Issue: 19170801

Wednesday, August 1, 1917
AUGUST 1917
2
True
91
Monday, January 12, 2015

Articles
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0001.xml
tableOfContents
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5,6
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Contents for August, 1917
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0002.xml
advertisement
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7
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Blackstone Institute
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Blackstone Institute
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0003.xml
advertisement
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8,9
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THEO, AUDEL&CO.
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THEO, AUDEL&CO.
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0004.xml
advertisement
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10
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0005.xml
advertisement
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11
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RAHE’S AUTO TRAINING SCHOOL
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RAHE’S AUTO TRAINING SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0006.xml
advertisement
12
12
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The Oliver Typewriter Company
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The Oliver Typewriter Company
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0007.xml
advertisement
13
13,14,15,16,17,18
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0008.xml
advertisement
19
19
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American School of Aviation
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American School of Aviation
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0009.xml
advertisement
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20
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0010.xml
advertisement
21
21
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0011.xml
advertisement
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22
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NEW YORK ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
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NEW YORK ELECTRICAL SCHOOL
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0012.xml
advertisement
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23
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Advertisement: Popular Science
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0013.xml
article
162
162,163
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Drag-Bombing Submarines from Airplanes
Destroying a Submarine with a Cable-Bomb
A new method of airplane attack
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IN the airplane the elusive submarine has a deadly enemy. Flying high above the surface of the ocean, an airplane can see a submarine which has dived to avoid surface boats. The airplane’s methods of attack have not been so unerring as the gun fire from the boats.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0014.xml
article
164
164
ASTRONOMY
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How the Sun Looks in the Arctic Circles in the Morning, at Noon and at Night
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NORTH of the Arctic Circle, during certain periods of the year, the sun barely peeps over the horizon. Some days you have to stand on your tip-toes, so to speak, to see it at all. At sunrise, midday, and sunset it appears just above the horizon, and remains in about the same position.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0015.xml
article
164
164
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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“ An Army Travels on Its Belly,” Said Napoleon—Also on Its Feet, Say Chiropodists
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IF your feet trouble you, you are only about fifty per cent efficient as a fighting man. In the Fourteenth Regiment of the National Guard, in Brooklyn, N. Y., the men must submit themselves to a foot examination. The accompanying illustration shows a number of them undergoing treatment at the hands of the 1917 class of the School of Chiropody of New York.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0016.xml
article
165
165
MISCELLANY
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A Mechanical Hair-Parter. It Places Every Hair Where It Belongs
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LOOK at this hair-parting apparatus, It accurately outlines a straight part on any portion of the scalp, separating the hair easily and quickly without dependence upon a mirror. The device consists of two flat strips of celluloid or vulcanized rubber which may be bent lengthwise to conform with the shape of the head.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0017.xml
article
165
165
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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A Combined Ice-Box, Pantry and Trunk for Automobiles
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A COMBINATION refrigerator, pantry and trunk, which can be made to fit any automobile, has been invented by Ralph S. Hopkins of Seattle. Hopkins has found this contrivance, made of iron for his five-passenger car, most valuable for automobile trips. The apparatus weighs sixty pounds and is placed on the running board.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0018.xml
article
165
165
MISCELLANY
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There Are Five Hundred Indian Languages in the United States
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BEFORE you write the Government or the Smithsonian Institution and request it to send you the Indian name for this or that thing, bear in mind that there is no one American Indian language. On the contrary, there are no less than one thousand languages in the two Americas and practically five hundred distinct Indian languages north of Mexico.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0019.xml
article
166
166
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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The Largest Indoor Waterfall in the World
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THIS waterfall is not out of doors, nor is it used for the development of power, but it represents the flowing of one hundred tons of water each minute and energy of more than three hundred horsepower. It is part of the laboratory equipment at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and illustrates how this school teaches by means of commercial quantities under ordinary conditions.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0020.xml
article
166
166
MISCELLANY
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It Fastens Cord Tighter Than You Can Tie It
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A PACKAGE tie designed to fasten cord without tying the ends, has been invented by Warren L. Bald, of New York city. The inventor claims that his tie will fasten a cord tighter than any knot ever devised and will hold the cord more securely than a number of knots.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0021.xml
article
167
167
MISCELLANY
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Foiling the Pickpocket and Protecting Your Watch
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AVERY simple device to prevent your watch from falling out of your pocket has been invented by Carl Anton Nord of New York City. It consists of a case stamped from sheet metal and lined with soft fabric. The case, which is fastened securely to the pocket, has a notch at the top, which is rounded to admit the stem of the watch.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0022.xml
article
167
167
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Testing a Car’s Power to Pull Itself Out When Stuck
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GETTING stuck in mud, soft sand or snow—the particular circumstances depending on the season of the year—is one of the vicissitudes to be guarded against in southern California when motoring off the main highways in the mountains or deserts, as it is sometimes necessary to do there as well as in other sections of the country.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0023.xml
article
167
167
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
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Take Good Care of the Eggs This Year—You Will Need Them
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THE United States Department of Agriculture has called attention to the fact that carelessness in handling eggs causes an annual loss of over thirteen millions of them. The loss is due to small cracks in the shells. Once an egg shell is cracked even so slightly that the eye cannot detect it, the delicate, protective, gelatinous coating which Nature provides as a lining for it becomes exposed to the attack of germs and mold forms, lessening the keeping quality of the egg.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0024.xml
article
168
168,169
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Handling a Submarine
The success of an attack and the very lives of the crew depend almost entirely upon their ability to act as one man
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EVERY submarine has its commander —generally a captain—who acts as the very brains of the ship. No one else can give orders; for so interconnected are all the machines, that the conflicting commands from more than one officer would almost surely result in an accident.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0025.xml
article
169
169
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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A Tell-Tale Light System—First Assistant to the Motorcycle Cop
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IT would profit the French General Staff as much to have one of its members an agent of the German Intelligence Bureau as it would profit a motorist, bent on speeding, to display this tell-tale electric signal on the front of his machine. The device consists of a series of colored lights, five in number, arranged perpendicularly in a metal case, and mechanism essentially similar to that of a speedometer.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0026.xml
article
170
170
PICTURE PAGES
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Bayonet Practice for Our Recruits
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0027.xml
article
171
171
PICTURE PAGES
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Why the Hindenburg Line Seemed So Impregnable
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0028.xml
article
172
172,173
PICTURE PAGES
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The Michelangelos in Bakers’ and Confectioners’ Shops Do Their Work in Sugar, Chocolate and Fat
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0029.xml
article
174
174
PICTURE PAGES
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The Vanishing Chimney Sweeps of Paris
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0030.xml
article
175
175
PICTURE PAGES
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Novel Ways of Recruiting in the East
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0031.xml
article
176
176,177
PICTURE PAGES
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The Sailor Is as Handy with Knife and Rope as the Seamstress with Needle and Thread
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0032.xml
article
178
178,179
PICTURE PAGES
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The Betsey Rosses of Today Engaged in the Huge Task of Meeting the Demand for “Old Glory”
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0033.xml
article
180
180
PICTURE PAGES
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Waterspout—the Sailor’s Dread for Centuries
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0034.xml
article
181
181
PICTURE PAGES
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Making the Summer Bearable in the Zoo
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0035.xml
article
182
182
PICTURE PAGES
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Soldiers’ Art Exhibit at Leblanc’s Museum, Paris
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0036.xml
article
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183
PICTURE PAGES
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President Wilson’s Message Reaches the Germans
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0037.xml
article
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184
PICTURE PAGES
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Recreation for the Wounded and for Prisoners
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0038.xml
article
185
185
PICTURE PAGES
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Queer Trees and Near-Trees—All Are Useful
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0039.xml
article
186
186,187
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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The Automobilist's Mechanical Cost Keeper
It tells the mileage of the car, the life of each tire, and the gasoline and oil consumption
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THE latest device for the convenience of the automobile owner who desires to keep a complete record of his car operation is an instrument on which can be read at will the car speed, the trip mileage, the total mileage, the mileage of each of the four tires in use, the two spare tires usually carried, the gasoline and oil consumption and warnings at 500 and 1,000 miles of running to indicate that adjustments, greasings, etc., are necessary.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0040.xml
article
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187
ARCHITECTURE
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A Circular Garage for the Farm, Built from Silo Forms
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SILO forms previously used on a Missouri farm were employed' to build the novel circular concrete garage shown in the accompanying illustration. It cost about one hundred and fifty dollars and is sixteen feet in diameter, with sufficient space on each side of the car for work bench and vise.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0041.xml
article
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187
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Inflate Your Tires to Full Pressure, Even in Hottest Weather
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LOOK out! Don’t inflate that tire to full pressure on a hot day like this,” is the costliest warning ever hurled at motorists. Instead of tires and money it has cost automobile owners millions of dollars. True, a tire does expand in hot weather, but so slightly as to be negligible in its effect.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0042.xml
article
187
187
MISCELLANY
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Use Your Natural Arm If You Would Be a Good Craftsman
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THE brachiometer (don’t be frightened at the name) is an instrument which has been devised by Professor H. Franklin Jones, of the University of South Dakota, todetermine whether an individual is naturally right or left handed. Every person is born with a major and a minor arm, and Professor Jones, through study of this fact, has discovered things about the man who is jack of all trades and master of none.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0043.xml
article
188
188,189,190
ARCHITECTURE
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Roadtown—The Commuters’ Utopia
Vitalizing the country with arteries of energy and life from the city
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Max Fleischer
MR. EDGAR CHAMBLESS, who has devoted half a life-time to housing problems, has conceived Roadtown, which, if carried out, should give us all the advantages of the country with none of its disadvantages. The Roadtown plan of housing may be compared with the modern skyscraper hotel or office building.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0044.xml
article
190
190
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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A New Spur Is Carried on the Reins— Not on the Heel
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IF you dig a horse in the ribs with nicely sharpened spurs, he runs. You naturally assume that if you dig him in the back in like manner, the result will be the same. Herein lies the reason for the rein spurs invented by B. E. Jordan, of Hugo, Okla.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0045.xml
article
190
190
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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A Bottle Opener Which Will Not Break the Cork
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IN opening a bottle with the ordinary corkscrew, it often happens that the cork is broken and difficulty is found in removing it without dropping crumbs of cork into the contents of the bottle, or of pushing the broken cork itself down into the bottle.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0046.xml
