Issue: 19170701

Sunday, July 1, 1917
JULY 1917
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91
Wednesday, December 24, 2014

Articles
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Popular Science
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0001.xml
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Victor Talking Machine Co.
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Victor Talking Machine Co.
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0002.xml
article
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Popular Science Monthly INDEX
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0003.xml
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S. C. JOHNSON & SON
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S. C. JOHNSON & SON
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0004.xml
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Southern Cypress Manufacturers
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Southern Cypress Manufacturers
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0005.xml
masthead
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Popular Science Monthly
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0006.xml
tableOfContents
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Contents for July, 1917
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0007.xml
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The Oliver Typewriter Company
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The Oliver Typewriter Company
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0008.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0009.xml
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THEO.AIDE & CO.
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THEO.AIDE & CO.
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0010.xml
advertisement
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0011.xml
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Advertisement
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0013.xml
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0014.xml
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McGraw-Hill Book Co.
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McGraw-Hill Book Co.
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0015.xml
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Advertisement
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0016.xml
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Coyne Trade and Engineering Schools
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Coyne Trade and Engineering Schools
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0017.xml
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THE AMERICAN CHAUFFEUR
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THE AMERICAN CHAUFFEUR
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0018.xml
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Harper & Bros
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Harper & Bros
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0019.xml
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QUICK-ACTION ADVERTISING
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0020.xml
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American School of Aviation
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American School of Aviation
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0021.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0022.xml
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Advertisements
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0023.xml
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0024.xml
article
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Rear Admiral Fiske, Naval Strategist
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“Permit me to express my admiration for the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY in its present form. You are doing a splendid thing in making science really popular. The whole structure of modern civilization is built on physical science and its application to the mechanic arts; and the more successfully and widely we can utilize physical science, the higher a civilization we shall have.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0025.xml
article
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The First Successful Fliers of Man and Nature
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0026.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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A Bird with Four Wings
When Nature decided to evolve a bird out of a reptile she molded a four-winged flyer curiously like the first flying machine
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Maurice Krosby
BIRDS came later than fishes and reptiles in the evolution of life. But what manner of creature was it that linked fish with bird? What was the first bird that ever flew? Fossil remains and imprints have so far given only scant information as to how the feathered descendants of the fish or the reptile gradually came into possession of the power of flight.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0027.xml
article
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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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This Typewriter Prints in Every Type and Language
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THE multiplex typewriter, shown on the right, can type in all the languages and in hundreds of different styles of type. Naturally, it is radically different from the usual machine. Instead of having fifty different type blocks all mounted on separate steel bars, it uses one plate on which all the characters of one style are cast.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0028.xml
article
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RAILWAYS
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This Railroad Crossing Cleans Itself and Eliminates Jolts
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WHEREVER a road crosses railway tracks, this light weight steel crossing belongs. will fit any standard-gage track, it can be put down or taken up by one workman in thirty minutes, or in of repair work it can be adjusted to a skeleton track in ten minutes with sufficient security to allow teams, automobiles and other heavy traffic to pass safely.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0029.xml
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WAR PROBLEMS
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How Our Fighters Will Be Fed
Nothing is left to guesswork. Menus are planned by chemists and physicians
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UNCLE SAM has written generous menus for his fighting men on land and on sea and if the regulations which he has prescribed are followed his soldiers and sailors need never go hungry. He provides approximately twenty-eight cents a day to buy food for each one of his soldiers and a like allowance is made for his sailors.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0030.xml
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PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
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A Photographic Trick—Try It on the Night of the Fourth
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THE young man in the accompanying illustration, pictured as looking so calmly and critically at us from behind one of the rings of Saturn or some other astronomical wonder, is really standing out in his own back yard, in Hornell, New York, and posing for his photograph while whirling a sparkler, such as children delight in for the safe and sane Fourth of July celebration.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0031.xml
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ARCHITECTURE
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A Suitcase Laboratory for the Use of the Laundryman
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THE Mellon Institute of Industrial Research has been studying the laundry business scientifically. It wants to help the laundrymen guard against bad laundrv materials. The result has been the suitcase laboratory illustrated, with which valuable information is quickly obtained as to the purity of chemicals.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0032.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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A Hint to Motorists—Keep Your Radiator Clean
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TO assure the efficient operation and long life of your automobile, it is essential that the radiator be kept clean. Every radiator has been designed for the purpose of dissipating some of the heat from the engine to prevent it from overheating.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0033.xml
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PICTURE PAGES
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The Flag Equipment of an American Battleship Consists of 250 Flags of Various Kinds Costing $2,500
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0034.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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An Airplane Spies on Greece
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0035.xml
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PICTURE PAGES
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New York Firemen Have Strenuous Training
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0036.xml
article
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PICTURE PAGES
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Tests Which Scientists Use to Show Why We Can Not Always Believe Our Own Eyes and Ears
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0037.xml
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PICTURE PAGES
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The Oldest Man-made Things in the World
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0038.xml
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PICTURE PAGES
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Improving on Man’s “Natural Finish”
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0039.xml
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PICTURE PAGES
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Picking the Best in Brain and Brawn and Training Them for the Navy
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0040.xml
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Making Motor-Car Bodies to Order
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0041.xml
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PICTURE PAGES
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Killing the Dry Frog in the Opera Singer’s Throat
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0042.xml
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PICTURE PAGES
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The European Trenches Are Not the Only Place Wher Gas masks Are Necessary
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0043.xml
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How the Stay-at-Homes Can Provide the Sinews of War for America and our European Allies
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0044.xml
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WAR PROBLEMS
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The Poison Gases That Kill Men in Trench Warfare
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WE do not know definitely the composition of the gases used in trench fighting. From the appearance, odor and effects on the men it is believed that a mixture of chlorine and bromine is employed with the possible addition of sulphur fumes or formaldehyde gas.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0045.xml
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Making “Night Scenes" for the Motion Pictures
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THE Limited is held up! Light from a switchman’s lamp or from the highwaymen’s bull’s-eye illuminates the harrowing scene. Or so it appears on the screen at the motion picture theater. As a matter of fact the light is supplied by a semicircle of flaming arcs such as are used in the ordinary studio for “close-up” photographs.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0046.xml
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MISCELLANY
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The Largest Straw Hat in the World Is Yours If It Fits
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IN the display window of a large hat manufacturing company in New York city the hat in the photograph below was recently placed on view, bearing the placard, “The Largest Hat in the World. If you can wear it it is yours.” Immediately one of the editorial family of the POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY became interested.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0047.xml
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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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How Fast Is Your Typist? This Ingenious Machine Will Time Her
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INVENTORS have tried for years to put a counter on the typewriter to estimate the speed of the typist, but the efforts have always been confined to a count of the words written. A recently patented device, called a cyclometer, counts every stroke which the typist makes on the keyboard.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0048.xml
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NATURAL SCIENCE
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The Grave-Digger Beetle—Nature’s Sanitary Policeman
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WHEN an animal dies in a garden or in the woods and decomposition begins, carrion bugs come from far and near. A dead bird, a mouse or a harmless snake wantonly killed by some wanderer provides a banquet for hundreds of insects. Among these the “grave-diggers” are found, embracing forty-three species, twelve of which are found in Europe, the rest in America.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0049.xml
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How Scientists Capture Mosquitoes Alive for Experiment and Study
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OCCASIONALLY it is necessary to do something else with a mosquito besides swatting it out of existence. In order to study the best methods of annihilating it, scientists, health officials and entomologists find it necessary to classify the insect, dissect it and experiment with it.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0050.xml
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MISCELLANY
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A Japanese Invents a Curling Iron
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KANJI TANAKA, a Japanese residing in Seattle, Washington, has invented a curling iron, which is designed to make the hair-curling operation not only easier but more expeditiously performed. With it the hair may be curled and the iron taken out without the usual unwrapping process.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0051.xml
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RAILWAYS
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Attacking Mail-Car Robbers with Deadly Fumes
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IT would be a sad gang of robbers who tried to break into the railway car invented by George W. Meyers, of the United States Army. They would be greeted with clouds of poisonous gas fumes. Meyers’ robberproof car works with extreme simplicity.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0052.xml
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AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
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Making the Cow’s Tail Behave with a Trolley Restrainer
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JOSUA AERNI and Joseph O. Venden, of Guler, Washington, have come to the rescue of the legion of tailflogged milkers,with a device which makes the cow’s tail behave. Briefly, the device consists of a clamp, which holds the tail and an overhead trolley system which permits the holder to be moved from one cow to another.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0053.xml
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AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
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Guinea Pigs Were Once Raised Like Chickens for Food
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THE cavy (guinea pig) is typically a pet animal, and has no other excuse for existence than the pleasure he gives those who appreciate his good qualities. . . . But it is to the undeniable edibility of the cavy that we owe the existence of the cheerful little squeaker of today.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0054.xml
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RADIO COMMUNICATION
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“Silent Music”—A Hospital Recreation
A wireless system conveys the melodies to those who want to hear without disturbing those who don’t
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A CHICAGO concern has come forward with a “silent music” contrivance that is designed to furnish recreation to inmates of hospitals. With this system installed in a hospital, a continuous and noiseless program of music can be furnished. Each patient may decide for himself or herself whether or not to listen, and if the decision is against such recreation, the patient is not disturbed in any manner.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0055.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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Dickory, Dickory, Dock, the Mouse Ran up the—Clock
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WHERE are the creepy spiders, the mechanical beetles, and the springoperated bugs which used to be the delight of the office boys and the terror of the stenographers? And surely the mouse has lost none of its effectiveness as a screamproducer.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0056.xml
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SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
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Why You Can’t Compare Ships According to Tonnage
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THE different uses of tonnage terms when speaking of ships are causes of confusion to the lay mind. For example, steamship companies in order to impress upon the traveling public the size, and consequent relative safety of their craft, will advertise the sailing of a certain steamer of twenty-thousand tons, meaning, of course, gross tons.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0057.xml
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MISCELLANY
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These Magnifying Glasses Are Worn Like Spectacles
