile Freight Cars
It doubles the automobile capacity of a car and does not interfere with the shipping of other goods
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN shipping automobiles in car load lots at the present time, a temporary deck or floor is built within the car at the time of each shipment. On this, one row of automobiles is placed above another row loaded on the main floor of the car. In this way the capacity of the car is practically doubled.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0199.xml
article
593
593
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
You Can Roll This Can Without Spilling the Garbage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT looks as if the ideal garbage can had been invented at last. William Dowie, of New York city, is the inventor and his can is about everything that a garbage can can be. It is dustless, odorless and noiseless. You can turn it over without spilling it because the lid is clamped tight across the top.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0200.xml
article
593
593
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Drilling with This Electric Drill Is Like Shooting a Pistol
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ELECTRICITY is rapidly taking all the back-breaking exertion out of every kind of work. If all the inventions based upon it turn out satisfactorily and as many more are brought out in the future the old axiom about earning our bread by the sweat of our brow will lack pungency.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0201.xml
article
594
594
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
These Bottles Warn You That They Contain Poison
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a bulletin on poisons, issued from the Surgeon General’s Office at Washington, D. C., it is stated that every year five thousand people, on an average, take poison by mistake. The Surgeon General recommends that poison be sold and kept only in bottles of distinctive shape.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0202.xml
article
594
594
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Is This the Secret of Curious Lettered Finger Prints?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the April issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, on page 517, there appeared an article describing a curious finger print. A National Guardsman had his finger print taken and was surprised to see the letters “U O P L E” on the ball of his right fore-finger.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0203.xml
article
595
595
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Kitchen Luxury—The Ivory Pie-Crust Trimmers of New England
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEW ENGLAND has long been famous for pie, which, if it is not the actual staff of life, at least runs the other food contributions a close second. In the old Dartmouth Historical Museum in New Bedford is a curious collection of quaintly carved ivory instruments known then as now, in the old New England households as piecrust crimpers.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0204.xml
article
595
595
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Let This Automatic Device Feed Your Envelopes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SIMPLE machine designed to increase the efficiency of typists by automatically placing envelopes in proper positions in typewriters has just been put on the market. The instrument consists of a framework attached to the machine and operated by the ordinary space-line lever.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0205.xml
article
596
596
MISCELLANY
[no value]
It Has Stopped Raining? Then Pack Your Waterproof in Your Bag
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A RAIN coat suitable for the traveler weighs only thirty-two ounces and folds into a neat envelope when not in use. It is also useful to the motorist and to others who feel the need of being protected against inclement weather and wish to avoid carrying heavy garments.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0206.xml
article
596
596
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Bomb Exits for America’s First Portable Hospital
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the heart of New York city there are a number of trim frame buildings which form America’s first portable hospital. The buildings are constructed so that they can be taken apart and set up in another city within two days. All windows are made so that the air is admitted over the heads of the patients, preventing a draft, and bomb exits are provided every few feet.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0207.xml
article
596
596
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
What You Will Need When You Go to the Training Camps
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you happen to be one of the fortunate ones chosen to be transformed into officers at one of the training camps, your first impulse will probably be to purchase a nifty uniform, two or three pairs of classy looking shoes and a supply of varicolored ties and socks.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0208.xml
article
597
597
CIVIL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Machinery Made from Scraps
The material from which it was made was strewn about camp, and was mere junk
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the time came to pave the top of the Kensico Dam, in New York, the superintendent, George H. Angel, didn't go to the extra expense of purchasing new paving equipment. He took a hurried inventory of the odds and ends of machinery that lay about the construction camp and decided that he could make some machinery of his own out of them.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0209.xml
article
598
598
[no value]
[no value]
A Lumbermen’s Camp Which Can Be Moved from Place to Place on Rails
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN his account of the life of the rough and ready northern woodsman, Rex Beach often painted a realistic picture of his poorly-constructed and unsanitary home. As a rule, lumber camps enjoy but a temporary existence, and for this reason the houses are ramshackle affairs.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0210.xml
article
598
598
[no value]
[no value]
Pointers for the Inventors Working on the Submarine Problem
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Naval Consulting Board has received literally thousands of suggestions and plans for destroying submarines and protecting merchant ships against torpedo attack. In addition, the Secretary of the Navy has also heard from inventors on the subject.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0211.xml
article
599
599
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
Making It Easy to See the “Movies”
How tedious inserts can be avoided and how the clock can be watched