article
191
191
ELECTRICITY
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Protect Yourself Against Highwaymen with an Electrified Cane
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ATTACKED by a prowler, springing at you in the dark, how would you defend yourself? One young American believes he has solved the problem by an electric cane which would paralyze the muscles of the assailant in a twinkling. The cane is loaded with a high tension shocking coil and electric batteries.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0047.xml
article
191
191
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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A Folding Crib in the Automobile and Summer Camp
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WHAT shall be done with the baby when the family decides to go automobiling? The question is answered by a new crib which can be carried in the car and which can fold into a very small space and in such a shape that it can be disposed of readily when not needed.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0048.xml
article
192
192,193
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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The Time Fuse and How It Works
The number of feet, yards or miles which the projectile is to travel can be accurately gaged by simply turning the time ring
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Reginald Trautschold
YOU have read in the war dispatches that the "troops advanced under a curtain of fire.” What does that mean? Simply that a barrage of bursting shells, hurled over the advancing men into the enemy’s lines, forms a protective screen. In order that this curtain of fire may be a real protection, however, and not a terrible menace, it is absolutely essential that the men who fire the guns should have precise control of the point at which the shrapnel or high-explosive shells are to break.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0049.xml
article
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193
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Filling Up Your Automobile Tank Without Spilling the Gasoline
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EVERY autoist will appreciate this funnel, invented by Walter W. Errington of Texas. It is an ordinary funnel soldered to a plug which fits snugly in the tank opening. The air valve, through which the air in the tank escapes when the gasoline is poured in is attached to this plug, the valve stem and spring serving as the funnel handle.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0050.xml
article
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194,195
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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And Still the Inventors Continue to Provide Us with Automobile Improvements and Accessories
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PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0051.xml
article
196
196,197,198
NATURAL SCIENCE
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The Misunderstood Shark
Under-sea photography is adding to our scant knowledge of these wolves of the deep
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WILL a shark attack a man ? “Yes,” say the landlubbers, some of whom saw sharks deliberately attack and kill bathers along the New Jersey coast last year. “No,” indignantly retort the sea captains, fishermen and shark-wise scientists. The truth is that only a few facts about sharks are well established, apart from the question of whether they do or do not kill human beings.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0052.xml
article
198
198
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Co-operative Kitchens to Solve the “High Cost” Problems
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THAT the cost of the primary necessities of life has increased to a point that causes hardship, privation and under-nutrition among the unemployed or in large families striving to exist on a small income, is no doubt pitifully true. In the majority of cases, however, it is expensive tastes and pampered appetites which suffer most.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0053.xml
article
199
199
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Teaching the Proper Care of Forests by Object Lesson Models
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THE right and the wrong way to cut timber is shown by realistic models which the Forest Service has had prepared for exhibition purposes throughout the country. Three models are included in the series. The first shows a stand of one acre of virgin timber, an actual scene in one of the national forests that has been reproduced on a small scale with great accuracy both as to proportion and coloring.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0054.xml
article
199
199
MISCELLANY
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A New Helmet for Use in Smoke or Gas-Filled Chambers
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THIS is not a gas mask such as is used in European trenches. It is a new helmet which the British Government has installed on five hundred battleships to be used below the decks when entering gas or smoke-filled compartments. It is also being introduced in America, in city fire departments.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0055.xml
article
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200,201
AERONAUTICS
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America’s Biggest Flying Machine
Glenn Curtiss builds a giant airplane for the Navy
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Carl Dientsbach
IN no craft are the drawbacks of small size so manifest as in aircraft. Flying in a disturbed atmosphere is never less severe than navigating an angry ocean. The altitude, the indescribable emptinessof the air, and the offdrift caused by the wind make it difficult to follow a set course.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0056.xml
article
201
201
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Teaching Children Natural History with Animal Pictures Made of Sand
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THE approved method of teaching very young children is to disguise the instruction under the cloak of amusement. An interesting development in the carrying out of this idea is found in the sand pictures of Walter A. Ward, of New York city. Cardboards covered with colored pictures of animals are given to the children together with bottles containing the variously colored sand.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0057.xml
article
201
201
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Sometimes an Object Is Beautiful Because It Is So Ugly
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EVERYBODY is familiar with the extreme ugliness of the bulldog’s face that makes the animal positively attractive ; and everyone who has studied the moths is familiar with the marvelous hideousness —or beauty—of the larva of the Automeris io.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0058.xml
article
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202
MISCELLANY
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How Would You Like to Hold a Chinese Printer’s Job?
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CHINESE characters do not express sounds although the pitch of the voice is significant. Their letters are ideographs, or writings of ideas or things. Hence the Chinese have no alphabet, strictly speaking. For this reason the Chinese must employ an astounding number of characters.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0059.xml
article
202
202
MISCELLANY
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A Wire Hood for Protection Against Bees or Mosquitoes
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ALL too often, the best fishing and outing grounds are to be found where the mosquitoes and the wood pests are thickest. F. L. Rhodes, a fisherman of Michigan, at least found this the rule in his State. Notwithstanding the regular hoods of cloth mosquito-netting which he would use, the insects would finally get at him; the netting would catch in the bushes.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0060.xml
article
203
203
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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A Street Cleaner Built Like a Carpet Sweeper
Cleaning two hundred thousand square yards of pavement in eight hours
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THE motor-driven vacuum street cleaner shown in the accompanying illustration is built on exactly the same principle as that of the ordinary household carpet sweeper. It differs from others of a similar type in that every particle of the dust and dirt picked up is retained in the vehicle storage bin.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0061.xml
article
204
204
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
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Growing Mustard and Water Cress on Blankets
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PROFESSOR JASPER JEGGLES, an English botanist, advocates some quick methods of salad raising. “Mustard and cress,” he says, “can be grown anywhere. All that is required is an old blanket hung over a line and well soaked with water. Sprinkle the mustard seed on one half of the blanket and the cress on the other and in two weeks time you will have a crop ready for the table.”
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0062.xml
article
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204
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Children May Write On These Walls Without Fear of Punishment
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WHY would children rather write on immaculate walls than on writing paper? Because, first, their mothers caution them not to do it, and, second, because the walls are whiter and the writing looks better on them than it does on paper. But the time has come when the mother need fear for the white nursery walls no longer.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0063.xml
article
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205
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
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Plowing and Pulverizing the Soil in One Operation
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A ROTARY tiller which prepares a seed bed without the usual harrowing, disking and rolling operations has been invented by Guy E. Lincoln, a graduate of the Minnesota Agricultural College. It is somewhat similar to milling machines used in Europe, but it differs from them in that it does its work on a furrow turned with an ordinary sulky plow, while most of the foreign machines work on the soil just as it lies in the field.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0064.xml
article
205
205
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
A Water-Tight Holder and Sterilizer for the Toothbrush
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE toothbrush illustrated is made with a folding handle, somewhat like that of a familiar type of pocket comb. But the toothbrush handle does more than fold over the bristles of the brush. It forms a receptacle for a disinfectant which will keep the brush perfectly sterilized and antiseptically clean until it is ready for use again.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0065.xml
article
206
206,207
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
A Two-Million-Dollar Hospital Ship for Our Navy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PLANS for a hospital ship for the United States Navy have been completed by the naval constructors and officials of the Bureau of Medicine and Surgery, and work on the new ship, which will be a model of its kind, will soon begin at the Philadelphia Navy Yard.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0066.xml
article
206
206
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Lo, the Soya Bean! A Substitute for Meat, Fish and Fats
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH all due respect to Western civilization and progress, we must nevertheless yield the palm to China for the production of the soya bean, a vegetable so full of promising possibilities that agricultural experimental stations all over the United States are concentrating attention upon it.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0067.xml
article
207
207
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
The Mysterious Ice Mines of the United States
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are several caves in the United States where Nature seems to have become confused as to the seasons. During the late spring and summer ice forms and a freezing temperature prevails, but as winter comes on the interior of the caves becomes milder, the ice gradually melts and a kind of subdued summer sets in underground.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0068.xml
article
207
207
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Poison Ivy : How to Kill It and Cure a Case of Inflammation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE cheapest and most effective method of eliminating poison ivy, according to experts of the Department of Agriculture, is the simple one of rooting up the plants and destroying them. If the poison ivy is in large fields it may be necessary to plow and cultivate the land.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0069.xml
article
208
208
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
How the Government Seals Unofficial Wireless Stations
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMATEUR and commercial stations alike have been ordered closed. The Government cannot afford to take any chances of military information leaking through to the enemy. All aerials have been dismantled, and the instruments stored away.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0070.xml
article
208
208
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Teaching the Blind How to Write on Straight Lines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE December issue of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY contained an article on an instrument invented to aid the blind in writing. This was the writing tablet invented by the French scientist Dr. Emile Javal. His tablet consists of a fixed elbow rest in which the writing arm swings across the paper.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0071.xml
article
209
209
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
A Torpedo-Proof Ship With Six Hulls
It is to solve the food problem by scooping up the fish from the sea
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE one great aim of Germany is to cut off America from her Allies, preventing our giving them military assistance and our supplying them with food. With his radically new inventions, Nels A. Lybeck, of New York, a seaman of many years’ experience, hopes to thwart Germany in both of these aims.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0072.xml
article
210
210,211
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Do It With Tools and Machinery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0073.xml
article
212
212,213
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
The “Recruit”—Our Only Land Battleship
It is New York’s recruiting center for enlistment in America’s first line of defense
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN Rear Admiral Bradley A. Fiske published his great article on “If Battleships Ran on Land,” in the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY for November, 1915, showing, as it did, the tremendous energy of a battleship on land and the destruction it would work while crashing down Broadway, New York city, he little dreamed that a real battleship would be anchored close to the subway in Union Square in the year 1917.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0074.xml
article
214
214
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Scraping a Bat—Why Is It Done? O, Just Because
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BASEBALL players are as superstitious as Zulus. In no way is this more lucidly illustrated than in the care which some of them lavish upon an ordinary baseball bat. Manufacturers oil and shellac their bats to make them sleek and fresh, and the superstitious baseball player proceeds to use glass, bone, sandpaper and what-not to remove the finish.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0075.xml
article
214
214
RAILWAYS
[no value]
An Improvised Street Railway Smoking Car
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INCREASED traffic and car shortage on a street railway property in the East during the past winter months made some of the operative heads do quick scheming in order to cope with the situation. As a result, some of the open summer cars were equipped for "shop service” in winter.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0076.xml
article
215
215
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
He Finds a Coal Mine in His Cellar
Coal may sell at eighteen dollars a ton but this fortunate lawyer can have all he wants at thirty cents