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THE field of usefulness of the binocular magnifier, shown in the illustration on the right, includes the scientific laboratory, the medical office or hospital, and the workrooms of botanists, metal workers, watchmakers, etc. An elastic headband fastens it on so that both hands are free.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0058.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLE AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Differentials for Motor Vehicles
Comparisons which illustrate the merits of various types
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Marius C. Kramp
THE Bailey is the name of a new differential gear for motor vehicles. It transmits power to both drivingwheels when these can rotate at the same speed, but only to one wheel when the other runs faster. The power is divided at the rate at which the wheels can utilize it for traction if the wheels have the same speed but one is inclined to slip.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0059.xml
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SPORTS AND PASTIMES
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A Refrigerator Basket for the Picnic Outing
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ALL the luxuries of home are now at the disposal of the vacationist starting off for a picnic at the beach or in the woods. The increasing vogue of automobile touring trips has also created a demand for portable creature comforts. A refrigerator basket is a refrigerator in miniature, which keeps the butter hard, the meat fresh and the milk sweet.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0060.xml
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AERONAUTICS
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The Strength of Human Wings
One hundred and twenty-two people can stand on the wings of a big biplane
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IF the men who lost their lives in the early years of the flying machine’s development could come back to life and gaze upon the picture which accompanies this article, they would first gasp in astonishment and then they would approve enthusiastically the construction which made it possible for sixty people to crowd upon one-half of a huge biplane’s wings without breaking them.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0061.xml
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ELECTRICITY
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Lost in New York? Consult an Electrified Street Directory
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THE man from Oshkosh or Paducah can easily find his way around New York city if he happens to stop at one of the thirteen hotels there which have installed the electric directory. He can find the location of any building, street, or carline by pushing an electric button on the keyboard, for the location he is seeking will be illuminated by a little six-volt incandescent lamp.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0062.xml
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PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
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Taking Records of Sounds by Wireless for Talking Motion Pictures
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THE problem of making talking motion pictures has been attacked by many inventors, but no more ingenious suggestion than that of Mr. William B. Vansize has been brought out. According to Mr. Vansize’s plan, each actor is equipped with a tiny wireless telephone transmitter, and his speech is sent through the ether by “radio” to a receiving station which is connected with the phonograph.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0063.xml
article
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MOTOR VEHICLE AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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The Newest Automobile Conveniences
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0064.xml
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Labor-Saving Automobile Attachments
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PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0065.xml
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MOTOR VEHICLES AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
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Measuring Motor-Truck Loads Automatically
A dial registers the readings from all four wheels as the load is distributed
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OVERLOADING of motor trucks would be entirely eliminated if all such trucks were fitted with the novel loadmeasuring device shown in the accompanying illustrations. The apparatus makes use of the relative motion between the axles and springs of a vehicle as loads are applied.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0066.xml
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HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
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Not Even the Space Under This Desk Is Wasted
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HENRY J. WILLIAMS, of Brookline, Massachusetts, has patented a filing rack which utilizes the space under the desk beyond the reach of the knees. The rack slides forward when the letters are being filed; then a push by the hand sends it back out of the way. The desk is thus as comfortable as before, while expensive floor space otherwise wasted is made use of.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0067.xml
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MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
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Our Big Guns and How They Are Made Stage in the making of Big Gun
It is the most powerful thing on earth, is a great gun, but its actual firing life is not as long as the life of a butterfly
"Built-up" and Wire-wound Guns and What They Are
Why the Wire-Wound Gun Is So Strong
Charging the Furnaces with Iron Ore
A Great Modem Gun-Shop Where the Giant Tubes of Guns Are Machined by Lathes
Heat Treatment and What It Means
Forging a Great Gun
Cooling the Steel Under Pressure
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IT is not easy to understand what the power of a gun really is—its penetrating and destructive power. What we call a 15-inch gun—which means one whose muzzle or hollow part is 15 inches in diameter—will hurl a shell right through a plate or wall of the hardest steel 12 inches thick seven miles from the muzzle.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0068.xml
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MISCELLANY
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Making a Second “Self” for Dressmaking Purposes
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FITTING is the hardest and most tedious part of dressmaking. Many a woman could make her own clothes and save a good percentage of her pin-money if she were sure that the garments would have the proper “set.” There are various kinds of dress forms on the market to meet this need.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0069.xml
article
48
48
MOTOR VEHICLE AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
The Youngest Manufacturer of Automobiles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH only twelve years old, Clarence Suttcliffe, of Aurora, Ill., has constructed a real automobile which makes record time for its size. His materials were obtained mostly from scrap heaps. His one purchase was a one-quarter-horsepower gasoline engine.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0070.xml
article
49
49
[no value]
[no value]
The Laundry Keeps Pace with the Fashions. It Irons Stockings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS is the day of conspicuous and elaborate hosiery. The laundering of stockings and socks has had to keep up with the fashion. Formerly it was necessary only to smooth out the wrinkles, regardless of any “shine” that might be imparted by the iron.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0071.xml
article
49
49
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
An Alarming Alarm for the Burglar. He Gould Never Turn It Off
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN entirely new burglar alarm which prevents a burglar from opening your window stealthily at night has been patented by William Connoly, of New York. Once the window is started upward, the noise of the alarm will upset the nerves of the burglar himself.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0072.xml
article
50
50
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Fighting the Big Guns from Balloons
Why the observation balloon still plays a part in war despite the airplane and the dirigible
[no value]
[no value]
Carl Dienstbach
THERE never was a time in the history of fighting when a general did not envy the birds. If he could only hover over his enemy and see for himself what was going on! Since he could not do that, he used such makeshifts as he could devise. But the first real spying on the enemy came when the balloon was invented.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0073.xml
article
51
51
[no value]
[no value]
War-Time Uses of the Old-Fashioned Balloon
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0074.xml
article
52
52,53
[no value]
[no value]
Housekeeping Made Easy
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0075.xml
article
54
54,55,56
[no value]
[no value]
Home-Made Paper Motion Pictures
A safe and sane method by which you can make the pictures and exhibit them to your friends
[no value]
[no value]
Max Fleischer
WHY is the phonograph in every home, but not the motion picture? Chiefly, because celluloid films are highly inflammable, because rooms must be darkened, because screens must be set up, in a word because elaborate preparations must be made.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0076.xml
article
57
57
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
A New Type of Caterpillar Motor-Truck. It Can’t Stick in the Mud
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE novel commercial vehicle shown in the accompanying illustration differs from other forms of caterpillar tractors in that it has one caterpillar or track-laying unit in the rear and two wheelsin front. It is substantially a threewheeled vehicle with the track-layer as the third wheel.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0077.xml
article
57
57
[no value]
[no value]
The Convalescent Soldiers Are Ingenious Toy Makers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE war has indirectly been the cause of driving many erstwhile clerks and mechanics but now soldiers into the ranks of the toy makers. The invalid soldier finds not only employment for his enforced idle hours but a certain amount of recreation as well in devising original toys.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0078.xml
article
58
58
MOTOR VEHICLE AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Solution Which Promises to Solve Some Tire Troubles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SOLUTION which is injected into the inner tube of an automobile tire through the stem is said to keep the tire at normal inflation and to make it practically puncture proof. The solution lies in a fluid state at the bottom of the tire, occupying only six per cent of inner space, except when the car is in motion, when centrifugal force carries it around the tire in a thin film, thereby sealing all porous places that cause slow leaks.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0079.xml
article
58
58
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
On Land a Submarine Travels at Tortoise Speed
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
To her great surprise, the U. S. Submarine H-3, of the Pacific division, woke up one day to find herself high and dry on the sands of Samoa Beach, California. It was not exactly the proper place for a perfectly respectable submarine, and plans were immediately devised to launch her.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0080.xml
article
59
59
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
Typewriting in Code on a Specially Constructed Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE war has brought forth many devices for communication in code; and many different codes are used in the different departments, as well as among individuals. The invention of a typewriter which will print in code follows as a natural consequence, for time and speed cannot be sacrificed continually, even in the interest of secrecy and safety.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0081.xml
article
59
59
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
Fire-Crackers: A Chinese Protection Against Submarines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE Chinese are superstitious. They are constantly trying to slaughter the myriads of malicious spirits and sprites that are supposed to flutter everywhere, even under the bed or between the cracks of a floor. Fortunately, it is a comparatively simple matter to put a couple of thousand sprites out of the way in one fell swoop.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0082.xml
article
60
60
SHIPS AND SHIPBUILDING
[no value]
A Life-Boat That Cannot Capsize or Sink
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW life-boat built along the lines of a big surf board, has proved so satisfactory that it has been officially adopted by the city of Long Beach, California. The boat, sixteen feet long, forty inches wide and fourteen inches deep, is noncapsizable and self-draining, and is the invention of A. M. Nelsen of Long Beach.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0083.xml
article
60
60
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A New Machine Husks a Bushel of Corn a Minute in the Field
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW type of corn husker which promises to relieve the farmer of the tedious and disagreeable work of husking corn in the damp fields has just been completed by W. H. Tschantz, of Ohio. The apparatus is driven by a gas engine and not only husks the corn but dcposits the clean ears in a wagon bin by means of an elevator forming a part of the device and binds up the husks and silks in bundles like wheat, eliminating all litter and loss.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0084.xml
article
61
61
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
The “Shoe Hospital" of the Allies. Not an Inch of Leather Is Wasted
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a recent issue of The New Republic, W. M. Meredith makes the following reference to the shoe-repair shops of the Allied Armies. “Entering another shop we find huge stacks of worn-out boots in every degree of disrepair. These are first sorted out like patients in a hospital, according to their various injuries.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0085.xml
article
61
61
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Not the Latest Style in Hats—Just a Hair-Drying Frame
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE artist who made the “human interest” drawing of the hair-drying frame illustrated below is evidently a bachelor who has spent all his days in an Eden where there were no Eves to go about periodically in low-necked kimonos and wildly flowing tresses during the process of drying and airing the hair after a shampoo.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0086.xml
article
62
62
[no value]
[no value]
A Drawbridge Gate Which Will Stop Any Automobile
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DESPITE even the massive iron gates that swing across a road when a drawbridge is opened, automobiles break through occasionally and plunge into the river below. Such accidents occur when the brakes jam. Here was an opportunity for an inventor.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0087.xml
article
62
62
[no value]
[no value]
The Wooden Hand Rammer — A Survival of the Fittest
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DURING the last five years the electric chain rammer has disappeared from the turrets of modern warships. A short circuit on one of the battleships almost led to disastrous consequences. In other cases a temporary breakdown spoiled the turret’s chances in record firing.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0088.xml
article
63
63,64,65
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
Our Unsinkable Torpedo-Proof Cargo Fleet
The boats will be patterned after the ordinary oil-tanker with its hull divided into a dozen or more tight compartments
Applying the Lesson Taught by the Oil-Tanker
[no value]
[no value]
Joseph Brinker
UNSINKABLE? Yes, practically. That’s the kind of ships it is now proposed to build for Uncle Sam’s fleet of freighters to thwart the torpedoes of the German submarines. Of course no vessel afloat or to be launched in the near future will be unsinkable if a sufficient number of torpedoes are exploded against her sides.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0089.xml
article
66
66
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A German Medal to Commemorate the Torpedoing of the Lusitania
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE came into the office of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY recently a bronze medal in a leather case. It was one of the two medals struck off by the German Government in commemoration of the act that, more than any other, inflamed the American people against Prussianism, the torpedoing of the Lusitania.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0090.xml
article
66
66
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
An Automatic TeaMaking Machine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BR-R-R-R! ting-aling! Wake up! Your tea is ready. Br-r-r-r ! Time to get up!” This is practically what the automatic tea-making machine does every morning. It brews a cup of good tea, and then it calls its master. It was invented by a young Englishman, George Weddle, of New York, and was designed especially to call him and serve him with his morning bracer.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0091.xml
article
67
67
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
California’s Conception of a “Tank”
It was designed for aid in recruiting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PATTERNED somewhat after the famous British tanks pictured and described in the May issue of POPULAR SCIENCE MONTHLY, the California-made tank shown herewith is like its famous prototype in only one particular, that of a track-laying propelling means.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0092.xml
article
68
68
[no value]
[no value]
Seeing the Wonders of the Ocean Through an Inverted Periscope
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS is well known, the periscope enables the submarine, while submerged, to see above the surface of the water. Why not invert the periscope, attach it to the side of ocean liners, and thus enable the passengers to study marine growths and fishes?