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THANKS to the invention of Dr. J. W. Billings, any explanation that needs to be made in a motion-picture can appear at the same time that the action is going on. The inventor calls his contrivance for projecting captions a “descriptograph.” In general appearance it looks not unlike an ordinary stereopticon.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0212.xml
article
600
600
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
A Wooden Lighthouse Candlestick and How It Is Made.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is easy to make a wooden candlestick in the shape of a lighthouse. The one illustrated is about six inches high and about four inches in diameter. The lighthouse is white, with yellow and red ornamentation; the windows are painted. The saucer in which the lighthouse stands can be used to receive burnt matches.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0213.xml
article
600
600
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Getting Rid of the Poppet-Valves on a Gasoline Engine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE trend of the times in engine construction as well as in every other kind of manufacture is toward simplicity. Wherever one thing can be made to do the work of two or even more parts, nothing is left untried to facilitate the merger. A western manufacturer has brought out a new gasoline engine in which the poppet-valve, camshaft and associated parts are eliminated and a common rotary valve substituted in their stead to perform the same functions.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0214.xml
article
601
601
The Amateur Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
A Simple and Attractive Loading Coil
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. V. CLARK
ORDINARY loading coils are often made in very compact form, as when wound between two hard rubber disks. Though very neat in appearance, such coils are hard to make without the aid of suitable machinery for turning out the rubber disk ends, which are expensive if bought ready made.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0215.xml
article
601
601,602
The Amateur Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
Using a Bicycle Pump for a Water Rheostat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
K. M. COGGESHALL
A WATER rheostat can be quickly made from an old bicycle hand-pump. Remove the metal cap through which the rod passes, and substitute a plug of wood or cork. Through the center of this plug a hole should be bored, its diameter being identical with that of the rod. Next remove the plunger disk and thoroughly clean the rod so it will be free from grease or rust. Wire leads should also be soldered to both casing and rod for electrical connections.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0216.xml
article
602
602
The Amateur Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
Transmitting Wireless Messages Underground Without Aerial
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. E. HASTY
WIRELESS messages can be transmitted without any aerial by using at each station two ground terminals not less than 200 ft. apart. One ground should extend but a few feet below the surface of the earth; the other should be sunk to a much greater depth, or better still, attached to a gas or water pipe.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0217.xml
article
602
602
The Amateur Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
A Flexible Spline Used for a Draughtsman Curve
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
NEY
IF one adjustable curve could be obtained draughtsmen would readily appreciate its value and prefer it to others. The illustration shows such an adjustable curve-making device that is simple and convenient. With this device it is possible to obtain a great variety of curves quickly and easily, that will fit to a fraction of a degree.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0218.xml
article
603
603,604,605
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Sending Wireless Messages Under Fire
Mobile wireless stations on the western front
[no value]
[no value]
Captain A. P. Corcoran
YOU have heard much of the amazing inventions that have been developed during the great war—inventions that have displayed not merely human but diabolic ingenuity in their effectiveness in destroying human life. There are the British “tanks,” and the German gas bombs which have accounted for many a good man.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0219.xml
article
605
605
[no value]
[no value]
Tire Deterioration Caused by Improper Storage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN exposed to the light and sun, especially to the hot summer sun, a rubber tire is likely to dry out, harden and become impaired in efficiency in consequence. The manufacturer wraps his tires in paper to protect them from the light when they are to be kept in stock at the factory.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0220.xml
article
605
605
[no value]
[no value]
Paint for Use on Exterior Surfaces Should Be Left to Ripen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PAINT for exterior use should be allowed to stand after mixing for a day or two to ripen. It has been found that paint mixed and applied at once will not begin to give as good results as that given sufficient time to ripen after mixing.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0221.xml
article
606
606
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A New Type of Acid-Proof Brush for Soldering Flux
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
R. U. CLARK
THE use of non-corroding paste in soldering has, in many cases, done away with the disagreeable and dangerous acid brush. There are still a few jobs, however, which require an acid flux for soldering. To those who have occasion to use soldering acid of any kind, the non - corrosive acid brushes shown in the illustration should prove serviceable.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0222.xml
article
606
606
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Construction of a Rotating Arm for a Rotary Gap
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO those amateurs employing a rotary spark-gap of the type having the studs arranged in a ring about a revolving arm, the construction of this arm often presents difficulty; for it must combine good insulation from the motor shaft with extreme lightness.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0223.xml
article
606
606
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Using Resistance in Field Wiring on an Automobile Dynamo
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY times the car owner is not entirely familiar with the lighting system and does the wrong thing when trouble occurs. Cars are equipped with a generator that will carry about six 12 c. p., 8-volt, tungsten filament bulbs. Each bulb takes about 1½ amperes.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0224.xml
article
607
607,608,609,610
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Wireless Work in Wartime. III.