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE purchasers of property in the residence section of Norton, Va., will hereafter be inclined to examine the cellars of their prospective homes very carefully in the hope of locating some such bonanza as did H. M. Bandy recently. Mr. Bandy was excavating in the cellar of his newly-purchased house in ‘order to install a hot-water heating plant.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0077.xml
article
216
216
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Flag Pole Repairing Minus the Usual Steeple-Jack
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SPECIALIZED pole painters and steeplejacks may soon find themselves unnecessary adjuncts to the business world, if the ingenious flag raising and lowering device shown in the accompanying illustration becomes popular. It can be used on all flat roofs.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0078.xml
article
216
216
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
The Tender Chloroforming, Antiseptic Bayonet—It Wounds and Heals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HOW can we make the soldier fight harder? Can we do it by giving him new implements of torture, new weapons to increase bloodshed? “No,” is the answer of Alexander Foster Humphrey, of Pittsburgh, Pa., inventor of the gentle narcotic hunting bullet and the polite antiseptic, anaesthetic military bullet.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0079.xml
article
217
217
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A New French War Word Which Means “Fooling the Enemy’’
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SINCE the war started the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY has published photographs of big British and French field pieces covered with shrubbery, railway trains “painted out” of the landscape, and all kinds of devices to hide the guns, trains, and the roads from the eyes of enemy aircraft.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0080.xml
article
217
217
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
A Motor-Fan That Works Without Electricity
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL the benefits of the electric fan may now be had in places where electricity is not available by using a fan driven by a motor operated by alcohol, gas, or kerosene. The motor is really an adaptation of the air engine. The alcohol lamp or other source of heat is placed at one end of the cylinder.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0081.xml
article
218
218,219
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Why They Were Rejected
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0082.xml
article
220
220
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
A Dinner Served in Gondolas on a River of Champagne
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE dinner being served in the accompanying photograph is probably the wettest on record. It literally floated on champagne (the stage variety). As one might suppose the novelty is the product of the combined imaginations of a motion-picturedirector and his technical assistant.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0083.xml
article
220
220
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Fighting German Machine-Guns with the French “37”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE great work of the French “75” in counterbalancing, the mass of German artillery in the present war has justly made it famous. But in that work it has had a smaller ally, not so well known though deserving of most honorable mention. This is the French “37,” a small quick-firing cannon which advances with the skirmishing first line, seeking to destroy the German machine-guns.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0084.xml
article
221
221
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Filling Nine Thousand Cans of Beans an Hour
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ARMIES may fight with bullets, but they live on beans. The Civil War was fought on a diet of our dried army beans; this war is waged with canned beans. In the photograph below is shown a modern bean-canning factory working at the height of production.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0085.xml
article
221
221
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
The Largest Human Mouths in the World
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DR. GREENBAUM, an enterprising young dentist in Cincinnati, eager to help Uncle Sam in demonstrating to the volunteer the necessity of getting his mouth in good shape before enlisting for the front, devised what are probably the largest scientifically-correct models of the human mouth in the world.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0086.xml
article
221
221
[no value]
[no value]
Europe Is Starving for Gasoline
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANCE, one of our largest automobile and truck buyers, has prohibited the importation of foreign motor vehicles, except for government account simply because of the difficulty of obtaining gasoline. Gasoline is now selling in France at about a dollar a gallon.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0087.xml
article
222
222
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A Ten-Thousand-Dollar Map of Warring Europe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the lobby of one of Chicago’s large office buildings is a huge relief map of the European countries where the war rages, exhibited to the public and lectured upon by a former war correspondent. The main map is 10 × 20 feet, but owing to its convex construction it contains an area of 300 square feet.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0088.xml
article
222
222
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
An Electric Self-Winding Clock for the Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WEAK-CURRENT electricity is interestingly applied in the self-winding mechanism of a clock which has been specially designed for the dashboard of the automobile. A simple electromagnet is made to drive the clock, and but three or four batteries are required.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0089.xml
article
223
223
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
It Always Turns Right-Side Up
A boat which will carry twenty-five persons and will not “spill” even if turned upside down
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE chief objection to the ordinary type of life boat is the fact that almost no provision is made to protect the passengers from anything except actual drowning. Even here the protection is not complete, for in the heavy storms that so often cause the mother ship to be wrecked the little life boat is tossed about unmercifully, and its occupants sometimes swept overboard.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0090.xml
article
224
224
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
The Latest Device for Easy Entrance to Automobile Doors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE last word in easy-entrance automobile doors permits direct entrance to both the front and rear seats of a close-coupled four-passenger roadster. The special feature of the design is the fact that one-half of the front seat opens with the door.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0091.xml
article
224
224
RAILWAYS
[no value]
The Largest Traveling Kitchen in the World
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE ordinary dining-car, compact as a watch in its arrangement, can feed thirty persons at one sitting. The commissary car illustrated, which is the type used by Canada in transporting her troops, can feed 1,200 men at one sitting, and the food can be served in fifteen minutes.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0092.xml
article
225
225
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Old Before She Was Launched
There are styles in airships as well as in derby hats. The D. N. 1, our new navy schoolship-dirigible, is new and yet so old
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO years ago, the United States Navy contracted for a small dirigible to serve as a schoolship. Now that the craft has been finished, now that it can be judged in the light of the European war, it must be wholeheartedly condemned as well-nigh useless.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0093.xml
article
226
226
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Turn It at Any Angle. It’s Always Ready to Shoot
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SEVERAL attempts have been made to mount machine guns on automobiles and motor boats. The principal problem to be confronted is that of vibration. In every case the inventors have devised several forms of mountings which would lessen to a considerable degree violent shocks.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0094.xml
article
226
226
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
A Giant Swing for the Summer Resort
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
INSPIRED by the swing ’neath the old apple tree, Frederick E. Happel, of Ballston, Virginia, has devised a giant swing for parks and recreation centers to thrill even the person who has grown tired of turning figure eights, riding down the roller coaster, and chuting the chutes.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0095.xml
article
227
227
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Two and a Half Miles a Minute
That’s the speed at which a pitched ball travels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MR. FRANK B. GILBRETH, of Providence, R. I., who is known all over the world as an efficiency engineer and who has specialized in motion study, knows probably more about champions than any other living man—champion golf players, champion fencers, champion baseball players, champion handkerchief folders, champion surgeons and champion typewriters.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0096.xml
article
228
228
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Here Is a Pencil with Nine Good Points
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AT a masquerade ball recently given in Oakland, California, by the advertising men of that city, there appeared eight girls standing in single file and wearing cone-shaped hats which resembled the points of pencils. They were enveloped in a clumsy, bag-like device which had a big point at the front end.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0097.xml
article
228
228
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
The Latest Enemy of Lost Motion—the Portable Elevated Saw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN all manufacturing plants using steel rods, considerable time and labor were formerly required to carry the heavy rods from their racks to the sawing machine and back again when short pieces were to be cut off. But thanks to a new portable elevator designed especially for carrying the electric saw, there is practically no loss at all.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0098.xml
article
228
228
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Deadening Noise by Pasting Tar Paper on a Concrete Floor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BY pasting heavy tar paper to the concrete floor of a factory the thundering noise of passing trucks can be eliminated. The floor is first given a coating of gray cement paint and, when that is dry, a second coating is then applied. At the same time one side of a five-ply tar paper is painted and when both paper and floor are wet the paper is laid wet side down on the floor and rolled until all air-pockets disappear.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0099.xml
article
229
229
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Putting Alcohol to Work on the Farm
The stuff that destroys brawn and brain promises to be the inexhaustible fuel of the future
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PROMISING to be on land what our great fleet of new steel ships will be to England on the seas, the Ford farm tractor shown in the accompanying illustration has been presented to the British government for use in raising England’s crops during the coming season, even before a single one has been sold in this country.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0100.xml
article
230
230,231,232
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
[no value]
Death-Traps on German Liners
The harrowing task of investigating an interned German liner with the possibility of setting off a bomb or plunging into a pitfall at every turn
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THINK of a great deserted ship, five hundred and forty-five feet long, seventy feet wide and over fifty feet deep—as black and forbidding as a Siberian copper mine, with not a ray of light from the uppermost deckhouse to the caverns of the lowest holds, in the damp and slimy bilges, or in the rooms filled with engines, pumps, dynamos, pipes and valves without number.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0101.xml
article
233
233
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Getting Your Change by Machine From the Cashier
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN busy stores and restaurants of the pay-at-the-desk variety, a new device for handing change back to the customers is proving popular. You simply hand in the check and the money through the cashier’s window. When she has made the change she deposits it in the opening of a cylinder, as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0102.xml
article
233
233
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
A Fishing Light to Lure the Fish to the Bait
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WE have the word of the fishermen for it that fish are not unlike other creatures of the earth in regard to curiosity. They are as interested in what goes on below sea level in their subterranean home as we are in what takes place above it. William J. Ryan, of Sapulpa, Oklahoma has made good use of this bit of fish psychology in devising his fishing apparatus.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0103.xml
article
233
233
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
It Costs a Fortune to Keep French Army Officers in Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOY riding seems to be a regular sport of French army officers. According to charges of reckless extravagance made against the touring-car section of the French army, the officers think that the cars they use are their own private property.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0104.xml
article
234
234
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Addressing Newspapers by the Thousands
The lightning-quick method by which the news reaches the subscriber before it grows “stale”
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHEAPER and quicker than the leadtype methods of printing the addresses on newspapers, is the new system which uses embossed aluminum plates. The addressing of daily newspapers by the former method was a tedious task. Now the same task can be done by machinery with the saving of half the expense and of considerably more time.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0105.xml
article
235
235
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Open-Air Barber Shop Where the Prices Fit a Beggar’s Pocket
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN Paramaribo, capital of Dutch Guiana, South America, are many East Indian coolies who have been imported under a system of indenture in such numbers that they comprise one third of the entire population. Now, since through some tenet of their unfathomable religion, the wearing of a beard is not permitted except by the very aged or by dignitaries, the coolie must needs shave continually.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0106.xml
article
235
235
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
A Wounded Man Can Dress His Own Wounds with This Bandage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE rolled bandage is in great demand. Not only in the hospitals and in the equipment of the doctors and nurses on the battlefields, but also in the comfort kits of the soldiers it is found—or should be. The one illustrated is an improvement on that in ordinary use.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0107.xml
article
235
235
[no value]
[no value]
Olive Oil Can Be Utilized to Prevent Fog at Sea
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OIL, though long known to be effective in calming a sea, has only recently been proved of value in preventing fog. Air is prevented from coming in direct contact with water which is warmer than the air. Thus condensation of water vapor is hindered.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0108.xml
article
236
236
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Wild Goats Live on the Roof of Their Building
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE efforts of wild animals in captivity to follow their natural instincts were amusingly illustrated recently by the antics of some wild goats in a Western Zoological Park. Six of the goats were captured and a loghouse, surrounded by a high wire fence, was specially constructed for them in the zoological park. For a long time, however, they were ill at ease and made desperate efforts to scale the wire fence. Finding this impossible, they finally attempted to climb up the sides of their log house.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0109.xml
article
236
236