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0093.xml
article
68
68
[no value]
[no value]
Importing Japanese Mosquitoes for Bird Food
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE delicate vocal organs of song birds respond magically to special care bestowed upon the diet. For this reason birds that are cultivated in captivity are fed specially prepared foods designed to furnish maximum nourishment with minimum labor of the digestive organs.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0094.xml
article
69
69
[no value]
[no value]
Shall Personal Vanity Prove a Handicap to the Government?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BECAUSE Dame Fashion, in one of her capricious moods, has decreed that platinum jewelry .is the fashionable thing to wear, that metal has steadily advanced until to-day it is worth five times as much as gold. As a result all chemical laboratories and institutions throughout the country are greatly handicapped by its scarcity.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0095.xml
article
69
69
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
The Many-Sided Bathing Cap. Change It to a Suit-Bag When You Travel Home
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE convertible bathing-cap of a New York merchant has many virtues. Inflated, it serves as a waterwing or a football. Deflated, it becomes a wrapper in which to carry your bathing suit. The cap is made from strips of waterproof material sewed together to a football’s shape.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0096.xml
article
69
69
[no value]
[no value]
At Last!—The Safety Chain for Frustrating the Pickpocket
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM sad experience, many a man has learned that placing his wallet in even an inside pocket will not prevent it from being stolen. But if the wallet is attached to the safety chain invented by Lawrence R. Delaney, of Gage, Oklahoma, a pickpocket could not remove it without taking the coat along, too!
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0097.xml
article
70
70
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
Fifty Million Shots to Win a Line of Trenches
Nearly nine million pounds of artillery projectiles were hurled at the Germans in a single engagement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the early days of the war, when the Germans were turning out 250,000 shells a day, the British were producing 2,500 in high explosives and 13,000 in shrapnel. Before the war, Germany held an average stock of 3,000 shells for each gun, while France had 700.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0098.xml
article
71
71
[no value]
[no value]
Cutting Forty Soldiers' Uniforms At One Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the aid of an electric cutting machine one tailor can cut forty soldiers’ uniforms at one time, and in one day do the work of one hundred men working with shears. Were it not for the many labor-saving machines in the tailoring business our soldiers might be obliged to wait long for their uniforms.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0099.xml
article
71
71
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Flashing Signals from ElectricLight Guns
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NOVEL signal gun has been devised by the United States Navy to transmit visual signals between ships in a fleet of war vessels that are running without lights, and yet not betray their presence to the enemy. Signals flashed by it are visible only to the ship at which it has been aimed or one in line with it.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0100.xml
article
72
72
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Utilizing Your Player Piano as a Vacuum Cleaner
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is no better vacuum cleaning pump than the air pump of your player piano. So thought Max Rothfeld, of Philadelphia, who has patented the dustfiltering attachment which will change your piano into a vacuum cleaner. You need only to disconnect the air pipe leading from the piano bellows, from the air motor.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0101.xml
article
72
72
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
Conserving the Wheat Supply with Alfalfa
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SHORT time ago alfalfa, the clover-like plant which grows so abundantly in the West, was considered fit only for feeding cattle. Thanks to the researches of the industrial chemist, it is now destined to become one of the most important articles of human food.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0102.xml
article
72
72
CHEMISTRY
[no value]
Making Bad Whiskey out of Good Jam and Potatoes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOME German prisoners in the Holdsworthy Internment Camp, in Australia, rigged up a still of kerosene cans, bottles tin tubes and other receptacles and made whiskey out of Jam and potatoes! It was efficient enough to meet the demands of the drinkers.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0103.xml
article
73
73
MOTOR VEHICLE AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Transforming a Roadster into a Truck
A device which makes it possible for a onepassenger automobile to haul three trailers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE COnverSiOn of a roadster automobile into a one-ton truck and back again into a passenger car in five minutes has been made possible by the use of a patented fifthwheel device to be set on the rear deck of the car to support the front end of a wagon-like trailer.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0104.xml
article
74
74,75
[no value]
[no value]
Do It With Tools and Machines
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0105.xml
article
76
76
AERONAUTICS
[no value]
Fighting in the Air
The new machines that have been evolved and the way they fight four miles above the ground
New Types Had to Be Evolved for the Exigencies of Battle
All Europe Was Aëronautically Unprepared —Even the Germans
[no value]
[no value]
Waldemar Kaempffert
THE General Staff of every European army knew five years ago that the airplane would prove a potent factor in war. Germans, English, French, Italians, all had tried to evolve a system of airscouting in their annual maneuvers. The Italian campaign against the Turks in Tripoli and the Balkan wars had proved clearly enough that a man in the air could see more than could a man on horseback.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0106.xml
article
77
77,78,79,80
[no value]
[no value]
Carrying the War into the Air
How a Difficult Problem Was Solved
The Fast Fighting Machine Appears
Like Flocks of Birds the Squadrons Maneuver
How the Airplanes Carry War Into the Atmosphere
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
The opposing squadrons watch and watch each other. Woe betide the man in a squadron who lags behind for a second, who manipulates his control a little too carelessly, who is not quite en rapport with his teammate in the machine beside him! Two enemies swoop down upon him.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0107.xml
article
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
A Garden in Which Weeds Are Not Only Tolerated but Cultivated
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
“FOR every evil under the sun there is a remedy or there is none,” says the jingling rhymster, and leaves it to the scientist to find out whether there is or not. To find the remedy for weeds, the bugbear of every farmer and lover of growing things, a garden was planted at the Agricultural Experiment Station of the University of Minnesota and I75 different varieties of the pests were given honorable lodgment in the perfectly good soil.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0108.xml
article
81
81
[no value]
[no value]
Taking Motion Pictures on the Road in a Queer Vehicle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE motion picture director is a creature of weird fancies. If he were otherwise he would not be a motion picture director. He lies awake nights worrying about ways for doing something different. If he becomes hum-drum, if his ideas smack of the commonplace, his directorship is soon ended.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0109.xml
article
82
82,83,84,85
[no value]
[no value]
Chasing Submarines with Motor-Boats
Boats for the purpose are built up in sections produced in immense quantities, like the parts of the lowpriced, easily assembled automobile
Applying Automobile Manufacturing Methods
Will Every Coast Dweller Own a Motor-Boat?
[no value]
[no value]
Prescott Lecky
WHEN England found the submarine was a menace that threatened to destroy her paramount position as a maritime power and a maritime nation she cast about her for a means of combating the underwater terror. One of her purchasing agents visited the New York office of Henry R. Sutphen, an official of a boat-building company and a submarine company.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0110.xml
article
85
85
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
A Board Which Will Help You Learn to Swim
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SWIMMING board invented by William H. Roberts, of Newburyport, Massachusetts, is a help in learning how to swim. The device is nothing more than two warp-proof boards of pine which are fastened together at a very large angle. The swimmer straddles these at the narrow junction of the boards.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0111.xml
article
86
86
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Changing the Apartment Telephone into a Pay-When-You-Call System
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A NEW telephone device deserves a Carnegie medal for furthering the cause of universal peace between tenants and apartment house managers. It enables the manager to collect at the time of the calling, and protects him and the tenant as well from being overcharged.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0112.xml
article
86
86
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Be Thou Wary of the Bubbling Cup
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A PROFESSOR in a western university has discovered that small organisms lodge in a great many kinds of bubbling-cup drinking fountains, and for a curious reason based on an ancient physical principle. Twenty-five years ago writers of textbooks on physics had not the wealth of material to draw from that is now available.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0113.xml
article
87
87
RAILWAYS
[no value]
Owens Valley, California, Has a Freight-Car Hotel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OWENYO is a railroad junction point in Owens Valley, California, east of the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Mining and agricultural development have made it important. But it had no hotel. George Brown built one with the best material that he could find.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0114.xml
article
87
87
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Turn on the Water in Your Bath. It Can’t Overflow. This Alarm Will Warn You in Time
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WILLIAM J. ABERLE, of St. Paul, Minnesota, has devised an alarm which tells you when your bathtub has been filled to whatever depth you desire. Instead of having to watch the rising water, you simply adjust the alarm and let it do the rest. A light hollow float is suspended in the water by a vertical iron rod.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0115.xml
article
88
88,89
MOTOR VEHICLE AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Ten-Ton Motor-Truck on Eight Wheels
It combines the greatest possible carrying capacity with the high speed and easy riding of lighter trucks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE novel motor vehicle shown in the accompanying illustrations is mounted on two trucks, patterned after the old-fashioned four-wheeled railway coach truck, having eight supporting wheels in all. Each wheel helps to drive the vehicle, which is thus always able to secure traction, since it is extremely unlikely that all eight wheels would be mired at once.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0116.xml
article
89
89
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
To Make Your Lawn Attractive You Must Edge It Evenly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN improvement on the ordinary lawn edger has been invented by Christian L. Schneider, of Davenport, Ia. It not only edges the lawn neatly but cuts a trough at the same time at a regulated depth. The edger consists of a J-shaped knife carried on an arm which adjusts it to any height.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0117.xml
article
90
90
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
An Adjustable Rake for the “Land Patriots"
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALL contributions to the cause of agricultural preparedness will be gratefully received! Especially when they are as good as the adjustable garden rake that is shown in the accompanying illustrations. Instead of having to use a number of different sized rakes to fit between rows of different kindsof vegetables, you can adjust this one rake to suit all purposes.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0118.xml
article
90
90
[no value]
[no value]
Eliminating the Noise from Railroad Traveling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE railroad at least has solved the noise problem. Much to the delight of the passengers, the “Burlington Route” has rooted out the grinding of wheels, the creaking of axles, and the other noises usually attendant upon traveling. They have accomplished this by installing a soundproof flooring in their new steel cars.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0119.xml
article
90
90
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Combining a Strainer with the Bung of a Barrel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A BARREL attachment which serves as a bung and a strainer in one has been devised by William R. Brison, of Tompkinsville, New York. Screw the attachment into the barrel and contents can be drawn through an exceptionally fine strainer, without retarding the flow.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0120.xml
article
91
91
[no value]
[no value]
Counting the Moisture Drops in a Fog
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MEASUREMENTS of fog have hitherto been crude. But an example of more refined measurements of fog has recently been afforded by experts of the United States Bureau of Standards. The measurements were made in the most notoriously foggy region of the world—the Grand Banks of Newfoundland.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0121.xml
article
91
91
MISCELLANY
[no value]
A Twelve-Year-Old Girl’s Combination Umbrella and Rain-Cape
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A LITTLE girl, Miss Martha Bachman, who lives in Chattanooga, Tenn., has evidently suffered the discomfort of wet stockings caused by the flapping of her just-so-long rain-cape against her legs on her way to school, as so many other little girls have done in days gone by.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0122.xml
article
92
92
[no value]
[no value]
Can the Railway Train Be Made Noiseless?