Dangers of Student Practice
Three-Station Lines
Copying Perfect Signals
The Disk Sender
The Paper Tape Transmitter
Morse Practice on the Buzzer Line
[no value]
[no value]
John L. Hogan
THE two articles of this series which have already been published, in the August and September issues, outlined the simplest ways to learn the Morse Code used in radio telegraphy and explained a buzzer-telegraph line which could be used for code practice.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0225.xml
article
610
610
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
The Underwriter’s Knot for Flexible Cords
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FLEXIBLE cords used to suspend a lamp should be arranged so that there is no stress or strain coming on the binding posts or connecting screws. To provide a suitable holding means, knots should be tied in the cord to make them take all the weight of the socket and fixture from the ends of the wire.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0226.xml
article
611
611,612,613
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Making a Practical Vacuum Cleaner
I.—Details in the construction of the universal motor
MATERIALS FOR THE MOTOR
MATERIALS FOR THE SHOE
The Motor
[no value]
[no value]
L. E. Swindell
THE machine described is not a difficult piece of apparatus to construct, and it will do the work equally as well as a standard make. However, building it yourself will not reduce the cost to any appreciable degree. The only thing gained will be the satisfaction of saying “I made it myself.”
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0227.xml
article
613
613
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Connecting a Spotlight in an Automobile Dynamo Circuit
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SPOTLIGHT was wanted on an automobile in which the lights were on a series circuit. As the spotlight was only to be used occasionally the method of wiring was as follows: A single switch was mounted on the dash and a wire connected with it from the left hand terminal on the back of the ammeter.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0228.xml
article
614
614
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Blackboard an Adjunct to the Amateur’s Shop
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HAROLD W. OFFIUS
A BLACKBOARD is a valuable adjunct to the amateur’s shop. One may easily be made of a sheet of cardboard painted with a mixture of lampblack and gasoline and then tacked in a convenient place on the shop wall with crayon box nearby.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0229.xml
article
614
614
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
A Grid Placed in the Wings of an Airplane
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN wireless telegraph work on airplanes there is often difficulty encountered in obtaining sufficient metal work to serve in a balancing capacity. In the construction the bracing wires of the wings are so connected that they provide a good path throughout the whole length of the wing, through which they are led to the wireless transmitter.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0230.xml
article
614
614
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Simple and Interesting Thermo-Magnetic Motor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALEXANDER V. BOLLER
A VERY simple thermo-magnetic motor which utilizes the principle that heating a piece of metal weakens its magnetic properties, can be easily built. The rim of the wheel that revolves is made of a piece of heavy iron wire, which is held together with copper spokes fitted in a cork A. Through the center of this cork a large pin is placed, about which the wheel rotates.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0231.xml
article
614
614
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
An Undercoating for Copper to Hold Paint
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
COPPER does not hold paint well, hence it must be treated with some substance that will take the paint, or left to weather a year or more. A good primer is boiled linseed oil, to which add a little Japan gold size. Apply one coat and let it stand about one week, then apply the paint over it.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0232.xml
article
615
615
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Warming Army Tents With Improvised Stoves
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEORGE M. PETERSEN
BEFORE the United States Government issued tent stoves to the Guardsmen on the Border, there were many improvised stoves or heaters to be seen in the various tents. The stove shown in the upper left corner of the illustration is the type known as the Sibley tent stove, which is the one issued by the Government to keep the boys warm.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0233.xml
article
615
615
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Stropping a Razor on the Fleshy Part of the Hand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN W. SHANK
THE finest strop for a razor is the fleshy part of your hand below the little finger. For eight years I have used no other for razor blades. If it is a safety razor blade grasp it between the thumb and first finger of the right hand and strike finger nail and blade at the same time on the fleshy part of the left hand.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0234.xml
article
616
616
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Campfire Tent out of a Pack Cloth
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
STILLMAN TAYLOR
THE campfire tent shown in the illustrations is most comfortable to live in. It is of the open front type and is always well ventilated. With the front flap raised as an awning, the heat from the fire is reflected inside, where it is most welcome on a cool night.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0235.xml
article
616
616
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Preserving Flowers in Natural Colors with Wax
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is not generally known that preserving flowers in wax is one of the easiest of tasks. Ordinary candles may be used. To prepare the wax, it is only necessary to cut the candles into chunks, being careful to remove the wicks. The wax is then melted in a saucepan over a flame, after which it is ready to receive the flowers.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0236.xml
article
617
617,618
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
How to Reline Your Automobile Brakes