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
If You Use This Lock, Don’t Forget the Combination
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW lock for the automobile works on a simplified form of the combination principle commonly used in safes. By a combination lock the self-starter, battery and magneto circuits are connected and disconnected within a steel case on the instrument board.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0110.xml
article
237
237
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
The Policeman and the Fainting Lady
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WASHINGTON police, experienced in handling big crowds at presidential inaugurations and other celebrations in the national Capital, recently set about to find a way to revive persons who have fainted on the street without having to call an ambulance and send them to a hospital.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0111.xml
article
237
237
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
A Conveyer Which Loads Coal in Box Cars Without Breakage
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is difficult enough to bring coal to the surface, but marketing it in good-sized lumps is a still harder problem. If the coal leaves the mine in large lumps and is delivered in small lumps, having been broken in freight cars on the trip, it suffers a depreciation in price of about thirty per cent.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0112.xml
article
238
238,239
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Housekeeping Made Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0113.xml
article
240
240
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
A Sprinkler Which Propels Itself Over the Lawn
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A LAWN sprinkler which crawls or rather hops along the garden under its own power has been invented by George C. Bohnenkemper of Denver, Colorado. The apparatus is simply constructed, consisting mainly of a cylinder and piston mounted on a pair of wheels.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0114.xml
article
240
240
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
The First Life-Long Flashlight. A Generator Furnishes the Power
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE first life-long flashlights are soon to be placed on the market by French manufacturers. They will be warmly welcomed by motorists. The usual batteries, which are frequently renewed if used constantly, are replaced by a tiny electric generator.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0115.xml
article
240
240
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
A Spoon Hook Which Will Not Tangle Your Fishing Line
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR ten years Charles Leonard, of Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, got his fishing line tangled or fouled when he used a spoon hook and pork bait for the large mouthed bass that abound in that section of the country. Sometimes the hook would snarl his line four or five times in succession, taking all the pleasure out of the pastime.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0116.xml
article
241
241
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
A Camera to Be Handled Like a Pistol
It is a happy combination of a leveling and sighting appendage and a repeating mechanism
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO handle a camera as easily as a ranchman mainpulates a six-shooter, and to make its aim and result equally effective, is the purpose of several ingenious inventions patented by J. N. Johnson of Albuquerque, New Mexico. He has obviated the necessity of clumsily focusing the camera by means of a finder.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0117.xml
article
242
242,243,244
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
The Unbeaten “Constitution”
Step on board with us and see the guns that won thirty-nine glorious victories
[no value]
[no value]
Thomas Stanley Curtis
THE frigate Constitution, fighter of thirty-nine battles and winner of every one of them, to-day offers the student an exceptional opportunity to compare the naval fighting machine of a hundred years ago with the super-dreadnought of the hour.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0118.xml
article
245
245
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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The Largest American Flag in Existence
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THE city of St. Louis, Missouri, possesses the largest American flag in existence, as far as is known. It is 150 feet long and 78 feet wide. Each of the thirteen stripes is six feet wide. Imagine a plot of ground containing 11,700 square feet—almost one-quarter of an acre— and you will have an idea of the size of the flag.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0119.xml
article
245
245
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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This Machine Is Five Times as Fast as an Expert Bank Teller
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AN expert bank teller can count by hand from six to ten thousand coins per hour for one hour only. With the new machine illustrated one man, not an expert, can count fifty thousand coins per hour indefinitely. Mistakes are impossible. In the course of a certain test, two thin dimes were glued together and mixed with the mass of coins.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0120.xml
article
245
245
[no value]
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Submarines Disguised as Sailing Vessels, Creep Up to Their Prey
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TO deceive vigilant merchant ships, the commanders of German submarines disguise their vessels when they can. Frequently they hoist sails so that their craft look like peaceful sailing vessels. According to the captain of a swift British freighter, as he was standing on the bridge of his vessel one day he sighted a craft lying low in the water, far astern.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0121.xml
article
246
246
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Automobile Engine Cooler Operates on Steam Ejector Plan
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THE latest accessory to aid the water circulation of an automobile engine forces the water through the system at a speed proportional to the engine heat generated. The device is built on the principle of the steam ejector used to draw water from a tank into a steam boiler.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0122.xml
article
246
246
MISCELLANY
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Cooling the Air of a Room with Cold Water Pipes
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THE simple but effective air cooler shown in the illustration below has been patented by Glen O’Brien, of Manhattan, Kansas. It consists of four coils of metal pipe, fitted one inside the other for compactness. Cold water flows through the pipes while an electric fan blows the sultry air of the room over them.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0123.xml
article
247
247
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Alas! It Will Not Work—This Method of Foiling Bomb-Droppers
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AND now come Mary Hannah Clarke, born Ashton, banker and British citizen but residing at Paris, France, and Mr.Demetrio Maggiora, engineer and Italian subject but residing in the same city, with a new invention. These two secured sole American rights to an anti-airplane ordnance of the most flabbergasting construction.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0124.xml
article
247
247
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Policeman’s “Billy” Becomes a Whistle
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THE inventors have discovered that the ordinary hardwood club of the policeman is not so efficient as it looks. James A. Byrne, of West Orange, N. J., has been struck by the fact that when an officer clutches a prisoner with one hand and his club with the other, he is not in a position to take his whistle from his pocket.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0125.xml
article
248
248
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Applying the Idea of the Needle Bath in Shell-Making
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THE steel utilized in the manufacture of explosive shells must be carefully tempered. If the steel is too brittle or too ductile the destructiveness of the projectile is affected. Steel of the correct temper, however, does not lend itself readily to heavy machine operations.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0126.xml
article
248
248
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Fortune from Old Razor Blades
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A CALIFORNIA man is making a little fortune out of old safety-razor blades. It seems almost unbelievable but it is not more strange than the stories we hear of fortunes made by rag-pickers and dealers in old tin cans. This man patented a suitable blade-holder, which he sells with supplies of old blades to tailors, milliners, show-card writers, and photographers.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0127.xml
article
249
249
MISCELLANY
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When the Star-Spangled Banner Is Played Wave Your Cane Flag
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THE question of what to do with your cane when the orchestra strikes up the Star-Spangled Banner has been solved by Charles T. Fernandez, of Roxbury, Massachusetts. If you have one of his new canes you raise it above your head, turn a knob until an American flag concealed in the interior comes out through the slot, and then wave the flag as long as the music lasts.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0128.xml
article
249
249
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Fifty-Five Packages of Chewing Gum for Everybody!
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ELLWOOD HENDRICK
AT the Kansas City meeting of the American Chemical Society, Dr. Frederic Dannerth, of the Research Department of the Rubber Trade Laboratory, presented in detail the methods for determining the content and value of block chicle, of which chewing gum is made.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0129.xml
article
249
249
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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A Portable Nail Distributor Saves the Carpenter’s Hands and His Time
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A BOON to the traveling carpenter, in the form of a portable nail distributor has been invented by Robert B. Holland, of North Yakima, Washington. With it the carpenter or other workman can separate small nails from large ones by simply dropping them into a hopper.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0130.xml
article
250
250,251
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Conquering Your Cramps Under Water
Some valuable first-aid advice from the champion long distance swimmer of the world
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THE “Old Man of the Sea,” who figures in fiction so mysteriously and with such dire consequences, might well be named “Cramps” for everyday application, as far as swimmers are concerned. To many swimmers, otherwise absolutely fearless in the water, the suspicion of a cramp is a nerve-wrecker.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0131.xml
article
251
251
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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The Very Biggest Locomotive in the World
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THE greatest steam locomotive in the world has been put into service by the Baldwin Locomotive Works. It is so gigantic that its boiler had to be made flexible at three different joints so that the locomotive could turn around a curve! It is over one hundred feet long and weighs some four hundred and twenty tons.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0132.xml
article
251
251
ELECTRICITY
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Shave Under a Flashlight Attached Directly to Your Razor
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"FIRST AID" in affording yourself a quick shave is given by a new razor attachment patented by Katherine E. Allport of Chicago. It is a combination of a flashlight and a razor which will illuminate a man’s face far better than the regular wall light.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0133.xml
article
252
252
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
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The Largest Model of a Ship Ever Constructed Under a Roof
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IN the days when the American merchant marine was the pride of the entire shipping world, New Bedford, Massachusetts, was the port of many a prize-winning cutter. It was also the headquarters for the whaling industry. One of the early sea captains who made a fortune out of whale oil was Jonathan Bourne, whose favorite ship was the Lagoda.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0134.xml
article
252
252
NATURAL SCIENCE
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The Curious Ways of Egypt’s Holy Beetle
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DR. E. BADE
THE holy beetle of the Nile is found carved in stone everywhere in Egypt—a relic of a time when crocodiles, bugs, and beetles were objects of worship. As the scarab is a dung beetle it is naturally found in the vicinity of herds and particularly in pastures where nomadic herdsmen watch their flocks.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0135.xml
article
253
253
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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With an Axe and Two Springboards He Chops His Way Up a Giant Tree
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FROM the logging camps in the vast timber district of Vancouver have come some remarkable accounts of daring and agility. The story that is going the rounds of the camps just now is the tree-climbing feat performed by a powerful lumberman, Andrew Busby.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0136.xml
article
253
253
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
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Studying the Effects of Calf-Foods by Means of Photographic Records
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IN keeping records of experiments to determine the effects of various foods and combinations of foods as substitutes for whole milk in the rearing of calves the Agricultural Experiment Station of Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind., uses photographs instead of tabulated figures to furnish an index in regard to the condition and development of the calves.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0137.xml
article
254
254
[no value]
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Directing a Motion Picture Show From the Manager’s Office
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THE problem of keeping in touch with the audience and the stage while attending to the affairs of his own private office, has been solved in a very Twentieth Century way by Mr. Harold Edel, managing director of the Strand Theater, New York City.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0138.xml
article
254
254
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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The Evaporation of Water Drives This Remarkable Clock
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A CLOCK designed by M. Bernardi, a German watchmaker, is run by ether and water. The driving wheel consists of three glass tubes having light glass balls fused to their ends. Some ether vapor is contained in each tube system. The water is contained in a reservoir, through which the balls pass when turning.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0139.xml
article
255
255
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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A Puncture-Proof, Bullet-Proof, Blowout-Proof, Skid-Proof Tire
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FROM Washington there comes the photograph which is reproduced herewith, showing a Seattle citizen’s ideas on keeping pneumatic tires out of harm’s way and yet getting a little more service from them than could be obtained if they were locked up in a dark room in an atmosphere of nitrogen.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0140.xml
article
255
255
NATURAL SCIENCE
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How Monterey Turned a Whale into One of the City’s Sights
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MONTEREY, California, has solved the question of what to do with a stray whale that is washed up on shore. After disposing of the flesh and oil to a refinery, the bones may be mounted on shore and kept as a permanent natural history exhibit. That is what the city officials did with a whale which was washed ashore there.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0141.xml
article
256
256,257,258,259
ASTRONOMY
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What’s On the Moon?