“Yes,” say the inventors, “by improving the wheels.” “No,” say the engineers, “unless you perfect the road-beds”
[no value]
[no value]
Marius C. Krarup
THE idea of producing a noiseless rail wheel, and even making it distinctly flexible to reduce the wear and tear of the rolling stock has seemed a good one to some inventive minds, and they have proceeded to patent their conceptions. These are all characterized by a noise-deadening and more or less elastic substance which is inserted between the flanged rim and the hub portion of the wheel; by some provision to prevent the rim from slipping round on the inserted material, and by guide plates on the sides to hold the hub and rim in alinement.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0123.xml
article
93
93,94
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Salvaging in Armor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AS a diver goes down, the water pressure increases at the enormous rate of over three tons a square foot for every one hundred feet. This water pressure is overcome by supplying the diver’s lungs with air of an equal pressure. Evidently, the air pressure has to be increased the farther down the diver goes; but if at any time this pressure becomes either more or less than the water outside, the diver will be injured or even killed.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0124.xml
article
94
94
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
Dummy Guns and Turrets Train England’s Gunners for the Sea
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN England trains her gunners for the sea, she sends them to Whale Island in Portsmouth Harbor. Here the entire island is given over to steel sheds which are built like gun turrets on a battleship. The great guns projecting from these sheds are dummies, though they are exact counterparts of those on a battleship.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0125.xml
article
95
95
MISCELLANY
[no value]
The Straw Hat for Storms. The Top Turns Inside Out
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A STRAW hat which can be taken out in the fiercest storm with impunity is a recent invention of William Wilson, of Newark, New Jersey. There is nothing exceptional about the straw. The top of the hat, however, can be turned inside out. The folded waterproof covering that is thus exposed can be drawn over the entire upper surface of the hat.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0126.xml
article
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
A Toothbrush for the Sick—It Has a Removable Pad
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE toothbrush of an invalid should be destroyed after a single use. That is the practice in the more carefully conducted hospitals. Ordinarily this would necessitate having on hand a goodly supply of brushes if the patient’s teeth are to be properly cared for.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0127.xml
article
95
95
[no value]
[no value]
The Private Hairbrush—The Bristles Gan Be Locked Up
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
APPARENTLY only one man of inventive genius in all the United States has been able to remain unaffected by the zip-boom-bang of guns and war news and to apply his talent to the crying needs of everyday and home. He has invented a device for locking up his hairbrush to protect it from the other boarders in the house!
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0128.xml
article
96
96
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
[no value]
A Safety Coat for Workmen. It Pulls Apart in Sections
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TWO million machineshop workers in the United States read safety bulletins each week and operate machinery equipped with every kind of safety appliance which money will'buy. Yet not a week goes by but several careless workmen are injured and one or two killed outright because of their own recklessness.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0129.xml
article
96
96
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Motor Attachment Which Prevents Injury to Rowboat Screw
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WITH the marketing by a Western concern of a tilting motor attachment, the motor-driven rowboat comes into its own. In the past when beaching the boats or when passing through shallow water, the propellers of rowboats using motor power were endangered.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0130.xml
article
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
It Stormed; So the Funeral Was Conducted by Telephone
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FROM Wisconsin comes the report of a funeral by telephone. A Methodist minister, of Oakfield, died and his bishop was to deliver the funeral sermon. But a severe storm came on and the bishop, who was on his way, saw no chance of getting to the village, since traffic was stopped on the short branch line leading to the place.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0131.xml
article
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
The Last Word in Fountain Pen Efficiency—An Eraser Attachment
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IF you should make a mistake while writing, the fault is yours, not your pen’s. However, your pen may be made to correct the mistake very neatly. Daniel R. Markley, of Lancaster, Pa., has devised a plan for attaching an eraser composed of threads of spun glass to the top of the barrel of any ordinary fountain pen.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0132.xml
article
97
97
[no value]
[no value]
Removing Iron Rivets with a Pneumatic Hammer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOUGH the pneumatic hammer has long been used in structural steel work to shape the heads on red-hot rivets, the old hammer-and-bar methods are still used in removing the rivets. A pneumatic hammer has been invented, however, which removes fifty times as many rivets in a given time.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0133.xml
article
98
98,99
MISCELLANY
[no value]
Giving Convicts a Real Chance
How the Prison Farms of Florida have superseded the inhuman leasing-out system
[no value]
[no value]
Ewing Galloway
A FEW years ago Florida’s penal system was one of the crudest, the most brutal that ever existed in the United States. All able-bodied male convicts were leased to private concerns to work in lumber and turpentine camps, and thousands of them were overworked, underfed, and housed in cages unfit for wild beasts.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0134.xml
article
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
With the Warm Weather Come Improvements in Ice-Cream Making
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE ice-cream manufacturer encounters the same difficulty in removing blocks or forms of cream from their molds as does the average cook or housewife with her frozen desserts. A recent device, patented by L. M. Hendler, of Baltimore Md., for overcoming this difficulty, is a contrivance for forcing warmed air through a pipe to the bottom of the mold to dislodge the bricks of cream.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0135.xml
article
100
100
[no value]
[no value]
Why Not Dress Alike and Save Money During War Time?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHY not a civilian uniform as a measure of economy in clothing? suggests a Canton, Ohio, man. It could be worn by everyone, man, woman and child, and thus eliminate foolish dressing, the dude, and the spending of hundreds of thousands of dollars on needless finery.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0136.xml
article
100
100
MOTOR VEHICLE AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A New Type of Transmission Employs Cork Inserts
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE new type of transmission band shown in the accompanying illustration is designed to overcome the objection to the planetary form of transmission, such as used on the Ford car. It has cork inserts like buttons. These extend out beyond the band proper for a very slight distance and come into direct contact with the revolving drums as the speed is changed.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0137.xml
article
101
101
MISCELLANY
[no value]
This Actually Happens Oftener Than You Would Think
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT may be a mere matter of superstition which causes so many hundreds of soldiers to wear small Bibles and Testaments over their hearts. But the Pocket Testament League of England reports that it is very generally done, and occasionally we hear of incidents which confirm the report of the League.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0138.xml
article
101
101
ARCHITECTURE
[no value]
The Door to This Siberian Home Is Located on the Roof
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
M4UCH of Siberia is a vast wilderness which still remains to be explored. In the winter season, when the streams cease to flow, disappearing beneath the ice and snow, the animals hibernate in their dens and the natives repair to their huts to sleep away, so far as possible, the infinite silence that broods over the land.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0139.xml
article
101
101
[no value]
[no value]
Have You Put the Can Out for the Night? Then Don't
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Says Lee S. Crandall, in Pets (Henry Holt & Co., New York): "The practice of turning the cat out of doors at night is as cruel as it is unnecessary. No animal is fonder of warmth and comfort, and the pet's happiness certainly is not increased by a night spent outside in cold and dampness.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0140.xml
article
102
102,103
[no value]
[no value]
The Problem of the Automobile Top
It may be made self-effacing and self-adjusting
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ONE of the most conspicuous and ugly parts of the average automobile is the top. Folded, it is an overhanging object at the rear out of harmony with the pleasing lines of the body. To eliminate this unsightliness, the engineers of two large companies have designed two types of disappearing tops which are entirely hidden when not in use.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0141.xml
article
103
103
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
A Vast Fortune Is Chewed Up Every Year
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
LOUD and long are the complaints of the stringency of the times and the wails concerning the tightness of money; but these laments are not coming from the manufacturers of chewing gum. Neither the war nor any other calamity has affected the output of this great necessity.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0142.xml
article
104
104,105
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Electric Newspapers in the Sky
They flash information in flickering tidbits— a fresh, dazzling morsel every ten seconds
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANY evening now in Chicago you can look skyward and read, one after another, flaming messages to the general public. Up on top of some tall skyscraper is the contrivance that delivers these messages. It is a form of electric sign, at a distance differing but little from the ordinary kind, except that the messages it blazons forth change with far greater rapidity.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0143.xml
article
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
Compared with Electricity Gas Is Still the Cheaper Medium
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN spite of the decreased cost of electric service and the increased efficiency of electrically operated devices, the fact remains that of the two sources of energy generally available for heating, lightingand cooking, namely, electricity and gas, gas is by far the cheaper medium.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0144.xml
article
105
105
[no value]
[no value]
A Telephone Attachment Which Performs the Services of a Watch Dog
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
RUPERT H. GREENLAW, of New York, has invented a meter attachment which is a mechanical watch-dog for your telephone. It consists of a small case containing a locking and registering mechanism, a clamp which fastens it to the telephone standard, and a rod which engages with the telephone receiver.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0145.xml
article
106
106
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
[no value]
A Silo Roof Which Opens Like an Umbrella
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A ROOF built like an umbrella is the ingenious device of a manufacturer of appliances for silos. It has this advantage: the structure can be filled five or six feet above the level of the walls; as the ensilage gradually settles, the roof will close down upon it automatically.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0146.xml
article
106
106
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
The United States Armies Are Preparing to Fight Vermin and Germs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CLOTHING disinfectors of a portable type similar to those in use in Europe have been purchased by the United States Army. The outfit consists of a five-horsepower upright boiler connected by piping with a cylindrical chamber about six feet long and three feet in diameter.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0147.xml
article
107
107
RAILWAYS
[no value]
Flushing Streets with Water Pipes on Trolley Cars
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN Worcester and Springfield, Mass., the day of horse-and-wagon street flushing is past. Trolley cars carrying large water-tanks and electric pumps have been found much more effective and considerably more rapid. The pumps force the water out in such powerful streams that the trolley-car method has proved itself cleaner than the horse-drawn barrel-wagon from which the water flowed by gravity.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0148.xml
article
107
107
[no value]
[no value]
That Wad of Dental Cotton—Was It Sterilized?