An easy method of inserting new lining in a brake drum
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Brinker
MANY automobile owners who delight in tinkering around their cars and keeping them in repair would like to reline the vehicle brakes were they sure they could do it properly and not jeopardize their lives through poor workmanship. The drawings shown indicate the various steps necessary in properly relining a brake.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0237.xml
article
618
618
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Cord Cutter Made From a Safety Razor Blade
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS DEAN
THIS cord cutter consists of a discarded safety razor blade and a block of wood. If the cutter is to be used on the counter edge the block of wood should be considerably thicker than the counter top. The lower edge of the block is placed flush with the underside of the counter allowing the extra thickness to project above the upper surface, which is notched in the center and cut slanting toward both ends.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0238.xml
article
618
618
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Electric Lamp Attached to a Spoon for Tongue Depressor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. A. WARNER
WHEN it becomes necessary to examine the throat of a child, or to remove a lodged fishbone or button, a spoon is the first thing sought for to depress the tongue in order to make the examination. A good light is also necessary. To furnish one for the purpose, a small electric light may be attached to the back of the spoon.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0239.xml
article
618
618
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Temporary Repair on a Broken Lubricator Filling Glass
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. W. BENTLEY
A STEAM shovel located at a great distance from a repair shop had a broken lubricator filling glass. There were no extra ones on hand. The sketch illustrates how a small piece of wood was whittled and substituted for the glass. Though this did not register the use and supply of oil in the lubricator, it plugged the openings left by the broken glass satisfactorily and held very nicely until new glasses arrived several days later.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0240.xml
article
619
619,620
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Sheet Metal Working Simply Explained
V.—Method of finding the miter lines and laying out the pattern for ninety-degree elbows of any number of pieces
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
SINCE the publication of the article in the September issue describing the method of laying out elbow patterns, many inquiries have been received asking for the method of finding the miter lines and laying out the patterns for elbows having any number of pieces.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0241.xml
article
620
620
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Ingredients That Make the Best Kind of Glue
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are two kinds of constituents in glue—glutin and chondrin—the one or the other in large quantities according to the raw stock used. Skins will produce more glutin and bones yield a larger amount of chondrin. As a cement, the glutin has the greater binding power and naturally is the more valuable.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0242.xml
article
620
620,621
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
An Inexpensive Cesspool Made of a Barrel and Cask
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. B. ROBBINS
A SERVICEABLE cement cesspool can be constructed in the following manner at a cost of about three dollars. The essentials are a large crockery cask that stands about 4 ft. high, half of a lime cask, three or four bags of cement and plenty of clean sand and loose stone.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0243.xml
article
621
621
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Pedal-Operated Brake for a Belt-Driven Motorcycle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE only brake that can be used on a belt-drive motorcycle is the friction clutch in the rear hub controlled by the starting pedals. Just to be more up-to-date I applied the attachment shown in the accompanying illustration to operate this brake with a foot-pedal.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0244.xml
article
621
621
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Making a Soldering Iron Heater of Pipe and Fittings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE main body of the heater A is a piece of ½-in. iron pipe 12 in. long, threaded on both ends to receive a cap B. A portion of one end equal to the length of the soldering copper is perforated or drilled to produce two rows of 1/16-in. holes at C. Located in the center are two feet or supports to raise the heater from the bench surface.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0245.xml
article
621
621
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Durable Paint for Surfaces Exposed to the Weather
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SEVERAL tests made with paint on boards showed that a mixture of one-third zinc white and two-thirds barites was the most durable. The large amount of oil required prevented the reaction of the zinc, but the paint was deficient in body, hence in covering quality.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0246.xml
article
622
622
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Clip for Carrying Pipe in the Vest Pocket Safely
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. W. BENTLEY
A GREAT number of pipe users adhere to the straight stem for reasons known to the habitual smoker. However, carrying such a pipe is somewhat difficult. If carried in the hip pocket it is liable to be broken, and if in the vest pockets it is liable to be dropped out and lost.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0247.xml
article
622
622
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Silvering Process for Glass Instruments and Mirrors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DISSOLVE 2.5 grams of silver nitrate in 100 c.c. of distilled water, and add ammonia until the precipitate just goes into solution. Make up the solution to 250 c.c. When this has been done, prepare another solution containing .5 gram of Rochelle salt in 250 c.c. of water; boil the solution to dissolve the salt more rapidly.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0248.xml