Look through the telescope with us and see the great mountains, the vast dead craters and arid wastes of slag
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Scriven Bolton
SUCH is the power of our largest telescopes that a creature as large as an elephant might be detected on the moon. Hence we are more familiar with the lunar surface than with Central Africa. Since there is no appreciable air on the moon, our view is always clear and unobstructed.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0142.xml
article
260
260
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Keeping Out Flies When You Open the Door
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A DOOR-OPERATED fan which drives away venturesome flies has been brought out by Joel J. Hurt, of South Omaha, Neb. The bracket holding the fan is attached to the door jamb at the top of the door. The gear of the fan engages the driving gearing mounted on another shaft.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0143.xml
article
260
260
MISCELLANY
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If Your Parrot is Thirsty, Give Him a Drink
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"THERE is a curious superstition existent among parrot-keepers," says L. S. Crandall, in Pets (Henry Holt & Co., New York), “to the effect that these birds not only require no water but are better off without it. The foundation for this absurd belief is not hard to find. When parrots, particularly young birds, are being brought from the tropics, they are customarily fed on boiled corn or bread and milk. What moisture they require is obtained from the food. If such birds are suddenly given access to unlimited water, the effect on the digestive organs is dangerous, and may result in the death of the bird. On the other hand, if the parrot be given a drink daily, and then the water be removed for a short period, the bird will gradually become accustomed to it. Once this is accomplished, there is nothing to fear from clean water.”
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0144.xml
article
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260
MISCELLANY
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An Accommodating Church—It Goes Wherever It Is Wanted
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IN India and in some places of the New World, particularly in the British West Indies, many religious festivals are held along the roadside and in the open fields during the month of February, which is the month of weddings and special feastings.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0145.xml
article
261
261
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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One Horsepower Will Run All the Watches in the World
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AN astute French mathematician has found that in certain watches the motions exceed two hundred million a year in little equal jumps. In the same time the outside of the average balance travels seven thousand five hundred miles. Yet despite this astonishing distance traveled by the ordinary watch the amount of power consumed is trifling.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0146.xml
article
261
261
MISCELLANY
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The Latest Conceit in Timepieces—A Buttonhole Watch
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IN spite of the fact that there is no article of jewelry more useful than the watch, it seems hard to stow it away in a suit of clothes. It has been tucked away in vest pockets and belts, attached either to an ornate chain or an inconspicuous ribbon, and has adorned the wrists of all classes.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0147.xml
article
261
261
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Making a Trolley-Car of the Motor-Truck
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WHY can’t motor-trucks and other commercial vehicles obtain their power from overhead trolley wires? So they can, if reports from Bradford, England, are true. In Bradford a motor-truck with a trolley pole attached to its cab takes power from overhead street car wires.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0148.xml
article
262
262
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Device to Remove Automobile Bodies Without Scratching Them
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TWO men can remove a highly-polished automobile body from its chassis without giving its surface a scratch, by means of the device shown in the accompanying illustration. This new device is attached to an overhead trolley. It consists of two sets of compass-like arms pivoted to the ends of a common cross-member at the top.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0149.xml
article
262
262
MISCELLANY
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An Automatic Revolver No Bigger Than Your Watch
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AUTOMATIC revolvers are made about as big as a standard watch. Little as these revolvers are, they nevertheless contain an automatic reloading mechanism as complete as that of any of their bigger brothers. They are “seven-shooters.”
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0150.xml
article
263
263
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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A Small Sand Spreader Is Useful All the Year Round
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THE small two-wheeled bin device shown below is particularly adapted for spreading sand over small areas such as icy cross walks in the winter or over oily streets, or for scattering fertilizer in the summer. The sand is spread uniformly with no bare spots or large piles, hence this is preferable to the hand method.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0151.xml
article
263
263
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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The Newest Child’s “Pushmobile.” It Is Built on a Novel Principle
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A CHILD’S hand-propelled pushmobile has been invented by Charles R. van Horn of Aberdeen, Wash. The lower end of the operating lever is coupled by two connecting rods with the gearing that drives the rear wheels and propels the vehicle. The connecting rods are attached to the lever at different points; they also engage the first gear wheel at different portions.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0152.xml
article
264
264
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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Panning for Gold in Central and South America
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GRACE S. MATHEWS
THE “battel” used by the prospector for gold in Central and South America in tropical placer mining is a better gold-saver than the Alaskan gold pan. Shaped like a platter, with a depressed center coming to a point in the middle, the gold collects in the point of this broad shallow cylinder.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0153.xml
article
264
264
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Everybody Is Acquainted with the Squash Bug
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EDWARD F. BIGELOW
SOME of us know all the bad things about the squash bug—that it is proverbially ill-favored and ill-smelling and an enemy to the squash vines. We have heard the entomologist speak about Anasa tristis with elaborate description of the bug that hibernates in the adult stage, wakes up in the early spring and lays its eggs on the young leaves of the squash and the pumpkin.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0154.xml
article
265
265
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
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Giant Mushroom Anchors for Holding Buoys
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"MUSHROOM" anchors take their name from their shape. They look like mushrooms upside down. The mushroom anchor illustrated was made by a prominent cast-steel maker of this country for use by the United States Department of Commerce in lighthouse service for buoys.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0155.xml
article
265
265
MISCELLANY
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The Rate at Which Food Prices Have Advanced
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HOW much has the cost of food advanced? According to one of the leading statistical houses of America, cabbage has gone up 850 per cent since last year; onions, 1,100 per cent; potatoes, 280 per cent; eggs, 77 percent; beef, 20 per cent; pork, 70 per cent; butter, 30 per cent; wheat and flour, 46 per cent; beans, 90 per cent.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0156.xml
article
265
265
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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The Compressed-Air Orchestra; Human Lungs Give Place to Tanks
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IF the inventors have their way, musicians will no longer need to blow their souls into their instruments. The inflated eye-ball, the puffed cheek, and all the laugh-inducing mannerisms of the men who play the wood and brass instruments will become as history.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0157.xml
article
266
266
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Five Tools in One
Here is a combined spade, knife, pickaxe, hammer and trench weapon
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[no value]
A TOOL which permits of a wide variety of uses has been invented by Dr. F. P. Archer, of Wilkes-Barre, Pa., and could with advantage take its place beside the other necessary equipment of the fighting man. A modern army must not only be equipped, each man individually, with practically every necessity for fighting and for health and comfort that space will permit, but it must be equipped with tools to dig itself into the ground when necessary.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0158.xml
article
267
267
NATURAL SCIENCE
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Coaxing Music from a Pile of Rocks
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A MR. FROST, of Marblehead, Mass., was engaged in clearing his land of some huge, flat rocks, when he accidentally struck one with his hammer. It emitted a clear musical note. He struck another in the same way. The tone given out was equally clear and sweet but different in pitch.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0159.xml
article
267
267
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Household Bookless Bookkeeping on the Poker-Chip Principle
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A NEW system of bookless bookkeeping, designed especially for the housewife, happily coincides with the demand for careful record keeping in order to cut down expenditures to a wartime basis. This new system substitutes for old fashioned juggling with figures the simplicity and vividness of account-keeping with poker chips.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0160.xml
article
268
268
MISCELLANY
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The Dumb Turk. He Smokes Cigarettes and Doesn’t Know It
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[no value]
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A DUMMY who smokes cigarettes as realistically as a living human being is now used to advertise the fragrant aromas of different grades of tobacco. The idea is not to show the public how well a cigarette burns or how well the dummy smokes it, but to enable smokers to smell the smoke as it is automatically puffed out by the apparatus concealed within the dummy.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0161.xml
article
268
268
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
An Easily Adjusted Tire. It Locks Itself on the Wheel
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW type of tire just brought out by an Akron manufacturer is designed to eliminate the trouble experienced in mounting either a demountable or pressed-on solid tire on the wheel of a motor-truck. It employs the compression of an annular rubber pad between the steel base of the tire and the steel felloe band on the wheel to lock the tire on the wheel.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0162.xml
article
269
269
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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Closing Up a Wound Without Using a Surgeon’s Needle
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A NEW method of drawing together the parts of a wound so as to give Nature a chance to knit them permanently together again, eliminates the surgeon’s needle, together with the pain of the sewing-up process. In this new method a lacing plaster is used, a strip on each side of the wound.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0163.xml
article
269
269
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
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The “Pretty Maids” of a Chinese Window Garden
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"MARY, Mary, quite contrary, how does your garden grow?" “With tinkle bells and conchal shells and pretty maids all in a row.” So goes the English nursery rhyme, but it remained for the Chinese to make a practical application of the idea, The two photographs below show how the pretty maids are made to grow in the miniature flower gardens of China.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0164.xml
article
270
270
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
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Mollycoddling the Microbe
Some of the deadliest germs are very delicate and require plenty of milk and eggs
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THINK of cultivating deadly germs, the typhoid bacillus, for instance, with as much care and attention to diet and environment as would be given to a delicate orchid or even to a beautiful baby! That is what is being done at the American Museum of Natural History in New York city.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0165.xml
article
271
271
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Put Your Flowers Outdoors on This Adjustable Window Shelf
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WITH a new adjustable window-shelf invented by Earle H. Bartlett, of Kansas City, Missouri, flower pots can be placed outside the windows with perfect safety, provided city ordinances allow it. The shelf permits the window sash to be raised or lowered.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0166.xml
article
271
271
MILITARY AND NAVAL SCIENCE
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Figures That Give an Idea of the Task of Transporting Our Armies
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SOME idea of the enormity of the task of moving the great bodies of United States troops to be raised may be gained from the following figures: 6,229 cars are necessary to transport an army of 80,000 men. These cars would be made up into 366 trains with as many locomotives.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0167.xml
article
271
271
MISCELLANY
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A Sculptor’s Error in a Famous Military Group
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WHENEVER there is a military parade in Washington, D. C., and the soldiers or others who have had military experience are in the vicinity of the magnificent statue of General Sherman, which stands just south of the Treasury, there is sure to be comment on the blunder which the sculptor made in connection with the equipment of the figures at the base of the statue.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0168.xml
article
272
272
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Delivering Ice Cream by Motor-Truck
The truck is fed ice and salt in much the same way that a locomotive is fed coal
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[no value]
A NEW type of body fitted on a motor-truck is designed to save time in the delivery of ice cream at retail. It has separate compartments for the ice cream in cans, for the mixing ice and for the salt. The compartment nearest the driver’s seat is used to carry eighteen of the conventional ice cream cans packed in ice and salt in the usual manner.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0169.xml
article
273
273
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Holding the Whetstone Where It Is Needed
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FOR unnumbered ages—perhaps ever since knives were invented—women and housemaids have sharpened those used in the kitchen on the edges of stone crocks or on the sandstone slab under the kitchen range, simply because the whetstone or corrugated steel for the purpose was not at hand at the moment when it was needed.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0170.xml
article
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273
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[no value]
What’s the Matter with American Feet and Legs?