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN cleaning the root-canals of affected teeth the dentist employs a wad of cotton wrapped on a steel needle. This wad is called a “broach,” and is used in reaching the vital point where the nerve of the tooth passes out into the bony structure. Usually the dentist twists the cotton around the needle with his fingers, which is neither sanitary nor safe in most cases. Dr. L. L. Funkof Chicago has invented the machine shown in the illustration. It does the wrapping mechanically, and sterilizes the cotton at the same time.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0149.xml
article
108
108
[no value]
[no value]
Mountains That Float
Why? Because the underlying materials are lighter than the mountains
The Proof Furnished by Gravity
How We Get the Idea of Floating
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a remarkable series of researches conducted by the U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, under the direction, first of Professor John F. Hayford, and later of Mr. William Bowie, Chief of the Division of Geodesy, it has been conclusively proved that mountains and continents, and probably islands, float.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0150.xml
article
109
109
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Land Skates with Brakes and Pneumatic Tires
The latest “quicker than walking” form of exercise
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ABALL-BEARING, pneumatictired skate which will run easier on a level road or street than an ice skate will slide on ice, has been invented by Charles H. Clark, of New York city. Located on opposite sides of each foot are two nine-inch wheels, the front wheel being on the inside of the foot and the rear wheel on the outside, so as not to interfere in any way with the movements of the legs.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0151.xml
article
110
110
SPORTS AND PASTIMES
[no value]
Rafting the Rapids on the Rio Grande in Jamaica, British West Indies
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMAICA, although a tropical country, has a form of sport equal if not superior to tobogganing. The national pastime is shooting the rapids in the Rio Grande River on bamboo rafts. For about four miles of its length the river is one succession of rapids.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0152.xml
article
110
110
[no value]
[no value]
Facts about Your Enemy, the Common Housefly
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MORE than one-third of all the known flies belong to one family, Musca Domestica, or the common housefly. This fly is perhaps the most cosmopolitan in the whole order of insects, being found in almost every part of the world. The eggs are laid in groups, and in a few hours the larvae make their appearance.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0153.xml
article
111
111
MOTOR VEHICLE AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
A Community Garage Comprises Fifty Buildings on One Lot
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
FIFTY garages, set as closely together as possible, occupy a vacant lot in New York city. Each one is rented to a car owner living in the neighborhood. The fireproof structures are uniform in design, being made out of galvanized iron with the framework formed of angle steel.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0154.xml
article
111
111
HOUSEKEEPING MADE EASY
[no value]
Making the Kitchen Range One Hundred Per Cent Efficient
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE oil-burning stove of Garritt Van Daam, a combustion engineer of Buffalo, New York, is a recently invented rival of the modern coal range. The usual kerosene heater is a good little stove, but it is known to smoke and to smell generally.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0155.xml
article
112
112,113
WAR PROBLEMS
[no value]
Protecting the British Fleets with Chain-Nets
No enemy submarine can thread the English Channel without being caught like a fish in a seine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
DISPATCHES from Europe tell repeatedly that hostile submarines have been caught in nets, but none of them have indicated how it was done. The English fleet is kept in the Orkney Islands, protected by great steel chains woven in the form of simple nets which are not stationary but mobile.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0156.xml
article
113
113
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
The Latest Salvaging Device for Metals —An Electromagnet
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALIGHTER accidentally turned over at sea, spilling several thousand cases of shells. A diver was put on the job, but owing to the ice and extremely cold water, he was able to work only a few hours at a time. At the end of a day less than one hundred cases had been raised.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0157.xml
article
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
“Safety First” for Skyscraper Workers Attained with Nets of Rope
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO protect the men who erect the steel frames of skyscrapers, life nets are now used instead of the usual flooring. The building laws of practically every state require that the contractor install a plank floor for each story as the structural work progresses.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0158.xml
article
114
114
[no value]
[no value]
Seal Your Letters by Electricity
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BESIDES its special task of keeping letters and packages intact and safe from prying eyes, sealing wax lends itself to many forms of decoration, especially on china. The chief difficulty in the way of its use is in heating it to the proper flowing state without smoking it or spoiling its color.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0159.xml
article
115
115
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
An Electric Eye Watches the Smoke Screen During a Battle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE manner in which the density of the smoke screens is now regulated during a battle is interesting. By partially shutting off the draft to her boilers, a battleship is made to emit clouds of smoke which screen her from the enemy. But how can the stokers, who are far below deck, see the stacks so that they can regulate the smoke clouds to the proper density?
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0160.xml
article
115
115
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
An Ice Helmet to Relieve the Fever Patient Without Disturbing Him
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE principal defects of the ice caps so frequently used on the heads of fever patients are that they do not fit the head, they can not be refilled with cracked ice without removing them from the patient and the water can not be drained off. A New York city inventor, M. Finkelstein, seems to have overcome all these shortcomings in devising the ice cap illustrated.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0161.xml
article
116
116,117,118
SHIPS AND SHIP BUILDING
[no value]
Practical Motor-Boating
A series of three articles on the selection, operation, care and upkeep of a motor-boat
[no value]
[no value]
George M. Petersen
MOTOR-BOATING, as commonly thought of by the amateur boatman, consists mainly of trying to drive any kind of hull through all kinds of water, at any speed possible, by means of a mass of cast iron in the shape of a propeller in the stern of the boat.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0162.xml
article
119
119
MEDICINE, SURGERY AND HYGIENE
[no value]
Separating Russian Prisoners from Vermin
The Germans have special stations on the Eastern frontier for “de-licing” friends or foes from Russia
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GERMANY is more afraid of vermin than of machine guns. To the German military surgeon a filthy Russian Cossack—and there is nothing filthier— is more to be dreaded than screaming shrapnel. Germany, in particular, has to deal with the problem in a serious way.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0163.xml
article
120
120
PHOTOGRAPHY AND MOTION-PICTURES
[no value]
An Attachment Which Will Lock Your Camera to the Tripod in an Instant
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN ingenious camera attachment has been invented by Clarence J. Dawson, of Detroit, which will instantly lock your camera to its tripod, and will just as quickly release it. It does away with the inconvenience of having to turn your camera a dozen times about the tripod stand in order to screw it down tight.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0164.xml
article
120
120
MOTOR VEHICLE AND THEIR ACCESSORIES
[no value]
Making the Acetylene Light as Brilliant as the Electric Lamp
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE accompanying diagram shows the details of an ingenious device which makes the acetylene light almost as brilliant as that cast by the electric lamp on automobiles and motorcycles. The burner consists of a round disk, or “button,” three-fourths of an inch in diameter, set in a pressed metal holder.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0165.xml
article
121
121
FOR PRACTIAL WORKERS
[no value]
Cutting Clippings from Magazines with a Pin
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. MURBACH
WHEN you lose your knife or do not have a pair of scissors at hand for cutting the paper a common pin or needle of any kind serves the purpose admirably. If it is a single sheet from which the clipping is to be removed, lay the part on another paper, hold the pin slantwise so that the point will follow around the clipping, just as if tracing its outline.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0166.xml
article
121
121
FOR PRACTIAL WORKERS
[no value]
Solid Board Fence with Artistic Upper Edge
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. R.PERRY
THE owner of a small cottage wanted a garden in his back yard, and to prevent prowlers running over it at night it was necessary to have a high wall or tight board fence. To secure an artistic effect the fence was made as shown in the illustration.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0167.xml
article
121
121,122
FOR PRACTIAL WORKERS
[no value]
Rustic Furniture Made of Poles and Logs
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE illustrations on the next page show a new idea in rustic furniture. Almost any kind of wood may be used; however, these are small tamarack poles and disks sawed from an oak tree. These disks, when made very smooth by planing and sandpapering, and then given a coat of oil and one or two coats of spar varnish, present a very fine appearance, showing the grain to the heart of the tree.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0168.xml
article
123
123,124,125
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Using a Drop of Water for a Lens
It Is a wonderful magnifier in microscopic photography
[no value]
[no value]
Frank M. Gentry
EVERY amateur photographer will be glad to learn of a method that is both simple and inexpensive, by which he may make perfectly clear photographs of microscopic objects. It has been known ever since the first scientific investigations of the refractive properties of different substances, that water, if it could in some practical way be heldin shape, would form a lens of extraordinary value.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0169.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
An Effective Fireproofing for Children’s Clothing
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JENNIE E. McCOY
IT is a common occurrence for children’s clothing to take fire from playing with matches and from other causes. This may be prevented by a little precaution which may be taken every time the children’s clothes are washed, particularly the dresses, suits and petticoats.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0170.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Collecting Ants in a Sponge and Drowning Them
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ANTS in the house or on the lawn can be quickly eradicated in the following way: Wet a large sponge and sift sugar all over it and place in the infested spot. It will be filled with ants in a very short time. Sink it in a pail of water and the ants will leave it and drown.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0171.xml
article
125
125
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Exterminating Moles and Gophers by Asphyxiation
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN some of the Western States moles and gophers are a great pest and difficult to exterminate. One of the best methods of getting rid of these animals is to fill their holes with the burnt gases from the exhaust of a gasoline engine. The illustration shows the method used by a Western farmer for the purpose.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0172.xml
article
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Exhibiting Specimens of Flowers in Single Blossoms
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W.H. SARGENT
CERTAIN flowers, such as pansies, cannot satisfactorily be shown in bunches, but should be exhibited as separate specimens. To put each in a vase by itself takes than flowers. A good way to exhibit such blossoms is to make a table top of soft wood and bore holes into it for inserting glass tubes. The top of the table should then be covered with paper, through which the flower stems may extend down into the water-filled tubes.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0173.xml
article
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
A Tracing Cloth Repair That Does Not Affect Transparency
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
Louis FLEISCHER
THE principal objection to patching a tracing cloth is that the part covered is no longer transparent enough for making a perfect blue print. If the tear is not too large, apply liquid court plaster to the parts and allow it to dry. This holds the parts together, fills the gap or hole and does not impair the transparency of the cloth.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0174.xml
article
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Difference in Curing Time of Parts Makes Poor Tire Repair
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SOME repairmen attempt to use materials from two or more concerns on the same job. For example, sometimes a fabric is bought from one firm which cures at 40 lb. steam pressure for 40 minutes, with gum from another firm, curing at 55 lb. for 50 minutes.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0175.xml
article
126
126
[no value]
[no value]
Porcupine Removes Window Pane to Gain Entrance
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE wily ways of a porcupine and its almost human intelligence are illustrated in the accompanying picture. A camping party having food stuffs stored in a cabin, left the place for a few days to go fishing across the lake. They left the door and windows securely locked, but upon their return they found that a porcupine had gained entrance and played havoc with their edibles.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0176.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Round Belt Guide on a Washing Machine Wheel
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
GEO. C. ROUSCH
THE circumference of the washing machine flywheel shown in the illustration is divided into eight equal parts and at each division a pair of 3/16-in. holes are drilled. Pieces of stiff wire bent U-shaped and about4in. long are slipped through these holes from the inside of the wheel rim and their ends bent outward as shown.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0177.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Vine Covered Tepee in the Garden for the Little Folks