article
622
622
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Holding the T-Square on the Drawing-Board
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN using a small drawing-board not supported by a stand or other regular holding arrangement, the most convenient position in which to hold it while seated is to tilt it against the edge of the table. As a result, the T-square must be dropped to the base after each time it is used.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0249.xml
article
623
623,624
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Range-Finder to Locate Landmarks and Signal Fires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WE NATURALLY think of a range-finder as that part of a gunner’s equipment which tells him the distance to his target, thus enabling him to give the proper elevation to his gun. But the range-finder off the battlefield is a part of the equipment of a tramping kit which will tell the width of valleys and rivers and the distances to landmarks and signal fires.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0250.xml
article
624
624,625
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Convenient Pivoted Card File for the Desk
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FILING systems are necessary in all lines of business, and for convenience of small accounts or for data a single tray is often applicable. The desk tray illustrated is especially designed and it fits into a slide made for it, so that it is never in the way. Another feature of the tray is that it turns on a pivot and the cards face the person sitting at the desk.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0251.xml
article
625
625,626
[no value]
[no value]
Three Methods for Finding a Chosen Card
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR this trick the chosen card must be worked to the top of the pack. If it is there already, well and good; but if not, it must be brought there by some means or other. This is generally an easy matter, even without sleight of hand, and can usually be effected under the pretense of looking through the pack. When the card is once at the top a false shuffle may be given, to throw the onlookers off the track.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0252.xml
article
626
626
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Piping Automobile Engine Exhaust Gas from Garage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
P. P. AVERY
ASPHYXIA caused many deaths in garages before it became generally known that a garage must be well ventilated and the doors left open if the automobile engine is kept running any length of time. One owner of a private garage avoided the necessity of keeping the doors open by piping the exhaust outside, as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0253.xml
article
626
626
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Edging Flower Beds with Old Bottles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LOUIS M. WAHRER
VARIOUS methods are used to construct edging for flower beds that will produce an effect in keeping with surroundings. One simple way is to use a number of bottles, all the same size, set with their necks in the ground, outlining the shape of the bed. Bottles of different colors may be used, or alternate ones let into the ground deeper, making two levels for the bottoms, which have become the tops, similar to a paling fence.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0254.xml
article
626
626
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Repairing a Broken Test Tube or Beaker
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MALCOLM MACURDA
WHEN you have broken the top of a test-tube or beaker, do not throw it away, for there is a simple way to cut it off smoothly and make a new lip on it. Take a three-cornered file and heat the small end that goes into the handle. Now place the red-hot file on a spot below the break, which has been dipped in water, and hold it there until a slight snap is heard.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0255.xml
article
627
627,628,629
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Making and Using a Casting Rod
II.—The manner of making the cast and controlling the line
[no value]
[no value]
Stillman Taylor
BAIT casting with the modern short casting rod is altogether unlike the old method handling the nine foot bait rod. In the new style the casting is done from the reel, and after a little practice, it is easy to project the minnow or other weight a distance of 75 or 100 ft.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0256.xml
article
629
629,630
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Making a Cabin Tent out of Ordinary Sheeting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PORTABLE tent, easily carried, quickly erected, adapted for any climatic conditions, and capable of housing four or five persons with comfort may be constructed of a few yards of common sheeting, a small reel of wire, two dozen nails, and a package of safety pins.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0257.xml
article
630
630
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Holding Papers on a Movable Sloping Desk-Top
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. W. BENTLEY
IT is difficult to hold letters or other pieces of paper on the surface of an ordinary sloping top desk, even though paper weights are used for the purpose, as the desk-top must be raised at times to gain access to the contents within. The illustration shows how a permanent clip or holder can be made of a piece of light brass wire and spring and placed on the desk-top. A small hole sufficient to take the wire size is drilled down through the desk-top.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0258.xml
article
630
630
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Keeping Oil from the V-Belt of a Motorcycle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OIL leaking through the shaft bearing and running on the pulley face and entering the groove caused considerable trouble on a drive of my motorcycle. This difficulty I easily overcame by attaching a steel flange to the inner surface of the pulley, which had a diameter considerably larger than that of the pulley flange.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0259.xml
article
631
631