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[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICA’S physical foundation—the feet and legs of her citizens—is unsound, if we are to believe P. A. Vaile, who has made a study of feet. If we do not discard the present monstrosities in footgear and get into the habit of walking, using our legs and feet instead of the auto mobile and street car, he says we will become human penguins.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0171.xml
article
273
273
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
The Stationary Fruit Net—The Fruit-Picker’s Dream Come True
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ingenious method of gathering fruit which reduces the fruit-picker’s work to a minimum, makes use of a large net suspended above the ground directly under a tree and does away with the usual fruit-picking harness, buckets, pails and baskets.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0172.xml
article
274
274
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The “Swat the Fly” Campaign Is On. Here Is a New Trick
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHILE the “swatter” has done its bit toward final victory over the fly, it has its disagreeable features. Strips of sticky fly-paper and similar devices are unsightly and disagreeable also. The invention of Crystal Hilgers of Chicago, Ill., eliminates the unsightly elements of the fly-warfare.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0173.xml
article
274
274
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Going to College to Learn Wood Graining
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW sort of school, designed solely to benefit the man who cannot afford to leave his home to acquire a broader knowledge of his profession, has been established in Iowa by the State College at Ames. It is a short course for the painter and decorator whose education and training in his profession has been of the “pick-up” variety.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0174.xml
article
275
275,276,277,278,279
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Practical Motor-Boating
II.—The proper location of the power plant and mechanical attachments, and their care and operation
[no value]
[no value]
George M. Petersen
THE amateur boatman should thoroughly understand the names and location of the various parts of his craft, in order to take good care of it. The principal ones are as follows: stem, keel, stern-post, deadwood, shaft-log, keelson, bilge keelson, deck beams, stringers, knee, shear-brake, ribs, bulkheads and car-lines.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0175.xml
article
280
280
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
Taking Snap Shot Action Pictures at Night with a Flashlight Pistol
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO take flashlight photographs the usual procedure for the photographer is first to set up his camera and tripod, open the lens with one hand, and then fire the flash powder with the other. Because of all this preparation, it has been impossible for the photographer to take instantaneous or snap shot photographs by flashlight.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0176.xml
article
280
280
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Collection of Old Newspapers Has Become a Thriving Business
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ON account of the shortage of paper, old newspapers and other waste paper have risen to an important place in the commercial world. Today the man who throws down his paper in the cars after he has finished reading it is regarded as somewhat of a spendthrift.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0177.xml
article
280
280
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
An Elastic Cord for the Sash Curtain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN extremely simple and inexpensive device for holding sash curtains employs an elastic cord which is drawn through the curtain in the usual way, the ends being clamped down at the sides of the window as shown in the illustration. The elasticity of the cord makes it adjustable to any window.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0178.xml
article
281
281
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Never-Slip Calks Used on Lawn-Mower Wheels
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE wheels on a campus lawn-mower drawn by a horse became so smooth that it was impossible to cut long grass with it, because the wheels would slide. The trouble was overcome in a satisfactory manner by using the never-slip calks that are applied to horseshoes.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0179.xml
article
281
281
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Three Methods for Finding a Chosen Card
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR this trick the chosen card must be worked to the top of the pack. If it is there already, well and good; but if not, it must be brought there by some means or other. This is generally an easy matter, even without sleight of hand, and can usually be effected under the pretense of looking through the pack.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0180.xml
article
281
281,282
FOR PRACTICAL WORKERS
[no value]
Making a Push Cart Oil Sprinkler for Dusty Drives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. C. GRINDELL
IN mid-summer when the suburbanite is confronted with dusty driveways and walks, he will appreciate an acquaintance with the home-made oil sprinkler shown in the illustration. It consists of a steel frame mounted on wheels, that carries an ordinary oil barrel. Inserted in the bung of the barrel is a short piece of pipe equipped with a shut-off.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0181.xml
article
282
282
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Tipping Truck for a Large Cylindrical Oil Tank
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BECAUSE the faucet of a kerosene oil barrel leaked more or less continually, the owner devised the tipping truck illustrated. The tank was fitted with wheels from a discarded farm spring wagon. Two cross-pieces were run under the tank, the ends being supported on cleats fastened to the spokes on each side of the tank.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0182.xml
article
282
282
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Waterproofing for Concrete Walls and Floors
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE general impression is that concrete is water and moisture proof, but such is not the case for if the surface were flat or concave it can be made to absorb almost any amount of water that is put upon it. For certain uses, it is very important to have a waterproof concrete and the waterproofing can be done by applying a facing to the concrete surface before it begins to harden.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0183.xml
article
282
282
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
End Mills Made of Broken and Worn Twisted Drills
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. DANE
DRILLS which have been discarded because they have become too short through frequent grindings or broken off in use, still have considerable value as end mills when placed in a milling machine for cutting keyways, etc. They may be held in an ordinary three-jawed chuck, or a holder may be made up with a taper shank to fit the spindle of the machine, and a number of split bushings provided, one for each size of drill to be used.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0184.xml
article
283
283
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Miniature Automobiles and Their Race Meets
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MINIATURE but practical motor-cars are being built by youngsters in California in great numbers, and of widely differing designs, and the sight of them whizzing through the streets of Los Angeles is so common that they no longer attract special attention.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0185.xml
article
283
283
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Hanging Backing Cloth for Wall Paper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN hanging cheesecloth or muslin for backing on which to hang wall paper, wrinkles will be prevented if you first wet the cloth with clear water and when dry size it with alum water, I lb. to the pail.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0186.xml
article
284
284,285,286
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Simple Oscillograph to Record Current Alternations
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTERNATING electric current derives its name from the fact that the current reverses the direction of its flow. It first flows in the wire in one direction and then dies out to zero and then flows in the opposite direction and dies out to zero or no current again.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0187.xml
article
286
286,287
[no value]
[no value]
A Home-Made Steam Volcano to Explain Volcanic Activity
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BELIEVING that steam causes the activity of volcanoes, a Frenchman has used that agent in imitating Nature in a most realistic way, as illustrated and described in La Nature. The whole experimental volcano is made in a shallow basin about 2 ft. square, in which a wet mixture of sand and clay is placed so that the lower side represents the sea and the upper side the land.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0188.xml
article
287
287
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
A Solution for Reclaiming Over-Exposed Blue Prints
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN washing blue prints, if 10 drops of peroxide are added to each gallon of water a solution will be made that will produce even blue prints. The blue print is washed as usual in clear running water, after which it is placed in the peroxide solution and is finally washed in clear water to remove all traces of the salt.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0189.xml
article
287
287
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
A Double-Deck Revolving Clothes Hanger for a Yard
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES M. STEWART
WHERE backyard space was at a premium, the double-deck clothesline apparatus, shown in the illustration, was made to serve the purpose of drying as satisfactorily as the ordinary line that takes up so much room. The double-deck arrangement is built on a center upright made of 25 ft. of 2-in. galvanized pipe purchased from a local plumber.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0190.xml
article
288
288
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
To Prevent a Colt from Becoming Tangled in a Halter Rope
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. O. McDONNELL
IN the illustration a device is shown that will prevent a colt from becoming tangled in the tie-rope of the halter. The old method of a weight is used, but a spring is applied to cushion the jerk a colt will give when first tied with a halter.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0191.xml
article
288
288
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Effects of Oil and Grease on Rubber Tires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is pretty generally known that gasoline, grease, oil and other fatty substances are solvents of rubber. If garage floors are not kept clean and tires stand in a pool of oil, the treads soften and the traction strains in service stretch the rubber in a wavy outline, eventually causing it to separate from the fabric body underneath.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0192.xml
article
288
288
NATURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
An Irish Thrush Rings for His Food
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FOR a token of remembrance of a trip abroad a lady promised a friend that she would bring back a bird of some kind. An Irish thrush was selected. When caged the bird cultivated the habit of pounding the metal bottom of his inclosure with a small gong top, taking hold of the edge with his bill and manipulating it just as a workman does a pick.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0193.xml
article
289
289
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Iceless Refrigerator Using Evaporation for Cooling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT is not always convenient or possible to have ice for refrigeration. When such is the case, as in a camp or isolated places, the evaporation method may be applied. Milk or butter will keep much better by this method than in the regular ice-box or refrigerator.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0194.xml
article
290
290
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
An Open Shelter for the Yard or Flat Roof of a Building
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE flat roofs of tenement and apartment houses in large cities are often used as breathing places by the tenants. Shelters can be built upon them at small cost as protection from sun and rain. Our illustration shows one of these shacks, which is the result of the campaign for the prevention of tuberculosis by the New York State Department of Health.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0195.xml
article
290
290
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Sterilization Is the Essential Factor in Canning Vegetables
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE great secret of canning or preserving lies in complete sterilization. The air we breathe, the water we drink, all fruits and vegetables, are teeming with minute forms of life which we call bacteria, or molds, or germs. These germs are practically the sole cause of decomposition or rotting.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0196.xml
article
291
291,292
[no value]
[no value]
A Self-Acting Fountain for the Home Conservatory
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN Y. DUNLOP
THE making of any contrivance which when started works automatically and continually on its own power, is always a satisfaction to those mechanically inclined, and I do not doubt that a fountain and fish pond which I made will be of interest to others.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0197.xml
article
292
292
ARCHITECTURE
[no value]
Unique Shelter of Palm Leaf Fans for Garden Entrance
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN owner of a country place desiring to have something different from his neighbors made a garden entrance or shelter along the usual lines, but instead of covering it with shingles, prepared roofing or the like, palm leaf fans were nailed on as if they were shingles.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0198.xml
article
292
292,293
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
Leveling a Motion Picture Camera Tripod
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
T. B. LAMBERT
THE leveling of a motion picture camera tripod, especially if the panoramic head is used, is very essential. For this, such cameras are generally equipped with two small spirit levels placed at right angles to one another.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0199.xml
article
293
293
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Substitute for a Shoe Horn in an Emergency
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A. A. KELLY
ONCE when I had been in swimming I found myself without a shoe horn, but a friend showed me a little trick that supplied my need. Simply fold your handkerchief two or three times and lay it in the shoe at the heel, holding one end of it. As you press your heel down into the shoe gradually draw on the end of the handkerchief, and when the heel is nearly all the way down draw out the improvised horn.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0200.xml
article
293
293
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Preserving Surfaces from Which the Paint Has Worn Off
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE are sometimes places on the exterior of a house where the paint gets worn off and which cannot be retouched without making a “botch job” of it owing to the difficulty of mixing the new paint to match the adjoining color which has faded. To preserve the wood in such spots until the house can be repainted, apply two coats of linseed oil with a rag.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0201.xml
article
293
293
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Repairing a Worn Plunger in an Automobile Oil-Pump
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ADOLPH KLINE
FREQUENTLY the cause of an engine heating up rapidly can be traced to a faulty oil-pump. This trouble was encountered in one of the cars in our garage and upon examination it was found that the oil-pump plunger was badly worn. This prevented it from delivering the maximum amount of oil to the various bearings.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0202.xml
article
294
294
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Turned Down or Pistol Grip Handle for a Garden Rake
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. MATTER.