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD F. BIGELOW
AVERY attractive tepee can be built of 2 by 4-in. timbers, as shown in the illustration. First lay out a plot of ground and box it in with the timbers, filling up the part within with dirt to the upper edges of the timbers. Near each corner of the frame stand one of the timbers, allowing the upper end to slope toward the center of the square where all four meet.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0178.xml
article
127
127
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Shaft-Polisher Made Like a Lemon Squeezer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PISTON rods, mandrels and similar shafts of considerable length turned in a lathe are usually given a high finish. Where no grinding fixtures are available this finishing must be done with files and emery cloth. A polisher for such work that gives more pressure on the surface and does better work with less fatigue may be made on the principle of a wood lemon squeezer.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0179.xml
article
128
128,129
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Building an Artistic Bird-House For the Garden
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE design as shown by the drawing is an attempt to carry out a pergola effect. The general dimensions are II ft. 6 in. from center to center of round columns. From the grpund to the under side of upper beam is I2 It. The diameter of columns at base is I ft. 5 in., at the top I ft. 3 in. The general dimensions can be changed to suit the particular fancy of the amateur builder, but for satisfaction and to avoid mistakes they ought to be carried out as shown.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0180.xml
article
129
129,130,131
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Printing Process for Imitating Hard Woods
Making the Roller
Now for the Scraper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE art and practice of graining dates back about 150 years, the exact period not being known; hence imitating hardwoods is by no means a modern idea. An expert grainer to do his best, uses only his best; whereas Nature, always variable, gives us her best and her worst, and the result is seen in poor cabinet work.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0181.xml
article
131
131,132
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
An Improvised Stage for an Out of Doors Fairy Play
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SHIRLEY L. SEIFERT
AUTOMOBILES, four on the right and two on the left, furnished most of the light for a fairy play, “The Merman’s Pipe,” produced under the direction of Mrs. A. J. Commons, at Merrill Springs, Wisconsin, for the benefit of a rural school social center five miles away from any stage machinery or electric lights.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0182.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
An Experiment in Optics Using Heated Graphite
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS W. BENSON
AN interesting experiment in optics may be performed in the following manner: Take a bit of hard graphite, such as a lead pencil, and hold it in the tip of a candle flame until it is completely covered with soot. It will then appear black in the air, but lay it in some water, completely covering the lead part, and it will appear like silver.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0183.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Small Hand Drill Made from a Cheap Watch
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN doing some very fine repair work it was necessary to use a smaller drill than could be used in a breast drill without breaking. To accomplish the drilling of very small holes I made a drill driver of an old dollar watch and some parts taken from a discarded alarm clock.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0184.xml
article
132
132
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Snap-Fastener for a Small Cupboard Door
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
AN efficient fastener for small cupboard doors can be quickly and easily made from a brass-headed tack, a piece of soft rubber, a small piece of tin and a few small nails. Bore a hole in the edge of the door ⅜ in. in diameter and at least ½ in. deep at the location for the fastener.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0185.xml
article
133
133,134
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Awnings for the Veranda and How they are Made.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H.S.Tallman
IF made at home, an outfit awnings will not be expensive. The material is cheap, if purchased in bulk, and the only equipment required for the manufacture is a sewing machine, a pair of shears, a small pipe-wrench, a hack-saw, and a ⅜-in.pipe die.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0186.xml
article
134
134
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Fastening an Oar-Lock to Keep It from Falling Out
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
G. P. LEHMANN
IF an oar fits a lock snugly the lock is likely to be pulled out of the socket when the oar is removed, and it may be lost. I have found that fastening such a lock in the manner illustrated will prevent this. A stout cord is tied to one arm of the lock and run through a screweye turned into the block or oarlock base as shown in Fig. I.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0187.xml
article
135
135,136
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Boomerang Flyer
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J.S.Zerbe
A LITTLE gyroscopic flyer which can be adjusted so it will return like a boomerang can be made by any intelligent boy. Excepting the shaft, every part can be made with such simple tools as a jack-knife, a pair of pliers and a hammer. The only outside work required is the boring of two small holes in the shaft.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0188.xml
article
136
136
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
How to Cut Roses So That the Plants Are Not Injured
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THERE is a right and a wrong way to cut roses. If the cut is not made correctly the blossom-producing properties of the plants may be seriously injured. This applies particularly, of course, to rose plants chosen and grown especially to supply cut-flowers.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0189.xml
article
137
137,138
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Sheet Metal Working Simply Explained
II.—An easy problem in developing a pattern for a scale scoop
[no value]
[no value]
Arthur F. Payne
THE problem for this article is apparently entirely different from that of the periscope. It is true that it is an entirely different object, but the methods used are exactly the same. Pattern drafting is divided into six divisions; namely, (I) orthographic projection (big words, but the easiest of all to draft), (2) parallel lines, (3) radial lines, (4) triangulation, (5) approximation, and (6) templet work.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0190.xml
article
138
138
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Pin Inserted in a Cork to Make an Oil Dropper
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. H. SARGENT
IN oiling fine machinery, clocks, watches, etc., too much oil is often used. Light oil flows so freely that it is difficult to get just enough out of the spout of an oil-can and to put it in the exact spot where it is needed. A needle inserted in the cork of an oil-bottle will be found to pick up just a drop of oil.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0191.xml
article
138
138
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
An Automatic Watering Tank for Poultry Yards
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MANY types of automatic tanks have been invented to provide fresh clean water for the fowls all during the day. Several of these must be tipped upside down in the process of filling. The accompanying sketch presents a type of tank in which the water may be poured in through the top.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0192.xml
article
138
138,139
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Trough for Thoroughly Washing Film Negatives
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
A SPECIAL trough for washing negatives will be found a great convenience to the photographer who uses films. The trough here illustrated is nothing more than a long, water-tight box, made of galvanized sheet steel, having a drain cock fitted at the bottom of one end and with a small piece of tubing soldered at the top of the other end to hold a length of rubber tubing or hose for making connection with a faucet.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0193.xml
article
139
139
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Safety Guard Placed on an Emery-Wheel Dresser
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH K. LONG
IN the crusade for “safety first” attachments on machine tools, one that is likely to be overlooked is the emery-wheel dresser. This, however, has been taken care of in a very efficient manner in one shop as illustrated. A piece of I/16-in. boiler plate about 2 in. wider than the cutting wheels of the dresser was bent and fastened with two 3/ 16-in. screws about ⅜ in. long on the handle of the dresser for a GUARD.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0194.xml
article
139
139
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Nest-Box Trap for Catching the English Sparrow
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SPARROW traps may be classified, according to the U. S. Department of Agriculture, as nest-traps and bait-traps. Inasmuch as sparrows usually feed in flocks, but approach nest-boxes singly or in pairs, the annual catch of a bait-trap will exceed that of a nest-box trap many times; but during the breeding season the nest-box traps are decidedly useful.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0195.xml
article
139
139
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Look Over Stored Tires Before Applying Them to Rims
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
BEFORE using tires laid aside examine them carefully for cuts on the outside, remove tacks and small nails, reinforce any breaks in the fabric inside and lubricate the fabric and inner tube with powdered mica. Apply a thin solution of graphite, shellac and alcohol according to instructions.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0196.xml
article
140
140
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Metal Garage Made from a Discarded Tank
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
CHARLES CLAUDE WAGNER
AN opening was cut out in one end of the tank large enough to admit the automobile; then a strip was cut out on the side and the metal bent out to form a covering in the shape of an inverted U. A framework was made of wood and placed on the ground. To this the sides and ends of the tank were attached.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0197.xml
article
140
140
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Cheap and Effective Method of Bracing a Roof
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
HENRY SIMON
IN many instances the partitions of frame buildings do not allow the rafters to be effectively braced from them, so that trussing is resorted to. This, however, spoils any room directly under the roof. The method illustrated is more effective than trussing, is cheaper, and provides a stronger brace.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0198.xml
article
140
140
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Small Closet in Door-Frame Stile for Milk Bottle
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JAMES A. CARTER
THE question of where the milkman shall put the milk bottles in the mornings in order to prevent them from being stolen, upset by dogs or cats, or from smearing the porch or steps has been answered in many ways; but the neatest and best device for the purpose which I have yet seen is a little closet cut out just above the floor in the kitchen, between the inner and outer wall of a cement bungalow.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0199.xml
article
141
141,142,143,144,145
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Winning an Athlete’s Laurels
IV.—Pole vault and potato races
Taking the Jump
Training Hints
Other Styles of Vaulting
Vaulting Rules
Indoor Athletic Events
Relay Races in the Gymnasium
[no value]
[no value]
Albert B. Wegener
THE pole vault is the most spectacular and at the same time the most exacting of athletic events, requiring strength, speed, and skill. A left-footed jumper should grasp the pole with the ordinary left-hand grasp and the right hand reverse grasp, hands 30 in. apart.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0200.xml
article
145
145
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Sticky Fly Paper Used to Keep Insects Away from Poultry
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PAUL GREER
TO keep insects away from fowl in a poultry house sticky fly paper may be used with good results. It is placed sticky side down on the upright parts holding the roosts, which rest on the paper. Do not allow the paper to touch the sides of the building in any place.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0201.xml
article
145
145
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Saving Concrete in Setting Posts in Holes
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ROBERT W. PHELPS
THE ordinary method of setting a post in concrete is to set the post into the hole and fill in around with concrete. This is wasteful and does not reach the highest efficiency. A square hole should be dug so that the concrete will have square corners.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0202.xml
article
145
145
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Waterproofing Blue Prints and Drawings for Rough Handling
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THOMAS W. BENSON
WHEN blue prints are handled to a great extent or when it is necessary to use them outdoors, as in construction work, they often become spotted by water or soiled; which makes the prints difficult to read. Waterproofing them protects them from the water, and makes it possible to wash them off when they become soiled.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0203.xml
article
146
146
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Coating Which Gives the Appearance of Stone to Wood
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
L. E. FETTER
TO make imitation stone for outdoor furniture, sun-dials, flower pots, etc., the following can be used: 10 parts lime 12 parts rosin I part linseed oil Dissolve ingredients thoroughly and apply the mixture while hot to the wood as a coating. The result will be an attractive stone-like appearance that will last indefinitely.—L. E. FETTER.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0204.xml
article
146
146
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
A Special Ladder for Use in Boiler Shops
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
JOSEPH K. LONG
THE type of ladder illustrated is especially made for use in boiler and car shops where it is necessary to climb up to moderate heights for doing work. Being of the A-type it can be used like a painter’s ladder and a plank can be put between two of them to form a trestle which will accommodate more than one workman.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0205.xml
article
146
146
PRACTICAL WORKERS' DEPARTMENTS
[no value]
Three Plates and Three Color Screens Used in New Color Photography