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Cutting Brass Tubing Rapidly on a Buzz Saw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BRASS tubing can be cut off to the required lengths very much faster on a buzz saw than by any other method. A square cut is obtained in this way and by cutting with a set stop, lengths are made exact within a few thousandths of an inch. As compared with cutting off in a lathe or milling machine or by hand the buzz saw will show a multiplied production.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0260.xml
article
631
631,632
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Labor Saving Wood Lift Built In Like a Dumb-Waiter
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD R. SMITH
A PROPERLY built wood lift is a labor-saving device and may be made inconspicuous by concealing it by means of a paneled door in the wall, as in the illustration. An open-faced box or cage is built and placed in two main braces, to which the pulleys are fastened, serving as guides.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0261.xml
article
632
632
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Improving Your Piano by Moistening the Air in the Room
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. WOLFE
A RELIABLE piano tuner says that pianos are often injured because they become too dry. Keep a growing plant in the room with the piano and see how much more water it will require than the plants in any other room. A large vase with a wet sponge kept near the piano will supply moisture.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0262.xml
article
632
632
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Simple Camera Attachment for Photographic Enlarging
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. FRANCIS DASHIELL
ANYONE owning an ordinary folding pocket camera with adjustable focus can easily make and use this enlarging outfit. The sketch shows a longitudinal section and gives an idea of the general arrangement. The box is fitted up with an electric lamp, socket and reflector.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0263.xml
article
633
633
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Teeter Swing for Public or Private Playground
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES E. NOBLE
THE illustration shows a way to make a permanent amusement device for children’s playgrounds. It is inexpensive to build and if erected will prove as attractive to children as many other more elaborate devices. Two planks A 16 ft. long, 10 in.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0264.xml
article
633
633
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
An Interesting Experiment with Sulphate of Soda
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN experiment of an unusual character may be made with a thoroughly sterilized glass rod and a supersaturated solution of sulphate of soda. The phenomenon is so extraordinary that any one who may make the trial will find it difficult to clearly explain the result.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0265.xml
article
634
634,635
[no value]
[no value]
Drying Fruits and Vegetables
A simple method of drying your surplus sup ply of fruits and vegetables for future use
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE advantages of drying vegetables are not so apparent for the farm home as they are for the town and city household, which has no root cellar or other place in which to store fresh vegetables. For the farmer’s wife the new methods of canning probably will be better than sun drying, which requires a somewhat longer time.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0266.xml
article
636
636
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Bracing for an Iron Pipe Fence Post
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
THE illustration shows how a fence, the posts of which were ordinary iron pipe, was braced with a bent piece of the same sized pipe so as to stand a severe pull when the wire fencing was stretched on it. The brace and the posts were filled with cement, and the ring was inserted in it. The ring was shaped from a piece of heavy, flat wrought iron, which had enough shank to fit solidly into the pipe.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0267.xml
article
636
636
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Attaching Linoleum to a Cement Floor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GOOD cement for attaching linoleum to a cement floor may be made as follows: Manila gum 15 parts, brown rosin 20 parts and thick turpentine 45 parts, all by weight. Pulverize the rosin and gum and heat until melted; then thin out with denatured alcohol, using 20 parts.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0268.xml
article
636
636
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Casing for Carrying Tube Cements Without Damage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AXEL H. JOHNSON
HAVING trouble keeping the rubber cement tubes in the tool bag of my bicycle clean, I devised the tube-carrying case shown in the illustration. It consists of a brass tube about 1 in. longer than the cement tube and a little larger in diameter, with one end plugged and the other corked.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0269.xml
article
636
636,637,638
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Silver-Plating Bath and How to Use It
Preparing the Article to Be Plated
The Finishing Touches
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE most important attribute for the amateur plater to cultivate is caution. He is working with some of the most deadly poisons known to chemistry. He should not inhale the fumes given off in mixing solutions and should not get these solutions on his hands or clothing.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0270.xml
article
638
638
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Simple Toy Motor Run with Dry Sand
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. P. THORNTON
THE only materials needed in the construction of this sand motor are 2 needles, 1 cork stopper, some cardboard and heavy paper, glue and a quantity of fine sand. The stopper should be a very large size. On both ends of the cork mark off with a pencil a 6-sided polygon.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0271.xml
article
639
639,640
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Wigwam Made of a Tripod
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H.J. Blackwell
FOR the person always carrying a camera in the woods in search of pictures the wigwam illustrated will be of considerable interest, as the tripod of the camera equipment is used for the support. The other necessary parts are four pieces of 2-in.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0272.xml