THE straight handle on a rake makes it difficult to grasp when drawing it over the ground, especially where the heap of rubbish to be moved is large and long. To make a better hold for the hand I attached the turned down handle or grip as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0203.xml
article
294
294
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Tool for Accurately Lining Shop Shafting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES A. KING
IN many shops where machines are belted from lines of shafting little attention is given to the alinement after the shafting has once been lined up unless the settling of the building, the weight of the pulleys and the tension of the belts make it so badly out of line that attention is called to it by the thumping and heating.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0204.xml
article
295
295,296
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Tractor Trailer Made from an Old Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN old automobile having good mechanical parts, but too out of date in appearance to be used as a pleasure car, may be utilized as a truck by attaching a trailer. The illustrations and description are for changing over and attaching a trailer to a 35 hp. automobile having a 4-cylinder engine with a three-speed forward and a reverse.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0205.xml
article
296
296
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Inflation and Weight Governs the Resiliency of Tires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RESILIENCY of the tires is primarily governed by the construction and quality, but is largely influenced by the inflation and weight carried. Naturally a 4-in. tire inflated to 70 lb. air pressure and carrying 800 lb. weight will ride easier than the same size tire with the same inflation, and carrying 700 lb. weight.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0206.xml
article
296
296
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Cement Wash to Be Applied to a Damp Wall
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A GOOD cement wash for a damp wall may be made with 7 parts of soft, clear water, 1 pint of lime water and 2 oz. of table salt. Stir the cement enough to form a paint, adding any earth color desired, or use plain.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0207.xml
article
296
296
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
A Porch Swing Made from Your Favorite Rocking-Chair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
T. H. LINTHICUM
A COMFORTABLE rocker can be converted into a swing without altering or defacing the chair. The materials needed are two strips of wood about l¼ by 1½ in. and about 8 in. longer than the width of the chair seat; two sets of hammock chains; six stout screw-eyes and four long, slim wood screws.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0208.xml
article
297
297,298,299
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
TOY COMPRESSED AIR BOATS
Speeding a Torpedo with Air from a Bicycle Pump
[no value]
[no value]
Edward R. Smith
A SHIP has recently been devised which carries a veritable gale pent up, not in an oxskin, such as Homer’s Odysseus used to carry away the winds from the isle of Æolus, but in a cylindrical tank. This boat was designed primarily as a toy, a bicycle pump being used to fill the tank.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0209.xml
article
300
300
ARCHITECTURE
[no value]
Making a Durable Playhouse for the Children
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. FRUDDEN
THIS is really a young contractor’s job, and the boy building it will have something to be proud of. When complete as shown it makes an ideal playhouse for the children. The manner of construction is that employed for any house with the exception that it is not plastered or lined in any way, the studs and rafters being exposed.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0210.xml
article
300
300
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
Mixing a Durable Water Color Aluminum Paint
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO make a water color aluminum paint dissolve some gum shellac in borax water strong enough to dissolve the shellac, adding enough bronze powder to make the paint. Add a little aniline for color, if color is desired, or the plain bronze, using a very little glycerine to make the paint more flexible.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0211.xml
article
300
300
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
An Old Cake Tin Makes a Good Watering Pan for the Poultry Yard
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JENNIE McCOY
A CHEAP and satisfactory watering pan for the poultry yard can be made of an ordinary funnel cake pan. Secure the pan to the ground by driving a stake through the funnel hole and into the earth. It is easily changed to any desirable spot, cannot be tipped over and will serve a dozen or more chicks at one time without danger of hurting them.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0212.xml
article
301
301,302
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Sheet Metal Working Simply Explained
III.—One-piece pattern for making a twenty-sided steeple ornament
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
THE problem for the development of a pattern for a twenty-sided finial is very interesting. Glancing at the drawing of the finial it will appear difficult to lay out a one-piece pattern of tin in such a manner that when it is bent up it will take the shape shown in the finished drawing, but if the drawing is given close attention and study it will be readily seen that all of the twenty faces are of the same size and shape, and that each face is an equilateral triangle; that is, a triangle having three sides the same length.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0213.xml
article
302
302
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Folding Camp Fireplace Made of Angle Iron
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
B. E. DOBREE
ANY one who likes to go camping will be interested in these stoves. The only tools needed to make them are a hacksaw, riveting hammer and a breast drill with a 3/16-in. bit. The sides are made of two pieces of angle iron ¾ by ⅛ in. The ones used in making the fireplace illustrated were taken from an old bedstead.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0214.xml
article
302
302
PRACTICAL WORKERS’ DEPARTMENT
[no value]
Garden Seat with Checkerboard in Its Top
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD R. SMITH
GARDEN seats of the ordinary bench type can be made to serve a twofold duty by placing in the center of their upper surfaces a checkerboard design. In the wood top, squares may be cut out with a chisel or knife and alternate ones painted black.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0215.xml
article
302
302
MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Constituency of Rubber for Side Walls of a Tire
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE side walls of a tire must be flexible in order to properly distribute the strains, give resiliency, minimize heat, prevent sharp bending of the fabric, breaking and separation. Therefore, it is desirable that the rubber on side walls of a tire be elastic and not too dense or firm; the kind of hard wear resisting rubber used on the tread is not suitable for covering the side walls.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0216.xml
article
303
303,304
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Manufacturing Prussian Blue from American Products
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE shortage of many colors and dyestuffs in the United States since the European war has caused a thorough investigation into the means available for the direct manufacture of Prussian blue, which has been and still is in great demand for the production of printers’ ink, dyeing, wall-paper printing, oil color and in compounding colors for many other uses where an intense blue is required.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0217.xml
article
305
305,306
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A Plumbing System for the Farm Residence
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE important points to be considered in the arrangement of a plumbing system are durability of material and construction, and simplicity. Avoid any complication of pipes, and arrange the water pipes so as to carry the water to the point of discharge in as nearly a straight line as possible.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0218.xml
article
307
307
The Amateur Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
A Quick Action Electric Switch for Photographers’ Use
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
VIRGIL R. THARP
IN doing some work around my dark room I felt the need of an electric switch which would work more swiftly and easily than those sold by supply houses. The illustration shows a single pole switch that met my demands for something delicate and instantaneous in action and it was constructed quickly.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0219.xml
article
307
307,308
The Amateur Electrician And Wireless Operator
[no value]
Making an Electric Searchlight for a Motor-Boat
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS W. BENSON
A RELIABLE searchlight is a necessity for motor-boating at night, especially in crowded waters. The searchlight illustrated is for use on small craft not equipped with a generator and is operated independently of the ignition batteries.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0220.xml
article
308
308
[no value]
[no value]
A Simple Arc Lamp Using a Thermostat Control
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS W. BENSON
THE novel part of this arc lamp is the application of the active part of a thermostat for its control. A piece of asbestos board ½ in. thick makes a good base. To this is attached a ring-bolt for hanging the lamp.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0221.xml
article
308
308,309
[no value]
[no value]
How to Make Slow Acting or Sluggish Relays
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. H. TILLOTSON
PRACTICALLY all electrical circuits, and especially telephone and telegraph circuits, require relays. In telephone work especially, where several relays are used in one circuit, it is necessary that some of them shall be slow acting or sluggish.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0222.xml
article
309
309,310
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Reversing Rheostat for Controlling a Small Motor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
K. M. COGGESHALL
IT is often desired to reverse the direction of rotation of direct current motors and at the same time adjust the speed to suit the new condition of operation. A serviceable controller may be made as shown in the sketch. The sets of contacts A, B, and C, should be of brass or copper, and mounted on a slate slab 12 in. square.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0223.xml
article
310
310
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
An Ingenious Wiring System for Two Inductive Transformers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HARVEY N. BLISS
THE accompanying diagram shows a very good wiring system for the experimental set. Five different connections are possible for the two inductive couplers by using five single-pole, double-throw, knife-switches. The inductive couplers are shown in Fig. 1 and 2, A, the Fessenden interference preventer, having the two primaries connected in multiple and the secondaries in series; B, the selective tuning with the secondary of the first inductive coupler connected with the primary of the second; and C, a long wavelength “hook-up” with both the primaries and the secondaries in series.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0224.xml
article
310
310
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
A Variable Condenser for a Radio Receiving Set
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS LEE HODGES
THE average amateur, in constructing his own wireless receiving apparatus, encounters his greatest difficulty in making a good variable condenser. A simple tubular condenser is shown in the illustration. It is easily constructed. The base is preferably of oak, 14 in. long, 3 in. wide and ½ in. thick.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0225.xml
article
311
311
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
A Drip-Pan Alarm for the Ice-Box Drain
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
F. W. BENTLEY
THE illustration shows a very neat and easily constructed drip-pan alarm which can be made by the home worker at a very slight expense. A small piece of glass tubing is run up through a cork float, on top of which is secured a light round copper washer.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0226.xml
article
311
311
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Treating Cardboard Tubes for Tuners on Wireless Apparatus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES WILDINGER
A GOOD way to make a cardboard tube non-shrinkable is to give it several coats of varnish before commencing the WINDING.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0227.xml
article
311
311,312
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
An Amplifying Electrostatic Radio Receiver
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN THE development of radio telegraphy inventors have constantly striven to produce detectors or receivers which would be not only sensitive, but also rugged and easy to adjust and to keep in adjustment. Some of the instruments in common use meet these requirements, but in general the more sensitive of them are rather delicate in operation and seem likely to be rendered inoperative, or at least less sensitive, by receipt of loud signals or heavy strays.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0228.xml
article
312
312
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Strong Wireless Signals in Winter Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SERIES of tests lasting over two years were completed some time ago, with the object of finding out how much stronger radio signals between two selected stations would be in winter than in summer. The test signals were sent nearly every day during that time, and the amount of power sent and the intensity of signals received were carefully measured.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0229.xml
article
312
312
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
A Testing Set That Does Not Use a Battery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALBERT FERTICK