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN a recent patent on color photography there is brought out a process whereby three sensitive plates are placed together in such a way that the color screens in in them produce the desired effect on the plate. To obtain these results it is necessary to have all plates that are used in sets, sensitized at the same time so that they will age the same age the same and nave the same emulsion.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0206.xml
article
147
147
The Amateur Electrician
And Wireless Operator
Applying Insulation to Splices Made in Electric Wires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
TO comply with the rules of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, it is necessary to apply a rubber coating over a soldered joint in a wire. One of the best methods of doing this is to lay on the rubber over the splice before it begins to cool from the soldering operation.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0207.xml
article
147
147,148
The Amateur Electrician
[no value]
A Simple and Easily Made Electric Battery Motor
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. E. DAY
A SIMPLE and easily made motor that will run at high speed with two or three cells of dry battery, or on an alternating current with a transformer, is shown in the illustration. While this motor can be made in any size that will appeal to the experimenter, only one dimensioned drawing is given.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0208.xml
article
148
148,149
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Rebuilding Worn-Out Dry Battery Cells
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE most difficult part of rebuilding dry cells in quantity is the removal of the contents, which consists of peroxide of manganese and carbon powder tightly compressed and covered with pitch. Strike the pitch a sharp blow with a hammer to break it; then dig it out with a pointed tool like that of a screwdriver.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0209.xml
article
149
149
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Method of Insulating Secondary “Pies” in Transformers
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN most text-books on the construction of transformers, it is customary to advise the insulating of the “pies” or sections in the secondary winding by means of long strips of empire cloth, wound over and over through the center holes of the sections.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0210.xml
article
150
150
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Steadying the Voltage of a Dynamo Driven by Gasoline Engine
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THIS problem has been solved in various ways. We are all familiar with the storage-battery system, and being acquainted with this system, realize its expense. If a gas or gasoline engine is to be used to drive a dynamo, some provision must be made to steady the speed of the dynamo.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0211.xml
article
150
150
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Increasing the Voltage of a Dry Battery
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
OFTEN a battery of dry cells will fall in voltage or become reduced in pressure because some of the cells have polarized, consequently the current is not sufficient to operate the ignition of an engine or to perform its duty. Such an occurrence is likely to prove very annoying.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0212.xml
article
151
151
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
Keyless Lamp Socket for Switching Electric Currents
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. S. ZERBE
THE well known key socket for electric lamps requires at least thirty separate and distinct pieces, the assembling of which is an important item in estimating the cost of production. A new socket has been devised which may be made of less than half the usual number of parts.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0213.xml
article
151
151
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Curious Circuit for Audion On a Wireless Set
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IT has often been said that it is not possible to use an audion bulb in connection with a simple double slide tuner. But experiment has proved that a and accurately, the strength of signals from all stations being much greater than when the same audion is used with a receiving transformer.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0214.xml
article
151
151
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Conversion of Kilometers to Nautical and Statute Miles
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WIRELESS telegraph transmission distances are often stated in kilometers, nautical miles or statute miles. To convert the number of kilometers to nautical miles, multiply by fifty-four and point off two decimal places. To convert from kilometers to statute miles, multiply by sixty-two and point off two places.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0215.xml
article
151
151
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
An Experimental Wireless Aerial Made of Zither Strings
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. DROBE
WHILE experimenting with several different types of novel aerials I found that by connecting together all the strings of a zither and substituting it for the aerial with an inductive coupler, fixed condenser, silicon detector and a pair of 2000-ohm telephones, I could hear a number of local stations very clearly.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0216.xml
article
152
152
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
The Effect of Electricity and Music on the Human Organism
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
H. J. GRAY
THE effect of music upon the human organism, whether calming, exciting or otherwise, can be reproduced in a remarkable manner by means of electric currents. Dr. M. Dupont is responsible for much of the successful research in this direction and has obtained results that are not only interesting but of probable educational and medicinal value.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0217.xml
article
152
152
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
To Prevent the Ears from Perspiring When Using Telephones
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
W. T. DERR
NO doubt the wireless operator has often had the annoying experience of perspiring ears. This inconvenience can be easily overcome in the following manner: Take a small piece of paper slightly larger than the receiver and place it between the receiver and the ear.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0218.xml
article
152
152
ELECTRICITY
[no value]
A Rain Alarm Made of a Broken Electric Globe
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WM. WARTHEN
HOW often the rain pours into a window at night and we know nothing of it until we awake and find the floor and carpet damaged! This can be avoided by installing a simple rain alarm which will ring an electric bell. To construct such an alarm proceed as follows:
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0219.xml
article
152
152
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Mounting Tinfoil on Glass Condenser Plates
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
SAMUEL W. HUFF
A GOOD shellac for fastening the foil to the glass in transmitting condensers may be made by dissolving as much powdered rosin as possible in I oz. of turpentine and thinning the mixture by the addition of ½ oz. of alcohol. Only a very small amount of rosin will be needed.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0220.xml
article
153
153
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
How Germany’s Secret Service Wireless Stations Are Being Weeded Out
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THAT there are secret service wireless stations of Germany in and about our large cities and important harbors, there is not the slightest doubt. At the time the merchant submarine “Bremen” was to arrive from Germany, it will be remembered, German agents prepared moorings for her at New London, Connecticut.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0221.xml
article
154
154
[no value]
[no value]
Electric Experimenting Table Made from an Old Commode
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. EDWARD WHITE
AN old commode such as is very often discarded or sold for little or nothing can be very easily and cheaply transformed into a high class electrical experimenting workbench in the following manner. First procure a nice smooth board and nail it firmly to the two uprights A, which are found on nearly all old commodes.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0222.xml
article
154
154
[no value]
[no value]
Panels Made Out of Rubber Storage Cells for Radio Apparatus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN making panel facings for loose couplers or cabinet sets cut up an old hard rubber storage-battery case and use it for the switch-panel facing. When drilling be careful not to apply too much pressure. A plane may be used on this material if great care is taken; but it is very brittle and will break easily. It may be polished with sandpaper.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0223.xml
article
155
155
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Japan’s Commercial System of Wireless Telephony
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ALTHOUGH it is not generally realized, Japan has been one of the most diligent countries in making wireless telephony a commercial possibility. The “TY-K” radiophone system which the Japanese have developed is unusual in simplicity and compactness.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0224.xml
article
155
155
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
A Crystal Detector Holder for Wireless Apparatus
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
ASIMPLE clip to hold the mineral consists of a straight piece of brass sheeting with a U-shaped piece of spring brass soldered on at one end. Another and better device for holding the mineral is a reflector from an old tubular flashlight of the larger size.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0225.xml
article
156
156
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
A Trussed Aerial Spreader for Long Wires
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
E. R. THOMAS
ALIGHT and strong spreader is very desirable when the aerial reaches over 200 ft. in length. While bamboo answers the purpose for spreaders shorter than 6 ft., it does not do for longer ones. A truss-built spreader fills the conditions admirably.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0226.xml
article
156
156
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Position of Wireless Waves Passing Over Land
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN radio waves travel along the surface of the sea, or of any other good conductor, their fronts stand up nearly vertically. When they pass across stretches of poorly-conducting earth, however, the tops tend to gain and the whole wave-front tips forward in the direction of motion.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0227.xml
article
156
156
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Cloudy Days Best for Wireless Wave Signals
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
MEASUREMENTS made at the University of North Dakota showed that on the night following a cloudy day signals were received much more clearly than on nights following days of bright sunlight. It appeared that the cloudiness was most effective when it covered the territory lying between the sending and receiving stations.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0228.xml
article
156
156
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Improving the Tone of a Test Buzzer Used on Wireless Detector
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
THE tone of a buzzer used in finding a sensitive spot on the crystal detector can be made high-pitched by inserting a piece of paper, folded four times, between the contact spring and the bar next to the magnet. Also insert a folded piece between the cone of the first coil and the bar.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0229.xml
article
156
156
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Simple Construction of a Rotary-Gap Disk
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
IN the accompanying illustration is shown a new type of rotary-gap disk which will give unusually good results. It is very easy to construct. First procure a piece of ⅛-in. sheet fiber and cut out a disk 9 in. in diameter. With a 4-in. radius draw a circle on this and divide it off into 8 equal parts.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0230.xml
article
157
157,158,159
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
The Construction of a Magnetic Break Key
With it the lightest kind of a Morse key may be used for sending
[no value]
[no value]
T. Lambert
THE average experimenter’s “break key” consists of a number of springs, contacts, etc., which are attached to his regular transmitting key in a clumsy manner. To send clearly a code with key contacts ¼ in. apart is next to impossible. With the relay-key described herein it is possible to use the lightest kind of a Morse key for sending, since all the clumsy contacts of the breaks are on the heavier magnetic key.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0231.xml
article
159
159
[no value]
[no value]
An Emergency Form for Winding Motor Fields
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
EDWARD MCCLURE
RECENTLY my rotary spark-gap, IIovolt A. C. motor burned out one of its fields. As I was in a hurry to use it I tried a quick method of rewinding the coil by driving a series of nails into a wood face-plate on a small lathe and winding the wire on them.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0232.xml
article
159
159
[no value]
[no value]
Loading Coil in Series with the Secondary
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN a low resistance detector is used, it is a good plan to tune the secondary circuit by using a comparatively small inductance coil and a large condenser, for then the current flow is a maximum and the voltage is quite low. For high resistance detectors the reverse is true. Increased efficiency with such detectors as the audion can frequently be secured by inserting a loading coil in series with the secondary, and correspondingly reducing the capacity of the tuning condenser.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0233.xml
article
159
159
[no value]
[no value]
Effect of the Moon and Season on Wireless in the Tropics
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
J. M. COHEN
WHILE stationed in the tropics for several years as a wireless operator, I observed that in the periods of a full moon, or thereabouts, the atmospheric interferences are slight and the ether seems to carry the wireless waves with less absorption than when the moon is in its quarter periods, or thereabouts.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0234.xml
article
160
160
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Magnetic Brake for a Wireless Rotary Gap
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PAUL J. HOFFMAN
THE radio experimenter who uses a rotary spark gap in connection with his sending apparatus is usually troubled with interference in his receiving set caused by the inductive noises from the motor of the rotary gap, which if well balanced takes some time to come to a full stop.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0235.xml
article
160
160
RADIO COMMUNICATION
[no value]
Adjusting the Detector of a Receiving Set
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
WHEN the crystal or other detector of a wireless telegraph receiver is adjusted by the use of an ordinary buzzer set up near the instruments, it is often noted that the point of contact which gave loudest response to the buzzer is not that which is most sensitive for receiving signals from long distances.