article
640
640
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Siphon Made Out of Gas Pipe and Fittings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. W. BENTLEY
A SIPHON is very frequently needed for many purposes about a manufacturing plant. The illustration shows how a very practical siphon can be constructed from pipe fittings, and which will work very satisfactorily under almost any circumstances.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0273.xml
article
640
640
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Making a Miter Box for Cutting Trestle Legs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
IN doing some odd jobs one day I found that it was necessary to have a trestle, and as there was none at hand I collected the material for making one. Then to cut the miters for the legs became a problem. I did not care to lay out each leg separately to cut the right miter. After making some calculations an emergency miter box was made as illustrated.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0274.xml
article
640
640
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Replacing Tongue in a Fancy Brass Hook
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES M. KANE
A SET of four fancy brass snap hooks was given to me for repairs and on account of being unable to find a duplicate I replaced the broken hinged member with a piece of flat clock-spring as shown. It was soldered in place instead of being riveted.
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0275.xml
advertisement
101
101,102
[no value]
[no value]
CORRECTIVE EATING SOCIETY, Inc.
[no value]
CORRECTIVE EATING SOCIETY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0276.xml
advertisement
103
103,104
[no value]
[no value]
PELTON PUBLISHING COMPANY
[no value]
PELTON PUBLISHING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0277.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH CO.: Streamline
[no value]
ELGIN NATIONAL WATCH CO.
Streamline
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0278.xml
advertisement
106
106,107
[no value]
[no value]
VACUUM OIL COMPANY
[no value]
VACUUM OIL COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0279.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.: Lucky Strike
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.
Lucky Strike
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0280.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0281.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
DU PONT FABRIKOID COMPANY
[no value]
DU PONT FABRIKOID COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0282.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
L. C. CHASE & CO.
[no value]
L. C. CHASE & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0283.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN CHIME CLOCK CO.
[no value]
AMERICAN CHIME CLOCK CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0284.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.
[no value]
WINCHESTER REPEATING ARMS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0285.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
UNITED STATES TIRE COMPANY
[no value]
UNITED STATES TIRE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0286.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
THOS. E. WILSON & CO.
[no value]
THOS. E. WILSON & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0287.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
ROBT. H. INGERSOLL & BRO.
[no value]
ROBT. H. INGERSOLL & BRO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0288.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
NORDYKE & MARMON COMPANY
[no value]
NORDYKE & MARMON COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0289.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
HERCULES POWDER CO.
[no value]
HERCULES POWDER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0290.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Gillette Safety Razor Company
[no value]
Gillette Safety Razor Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0291.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
PARKER PEN COMPANY
[no value]
PARKER PEN COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0292.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Pratt & Lambert-Inc.
[no value]
Pratt & Lambert-Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0293.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Three-in-One Oil Co.
[no value]
Three-in-One Oil Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0294.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0295.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN PISTON RING SALES CO.
[no value]
AMERICAN PISTON RING SALES CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0296.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Anderson Steam Vulcanizer Co.: STEAM VULCANIZER
[no value]
Anderson Steam Vulcanizer Co.
STEAM VULCANIZER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0297.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM PETERMAN: HOMOL
[no value]
WILLIAM PETERMAN
HOMOL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0298.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
IDEAL AEROPLANE & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
IDEAL AEROPLANE & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0299.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
Morrison-Ricker Mfg. Co.: Grinnell coltskin glove
[no value]
Morrison-Ricker Mfg. Co.
Grinnell coltskin glove
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0300.xml
advertisement
124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0301.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
HAYWOOD TIRE & EQUIPMENT CO.
[no value]
HAYWOOD TIRE & EQUIPMENT CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0302.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
EXCELSIOR MOTOR MFG. & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
EXCELSIOR MOTOR MFG. & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0303.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0304.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Lewis Manufacturing Company
[no value]
Lewis Manufacturing Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0305.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
UNION LABORATORY: Calvacura
[no value]
UNION LABORATORY
Calvacura
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0306.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
BARNARD & CO.