THE testing set illustrated, which does not use a battery or magneto in the circuit, is novel and interesting. The current used is set up by the action of the saliva on the zinc and copper plates. While it is not recommended for constant use it can be worked in case of emergency.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0230.xml
article
313
313,314
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
How the Radio Inspectors Trapped a Disorderly Amateur
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JUST before Secretary of the Navy Daniels issued his order for the dismantling of all unofficial wireless stations, the Government radio inspectors about New York found it necessary to track a disorderly amateur who continued to send out false “S O S” signals.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0231.xml
article
314
314
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
How to Make a Kick-Back Preventer for Wireless Apparatus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN many instances where a wireless set is employed for sending purposes the fire underwriters require a kick-back preventer. This piece of apparatus is, in some cases, expensive to purchase; but it can be easily made, at little expense.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0232.xml
article
314
314
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Variable Primary Coil Using a Switch Instead of a Slider
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GLENN DUNFEE
IN winding tuning coils for long wavelengths, if the slider runs the whole length of the tube it causes extra labor and expense. The following plan may be used to prevent it from doing so. Scrape a few inches of the wire and use a rod of the length designated.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0233.xml
article
314
314
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
A Use for Discarded Cylindrical Food Boxes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD MCCLURE
CYLINDRICAL cardboard boxes, such as certain food products are packed in, make excellent forms upon which to wind tuning coils. By using two, one of which is slightly smaller than the other, a very satisfactory inductive coupler may be made.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0234.xml
article
315
315
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
America’s New Semi-Wireless System for Telephoning from Captive Balloons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHAT will be still another addition to the long list of America’s contributions to the technique of modern warfare is a wired-wireless system for communicating from balloons. The gun-fire of artillery is directed, as everybody knows, by battery commanders who ascend to high altitudes in anchored balloons.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0235.xml
article
315
315,316
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
A Polarity-Changer for Reversing Lighting Battery Current
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FRANK SAHLMAN
SOME audion detectors work better if the current from the lighting battery is reversed. To do this quickly a polarity-changer is very handy. There are many kinds of polarity-changers, but the one here described is very compact and looks neat.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0236.xml
article
316
316
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
A Simple and Dependable Multiplication Method
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN interesting and simple method of multiplication is performed as follows: Suppose, for example, that it is desired to multiply 145 by 39. Write 39 in one column, 145 in a second. Divide 39 by 2, neglecting the remainder, and multiply 145 by 2; write the first result in the first column, the second result in the second.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0237.xml
article
316
316
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
An Insulation for Secondary Terminals on Transformers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE insulation of secondary terminals on home-made transformers is often very poor, resulting in leakage and lowered efficiency. The hard rubber shells from telephone receivers can be used in such cases with excellent results. The shells should be mounted as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0238.xml
article
317
317,318,319,320
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Wireless Work in Wartime—I.
The beginning of a series which will cover every present-day application of the principles of wireless
[no value]
[no value]
John L. Hogan
IN military and naval warfare there are many times when no man is of more importance than the radio operator. Upon his speed and accuracy, and on his knowledge of the principles of his apparatus, may depend the failure or success of great strategic moves.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0239.xml
article
320
320
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
A Fixed Adjustment Detector Easily Made at Home
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD M. WEYER
A SIMPLE “permanent” detector is constructed of materials found in almost every experimenter’s workshop. Secure a piece of mica ½ in. square. Next, select a piece of sensitive galena. It should not be larger than a B-B shot. Cut a hole, just the shape of the galena, only slightly smaller, in the center of the square of mica.
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0240.xml
advertisement
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
WINCHESTER
[no value]
WINCHESTER
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0241.xml
advertisement
102
102,103
[no value]
[no value]
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC & MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
WESTINGHOUSE ELECTRIC & MANUFACTURING COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0242.xml
advertisement
104
104
[no value]
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Company
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0243.xml
advertisement
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0244.xml
advertisement
106
106
[no value]
[no value]
United States Rubber Company
[no value]
United States Rubber Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0245.xml
advertisement
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.: Lucky Strike
[no value]
The American Tobacco Co.
Lucky Strike
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0246.xml
advertisement
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
United States Tire Company
[no value]
United States Tire Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0247.xml
advertisement
109
109
[no value]
[no value]
Eclipse Machine Co.
[no value]
Eclipse Machine Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0248.xml
advertisement
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Doubleday, Page & Co.
[no value]
Doubleday, Page & Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0249.xml
advertisement
111
111
[no value]
[no value]
SENECA CAMERA MFG. COMPANY
[no value]
SENECA CAMERA MFG. COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0250.xml
advertisement
112
112
[no value]
[no value]
Copr. Life Pub. Co.
[no value]
Copr. Life Pub. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0251.xml
advertisement
113
113
[no value]
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK CO.
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0252.xml
advertisement
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
International Correspondence Schools
[no value]
International Correspondence Schools
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0253.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
BUFFALO SPECIALTY CO.: NEVERLEAK TIRE ELUID
[no value]
BUFFALO SPECIALTY CO.
NEVERLEAK TIRE ELUID
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0254.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO.
[no value]
JOSEPH DIXON CRUCIBLE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0255.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
SHAW MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
SHAW MANUFACTURING CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0256.xml
advertisement
115
115
[no value]
[no value]
FRISBIE MOTOR CO.
[no value]
FRISBIE MOTOR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0257.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
Veeder Mfg. Co.
THE ROTARY RACHET COUNTER
Veeder Mfg. Co.
THE SET BACK REVOLUTION COUNTER
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0258.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
L. SONNEBORN SONS, Inc.: LAPIDOLITH
[no value]
L. SONNEBORN SONS, Inc.
LAPIDOLITH
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0259.xml
advertisement
116
116
[no value]
[no value]
W. M. FINCK & COMPANY
[no value]
W. M. FINCK & COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0260.xml
advertisement
117
117
[no value]
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY: G-E ELECTRIC FANS
[no value]
GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY
G-E ELECTRIC FANS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0261.xml
advertisement
118
118
[no value]
[no value]
FOLMER & SCHWING DEPARTMENT: GRAFLEX
[no value]
FOLMER & SCHWING DEPARTMENT
GRAFLEX
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0262.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Caille Perfection Motor Co.
[no value]
Caille Perfection Motor Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0263.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
Three-in-One Oil Co.
[no value]
Three-in-One Oil Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0264.xml
advertisement
119
119
[no value]
[no value]
HERCULES POWDER CO.
[no value]
HERCULES POWDER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0265.xml
advertisement
120
120
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0266.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
MEAD CYCLE COMPANY
[no value]
MEAD CYCLE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0267.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
THE HORTON MFG. CO.: “Bristol”
[no value]
THE HORTON MFG. CO.
“Bristol”
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0268.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
The Carleton Company
[no value]
The Carleton Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0269.xml
advertisement
121
121
[no value]
[no value]
JOHN L. WHITING-J. J. ADAMS CO.
[no value]
JOHN L. WHITING-J. J. ADAMS CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0270.xml
advertisement
122
122
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0271.xml
advertisement
123
123
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0272.xml
advertisement
124
124
[no value]
[no value]
Haywood Tire & Equipment Co.
[no value]
Haywood Tire & Equipment Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0273.xml
advertisement
125
125
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0274.xml
advertisement
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0275.xml
advertisement
127
127
[no value]
[no value]
H. L. BARBER, Publisher
[no value]
H. L. BARBER, Publisher
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0276.xml
advertisement
128
128
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0277.xml
advertisement
129
129
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0278.xml
advertisement
130
130
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0279.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
C. A. SHALER COMPANY
[no value]
C. A. SHALER COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0280.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
F. K. BABSON
[no value]
F. K. BABSON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0281.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
MUNN & CO.
[no value]
MUNN & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0282.xml
advertisement
131
131
[no value]
[no value]
Burlington Watch Co.
[no value]
Burlington Watch Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0283.xml
advertisement
132
132
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0284.xml
advertisement
133
133
[no value]
[no value]
RICHARD B. OWEN
[no value]
RICHARD B. OWEN
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0285.xml
advertisement
134
134
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0286.xml
advertisement
135
135
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0287.xml
advertisement
136
136
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0288.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
National Aero Institute
[no value]
National Aero Institute
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0289.xml
advertisement
137
137
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0290.xml
advertisement
138
138
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0291.xml
advertisement
139
139
[no value]
[no value]
JOHNSON SMITH & CO.
[no value]
JOHNSON SMITH & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0292.xml
advertisement
140
140
[no value]
[no value]
BERNHARD-HEWITT & COMPANY
[no value]
BERNHARD-HEWITT & COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0293.xml
advertisement
141
141
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0294.xml
advertisement
142
142
[no value]
[no value]
BARNARD & CO.
[no value]
BARNARD & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0295.xml
advertisement
143
143
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0296.xml
advertisement
144
144
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0297.xml
advertisement
145
145
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0298.xml
advertisement
146
146
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0299.xml
advertisement
147
147
[no value]
[no value]
The Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc.
[no value]
The Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0300.xml
advertisement
148
148
[no value]
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.: “YANKEE” Ratchet Tap Wrench
[no value]
North Bros. Mfg. Co.
“YANKEE” Ratchet Tap Wrench
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0301.xml
advertisement
148
148
[no value]
[no value]
The Oster Mfg. Co.
[no value]
The Oster Mfg. Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0302.xml
advertisement
148
148
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0303.xml
advertisement
149
149
[no value]
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
[no value]
GOODELL-PRATT COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0304.xml
advertisement
150
150
[no value]
[no value]
S. C. Johnson & Son: PREPARED WAX
[no value]
S. C. Johnson & Son
PREPARED WAX
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0305.xml
advertisement
151
151
[no value]
[no value]
The Art Color Printing Co.
[no value]
The Art Color Printing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0306.xml
advertisement
152
152
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement: FATIMA
[no value]
[no value]
FATIMA
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170801_0091_002_0307.xml