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0236.xml
advertisement
101A
101A
[no value]
[no value]
Martin Rocking Fifth Wheel Co.: Martin Semi-Trailer
[no value]
Martin Rocking Fifth Wheel Co.
Martin Semi-Trailer
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0237.xml
advertisement
102A
102A
[no value]
[no value]
WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0238.xml
advertisement
103A
103A
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0239.xml
advertisement
104A
104A
[no value]
[no value]
Long Island City of National Carbon Co., Inc.: DOYLO
[no value]
Long Island City of National Carbon Co., Inc.
DOYLO
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0240.xml
advertisement
105A
105A
[no value]
[no value]
THE B.V.D. COMPANY
[no value]
THE B.V.D. COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0241.xml
advertisement
106A
106A
[no value]
[no value]
United States Rubber Company: Keds
[no value]
United States Rubber Company
Keds
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0242.xml
advertisement
107A
107A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
WINCHESTER
Model 90
WINCHESTER
Model 02
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0243.xml
advertisement
108A
108A
[no value]
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company: GRAFLEX Camera
[no value]
Eastman Kodak Company
GRAFLEX Camera
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0244.xml
advertisement
109A
109A
[no value]
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.,
[no value]
E. I. Du Pont de Nemours & Co.,
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0245.xml
advertisement
110A
110A
[no value]
[no value]
H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE COMPANY
[no value]
H. W. JOHNS-MANVILLE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0246.xml
advertisement
111A
111A
[no value]
[no value]
The Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc.
[no value]
The Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0247.xml
advertisement
112A
112A
[no value]
[no value]
Rochester Optical Department: PREMO No. 12
[no value]
Rochester Optical Department
PREMO No. 12
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0248.xml
advertisement
115B
115B
[no value]
[no value]
United States Tire Company
[no value]
United States Tire Company
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0249.xml
advertisement
114A
114A
[no value]
[no value]
The American tobacco co.
[no value]
The American tobacco co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0250.xml
advertisement
115A
115A
[no value]
[no value]
STANDARD OIL COMPANY: Nujo1
[no value]
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
Nujo1
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0251.xml
advertisement
116A
116A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0252.xml
advertisement
117A
117A
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0253.xml
advertisement
117A
117A
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0254.xml
advertisement
118A
118A
[no value]
[no value]
Pull-U-Out Sales Co.
[no value]
Pull-U-Out Sales Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0255.xml
advertisement
118A
118A
[no value]
[no value]
1 Three-in-One Oil Co.
[no value]
1 Three-in-One Oil Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0256.xml
advertisement
118A
118A
[no value]
[no value]
PRATT& LAMBERT VARNISHES
[no value]
PRATT& LAMBERT VARNISHES
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0257.xml
advertisement
118A
118A
[no value]
[no value]
SAMUEL CABOT, Inc.
[no value]
SAMUEL CABOT, Inc.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0258.xml
advertisement
119A
119A
[no value]
[no value]
THE ARLINGTON COMPANY
[no value]
THE ARLINGTON COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0259.xml
advertisement
119A
119A
[no value]
[no value]
W. M, FINCK & COMPANY
[no value]
W. M, FINCK & COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0260.xml
advertisement
119A
119A
[no value]
[no value]
ScenicLimited
[no value]
ScenicLimited
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0261.xml
advertisement
120A
120A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0262.xml
advertisement
121A
121A
[no value]
[no value]
EXCELSIOR MOTOR MFG. & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
EXCELSIOR MOTOR MFG. & SUPPLY CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0263.xml
advertisement
121A
121A
[no value]
[no value]
CYCLE COMPANY
[no value]
CYCLE COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0264.xml
advertisement
121A
121A
[no value]
[no value]
THE RELIANCE CO.
[no value]
THE RELIANCE CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0265.xml
advertisement
122A
122A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0266.xml
advertisement
123A
123A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0267.xml
advertisement
124A
124A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0268.xml
advertisement
125A
125A
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0269.xml
advertisement
125A
125A
[no value]
[no value]
FREE CATALOG COUPON
[no value]
FREE CATALOG COUPON
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0270.xml
advertisement
126A
126A
[no value]
[no value]
JOHNSON SMITH & CO.
[no value]
JOHNSON SMITH & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0271.xml
advertisement
126A
126A
[no value]
[no value]
Trouser Press Dept
[no value]
Trouser Press Dept
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0272.xml
advertisement
126A
126A
[no value]
[no value]
HARRIS-GOAR CO.
[no value]
HARRIS-GOAR CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0273.xml
advertisement
127A
127A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0274.xml
advertisement
127A
127A
[no value]
[no value]
THE MAYTAG COMPANY
[no value]
THE MAYTAG COMPANY
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0275.xml
advertisement
128A
128A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0276.xml
advertisement
129A
129A
[no value]
[no value]
JOHNSON SMITH & CO.
[no value]
JOHNSON SMITH & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0277.xml
advertisement
129A
129A
[no value]
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
INTERNATIONAL CORRESPONDENCE SCHOOLS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0278.xml
advertisement
130A
130A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0279.xml
advertisement
131A
131A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0280.xml
advertisement
132A
132A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0281.xml
advertisement
133A
133A
[no value]
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
VICTOR J. EVANS & CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0282.xml
advertisement
134A
134A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0283.xml
advertisement
135A
135A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0284.xml
advertisement
136A
136A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0285.xml
advertisement
137A
137A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0286.xml
advertisement
138A
138A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0287.xml
advertisement
139A
139A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisement
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0288.xml
advertisement
140A
140A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0289.xml
advertisement
141A
141A
[no value]
[no value]
PRESS & SONS
[no value]
PRESS & SONS
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0290.xml
advertisement
142A
142A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0291.xml
advertisement
143A
143A
[no value]
[no value]
AMERICAN SCHOOL OF AVIATION
[no value]
AMERICAN SCHOOL OF AVIATION
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0292.xml
advertisement
144A
144A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0293.xml
advertisement
145A
145A
[no value]
[no value]
Advertisements
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0294.xml
advertisement
146A
146A
[no value]
[no value]
The Oster Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
The Oster Manufacturing Co.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0295.xml
advertisement
146A
146A
[no value]
[no value]
Mathias Klein & Sons
[no value]
Mathias Klein & Sons
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0296.xml
advertisement
146A
146A
[no value]
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.: RED DEVIL
[no value]
SMITH & HEMENWAY CO., Inc.
RED DEVIL
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0297.xml
advertisement
146A
146A
[no value]
[no value]
THE ARMSTRONG MFG. CO.
[no value]
THE ARMSTRONG MFG. CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0298.xml
advertisement
147A
147A
[no value]
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.: Yankee
[no value]
NORTH BROS. MFG. CO.
Yankee
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0299.xml
advertisement
147A
147A
[no value]
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.: Bailey Iron Planes
[no value]
STANLEY RULE & LEVEL CO.
Bailey Iron Planes
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0300.xml
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147A
147A
[no value]
[no value]
Simonds Manufacturing Co.: SIMONDS SAWS
[no value]
Simonds Manufacturing Co.
SIMONDS SAWS
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0301.xml
advertisement
148A
148A
[no value]
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER CO.
[no value]
CORONA TYPEWRITER CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0302.xml
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149A
149A
[no value]
[no value]
Leggett & Myers Tobacco co.: Chesterfield
[no value]
Leggett & Myers Tobacco co.
Chesterfield
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0303.xml
advertisement
150A
150A
[no value]
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK CO.
[no value]
EASTMAN KODAK CO.
[no value]
[no value]
[no value]
PopularScience_19170701_0091_001_0304.xml