[no value]
BARNARD & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0307.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
AnheuserBusch
[no value]
AnheuserBusch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0308.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Harold Lachman Co.
[no value]
Harold Lachman Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0309.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0310.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.
[no value]
The Rudolph Wurlitzer Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0311.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0312.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
Hartman Furniture and Carpet Co.
[no value]
Hartman Furniture and Carpet Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0313.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
American Lead Pencil Company
[no value]
American Lead Pencil Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0314.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
W. M. FINCK & CO.
[no value]
W. M. FINCK & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0315.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Acorn Brass Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Acorn Brass Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0316.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
S. C. Johnson & Son
[no value]
S. C. Johnson & Son
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0317.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
LUXITE TEXTILES, Inc.
[no value]
LUXITE TEXTILES, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0318.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
ECLIPSE MACHINE CO.: VAPORIZER
[no value]
ECLIPSE MACHINE CO.
VAPORIZER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0319.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0320.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
Jos. M. Herman Shoe Co.
[no value]
Jos. M. Herman Shoe Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0321.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0322.xml
advertisement
139
139
[no value]
[no value]
Stanley-Rogers Company
[no value]
Stanley-Rogers Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0323.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0324.xml
advertisement
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0325.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
Johnson Smith & Co.
[no value]
Johnson Smith & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0326.xml
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142
142
[no value]
[no value]
The Hardin-Lavin Co.
[no value]
The Hardin-Lavin Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0327.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
F. K. BABSON
[no value]
F. K. BABSON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0328.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. SHALER CO.
[no value]
C. A. SHALER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0329.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
HARRIS-GOAR CO.
[no value]
HARRIS-GOAR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0330.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
BELL TAILORS OF NEW YORK
[no value]
BELL TAILORS OF NEW YORK
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0331.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
J. Lionel Cowen
[no value]
J. Lionel Cowen
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0332.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0333.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0334.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0335.xml
advertisement
147
147
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0336.xml
advertisement
148
148
[no value]
[no value]
I. PRESS & SONS
[no value]
I. PRESS & SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0337.xml
advertisement
149
149
[no value]
[no value]
ELMER RICHARDS CO.
[no value]
ELMER RICHARDS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0338.xml
advertisement
150
150
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0339.xml
advertisement
151
151
[no value]
[no value]
RICHARD B. OWEN
[no value]
RICHARD B. OWEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0340.xml
advertisement
152
152
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0341.xml
advertisement
153
153
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0342.xml
advertisement
154
154
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
AMERICAN TECHNICAL SOCIETY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0343.xml
advertisement
154
154
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0344.xml
advertisement
155
155
[no value]
[no value]
THE TIFNITE GEM CO.
[no value]
THE TIFNITE GEM CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0345.xml
advertisement
156
156
[no value]
[no value]
Johnson Smith & Co.
[no value]
Johnson Smith & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0346.xml
advertisement
157
157
[no value]
[no value]
L. BASCH & CO.
[no value]
L. BASCH & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0347.xml
advertisement
158
158
[no value]
[no value]
BURLINGTON WATCH CO.
[no value]
BURLINGTON WATCH CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0348.xml
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158
158
[no value]
[no value]
ARNOLD ELECTRIC CO.
[no value]
ARNOLD ELECTRIC CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0349.xml
advertisement
159
159
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0350.xml
advertisement
160
160
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0351.xml
advertisement
161
161
[no value]
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
[no value]
MATHIAS KLEIN & SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0352.xml
advertisement
161
161
[no value]
[no value]
THE OSTER MFG. CO.
[no value]
THE OSTER MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0353.xml
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161
161
[no value]
[no value]
The L. S. Starrett Co.
[no value]
The L. S. Starrett Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0354.xml
advertisement
162
162
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0355.xml
advertisement
163
163
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.: Yankee
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
Yankee
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0356.xml
advertisement
163
163
[no value]
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0357.xml
advertisement
164
164
[no value]
[no value]
The Prest-O-Lite Co.
[no value]
The Prest-O-Lite Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0358.xml
advertisement
165
165
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
HENRY DISSTON & SONS, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0359.xml
advertisement
166
166,167
[no value]
[no value]
Goodell-Pratt Company
[no value]
Goodell-Pratt Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0360.xml
advertisement
168
168
[no value]
[no value]
Milwaukee & St. Paul
[no value]
Milwaukee & St. Paul
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19171001_0091_004_0361.xml